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Hand temperature responses to local cooling after a 10-day confinement to normobaric hypoxia with and without exercise
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7440-2171
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 25, no 5, 650-660 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study examined the effects of a 10-day normobaric hypoxic confinement (FiO2: 0.14), with (HT; n = 8) or without (HA; n = 6) exercise, on the hand-temperature responses during and after local cold stress. Before and after the confinement, subjects immersed their right hand for 30 min in 8°C water (CWI), followed by a 15-min spontaneous rewarming (RW), while breathing either room air (AIR), or a hypoxic gas mixture (HYPO). The hand-temperature responses were monitored with thermocouples and infrared-thermography. The confinement did not influence the hand-temperature responses of the HA group during the AIR and HYPO CWI and the HYPO RW phases; but it impaired the AIR RW response (-1.3°C; P = 0.05). After the confinement, the hand-temperature responses were unaltered in the HT group throughout the AIR trial. However, the average hand-temperature was increased during the HYPO CWI (+0.5°C; P ≤ 0.05) and RW (+2.4°C; P ≤ 0.001) phases. Accordingly, present findings suggest that prolonged exposure to normobaric hypoxia per se does not alter the hand-temperature responses to local cooling; yet, it impairs the normoxic rewarming response. Conversely, the combined stimuli of continuous hypoxia and exercise enhance the finger cold-induced vasodilatation and hand-rewarming responses, specifically, under hypoxic conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2015. Vol. 25, no 5, 650-660 p.
Keyword [en]
CIVD, cold injury, cold tolerance, cross-adaptation, high altitude, rewarming
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-147191DOI: 10.1111/sms.12291PubMedID: 25039992Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84941731283OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-147191DiVA: diva2:728233
Note

QC 20151023. Updated from E-pub ahead of print to Published.

Available from: 2014-06-23 Created: 2014-06-23 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Keramidas, Michail E.

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