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Life Cycle Costing in Road Planning and Management: A Case Study on Collision-free Roads
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
2014 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Construction of infrastructure does not only mean large capital investments but also future costs to operate and maintain these assets. Decision making in planning and design of roads will impact the need of future operation and maintenance activities. Additionally, infrastructure management is often under increasing pressure of aging structures, limited budgets and increased demands from public which require transparency in the decision making. Life cycle costing is a methodology that takes into account costs throughout an asset’s life cycle including investment, operation, maintenance and disposal. Despite the methodology’s existence for more than 40 years, the practical application is often reported to be scarce in both private and public sectors. Implementation in road planning and management means a high complexity where the life cycle costing can to be applied from early planning, design, construction and management in which all influence life cycle cost. Life cycle costing can also be applied in many different ways, level of detail and for different type of studies.

For effective implementation of life cycle costing in road planning, design and management, different considerations need to be understood. In this thesis the application of life cycle costing has been studied through case study research. The main case selected was an investment to convert a single carriageway road to a, so called, sparse collision-free road. Through widening and separation between driving directions the traffic safety is significantly improved. However, in recent years increased operation and maintenance costs have been associated with the road type. Especially concerns regarding increased road user cost during road works have been expressed. This case was examined in two case studies from different perspectives. The first one was to study the implications on project appraisal and the second one examined the possibility to optimise pavement design.

Results from cost benefit analyses based on established road appraisal techniques indicated that operation and maintenance related costs had limited impact on profitability. The second study also indicated that future cost can be influenced differently depending on criteria for optimal alternative. Based on economic analyses using established techniques, increased operation and maintenance liabilities appear to be of limited concern, in contrary to the perception. In future research this need to be set in context of road management with refined analysis in order to study implications for future management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2014. , 59 p.
Series
TRITA-BKN. Bulletin, ISSN 1103-4270 ; 125
Keyword [en]
collision-free road, design, infrastructure, investment, life cycle costing, life cycle cost analysis, maintenance, management, operation, planning, road, sustainability
National Category
Infrastructure Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-154271OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-154271DiVA: diva2:756353
Presentation
2014-11-07, Stora konferensrummet, Brinellvägen 23, Stockholm, 10:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20141028

Available from: 2014-10-28 Created: 2014-10-17 Last updated: 2016-02-24Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Life cycle cost considerations in project appraisals of collision-free roads
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life cycle cost considerations in project appraisals of collision-free roads
2016 (English)In: Structure and Infrastructure Engineering, ISSN 1573-2479, E-ISSN 1744-8980, Vol. 12, no 2, 275-287 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the last decade, many single carriageway roads in Sweden have been converted to collision-free roads as a cost-effective alternative to conventional motorways. Investigations have concluded that the road type has been successful in reducing the number of fatal accidents, despite increased operation and maintenance costs. In recent years, the focus has shifted to converting narrower roads which are anticipated to further increase operation and maintenance cost but also complicate traffic management during road works. There are concerns that when life cycle cost is considered in the investment assessment the socioeconomic profitability could be reduced. This article examines this issue by first assessing changes in costs for operation and maintenance using a life cycle cost analysis approach applied on a case study. The results from the analysis were thereafter integrated into a cost-benefit analysis to assess changes in costs in relation to benefits in improved traffic safety and travel time. The analysis indicated profitability even with substantial increase in operation, maintenance and road user work zone costs. Results are discussed from project implementation and road management perspectives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keyword
road management, collision-free road, life cycle cost analysis, cost benefit-analysis, road design
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-180196 (URN)10.1080/15732479.2015.1009125 (DOI)000365600100009 ()2-s2.0-84948386814 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20160120. Updated from "Accepted" to "Published"

Available from: 2016-01-20 Created: 2016-01-08 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
2. Possibilities to reduce pavement operation and maintenance costs of a collision-free road investment using an LCCA design procedure
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Possibilities to reduce pavement operation and maintenance costs of a collision-free road investment using an LCCA design procedure
2014 (English)Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
National Category
Infrastructure Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-154846 (URN)
Note

QS 2014

Available from: 2014-10-28 Created: 2014-10-28 Last updated: 2014-10-28Bibliographically approved
3. Microsimulation of work zone delays and applications in pavement management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microsimulation of work zone delays and applications in pavement management
2012 (English)In: EPAM 2012: Malmö, Sweden, 5–7 September: 4th European pavement and asset management conference / [ed] Kent Gustafson, Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, 2012, 1-13 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Operation and maintenance activities on roads will to a varying extent affect the traffic flow.Reduced speed limits past the work zones will cause some delays but the main impacts will occur when the road´s capacity is reduced in case of lane closures. This increases the probability of queues which may contribute to significant delays for the road users. Delays result in costs for the society. Additionally, queues increase fuel consumption, pollutants, risk for accidents as well as wearing of vehicles and roads.

This paper examines the use of microsimulation as a method to estimate the road user delays and discusses implementation issues and applications. The work zone delays have been implemented in a life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA) model. An LCCA was performed for the selection of wearing course type.

The key finding of this study is that the high level of detail gives the opportunity to model different work zone types, road types and speed limits using one method. In comparison to other methods, most which are specifically developed for work zone analysis, microsimulation has previously been used in numerous traffic capacity studies. This gives a certain confidence, in conjunction with performed calibrations and validations, that the results are valid. The performed LCCA indicated that the road user delay costs contribute to a significant share of the total life-cycle cost. The delay costs did therefore affect the selection of wearing course with respect to the estimated life-cycle costs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, 2012
Keyword
Work zone, Delay, Road closure, Traffic flow, Micro, Simulation, Life cycle, Cost, Vägarbetsplatser, Förseningar, Avstängning (vägar), Trafikflöde, Mikro, Simulering, Livscykel, Kostnader
National Category
Infrastructure Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-154868 (URN)978-91-637-1432-0 (ISBN)
Conference
EPAM 2012 - 4th European Pavement and Asset Management conference, 5–7 September, Malmö, Sweden
Note

QC 20141028

Available from: 2014-10-28 Created: 2014-10-28 Last updated: 2014-10-28Bibliographically approved

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