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Evaluation of robot deployment in live missions with the military, police, and fire brigade
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
2007 (English)In: Sensors, and Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence (C31) Technologies for Homeland Security and Homeland Defense VI, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2007, p. 65380R-Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Robots have been successfully deployed within bomb squads all over the world for decades. Recent technical improvements are increasing the prospects to achieve the same benefits also for other high risk professions. As the number of applications increase issues of collaboration and coordination come into question. Can several groups deploy the same type of robot? Can they deploy the same methods? Can resources be shared? What characterizes the different applications? What are the similarities and differences between different groups? This paper reports on a study of four areas in which robots are already, or are about to be deployed: Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT), Military and Police Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD), Military Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear contamination control (CBRN), and Fire Fighting (FF). The aim of the study has been to achieve a general overview across the four areas to survey and compare their similarities and differences. It has also been investigated to what extent it is possible for the them to deploy the same type of robot. It was found that the groups share many requirements, but, that they also have a few individual hard constrains. A comparison across the groups showed the demands of man-portability, ability to access narrow premises, and ability to handle objects of different weight to be decisive; two or three different sizes of robots will be needed to satisfy the need of the four areas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2007. p. 65380R-
Series
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, ISSN 0277-786X ; 6538
Keywords [en]
CBRN, EOD, Fire fighter, MOUT, Robot
National Category
Remote Sensing Other Computer and Information Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-155559DOI: 10.1117/12.718345ISI: 000247902200016Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-35648939664ISBN: 0819466603 (print)ISBN: 978-081946660-0 OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-155559DiVA, id: diva2:762501
Conference
Sensors, and Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) Technologies for Homeland Security and Homeland Defense VI, 9 April 2007 through 12 April 2007, Orlando, FL, United States
Note

QC 20141112

Available from: 2014-11-12 Created: 2014-11-07 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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More styles
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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