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Perception of touch quality in piano tones
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. (Sound and Music Computing)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3086-0322
2014 (English)In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 136, no 5, 2839-2850 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Both timbre and dynamics of isolated piano tones are determined exclusively by the speed with which the hammer hits the strings. This physical view has been challenged by pianists who emphasize the importance of the way the keyboard is touched. This article presents empirical evidence from two perception experiments showing that touch-dependent sound components make sounds with identical hammer velocities but produced with different touch forms clearly distinguishable. The first experiment focused on finger-key sounds: musicians could identify pressed and struck touches. When the finger-key sounds were removed from the sounds, the effect vanished, suggest- ing that these sounds were the primary identification cue. The second experiment looked at key- keyframe sounds that occur when the key reaches key-bottom. Key-bottom impact was identified from key motion measured by a computer-controlled piano. Musicians were able to discriminate between piano tones that contain a key-bottom sound from those that do not. However, this effect might be attributable to sounds associated with the mechanical components of the piano action. In addition to the demonstrated acoustical effects of different touch forms, visual and tactile modalities may play important roles during piano performance that influence the production and perception of musical expression on the piano.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 136, no 5, 2839-2850 p.
Keyword [en]
Grand Piano, Performance, Keystroke, Accuracy, Pianists, Strings, Expert
National Category
Computer Science Human Computer Interaction Media and Communication Technology
Research subject
Media Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-158169DOI: 10.1121/1.4896461ISI: 000344989000052PubMedID: 25373983Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84908565994OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-158169DiVA: diva2:774973
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2010-4654
Note

QC 20150623

Available from: 2014-12-30 Created: 2014-12-30 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Bresin, Roberto

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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Output format
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