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Uranium theoretical speciation for drinking water from private drilled wells in Sweden: Implications for choice of removal method
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8491-4675
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
2014 (English)In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 51, 148-154 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Elevated concentrations of uranium (U) from natural sources have been measured in drinking water from private drilled wells in Sweden and many other countries world-wide. Although U is a radioactive element, radioactivity is not the main concern, but rather chemical toxicity, e. g. kidney damage. Uranium chemistry is complex and U in water has a very high tendency to form complexes with other compounds. Since speciation is crucial for the properties of U, and therefore the removal efficiency, this study determined theoretical U species in drinking water from private drilled wells using the geochemical model Visual MINTEQ. The drinking water samples used in modelling were from two datasets: (1) 76 water samples selected from a previous survey of 722 wells; and (2) samples of drinking water from 21 private wells sampled in May 2013. The results showed that neutrally charged U complexes dominated in the pH range 6.7-7.8, which is common in private drilled wells. This has important implications for removal method, since charge is an important factor for U removal efficiency. In the alkaline pH range, one of two calcium-UO2 carbonate complexes dominated and calcium (Ca) concentration proved to be a key factor determining the Ca-UO2 carbonate complex formed: the neutral Ca2UO2(CO3)(3)(0)(aq) or the negative CaUO2(CO3)(3)(2). Complexes with organic carbon (C) varied greatly in the acidic range, indicating that it is crucial to measure organic C content in the water since it is critical for the dissolved organic matter (DOM)-UO2 complex formation. Therefore before U removal method is selected, some crucial parameters for complex formation should be measured. Based on our results, such measurements should include pH, Ca, alkalinity and organic C concentration, as these determine the type of complexes formed and their charge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 51, 148-154 p.
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Geochemistry Geophysics
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URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-158384DOI: 10.1016/j.apgeochem.2014.10.005ISI: 000345405400015Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84908571542OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-158384DiVA: diva2:779829
Note

QC 20150113

Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Norrström, Ann Catrine

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