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eAMI: A Qualitative Quantification of Periodic Breathing Based on Amplitude of Oscillations
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2015 (English)In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 38, no 3, 381-389 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study Objectives:

Periodic breathing is sleep disordered breathing characterized by instability in the respiratory pattern that exhibits an oscillatory behavior. Periodic breathing is associated with increased mortality, and it is observed in a variety of situations, such as acute hypoxia, chronic heart failure, and damage to respiratory centers. The standard quantification for the diagnosis of sleep related breathing disorders is the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), which measures the proportion of apneic/ hypopneic events during polysomnography. Determining the AHI is labor-intensive and requires the simultaneous recording of airflow and oxygen saturation. In this paper, we propose an automated, simple, and novel methodology for the detection and qualification of periodic breathing: the estimated amplitude modulation index (eAMI).

Patients or Participants:

Antarctic Cohort (3800 meters): 13 normal individuals. Sleep Clinic Cohort: 39 different patients suffering from diverse sleep-related pathologies.

Measurements and Results:

When tested in a population with high levels of periodic breathing (Antarctic Cohort), eAMI was closely correlated with AHI (r = 0.95, P < 0.001). When tested in the clinical setting, the proposed method was able to detect portions of the signal in which subclinical periodic breathing was validated by an expert (n = 93; accuracy = 0.85). Average eAMI was also correlated with the loop gain for the combined clinical and Antarctica cohorts (r = 0.58, P < 0.001).

Conclusions:

In terms of quantification and temporal resolution, the eAMI is able to estimate the strength of periodic breathing and the underlying loop gain at any given time within a record. The impaired prognosis associated with periodic breathing makes its automated detection and early diagnosis of clinical relevance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 38, no 3, 381-389 p.
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-159293DOI: 10.5665/sleep.4494ISI: 000350648500009PubMedID: 25581914Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84923805150OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-159293DiVA: diva2:784148
Note

QC 20150507

Available from: 2015-01-28 Created: 2015-01-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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