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Use and perception of Design for Environment (DfE) in Small and Medium Sized Enterprises in Sweden
Högskolan i Kalmar.
Högskolan i Kalmar.
Högskolan i Kalmar.
Högskolan i Kalmar.
2003 (English)In: 2003 3RD INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS DESIGN AND INVERSE MANUFACTURING - ECODESIGN '03, 2003, 723-730 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper aims to give an image of the utilization and perception of DfE and methods and tools within some Swedish Small and Medium Sized Enterprises. The background is the large number of existing methods and tools in relation to the low utilization in the industry. The research method has been qualitative research interviews in ten companies. Some of the material is based on a Master Thesis written by Skoglund and Svensson (2002).

The education level about DfE is very low and the overall motivation for DfE in the companies seems to be low or nonexistent. The DfE method and tool utilization is zero. One reason for this lack of interest seems to be the low interest in environmental questions and DfE among customers. The number of environmental and DfE requirements are low.

The authors noted that environmental improvements have been made but not considered as environmental work, e.g. weight and fuel minimization but they are driven by for example quality or economical reasons.

There are two ways to get environmental improvements by using methods and tools, by specific DfE methods and tools and by integration of environmental considerations in the ordinary design methods and tools.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. 723-730 p.
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-5194ISI: 000222499500134OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-5194DiVA: diva2:8007
Conference
3rd International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing (EcoDesign 03) Tokyo, JAPAN, DEC 08-11, 2003
Note
QC 20101021Available from: 2005-05-31 Created: 2005-05-31 Last updated: 2010-10-21Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Engineering Designers' Requirements on Design for Environment Methods and Tools
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engineering Designers' Requirements on Design for Environment Methods and Tools
2005 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
Abstract [en]

Given a special focus on Design for Environment (DfE) methods and tools, the objectives of this thesis are to, “Identify basic design-related requirements that a method or tool should fulfill in order to become actively used by engineering designers”, and to “Investigate how those basic requirements could be used to make DfE methods and tools more actively used in industry among engineering designers”.

The research has shown that designers in general have three main purposes for utilizing methods and tools, of which the last two could be seen as subsets of the first one. The purposes are to: (1) facilitate various kinds of communication within the product development process; (2) integrate knowledge and experience into the methods and tools as a know-how backup; and (3) contribute with structure in the product development process. The low degree of follow-up implies a risk that methods and tools are used that affect the work within the company in a negative way. In order to be able to better follow-up methods and tools regarding both their utilization and usefulness, there is a need for a better definition of requirements for methods and tools.

Most of all designers’ related requirements are related to their’ aims to fulfill the product performance and keep down the development time. This can be concluded as four major requirements, that a DfE method or tool, as well as a common method or tool, must exhibit: (1) be easy to adopt and implement, (2) facilitate designers to fulfill specified requirements on the presumptive product, and at the same time (3) reduce the risk that important elements in the product development phase are forgotten. Both these two latter requirements relate to a method or tool’s degree of appropriateness. The second and the third requirements are related to the fourth requirement, which is found to be the most important: that the use of the method or tool (4) must reduce the total calendar time (from start to end) to solve the task. The conclusion is that DfE methods and tools must be designed to comply to a higher degree with the main users - in this case the designers’ requirements for methods and tools

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH, 2005. xiv, 74 p.
Series
Trita-MMK, ISSN 1400-1179 ; 2005:07
Keyword
Environmental technology, Design for Environment, Methods and Tools, Requirements, Miljöteknik
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-236 (URN)91-7178-110-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2005-06-07, M3, Brinellvägen 64, Stockholm, 14:00
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
QC 20101021Available from: 2005-05-31 Created: 2005-05-31 Last updated: 2010-10-21Bibliographically approved

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