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Sleep disturbances predict future sickness absence among individuals with lower back or neck-shoulder pain: A 5-year prospective study
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7099-5352
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 3, 315-323 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Musculoskeletal pain is one of the most common causes of sickness absence. Sleep disturbances are often co-occurring with pain, but the relationship between sleep and pain is complex. Little is known about the importance of self-reported sleep, when predicting sickness absence among persons with musculoskeletal pain. This study aims to study the association between self-reported sleep quality and sickness absence 5 years later, among individuals stratified by presence of lower back pain (LBP) and neck and shoulder pain (NSP). Methods: The cohort (n = 2286) in this 5-year prospective study (using data from the MUSIC-Norrtälje study) was stratified by self-reported pain into three groups: no LBP or NSP, solely LBP or NSP, and oncurrent LBP and NSP. Odds ratios (ORs) for the effect of self-reported sleep disturbances at baseline on sickness absence (> 14 consecutive days), 5 years later, were calculated. Results: Within all three pain strata, individuals reporting the most sleep problems showed a significantly higher OR for all-cause sickness absence, 5 years later. The group with the most pronounced sleep problems within the concurrent LBP and NSP stratum had a significantly higher OR (OR 2.00; CI 1.09-3.67) also for long-term sickness absence (> 90days) 5 years later, compared to the group with the best sleep. Conclusions: Sleep disturbances predict sickness absence among individuals regardless of co-existing features of LBP and/or NSP. The clinical evaluation of patients should take possible sleep disturbances into account in the planning of treatments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 43, no 3, 315-323 p.
Keyword [en]
musculoskeletal pain, occupational health, pain, predictors, public health, risk factors, sleep, sleep quality, spinal pain, work ability
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-167772DOI: 10.1177/1403494814567755ISI: 000352980000013Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84927797417OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-167772DiVA: diva2:814281
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareStockholm County Council
Note

QC 20150526

Available from: 2015-05-26 Created: 2015-05-22 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Nyman, Teresia

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