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A well-ordered surface oxide on Fe(110)
KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0483-0602
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2015 (English)In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 639, 13-19 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A well-ordered surface oxide grown on Fe(110) has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy electron diffraction, low energy electron microscopy, and core level photoelectron spectroscopy. The iron oxide film exhibits wide terraces and is formed after exposure to 100-1000 L at 1 x 10(-6) mbar O-2 and 400 degrees C. Two domains, mirror symmetric in the Fe(110)-lattice mirror symmetry planes but otherwise equal, are observed. The surface oxide forms a relatively large coincidence surface unit cell (16.1 angstrom x 26.5 angstrom). Imaging by STM reveals a strong bias dependence in the apparent height within the surface unit cell. The oxygen terminating atomic layer has a hexagonal atomic structure, FeO(111)-like, with the atomic sparing of 3.2 angstrom, that is expanded by similar to 63% relative to bulk FeO(111).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 639, 13-19 p.
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-170933DOI: 10.1016/j.susc.2015.04.008ISI: 000356546000003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84928957900OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-170933DiVA: diva2:841603
Note

QC 20150714

Available from: 2015-07-14 Created: 2015-07-13 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Transition metal oxide surfaces: Surface structures and molecular interaction
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transition metal oxide surfaces: Surface structures and molecular interaction
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Metal oxides are both corrosion products and useful materials with a wide range of applications. Two of the most used metals today are iron and copper. In this thesis, surface structures and molecular interaction with surfaces of iron oxides and copper oxides are studied using spectroscopy and microscopy methods.

 

The surface structures of iron oxides grown on the low-index iron (Fe) surfaces (100) and (110) have been studied during the initial oxidation phase. The oxidation condition for both iron surfaces was 400 °C and 1×10−6 mbar of oxygen gas. For the Fe(100)-surface, a Fe3O4(100)-film is formed beyond the oxygen adsorbate structures. For the Fe(110)-surface, a FeO(111)-film is first formed. When the FeO(111)-film grows thicker, it transforms into a Fe3O4(111)-film.

 

The surface structures of Cu2O(100) was studied and the main finding is that the most common surface structure that previously in literature has been described to have a periodicity of (3√2×√2)R45° actually has a periodicity described by the matrix (3,0;1,1). Furthermore, the low-binding energy component in the photoelectron spectroscopy O 1s-spectrum is determined to origin from surface oxygen atoms.

 

Sulfur dioxide, a corrosive molecule that in the environment to large share comes from human activities such as burning of fossil fuels, was studied using photoelectron spectroscopy when interacting with surfaces of iron oxide thin films and bulk Cu2O-surfaces. On the iron oxide thin film surfaces under ultra-high vacuum conditions, sulfur dioxide adsorbs partly as SO4-species and partly dissociates and forms FeS2. On the Cu2O-surfaces under ultra-high vacuum conditions, the adsorption of sulfur dioxide is non-dissociative and forms SO3-species. When interacting with near-ambient pressures of water, it is observed in the photoelectron spectroscopy S 2p-region that the sulfur from SO3-species shifts to Cu2S.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2016. 68 p.
Series
TRITA-ICT, 2016:36
National Category
Physical Sciences Physical Sciences
Research subject
Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-196130 (URN)978-91-7729-176-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-12-16, Sal C, Kistagången 16, Kista, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20161114

Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-11 Last updated: 2016-11-17Bibliographically approved

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Soldemo, MarkusWeissenrieder, Jonas

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