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A Medium-Scale 50 MWfuel Biomass Gasification Based Bio-SNG Plant: A Developed Gas Cleaning Process
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1881-2686
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Technology.
2015 (English)In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 8, no 6, 5287-5302 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Natural gas is becoming increasingly important as a primary energy source. A suitable replacement for fossil natural gas is bio-SNG, produced by biomass gasification, followed by methanation. A major challenge is efficient gas cleaning processes for removal of sulfur compounds and other impurities. The present study focuses on development of a gas cleaning step for a product gas produced in a 50 MWfuel gasification system. The developed gas cleaning washing process is basically a modification of the Rectisol process. Several different process configurations were evaluated using Aspen plus, including PC-SAFT for the thermodynamic modeling. The developed configuration takes advantage of only one methanol wash column, compared to two columns in a conventional Rectisol process. Results from modeling show the ability of the proposed configuration to remove impurities to a sufficiently low concentrations - almost zero concentration for H2S, CS2, HCl, NH3 and HCN, and approximately 0.01 mg/Nm(3) for COS. These levels are acceptable for further upgrading of the gas in a methanation process. Simultaneously, up to 92% of the original CO2 is preserved in the final cleaned syngas stream. No process integration or economic consideration was performed within the scope of the present study, but will be investigated in future projects to improve the overall process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 8, no 6, 5287-5302 p.
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-172500DOI: 10.3390/en8065287ISI: 000357489700033Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84933558353OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-172500DiVA: diva2:848571
Note

QC 20150825

Available from: 2015-08-25 Created: 2015-08-25 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Biomass to Biofuel: Syngas Cleaning and Biomass Feedstock
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomass to Biofuel: Syngas Cleaning and Biomass Feedstock
2017 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis builds around the idea of a biofuel production process that is comprised of biomass production, biomass gasification, gas cleaning, and fuel production. In this work, we specifically looked into H2S removal as a part of cleaning the producer gas and flocculation of microalgae which is involved in the harvesting of microalgae after biomass production. One of the impurities to remove from the producer gas is hydrogen sulfide which can be removed by using a packed bed of zinc oxide. Despite the regular use, it was only recently shown that during reaction with H2S, nano-size particles of ZnO exhibit void formation and outward growth. In this work, a micro-scale model was introduced to describe the void formation and outward growth. On the macro-scale, the simulations captured pore clogging of pellets due to the outward growth. The pore clogging prevents the full conversion of pellets and consequently leads to shorter breakthrough times of beds. The second problem investigated here deals with the flocculation of microalgae. Microalgae is produced in relatively low concentrations in the incubator liquid medium and during the harvesting, the concentration is increased to an acceptable level. The harvesting process includes a flocculation followed by a filtration or centrifuge unit. During flocculation, microalgae are stimulated to aggregate and form clusters. The experiments showed that the mean size of clusters formed during flocculation increases with time to a maximum and then starts decreasing, resulting in an overshoot in the mean size profile. The size of clusters influence the efficiency of the afterward filtration or centrifuge, thus it is of interest to carefully track the size evolution of clusters, making the studying of overshoot a crucial research topic. In this work, the possible mechanisms behind this overshoot were investigated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2017. 63 p.
Keyword
Gas-Solid Reaction; ZnO Sul_dation; Outward Growth; Hollow Particles; Algae Flocculation; PBEs; Fractal Clusters; Restructuring of Clusters; Deposition of Clusters; Primary Particle Aggregation.
National Category
Chemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-204570 (URN)
Presentation
2017-03-31, LOGOS, Teknikringen 42, plan 6, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20170330

Available from: 2017-03-30 Created: 2017-03-28 Last updated: 2017-03-30Bibliographically approved

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Sadegh-Vaziri, Ramiar

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