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Nanopore arrays in a silicon membrane for parallel single-molecule detection: DNA translocation
KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8962-1844
KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2219-0197
KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
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2015 (English)In: Nanotechnology, ISSN 0957-4484, E-ISSN 1361-6528, Vol. 26, no 31, 314002Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Optical nanopore sensing offers great potential in single-molecule detection, genotyping, or DNA sequencing for high-throughput applications. However, one of the bottle-necks for fluorophore-based biomolecule sensing is the lack of an optically optimized membrane with a large array of nanopores, which has large pore-to-pore distance, small variation in pore size and low background photoluminescence (PL). Here, we demonstrate parallel detection of single-fluorophore-labeled DNA strands (450 bps) translocating through an array of silicon nanopores that fulfills the above-mentioned requirements for optical sensing. The nanopore array was fabricated using electron beam lithography and anisotropic etching followed by electrochemical etching resulting in pore diameters down to similar to 7 nm. The DNA translocation measurements were performed in a conventional wide-field microscope tailored for effective background PL control. The individual nanopore diameter was found to have a substantial effect on the translocation velocity, where smaller openings slow the translocation enough for the event to be clearly detectable in the fluorescence. Our results demonstrate that a uniform silicon nanopore array combined with wide-field optical detection is a promising alternative with which to realize massively-parallel single-molecule detection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 26, no 31, 314002
Keyword [en]
nanopore, parallel, single-molecule, optical
National Category
Nano Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-172676DOI: 10.1088/0957-4484/26/31/314002ISI: 000358676300004PubMedID: 26180050Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84937774164OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-172676DiVA: diva2:850310
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RMA08-0090Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscience
Note

QC 20150901

Available from: 2015-09-01 Created: 2015-08-27 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Sychugov, IlyaLinnros, Jan

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