Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A material selection approach to evaluate material substitution for minimizing the life cycle environmental impact of vehicles
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2664-8783
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1509-8824
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5535-6368
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. Univ Cambridge, England.
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 83, 704-712 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Weight reduction is commonly adopted in vehicle design as a means for energy and emissions savings. However, selection of lightweight materials is often focused on performance characteristics, which may lead to sub optimizations of life cycle environmental impact. Therefore systematic material selection processes are needed that integrate weight optimization and environmental life cycle assessment. This paper presents such an approach and its application to design of an automotive component. Materials from the metal, hybrid and polymer families were assessed, along with a novel self-reinforced composite material that is a potential lightweight alternative to non-recyclable composites. It was shown that materials offering the highest weight saving potential offer limited life cycle environmental benefit due to energy demanding manufacturing. Selection of the preferable alternative is not a straightforward process since results may be sensitive to critical but uncertain aspects of the life cycle. Such aspects need to be evaluated to determine the actual benefits of lightweight design and to base material selection on more informed choices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 83, 704-712 p.
Keyword [en]
Lightweight design, Material selection, Life cycle assessment, Sandwich structures, Self-reinforced composites
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-173255DOI: 10.1016/j.matdes.2015.06.079ISI: 000359329000080Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84941312731OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-173255DiVA: diva2:853248
Note

QC 20150911

Available from: 2015-09-11 Created: 2015-09-09 Last updated: 2017-09-08Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Recyclable self-reinforced ductile fiber composite materials for structural applications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recyclable self-reinforced ductile fiber composite materials for structural applications
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Lightweight structures in vehicles are a proven way to reduce fuel consumption and the environmental impact during the use. Lower structural weight can be achieved by using high performance materials such as composites or using the material efficiently as a sandwich structure. Traditional composite materials such as carbon or glass fiber reinforced polymers have high weight specific mechanical properties but are inherently brittle and expensive. They consist of at least two different materials making recycling a difficult endeavor.The best composite material would have good weight specific properties and is ductile, cheap and comprises of a reinforcement and matrix material based on the same recyclable material making recycling easy. In self-reinforced polymer (SrP) composite materials, reinforcing fibers and matrix material are based on the same recyclable thermoplastic polymer making recycling to a straightforward process. SrP composite materials are ductile, inexpensive and have a high energy absorption potential. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the potential of SrP composites in structural applications. Firstly, the quasi-static and dynamic tensile and compression properties of a self-reinforced poly(ethylene terephthalate) (SrPET) composite material are investigated confirming the high energy absorption potential. Sandwich structures out of only SrPET with a lattice core are manufactured and tested in quasi-static out-of-plane compression showing the potential of SrPET as core material. Corrugated sandwich structured out of only SrPET are manufactured and tested in out-of-plane compression over a strain rate range10−4 s−1 - 103 s−1. The corrugated SrPET core has similar quasi-static properties as commercial polymeric foams but superior dynamic compression properties. Corrugated sandwich beams out of only SrPET are manufactured and tested in quasi-static three-point bending confirming the high energy absorption potential of SrPET structures. When comparing the SrPET beams to aluminum beams with identical geometry and weight, the SrPET beams shows higher energy absorption and peak load. The experimental results show excellent agreement with finite element predictions. The impact behaviorof corrugated SrPET sandwich beams during three-point bending is investigated. When comparing SrPET sandwich beams to sandwich beams with carbon fiber face sheets and high performance thermoset polymeric foam with the same areal weight, for the same impact impulse per area, the SrPET shows less mid-span deflection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2015. ix, 49 p.
Series
TRITA-AVE, ISSN 1651-7660 ; 2015:61
Keyword
Self-reinforced polymer, Composite, sandwich structure, mechanical properties, impact behaviour, finite element
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Research subject
Vehicle and Maritime Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-174131 (URN)978-91-7595-679-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-11-09, F3, Lindstedtsvägen 26, KTH, Stockholm, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Projects
ECO2
Funder
VINNOVA
Note

QC 20151012

Available from: 2015-10-12 Created: 2015-09-30 Last updated: 2015-10-12Bibliographically approved
2. Assessing design strategies for improved life cycle environmental performance of vehicles
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing design strategies for improved life cycle environmental performance of vehicles
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Vehicle manufactures have adopted different strategies for improving the environmental performance of their fleet including lightweight design and alternative drivetrains such as EVs. Both strategies reduce energy during use but may result in a relative increase of the impact during other stages. To address this, a lifecycle approach is needed when vehicle design strategies are developed. The thesis explores the extent that such a lifecycle approach is adopted today and assesses the potential of these strategies to reduce the lifecycle impact of vehicles. Moreover it aims to contribute to method development for lifecycle considerations during product development and material selection.

Current practices were explored in an empirical study with four vehicle manufacturers. The availability of tools for identifying, monitoring and assessing design strategies was explored in a literature review. The results of the empirical study showed that environmental considerations during product development often lack a lifecycle perspective. Regarding the use of tools a limited number of such tools were utilized systematically by the studied companies despite the numerous tools available in literature.

The influence of new design strategies on the lifecycle environmental performance of vehicles was assessed in three case studies; two looking into lightweight design and one at EVs. Both strategies resulted in energy and GHG emissions savings though the impact during manufacturing increases due to the advanced materials used. Assumptions relating to the operating conditions of the vehicle e.g. lifetime distance or for EVs the carbon intensity of the energy mix, influence the level of this tradeoff. Despite its low share in terms of environmental impact EOL is important in the overall performance of vehicles.

The thesis contributed to method development by suggesting a systematic approach for material selection. The approach combines material and environmental analysis tools thus increases the possibilities for lifecycle improvements while minimizing risk for sub-optimizations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2016. 60 p.
Series
TRITA-INFRA-FMS-PHD, 2016:04
Keyword
Vehicle design, Design strategies, Lightweight design, Electric vehicles, Design for Environment (DfE), DfE tools, Life cycle assessment (LCA), Simplified LCA, Composite materials
National Category
Environmental Sciences Environmental Management
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-192536 (URN)978-91-7729-108-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-10-17, F3, Lindstedtsvägen 26, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20160920

Available from: 2016-09-20 Created: 2016-09-14 Last updated: 2016-09-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(505 kB)14 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 505 kBChecksum SHA-512
e78dfd134a7d4081e6250022788e9411bb8f2f4c20b0169f5d4f1eac290433959ea8f715389860b7793b9f522f1928c0224f314f33c266d51cded0e97142975e
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Schneider, ChristofBjörklund, AnnaWennhage, PerZenkert, Dan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Poulikidou, SofiaSchneider, ChristofBjörklund, AnnaKazemahvazi, SohrabWennhage, PerZenkert, Dan
By organisation
Environmental Strategies Research (fms)Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering
In the same journal
Materials & design
Materials Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 14 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 463 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf