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Methodology for inventorying greenhouse gas emissions from global cities
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2010 (English)In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 38, no 9, 4828-4837 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper describes the methodology and data used to determine greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions attributable to ten cities or city-regions: Los Angeles County, Denver City and County, Greater Toronto, New York City, Greater London, Geneva Canton, Greater Prague, Barcelona, Cape Town and Bangkok. Equations for determining emissions are developed for contributions from: electricity; heating and industrial fuels; ground transportation fuels; air and marine fuels; industrial processes; and waste. Gasoline consumption is estimated using three approaches: from local fuel sales; by scaling from regional fuel sales; and from counts of vehicle kilometres travelled. A simplified version of an intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC) method for estimating the GHG emissions from landfill waste is applied. Three measures of overall emissions are suggested: (i) actual emissions within the boundary of the city; (ii) single process emissions (from a life-cycle perspective) associated with the city's metabolism; and (iii) life-cycle emissions associated with the city's metabolism. The results and analysis of the study will be published in a second paper.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 38, no 9, 4828-4837 p.
Keyword [en]
Urban metabolism, Life-cycle analysis, Climate change
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-176832DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2009.08.050ISI: 000279743500008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77953383307OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-176832DiVA: diva2:868261
Note

QC 20151110

Available from: 2015-11-10 Created: 2015-11-10 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Modeling urban energy flows at macro and district levels: towards a sustainable urban metabolism
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modeling urban energy flows at macro and district levels: towards a sustainable urban metabolism
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The urban sustainability is a growing importance in the built environment research. Urban areas play a key role in planning for sustainable city development. Urbanization has implications for future energy systems and energy-related emissions. The new built environment requires systems that are cost-efficient and have more efficient utilization of energy with a low environmental impact. This can be analyzed and designed with efficient tools for current and future energy systems. The objectives of this dissertation are to examine and analyze the metabolic flows of urban areas, and to develop a methodology for optimization of energy systems and services for the urban district. The dissertation is comprised of two phases and eight appended publications.

In the first phase of this dissertation, the research is emphasized on an in-depth understanding of the complex dynamics of energy utilization in large urban areas. An integrated approach applied in this phase includes the energetic urban metabolism, the long-term energy systems modeling using the Long-range Energy Alternative Planning (LEAP) system, and the Multi-Criteria Decision-Making (MCDM) approach. The urban metabolism approach has been employed to analyze the urban energy flows at macro level. The LEAP model and MCDM approach have been used to develop and evaluate energy scenarios in both demand and supply sides.

In the second phase, the research recognizes the lack of tools that applicable for district energy systems analysis. This phase concentrates on the important role of the district level in urban energy systems. Research methods include the Multi-Objective Optimization using Genetic Algorithms, the carbon budget approach, and the case study method. Research in the second phase is mainly focused on the development of tool for energy systems and services at the district level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2015. 86 p.
Series
TRITA-IES, 2015:07
National Category
Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-176828 (URN)978-91-7595-794-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-11-30, Sal F3, Lindstedtsvägen 26, KTH, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20151110

Available from: 2015-11-10 Created: 2015-11-10 Last updated: 2015-11-16Bibliographically approved

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Steinberger, JuliaVillalba Mendez, Gara

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