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Author:
Grillner, Katja (KTH, Superseded Departments, Architecture)
Title:
Ramble, linger and gaze
Department:
KTH, Superseded Departments, Architecture
Responsible org.:
KTH, Department of Architecture
Publication type:
Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
Language:
English
Place of publ.: Stockholm Publisher: KTH
Pages:
370
Series:
Trita-ARK. Akademisk avhandling, ISSN 1402-7461; 00:1
Year of publ.:
2000
URI:
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-2964
Permanent link:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-2964
ISBN:
91-7170-505-8
Subject category:
Architectural Engineering
SVEP category:
Architecture
Keywords(en) :
architecture, landscape, representation, 18thcentury land­scape garden, 18th century England, ThomasWhately, Joseph Heely, Hagley Park, garden history, gardentheory, garden representation, garden experience, architecturalrepresentation, poetic representation, narrativerepresentation, philosophical dialogue, architectural researchmethodology, hermeneutics.
Abstract(en) :

Ramble, linger, and gaze explores a method of architecturalresearch based on narrative dialogue and examines the gardentheories and lite­rary garden representations of ThomasWhately (Observations on Modern gardening 1770) and JosephHeely (Letters on the Beauties of Hagley, Envil, and theLeasowes 1777). The thesis has the form of a narrated dialoguebetween these two writers and the narrator, and it is situatedat Hagley Park, Worchestershire, England. The work does nothave a strictly art-historical aim, but wishes to provide newinsights in the field of archi­tectural research on both amethodological and an historical level. While the dialogicalmode of writing is explored as an hermeneutical research methodfor the field of architec­tural history and theory, thetext in itself discloses a world of reflec­tions and ideasthat surrounded the English landscape garden in the1770’s, and engages, from our present-daypo­si­tion, in a dialogue with that world.

The beginnings of diverse and opposing phenomena of our timecan be traced to the culture of the 18th century. Ascon­structions of the 18th century, Hagley Park, as wellas Whately and Heely’s texts, lead us closer to thehorizons of the indi­viduals and the society that producedit. But the landscape gar­den and the texts, as they standto­day, are also sites for alter­nativeepistemological models. Through its fictional character, thelandscape garden provides a possibility to move withininterpretative layers and spiralling horizons. It celebrates apoint of view on the move, both literally (physically) andimagi­natively. The dissertation demonstrates thepossibilities of arti­culating this spatio-temporalphenomenon within the field of architectural research.

Note:
QC 20100609
Public defence:
2000-05-19, 00:00
Available from:
2000-05-19
Created:
2000-05-19
Last updated:
2010-06-09
Statistics:
516 hits