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Multi-level sanitation governance: understanding and overcoming challenges in the sanitation sector in sub-Saharan Africa
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI). (PROUD)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9340-4391
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2014 (English)In: Waterlines, ISSN 0262-8104, E-ISSN 1756-3488, Vol. 33, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The provision of sanitation facilities - a basic necessity for human health, well-being, dignity, and development - remains a mammoth challenge for developing countries where the vast majority of the 2.5 billion people without improved sanitation facilities reside. Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is one of the regions where decent, dignified, and functional toilet facilities remain largely inaccessible. Most of the countries in SSA will miss the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) for sanitation. There are sharp contradictions in the region between formal and informal sanitation institutions. There is also a disconnect between actors at the macro, meso, and micro governance levels. This paper shows how multi-level governance analysis, path dependency, and institutional inertia can be used to improve understanding of some challenges in the sanitation sector in SSA, and discusses approaches that can contribute to improving the sanitation situation in a sustainable way. In addition, the paper asserts that demand-driven strategies and private sector involvement in the sanitation sector is paramount for establishing new sanitation paradigms and sociotechnical regimes. We conclude that a good understanding of actors at all levels - their various roles, interactions, and the way they interpret and respond to policies - is key to accelerating progress in sustainable sanitation coverage in SSA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 33, no 3
Keyword [en]
sanitation, hygiene, functionality, multi-level governance, institutions, institutional inertia, path dependency, coordination, socio-technical regimes, demand-driven
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-179466DOI: 10.3362/1756-3488.2014.024OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-179466DiVA, id: diva2:883351
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013–6364
Note

QC 20160120

Available from: 2015-12-17 Created: 2015-12-17 Last updated: 2018-03-16Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. ‘Making Sanitation Happen’: An Enquiry into Multi-Level Sanitation Governance
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Making Sanitation Happen’: An Enquiry into Multi-Level Sanitation Governance
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The importance of sanitation for human health and development is undisputed. Sanitation is now high on the international development agenda and has become a salient issue in most developing countries, Rwanda and Uganda being no exception. However, there are still shortcomings as regards ‘making sanitation happen’ on the ground. The basic institutional environment and the right governance structures are yet to be fully put in place. This is even more important in the new modes of governance wherein increasing numbers of public, private, and philanthropic actors at different levels of society are involved in sanitation provision and hygiene promotion driven largely by global goals and international development agendas. This has engendered top-down pressure to meet prescribed targets which in most cases miss the complexity of context, distort service priorities, and in some cases compromise sustainability.

This thesis disentangles how sanitation policies are articulated at multiple levels of governance and among various actors in the sector, and eventually translate into investment and behaviour change at the community and household levels. This is done by examining sanitation governance structures in Rwanda and Uganda. Specific emphasis is placed on the actors and actions at national, sub-national, community and household levels.

Drawing on multi-level governance as a conceptual framework, qualitative analysis of policy objectives and choices, and quantitative investigations of what motivates hygiene behaviour change at the community and individual levels, this cross-national comparative study is a novel attempt to decipher the complexity surrounding sanitation and to show ‘what makes sanitation happen’.

The insights of this research build on different strands of the literature but most importantly they contribute to the debate in the sanitation sector on what works on the ground, why and where.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2018. p. 95
Series
TRITA-SOM, ISSN 1653-6126 ; 2018-3
Keyword
Sanitation, hygiene, behaviour, multi-level governance, institutions, policy, implementation
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-224439 (URN)978-91-7729-686-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-03-28, F3, Lindstedtsvägen 26, stockholm, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-6364
Note

QC 20180316

Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2018-03-19Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttp://www.developmentbookshelf.com/doi/abs/10.3362/1756-3488.2014.024

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Ekane, Nelson

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