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Risk and benefit judgment of excreta as fertilizer in agriculture: An exploratory investigation in Rwanda and Uganda
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. Stockholm Environment Institute, Sweden. (PROUD)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9340-4391
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2016 (English)In: Human and Ecological Risk Assessment, ISSN 1080-7039, E-ISSN 1549-7860, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 639-666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This research explores the use of psychometric techniques to improve understanding of psychological mechanisms underlying judgment of excreta as fertilizer in agriculture including other excreta related activities. Participants consisted of environmental health students, smallholder farmers and traders in rural and urban Rwanda and Uganda. The finding reveals an inverse relationship between risk and benefit judgments. This relationship holds for the three groups of participants with significant risk-benefit correlations of p<.0001. This finding is consistent with other studies showing that affect plays a key role in risk perception, judgment and decision making.Building on this finding, we conclude that individuals with high risk and low benefit judgment for excreta related practices would eschew them or emphasize strict standards. Individuals with a high benefit and low risk judgment would engage in excreta management practices regardless of the actual risks involved. This finding is relevant for risk communication and risk management as it indicates that individuals do not rely only on risk management information they receive concerning excreta and related risks but also depend to an extent on their feelings about these substances when making judgments and decisions regarding the purpose for using excreta as fertilizer and the level of exposure they can tolerate and manage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016. Vol. 22, no 3, p. 639-666
Keyword [en]
Excreta, Fertilizer, Affect, Risk, Benefit, Judgment
National Category
Agricultural Science
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-179467DOI: 10.1080/10807039.2015.1100515ISI: 000371914500005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84960369901OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-179467DiVA, id: diva2:883352
Conference
Water and Health: Where Science Meets Policy, Chapel HillGlobal Dry Toilet Conference, Tampere
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013–6364Lars Hierta Memorial Foundation, FO2010-0322 and FO2011-0501
Note

Funding also from: Kungl. Skogs och Lantbruksakademien (H10-0233-ADA-01).

Travel grants were also provided by Stiftelsen Futura.

QC 20160411

Available from: 2015-12-17 Created: 2015-12-17 Last updated: 2018-03-16Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. ‘Making Sanitation Happen’: An Enquiry into Multi-Level Sanitation Governance
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Making Sanitation Happen’: An Enquiry into Multi-Level Sanitation Governance
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The importance of sanitation for human health and development is undisputed. Sanitation is now high on the international development agenda and has become a salient issue in most developing countries, Rwanda and Uganda being no exception. However, there are still shortcomings as regards ‘making sanitation happen’ on the ground. The basic institutional environment and the right governance structures are yet to be fully put in place. This is even more important in the new modes of governance wherein increasing numbers of public, private, and philanthropic actors at different levels of society are involved in sanitation provision and hygiene promotion driven largely by global goals and international development agendas. This has engendered top-down pressure to meet prescribed targets which in most cases miss the complexity of context, distort service priorities, and in some cases compromise sustainability.

This thesis disentangles how sanitation policies are articulated at multiple levels of governance and among various actors in the sector, and eventually translate into investment and behaviour change at the community and household levels. This is done by examining sanitation governance structures in Rwanda and Uganda. Specific emphasis is placed on the actors and actions at national, sub-national, community and household levels.

Drawing on multi-level governance as a conceptual framework, qualitative analysis of policy objectives and choices, and quantitative investigations of what motivates hygiene behaviour change at the community and individual levels, this cross-national comparative study is a novel attempt to decipher the complexity surrounding sanitation and to show ‘what makes sanitation happen’.

The insights of this research build on different strands of the literature but most importantly they contribute to the debate in the sanitation sector on what works on the ground, why and where.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2018. p. 95
Series
TRITA-SOM, ISSN 1653-6126 ; 2018-3
Keyword
Sanitation, hygiene, behaviour, multi-level governance, institutions, policy, implementation
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Planning and Decision Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-224439 (URN)978-91-7729-686-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-03-28, F3, Lindstedtsvägen 26, stockholm, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-6364
Note

QC 20180316

Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2018-03-19Bibliographically approved

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Ekane, NelsonWestlund, Hans

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