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Towards Fully Automated Motion Capture of Signs -- Development and Evaluation of a Key Word Signing Avatar
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7801-7617
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1399-6604
2015 (English)In: ACM Transactions on Accessible Computing, ISSN 1936-7228, Vol. 7, no 2, 7:1-7:17 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Motion capture of signs provides unique challenges in the field of multimodal data collection. The dense packaging of visual information requires high fidelity and high bandwidth of the captured data. Even though marker-based optical motion capture provides many desirable features such as high accuracy, global fitting, and the ability to record body and face simultaneously, it is not widely used to record finger motion, especially not for articulated and syntactic motion such as signs. Instead, most signing avatar projects use costly instrumented gloves, which require long calibration procedures. In this article, we evaluate the data quality obtained from optical motion capture of isolated signs from Swedish sign language with a large number of low-cost cameras. We also present a novel dual-sensor approach to combine the data with low-cost, five-sensor instrumented gloves to provide a recording method with low manual postprocessing. Finally, we evaluate the collected data and the dual-sensor approach as transferred to a highly stylized avatar. The application of the avatar is a game-based environment for training Key Word Signing (KWS) as augmented and alternative communication (AAC), intended for children with communication disabilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015. Vol. 7, no 2, 7:1-7:17 p.
Keyword [en]
Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), Motion capture, Sign language, Virtual characters
National Category
Computer Science Language Technology (Computational Linguistics)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-180427DOI: 10.1145/2764918ISI: 000360070800004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84935145760OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-180427DiVA: diva2:893708
Note

 QC 2016-01-13

Available from: 2016-01-13 Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2017-01-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf