Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Influence of different ventilation levels on indoor air quality and energy savings: A case study of a single-family house
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Fluid and Climate Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8614-5806
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Fluid and Climate Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1882-3833
2015 (English)In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 19, 165-172 p.Article in journal (Refereed) PublishedText
Abstract [en]

The influence of different ventilation levels on indoor air quality (IAQ) and energy savings were studied experimentally and analytically in a single-family house occupied by two adults and one infant, situated in Borlange, Sweden. The building studied had an exhaust ventilation system with a range of air flow rate settings. In order to find appropriate ventilation rates regarding CO2, relative humidity (RH) and temperature as indicators of IAQ, four ventilation levels were considered, as follows: (I) A very low ventilation rate of 0.10 L s(-1) m(-2); (II) A low ventilation rate of 0.20 L s(-1) m(-2); (III) A normal ventilation rate of 0.35 L s(-1) m(-2); (IV) A high ventilation rate of 0.70 L s(-1) m(-2). In all cases, the sensor was positioned in the exhaust duct exiting from habitable spaces. Measurements showed that, for case I, the CO2 concentration reached over 1300 ppm, which was higher than the commonly referenced threshold for ventilation control, i.e. 1000 ppm, showing unacceptable IAQQ. In case II, the CO2 level was always below 950 ppm, indicating that 0.20 L s(-1) m(-2) is a sufficient ventilation rate for the reference building. The case III showed that the ventilation rate of 0.35 L s(-1) m(-2) caused a maximum CO2 level of 725 ppm; showing the level recommended by Swedish regulations was high with respect to CO2 level. In addition, measurements showed that the RH and temperature were within acceptable ranges in all cases. An energy savings calculation showed that, in case II, the comparative savings of the combined energy requirement for ventilation fan and ventilation heating were 43% compared with case.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015. Vol. 19, 165-172 p.
Keyword [en]
Indoor air quality, Site measurements, Ventilation level, Energy savings
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-180997DOI: 10.1016/j.scs.2015.08.004ISI: 000367398900017ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84944054031OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-180997DiVA: diva2:898161
Note

QC 20160127

Available from: 2016-01-27 Created: 2016-01-26 Last updated: 2016-01-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hesaraki, ArefehHolmberg, Sture
By organisation
Fluid and Climate Technology
In the same journal
Sustainable cities and society
Energy Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 9 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link