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Repellency Evaluation of Litsea Cubeba and Zanthoxylum Armatum Essential Oils against Ixodes Ricinus
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
2016 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

The incidence of the most predominant tick-borne diseases such as Lyme borreliosis and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) has been increasing in Europe in the last few decades. The infectious agents are carried by the same vector Ixodes ricinus and the augment of its population density has been demonstrated to cause an increase in emergence and transmission of tick zoonoses. Ticks are crawling ectoparasites that perceive host stimuli through their olfactory sensilla. Synthetic compounds have been extensively used for repelling or killing a broad spectrum of arthropods. However, disagreeable odours and their resilience to hydrolysis at environmental pHs have led to a growing interest in novel botanical repellents. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the repellency of two essential oils against wild and laboratory-reared Ixodes ricinus nymphs. The essential oils were extracted by hydro-distillation of Litsea cubeba and Zanthoxylum armatum, two plant species, in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic and their volatile composition analysed performing gas chromatography coupled mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The predominant compounds were geranial (28.63%) and neral (24.95%) of L. cubeba oil and linalool (61.2%), thujone A (12.32%) and thujone B (7.8%) of Z. armatum oil. The host-seeking activity of the nymphs was assessed by performing a laboratory bioassay in response to 10% L. cubeba and 10% Z. armatum essential oil, both diluted in 99.5% ethanol. Furthermore, a mixture of 5% L. cubeba and 5% Z. armatum essential oil diluted in 99.5% ethanol was tested against nymphal I. ricinus. The single species test solutions showed strong repellency in the first 30 minutes, but only the mixture was still active at 120 minutes against the laboratory-reared group. A further difference between the two groups of ticks was noticed in the positive geotactic response. Wild ticks fell off from the index finger more frequently than the laboratory-reared ones. This behavioural response may underline the influence of environmental conditions on adaptive reactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. , 31 p.
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-187639OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-187639DiVA: diva2:930817
Available from: 2017-05-15 Created: 2016-05-25 Last updated: 2017-05-15Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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