Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Explaining “peak car” with economic variables
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9235-0232
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1789-9238
2016 (Swedish)In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 2016, no 88, 236-250 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many western countries have seen a plateau and subsequent decrease of car travel during the 21st century. What has generated particular interest and debate is the statement that the development cannot be explained by changes in traditional explanatory factors such as GDP and fuel prices. Instead, it has been argued, the observed trends are indications of substantial changes in lifestyles, preferences and attitudes to car travel; what we are experiencing is not just a temporary plateau, but a true “peak car”. However, this study shows that the traditional variables GDP and fuel price are in fact sufficient to explain the observed trends in car traffic in all the countries included in our study: the United States, France, the United Kingdom, Sweden and (to a large extent) Australia and Germany. We argue that the importance of the fuel price increases in the early 2000s has been underappreciated in the studies that shaped the later debate. Results also indicate that GDP elasticities tend to decrease with rising GDP, and that fuel price elasticities tend to increase at high price levels and during periods of rapid price increases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016. Vol. 2016, no 88, 236-250 p.
Keyword [en]
Peak car, Fuel price elasticity, GDP elasticity, Travel demand
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-188946DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2016.04.005ISI: 000379359800017Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84964992773OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-188946DiVA: diva2:941716
Note

QC 20160628

Available from: 2016-06-22 Created: 2016-06-22 Last updated: 2017-09-15Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Explaining Trends in Car Use
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Explaining Trends in Car Use
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Many western countries have seen a plateau and subsequent decline in car travel during the early 21st century. What has generated particular interest and debate is the claim that the development cannot only be explained by changes in traditional explanatory factors such as GDP, fuel prices and land-use. Instead, it has been argued, the observed trends are indications of substantial changes in lifestyles, preferences and attitudes to car travel and thus, not just a temporary plateau but a true peak in car use.

This thesis is a compilation of five papers, studying the issue on a national, international, regional and city scale through quantitative analysis of aggregate administrative data and individual travel survey data. It concludes that the aggregate development of car travel per capita can be explained fairly well with the traditional model variables GDP and fuel price. Furthermore, this thesis shows that spatial context and policy become increasingly important in car use trends: car use diverges over time between city, suburban and rural residents of Sweden and other European countries, while gender and to some extent income become less differentiating for car use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2017. 23 p.
Series
TRITA-TSC-PHD, 17-003
Keyword
car use, peak car, VMT, VKT
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Research subject
Transport Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-214558 (URN)978-91-88537-01-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-10-13, Kollegiesalen, Brinellvägen 8, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20170918

Available from: 2017-09-18 Created: 2017-09-15 Last updated: 2017-09-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bastian, AnneBörjesson, MariaEliasson, Jonas
By organisation
Transport Planning, Economics and EngineeringCentre for Transport Studies, CTS
In the same journal
Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice
Social Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 267 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf