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Open System Tribology and Influence of Weather Condition
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7560-6232
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.). (SYSTEM- O KOMPONENTDESIGN)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4447-3363
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.). (SYSTEM- O KOMPONENTDESIGN)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2489-0688
2016 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, 32455Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The tribology of an open system at temperatures ranging between 3 degrees C and -35 degrees C, with and without snow, was investigated using a pin-on-disc tribometer mounted in a temperature-controlled environmental chamber. The relationship between the microstructure and ductility of the materials and the tribology at the contacting surfaces was investigated. The study shows that during continuous sliding, pressure causes snow particles to melt into a liquid-like layer, encouraging the generation of oxide flakes on the contact path. The friction coefficient and wear rate are dramatically reduced through an oxidative friction and wear mechanism. In the absence of snow, the tribological process is controlled by the low temperature brittleness of steel in the temperature range from 3 degrees C to -15 degrees C. At these temperatures, cracks are prone to form and extend on the worn surfaces, resulting in the spalling of bulk scraps, which are crushed into debris that increases the friction coefficient and wear rate due to strong abrasion. When the temperature falls to -25 degrees C, an ice layer condenses on the metal surfaces and relaxes the tribological process in the same way as the added snow particles, which significantly decreases the friction and wear.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2016. Vol. 6, 32455
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-192723DOI: 10.1038/srep32455ISI: 000382158800001PubMedID: 27573973Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84984843708OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-192723DiVA: diva2:974455
Note

QC 20160926

Available from: 2016-09-26 Created: 2016-09-20 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved

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