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  • 1.
    Al Moubayed, Samer
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Bringing the avatar to life: Studies and developments in facial communication for virtual agents and robots2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The work presented in this thesis comes in pursuit of the ultimate goal of building spoken and embodied human-like interfaces that are able to interact with humans under human terms. Such interfaces need to employ the subtle, rich and multidimensional signals of communicative and social value that complement the stream of words – signals humans typically use when interacting with each other.

    The studies presented in the thesis concern facial signals used in spoken communication, and can be divided into two connected groups. The first is targeted towards exploring and verifying models of facial signals that come in synchrony with speech and its intonation. We refer to this as visual-prosody, and as part of visual-prosody, we take prominence as a case study. We show that the use of prosodically relevant gestures in animated faces results in a more expressive and human-like behaviour. We also show that animated faces supported with these gestures result in more intelligible speech which in turn can be used to aid communication, for example in noisy environments.

    The other group of studies targets facial signals that complement speech. As spoken language is a relatively poor system for the communication of spatial information; since such information is visual in nature. Hence, the use of visual movements of spatial value, such as gaze and head movements, is important for an efficient interaction. The use of such signals is especially important when the interaction between the human and the embodied agent is situated – that is when they share the same physical space, and while this space is taken into account in the interaction.

    We study the perception, the modelling, and the interaction effects of gaze and head pose in regulating situated and multiparty spoken dialogues in two conditions. The first is the typical case where the animated face is displayed on flat surfaces, and the second where they are displayed on a physical three-dimensional model of a face. The results from the studies show that projecting the animated face onto a face-shaped mask results in an accurate perception of the direction of gaze that is generated by the avatar, and hence can allow for the use of these movements in multiparty spoken dialogue.

    Driven by these findings, the Furhat back-projected robot head is developed. Furhat employs state-of-the-art facial animation that is projected on a 3D printout of that face, and a neck to allow for head movements. Although the mask in Furhat is static, the fact that the animated face matches the design of the mask results in a physical face that is perceived to “move”.

    We present studies that show how this technique renders a more intelligible, human-like and expressive face. We further present experiments in which Furhat is used as a tool to investigate properties of facial signals in situated interaction.

    Furhat is built to study, implement, and verify models of situated and multiparty, multimodal Human-Machine spoken dialogue, a study that requires that the face is physically situated in the interaction environment rather than in a two-dimensional screen. It also has received much interest from several communities, and been showcased at several venues, including a robot exhibition at the London Science Museum. We present an evaluation study of Furhat at the exhibition where it interacted with several thousand persons in a multiparty conversation. The analysis of the data from the setup further shows that Furhat can accurately regulate multiparty interaction using gaze and head movements.

  • 2.
    Al Moubayed, Samer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Beskow, Jonas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Granström, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    House, David
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Audio-Visual Prosody: Perception, Detection, and Synthesis of Prominence2010In: 3rd COST 2102 International Training School on Toward Autonomous, Adaptive, and Context-Aware Multimodal Interfaces: Theoretical and Practical Issues / [ed] Esposito A; Esposito AM; Martone R; Muller VC; Scarpetta G, 2010, Vol. 6456, 55-71 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we investigate the effects of facial prominence cues, in terms of gestures, when synthesized on animated talking heads. In the first study a speech intelligibility experiment is conducted, where speech quality is acoustically degraded, then the speech is presented to 12 subjects through a lip synchronized talking head carrying head-nods and eyebrow raising gestures. The experiment shows that perceiving visual prominence as gestures, synchronized with the auditory prominence, significantly increases speech intelligibility compared to when these gestures are randomly added to speech. We also present a study examining the perception of the behavior of the talking heads when gestures are added at pitch movements. Using eye-gaze tracking technology and questionnaires for 10 moderately hearing impaired subjects, the results of the gaze data show that users look at the face in a similar fashion to when they look at a natural face when gestures are coupled with pitch movements opposed to when the face carries no gestures. From the questionnaires, the results also show that these gestures significantly increase the naturalness and helpfulness of the talking head.

  • 3.
    Al Moubayed, Samer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Beskow, Jonas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Skantze, Gabriel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Granström, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Furhat: A Back-projected Human-like Robot Head for Multiparty Human-Machine Interaction2012In: Cognitive Behavioural Systems: COST 2102 International Training School, Dresden, Germany, February 21-26, 2011, Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Anna Esposito, Antonietta M. Esposito, Alessandro Vinciarelli, Rüdiger Hoffmann, Vincent C. Müller, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, 114-130 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we first present a summary of findings from two previous studies on the limitations of using flat displays with embodied conversational agents (ECAs) in the contexts of face-to-face human-agent interaction. We then motivate the need for a three dimensional display of faces to guarantee accurate delivery of gaze and directional movements and present Furhat, a novel, simple, highly effective, and human-like back-projected robot head that utilizes computer animation to deliver facial movements, and is equipped with a pan-tilt neck. After presenting a detailed summary on why and how Furhat was built, we discuss the advantages of using optically projected animated agents for interaction. We discuss using such agents in terms of situatedness, environment, context awareness, and social, human-like face-to-face interaction with robots where subtle nonverbal and social facial signals can be communicated. At the end of the chapter, we present a recent application of Furhat as a multimodal multiparty interaction system that was presented at the London Science Museum as part of a robot festival,. We conclude the paper by discussing future developments, applications and opportunities of this technology.

  • 4.
    Al Moubayed, Samer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Heylen, D.
    Bohus, D.
    Koutsombogera, Maria
    Papageorgiou, H.
    Esposito, A.
    Skantze, Gabriel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    UM3I 2014: International workshop on understanding and modeling multiparty, multimodal interactions2014In: ICMI 2014 - Proceedings of the 2014 International Conference on Multimodal Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, 537-538 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a brief summary of the international workshop on Modeling Multiparty, Multimodal Interactions. The UM3I 2014 workshop is held in conjunction with the ICMI 2014 conference. The workshop will highlight recent developments and adopted methodologies in the analysis and modeling of multiparty and multimodal interactions, the design and implementation principles of related human-machine interfaces, as well as the identification of potential limitations and ways of overcoming them.

  • 5.
    Al Moubayed, Samer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Skantze, Gabriel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Perception of Gaze Direction for Situated Interaction2012In: Proceedings of the 4th Workshop on Eye Gaze in Intelligent Human Machine Interaction, Gaze-In 2012, ACM , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate human perception of robots' gaze direction is crucial for the design of a natural and fluent situated multimodal face-to-face interaction between humans and machines. In this paper, we present an experiment targeted at quantifying the effects of different gaze cues synthesized using the Furhat back-projected robot head, on the accuracy of perceived spatial direction of gaze by humans using 18 test subjects. The study first quantifies the accuracy of the perceived gaze direction in a human-human setup, and compares that to the use of synthesized gaze movements in different conditions: viewing the robot eyes frontal or at a 45 degrees angle side view. We also study the effect of 3D gaze by controlling both eyes to indicate the depth of the focal point (vergence), the use of gaze or head pose, and the use of static or dynamic eyelids. The findings of the study are highly relevant to the design and control of robots and animated agents in situated face-to-face interaction.

  • 6. Alexanderson, Petter
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    Department of Informatics, HCID Group.
    Being and mixing: designing interactive soundscapes2006In: Proceedings of the 4th Nordic conference on Human-computer interaction: changing roles, 2006, 252-261 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a study of the auditory environment in a chemical factory, and how a group of process operators ascribe meaning to a selection of sound clips from their daily work environment. We argue for a design-oriented phenomenological approach to soundscape studies, and suggest an approach based on an exploration of how already occurring sounds are used. This knowledge will be used to inform the design of new useful auditory environments. Our study shows that the richness of the auditory environment is a crucial aspect of the distributed work environment. An important part of the design process is the operator’s contribution to the concepts suggested. From design workshops several design concepts aiming to explore and test different approaches for making sound affordances available have been developed. This has led us to a new understanding of how interactive soundscapes enable distributed awareness – what we refer to as ’Being and Mixing’.

  • 7.
    Andersen, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Making Magic Machines2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How can we design experiences that explore ideas and notions of the unknown? The aim of the work outlined here is to create short, intense, workshop-like experiences that generate strong commitments, and expose underlying personal desires as drivers for new ideas. I would like to propose a material practice, which uses open-ended making to engage in the imagination of new things. Informed by a concern or a longing, this exploration employs familiar yet mundane materials - such as candy and cardboard - through which several planes collide: the possible, the unknown, the feared and the desired. The process is aimed at allowing a broad range of knowledge to materialise - through ways that are less normative, and less constrained by commercial and technological concerns, and to emerge instead as far-fetched ideas that offer a kind of knowledge, which belongs to no one. The format has evolved over time, from relatively elaborate workshops for technology prototyping, towards the point where they are now focussed on the making of work that is about technology, rather than of technology.

  • 8. Andersen, Kristina
    Making Magic Machines2013In: 10th European Academy of Design Conference  - Crafting the Future, Gothenburg, Sweden, 17 – 19 April 2013: Crafting the Future, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is becoming increasingly common to include design methodology into innovation processes, but this is still mostly done to problem-solve or user-test technologies that are already at a late stage of innovation. This paper describes an attempt to use a fine art sculptural process to access unspoken desires and fears of the new and unknown: an exploratory children's workshops aimed at uncovering new technological objects and needs using craft and embodied making. The workshop uses the notion of magic and machine as substitute for technology to allow a broader range of response. We ask questions like: How do we design magic? What is magical to you? If you could make anything at all, what would it be? The responses are low-fi objects built from paper, cardboard, wood, string and plastic. These objects are in turn treated as props in a process of enacting a future scenario-of-use. The paper describes the process itself as well as a small selection of the resulting objects and suggests some tentative guidelines for using this type of workshop format.

  • 9. Andersen, Kristina
    The deliberate cargo cult2014In: Proceedings of the 2014 conference on Designing interactive systems (DIS '14), New York, USA: ACM Press, 2014, 627-636 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking it’s origin from the notion of the cargo cult as anelaborate misunderstanding, this paper suggests a series ofexploratory design methods to support users in generatingrequirements and scenarios-of-use for technological objectsthat do not yet exist. Strategies from fields such as art andperformance are used to create experiences of userinvolvementcentered on the making of non-functionalmock-ups. These can then act as props through which theparticipant can express their intuitions and concerns with agiven technological notion. The processes described makesuse of a broad range of cultural drivers to engage users inplayful misunderstandings that facilitate new, out of theordinary, interpretations of objects. The paper outlines thebasis of three projects, discusses the drivers behind eachproject and suggests guidelines for creating these kinds ofexploratory embodied experiences.

  • 10. Andersen, Kristina
    et al.
    Gibson, Dan
    The Instrument as the Source of New in New Music2017In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 33, no 3, 37-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can we treat technological matter as yet another material from which our notions of possible future instruments can be constructed, intrinsically intertwined with, and informed by a practice of performance? We strive to develop musical-performance instruments not only by creating technology, but also in developing them as aesthetic and cultural objects. A musical instrument is not an interface and should not be designed as such; instead, new instruments are the source of new in new music. Like any traditional instrument, a new instrument's potential for producing quality musical sound can only be revealed when it is played. We present an instrument-design process conducted by a visionary and an agenda-setting musician. The resulting objects are experimental prototypes of technological matter, which allow analysis and meaning to be specified through physical and tactile interaction with the objects themselves. As the instruments evolve through various stages, their capability is continually enhanced, making them all the more desirable for musicians to play.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-01-05 08:20
  • 11. Andersen, Kristina
    et al.
    Knees, Peter
    Johannes Kepler University.
    The Dial: Exploring Computational Strangeness2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA '16), New York, USA: ACM Press, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the process of a computational ideaemerging from a process of user engagement: algorithmicrecommendations as artistic obstructions in creativework. Through a collaboration between HCI and Music InformationRetrieval, we conducted open-ended interviewswith professional makers of Electronic Dance Music. Wedescribe how the idea emerged from this process, and considerhow algorithmic recommendation systems could bere-considered as tools for artistic inspiration. We proposethe concept of a “Strangeness Dial,” which allows the gradualadjustment of the degree of desired otherness, which istested through the use of a non-functional prop and a seriesof interviews.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Johanna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The Heart Companion:: Designing an empowering application for heart failure patients2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare practices are changing as focus shifts fromtreating acute illnesses to chronic diseases. Theresponsibility of managing the treatment has shifted fromhealthcare providers to the individual in a higher degree. Toachieve good treatment the patients need to be empoweredso that they understand their condition and can makeinformed choices throughout their self-care. A researchthrough design approach was used to investigate how todesign a personalized empowering application for heartfailure patients. Aside from information relating to thecondition, the themes of physical activity, dieting and socialconnectedness were identified as central to address for theempowerment of this group. Patients, partners andhealthcare providers contributed with different perspectivesthroughout the design process. As a result five personas,representing potential users, were developed. Based on thepersonas and knowledge of the domain, user scenarios incurrent- and preferred state were constructed in order toguide the design of the empowering application called ‘TheHeart Companion’. It is a tablet application catering to thedifferent needs of the personas that also addresses the threethemes relevant for empowerment. The purpose of theapplication is to facilitate better understanding, a feeling ofsafety and a more active empowered life for the patient.The application enables personalization of the content byproviding bookmarking and addresses empowerment ofphysical activity by enabling various guided exercisesessions, personalized feedback, the possibility of reflectionand construction of personalized exercise sessions.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Karl
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Manipulating Control-Display Ratios in Room-Scale Virtual Reality2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined how reduced control-display ratios on motion-tracked handheld controllers in virtual reality affected user immersion and sense of control. 24 participants played a puzzle game in virtual reality using one of three control-display ratios: one normal, and two that were reduced using the “Go-Go” technique. Results indicate that the control-display ratio can be reduced drastically while retaining user immersion and sense of control, but that the effectiveness of this seems to differ between individuals and is heavily influenced by previous experiences. Even so, these results could be of use for future virtual reality interaction designers as well as researchers studying the senses of vision and proprioception. 

  • 14.
    Andersson, Lisa
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    EquumTemp: A palpation aid that document and detect temperature changes on the surface of horse’s forelimbs2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    At the moment, in the daily health care for horses there is a lack of technical aids for private use. As a horse owner you need to physically palpate the horse’s limbs to detect signs of injury and lameness. It is difficult and the signs are usually vague and hard to distinguish. Technology and interaction design could be the solution to this problem. The related research this paper builds on are: clinical complementary diagnostic methods for lameness diagnosis, wearable health monitor systems for humans and smart textiles on horses. The question this paper tries to answer is:

    How to develop and design a prototype of a product that is an aid for horse owners to document and better understand changes in surface temperature of the horse’s fetlock?

    To answer this question a user-centered design process was used. A survey, expert domain interview, design and development of a prototype, two different user testings’ and a design workshop. The result is a prototype of a palpating aid called EquumTemp. It is used by the horse owner as a second opinion on the status of their horse fetlock temperature. EquumTemp measures, stores and documents surface temperature of the fetlock. The prototype was tested by the author for 2 weeks and by three different potential users. The knowledge gained from the project resulted in defined product requirements.

  • 15.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Effect of depth cues on visual search in a web-based environment2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, 3D graphics has become more available for web development with low-level access to graphics hardware and increased power of web browsers. With core browsing tasks for users being to quickly scan a website and find what they are looking for, can 3D graphics – or depth cues – be used to facilitate these tasks? Therefore, the main focus of this work was to examine user performance on websites in terms of visual attention. Previous research on the use of 3D graphics in web design and other graphical interfaces has yielded mixed results, but some suggest depth cues might be used to segment a visual scene and improve visual attention. In this work, the main question asked was:  How do depth cues affect visual search in a web-based environment? To examine the question, a user study was conducted where participants performed a visual search task on four different web-based prototypes with varying depth cues. The findings suggest depth cues might have a negative effect by increasing reaction time, but certain cues can improve task completion (hit rate) in text-rich web environments. It is further elaborated that it might be useful to look at the problem from a more holistic perspective, also emphasizing other factors such as visual complexity and prototypicality of websites.

  • 16.
    Andrieux, Alexandre
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Improving HSL Recognition Skills with a Color Game2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Improving color matching skills requires a specifically designed interface as much as well-calculated feedback on the underlying color model. This thesis relates to the production of a game for learning HSL and elaborates on learning patterns with regard to hue and game progression. A quantification of learning based on performance variation is proposed. In an effort to balance data quantity and relevance, several variables of pure analysis interest are defined. Results on learning inhomogeneities are presented through Hue Learning Curves with streamgraphs and detailed bar charts. The consequences of design choices and gameplay on performance and learning are discussed.

  • 17. Annebäck, Jesper
    et al.
    Bratt, Jesper
    Huanca Montes, Connie
    Jernström, Erik
    Stenseth, Viggo
    OMNES, "All trafik kan vara kollektivtrafik": Ett projekt av gruppen Omnes2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I kurserna DH2655: Kooperativ IT-design och DH2460: Programvarudesign, ekonomi och ledarskap är det traditionsenligt att utföra en projektuppgift i grupper, som kursledare satt ihop med hänsyn till elevernas egenskaper. Temat för årets projekt var Framtidens kollektiv- trafik. I denna rapport beskrivs projektgruppen Omnes hela designprocess från att uppgiften blev tilldelad till slutredovisningen, en utställning på Spårvägsmuséet i Stockholm.

    Vid projektstarten började samtliga medlemmar att definiera sin roll och individuella mål för kursen. I påföljande process utvecklas en frågeställning baserat olika litterära undersökning- ar och metoder för omvärldsanalys. Stor tyngd av projektet ligger på själva dokumentationen och utförandet av designprocessen. I designprocessen använder projektgruppen de metoder som kursen tagit upp i dess första del. Att kunna välja rätt metod för det rätta syftet samt uppföljande analys på utfallet är någon som visar sig vara signifikant för att lyckas gå vidare i processen. Detta är något som görs i omvärldsanalysen och genom den insamlade datan från momentet kan projektgruppen kristallisera sin idé. Idén är ett sammansatt system som ligger mellan 15-20 år framåt i tiden, beroende på hur bra det måste vara. En installation av idén görs i samtal med Spårvägsmuséets utställningsansvarig och projektgruppens representant. Detta är en parallellt löpande process som projektgruppen hanterar samtidigt som de ska fullfölja själva projektet. Allt som gjort i projektet från start till utställning tas upp i en diskussion som reflekterar över de problem vi stött på likväl som framtida planer för ytterligare utveckling. Slutligen knyts allt ihop av en slutsats som konfirmerar några av de teorier som framkommit under projektets gång, genom jämförelse med de andra projektgrupperna i kursen. 

  • 18.
    Arkenson, Caroline
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Music Control in the Car – Designing voice interactions between user and a music service with a focus on in-car usage2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Music is an important part of people’s lives and thanks to technology development music is more accessible than ever. It creates a pleasant auditory environment in many situations such as when driving, and in-car music streaming is one of the most requested features amongst drivers. Using technology such as mobile devices when driving is a major safety concern which can be addressed by implementing voice control. Said modality, if implemented successfully, puts less cognitive demand on the driver than using manual controls or looking at a monitor.

    This thesis has resulted in a set of design suggestions for voice interaction between driver and a music service for a safe and pleasant user experience where the dialogues aim at providing drivers with a feeling of familiarity and brand recognition with the music service. The design suggestions are based on design guidelines and previous research on voice interaction and in-car technology including cognitive demands on the driver. Input from drivers and music listeners have been collected first through a questionnaire on controlling music applications while driving followed by a design workshop where the participants, based on different stories, designed dialogues between driver and a music service.

    The research found that drivers are highly concerned with traffic safety, and want to be able to quickly and safely search for specific music or music that suits a current mood. In terms of familiarity, drivers should be able to use existing features from the music service when interacting through voice and be able to make actions that affect their private account - such as saving songs to a playlist.

  • 19. Arkenson, Caroline
    et al.
    Chou, Y. -Y
    Huang, C. -Y
    Lee, Y. -C
    Tag and seek a location-based game in tainan city2014In: CHI PLAY 2014 - Proceedings of the 2014 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, 315-318 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tag and Seek is a location-based game which leads a traveler through Tainan City in Taiwan. The traveler's task is to find Harry's friends who are hiding at different sites in the city. Once at the site, the traveler has to scan a Near Field Communication (NFC) tag placed on a board looking like Harry's friend. When the NFC tag is scanned the lost friend is found, information about the site is presented and instructions to the next site will be available. The game lets the traveler experience culture, gain knowledge about sites in the city and meet local citizens - without the traveler having to plan the trip ahead. By implementing NFC technology as check points the interaction with the game differs from regular tourist guides and the threat of privacy which comes with location-based services is greatly lowered as the traveler is not being tracked by GPS. From our user evaluation we found that both the interface and interaction with the boards could use some improvements to increase the usability.

  • 20.
    Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Dovhammar, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Lindquist, Sinna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Markensten, Erik
    Antrop.
    Swartling, Anna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Att beställa något användbart är inte uppenbart: En motiverande bok om att beställa användbarhet2010Book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Karlgren, Klas
    Ramberg, Robert
    Strååt, Björn
    Designing Interaction in Interaction Design: Using interactionarires in order to understand student use of interaction design concepts2012In: Designs for Learning 2012: Conference Proceedings, Copenhagen, Denmark: Aalborg University , 2012, 14-16 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design is about designing interaction. But how do first year students of interaction design understand and use concepts of interaction in their design processes? By interaction analysis of video material we analyse how students used concepts adhering to interaction. The aspect most frequently used was interactivity. Interaction was mainly handled by using spoken language. While working with physical materials, talk about interaction decreased

  • 22.
    Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. FOI.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Jander, Hans
    Lindquist, Sinna
    Castor, Martin
    Borgvall, Jonathan
    Towards the Learning Organisation: Frameworks, Methods, and Tools for Resource-Efficient and Effective Training2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this report is to describe models for operational training of military personnel and frameworks, methodologies, and tools that support the analysis, planning, monitoring, and evaluation of such training. The primary example used is simulator-based training and exercises, and in particular the operations at FOI/FLSC (Swedish Defence Research Agency/Swedish Air Force Combat Simulation Centre). The report also includes specific recommendations on how frameworks, methodologies, and data from assessment tools can be used by an organization for effective training, and suggests a number of research and development activities that strive towards a learning organization. 

  • 23.
    Aslamy, Benjamin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering.
    Utveckling av ett multisensorsystem för falldetekteringsanordningar2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Accidental falls among the elderly is a major public health problem. As a result, a variety of systems have been developed for remote monitoring of the elderly to permit early detection of falls. The majority of the research that has been done so far in fall accidents has focused on developing new more successful algorithms spe- cifically to identify fall from non-fall. Although the statistics show that mortality and injuries caused by falls are increasing every year in conjunction with the in- creasing proportion of older people in the population.

    This thesis is about improving the current fall detection devices by covering the gaps and meet the needs of the current fall detection techniques. The improve- ments that have been identified is to provide a secure assessment of the patient's health and be able to call for aid more quickly when a fall occurs. Another im- provement is the mobility for the elderly to be outdoors and have the ability to per- form daily activities without being limited by the location position.

    In summary it can be said that a multisensor system in form of a prototype has been designed to cover the deficiencies and improvements that have been identi- fied. Apart from detection of falls and body movements through an accelerometer sensor the prototype does also include a sensor for detecting vital signs in form of ECG. It also supports cellular and wireless network communication in form of GPRS and Wi-Fi to enable freedom of movement for the elderly. Furthermore, the prototype includes a sensor for GPS that provides information about location position. 

  • 24.
    Backlund, Sara
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Gyllensvärd, M.
    Gustafsson, A.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    SVID (Swedish Industrial Design Foundation).
    Mazé, Ramia
    Interactive Institute.
    Redström, Johan
    Center for Design Research, Royal Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Static!: The aesthetics of energy in everyday life2006In: WonderGround 2006 / [ed] Ken Friedman, Terence Love, Eduardo Côrte-Real, Chris Rust, Lisbon: CEIADE – Centro Editorial do IADE , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Bark, Ida
    et al.
    Teleca Sweden South, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Folstad, Asbjorn
    SINEF ICT, Oslo, Norge.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Use and usefulness of HCI methods: Results from an exploratory study among Nordic HCI practitioners2006In: People and Computers XIX - The Bigger Picture / [ed] McEwan, T, Gulliksen, J, Benyon, D, Springer London, 2006, 201-217 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As an HCI practitioner, it would be of great value to know which methods other HCI practitioners find most useful in different project phases. Also it would be interesting to know whether the type of ICT projects has any effects on HCI practitioners' perception of the usefulness of the methods. This paper presents results from an exploratory survey of HCI practitioners in the Nordic countries conducted in the fall of 2004. 179 of the respondents were usability professionals or UI designers with two or more years of experience. The survey results give insights with regard to whether or not HCI practitioners are included in those project phases regarded as most important. Also it describes which HCI methods that are used in different project phases, and how useful different HCI methods are perceived to be. The study complements existing HCI practitioner survey investigations by an explicit allocation of the HCI methods under consideration to concrete project phases, and by including analyses of group differences between practitioners working with different kinds of development projects.

  • 26. Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    Ivarsen, Ove
    UsersAward.
    Lind, Torbjörn
    UsersAward.
    Olve, Nils-Göran
    Sandblad, Bengt
    Uppsala Universitet och UsersAwards forskarpanel.
    Sundblad, Yngve
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Walldius, Åke
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Nya initiativ för användbarhetsarbetet: en pejling av behovet hos UsersAwards olika interessentgrupper2009Report (Other academic)
  • 27. Bentley, F.
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    The power of mobile notifications to increase wellbeing logging behavior2013In: CHI '13 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Digital Library, 2013, 1095-1098 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-logging is a critical component to many wellbeing systems. However, self-logging often is difficult to sustain at regular intervals over many weeks. We demonstrate the power of passive mobile notifications to increase logging of wellbeing data, particularly food intake, in a mobile health service. Adding notifications increased the frequency of logging from 12% in a one-month, ten-user pilot study without reminders to 63% in the full 60-user study with reminders included. We will discuss the benefits of passive notifications over existing interruptive methods.

  • 28. Bentley, F
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Dernirdjian, D
    Koile, K
    Darrell, T
    Perceptive presence2003In: IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, ISSN 0272-1716, E-ISSN 1558-1756, Vol. 23, 26-36 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perceptive presence systems automatically convey awareness of user states to a remote location or application without the user having to perform explicit commands or mode selection. The article describes a component-based architecture for creating presence applications using perceptual user interface widgets. Each widget performs a machine perception function, such as tracking a face or monitoring activity in a specific 3D location. Widgets provide an abstraction barrier between the perception algorithms and the needs of application writers. Two example applications developed using this framework are presented: one uses a luminous display to express a user’s availability for communication to a colleague at a remote location, and a second uses activity to control devices in a context-aware environment.

  • 29.
    Berglund, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Chatbots as Interaction Modality: An Explorative Design Study on Elderly Classical Music Concert Subscribers2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a pilot study aimed at exploring how a chatbot can be designed to be used as a tool to give elderly classical music concert subscribers information about concerts they are attending. Previous works have indicated chatbots to be useful as information retrieval systems. To test this theory, a chatbot called “BerwaldBoten” was created and tested on eight elderly concert subscribers. Apart from testing the chatbot in everyday settings during a week leading up to a concert, the users also answered questionnaires before and after the study for qualitative data. Data from the chats was also collected for qualitative analysis. The results were generally positive, where most users found it easier to acquire concert information when using the chatbot. A need to provide the alternatives to interact using either quick reply buttons or free text was indicated. Furthermore, the importance of stating limitations and being transparent regarding the system state at all times is discussed.

  • 30.
    Bergsmark, Moa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    From patchwork to appliqué: Reflections from an interaction design remake2016In: TEI 2016 - Proceedings of the 10th Anniversary Conference on Tangible Embedded and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, 236-244 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a case in which an existing tangible system and its core design values has been used to create a new variation with available standard technology exactly one decade later. We reflect on how the new technological setup fundamentally changed the interaction in terms of electronic media and behavior, as well as regarding perception, physical manipulation, and overall social activity. The new design is discussed in terms of transformations of practice, which shifted our conceptual understanding of the interaction from the metaphor of making a patchwork to that of an appliqué.

  • 31.
    Berns, Tomas
    et al.
    KTH.
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Toomingas, Allan
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Special issue of Behavioural and Information Technology with key note lectures and selected papers from the 8th international conference on Work With Computing Systems 2007 - WWCS 2007 - in Stockholm May 21st-24th 2007 - Foreword2008In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 27, no 4, 283-284 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32. Beskow, J.
    et al.
    Edlund, J.
    Granström, B.
    Gustafson, J.
    Gjermani, T.
    Jonsson, O.
    Skantze, G.
    Tobiasson, Helena
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Innovative interfaces in MonAMI: The reminder2008In: ICMI'08: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces, 2008, 199-200 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This demo paper presents an early version of the Reminder, a prototype ECA developed in the European project MonAMI, which aims at "mainstreaming accessibility in consumer goods and services, using advanced technologies to ensure equal access, independent living and participation for all". The Reminder helps users to plan activities and to remember what to do. The prototypemerges mobile ECA technology with other, existing technologies:Google Calendar and a digital pen and paper. The solution allows users to continue using a paper calendar in the manner they are used to, whilst the ECA provides notifications on what has been written in the calendar. Users may ask questions such as "When was I supposed to meet Sara?" or "What's my schedule today"?

  • 33.
    Blomqvist, Niklas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Perception of Trustworthiness and Valence of Emotional Expressions in Virtual Characters2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge on how to design trustworthy virtual characters are of importance when these are becoming more and more common interaction partners. In this study, a closer look at the suggested relationship from previous research between valence and trustworthiness is investigated by constructing virtual characters with different non-verbal behaviours and letting participants rate them in a pre-study. A second question of how perception of trustworthiness is based for virtual characters is investigated by letting participants play a trust game with life-sized virtual characters on a big 4k-screen. Results indicated that valence is not necessarily a factor influencing trustworthiness and that positive valence together with mutual gaze is not enough to provide a clearly trustworthy virtual character. Results also indicated that perception of trustworthiness is not based solely on a virtual character's previous decisions of trust in a longer interaction but also on its non-verbal behaviour. The outcome of this study will help when constructing virtual characters in different scenarios, especially when the goal is to make them as trustworthy as possible. The study also gives insight into tools and software that can be used when creating virtual characters and setting up scenarios of trust.

  • 34. Blythe, Mark
    et al.
    Andersen, Kristina
    Clarke, Rachel
    Wright, Peter
    Anti-Solutionist Strategies: Seriously Silly Design Fiction2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI '16), New York, USA: ACM Press, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much of the academic and commercial work that seeks toinnovate around technology has been dismissed as“solutionist” because it solves problems that don’t exist orignores the complexity of personal, political andenvironmental issues. This paper traces the “solutionism”critique to its origins in city planning and highlights theoriginal concern with imaging and representation in thedesign process. It is increasingly cheap and easy to createcompelling and seductive images of concept designs, whichsell solutions and presume problems. We consider a rangeof strategies, which explicitly reject the search for“solutions”. These include design fiction and critical designbut also less well-known techniques, which aim forunuseless, questionable and silly designs. We present twoexamples of “magic machine” workshops whereparticipants are encouraged to reject realistic premises forpossible technological interventions and create absurdpropositions from lo-fi materials. We argue that suchpractices may help researchers resist the impulse towardssolutionism and suggest that attention to representationduring the ideation process is a key strategy for this.

  • 35.
    Bohné, Ulrica
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Exploring the intersection of design, reflection and sustainable food shopping practices: The case of the EcoPanel2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Food production has been shown to have considerable negative impacts on the environment. A means to reduce this is to choose organic products when shopping for food.

    Through the case of the EcoPanel, a web application prototype that visualises the organic proportion of the household’s food shopping, the thesis explores the intersection between design, reflection and sustainable food shopping practices.

    In order to contextualise the role of the EcoPanel, the text discusses the concept of food shopping practice, both from the perspective of social practice theory (SPT), and the more focused food choice perspective. The studies show that it is fundamental to understand the complexity of choosing food, and the habitual aspect of practice, in order to understand the role of reflection in food shopping practice, and consequently the role of a tool for reflective decision-making, like the EcoPanel.

    We have used a research through design approach to develop the EcoPanel prototype. In an iterative process we probed how the EcoPanel could be designed to be as relevant and accessible for the users as possible. Essential in the process were the iterative user feedback sessions. The way in which the users answered the questions from the sessions formed the guiding principles for the development of the design.

    A central question in the thesis is to explore in what ways the users’ access to their individual sustainable grocery data provided by the EcoPanel affects their food shopping practices. The studies include monitoring sixty-five users of the EcoPanel over five months, a survey regarding aspects of lifestyle and attitudes to food, and interviews with ten of the users.

    The long-term study shows an increased organic purchase level (17%) for the EcoPanel users in comparison to the reference group. We also see that when the users receive feedback on their organic food purchases through the EcoPanel, they can make more reflective decisions. This is shown to be highly relevant and creates meaning for the users in several different ways. From this result, in combination with the result of the long-term study, we can conclude that the EcoPanel contributes with support for more sustainable food practices.

    The last question in the thesis is to understand how SPT can be useful for design practice. SPT shows a view that goes beyond the traditional interaction perspective, and points to the importance of approaching complex issues, such as sustainability challenges, with an awareness that also includes social and cultural aspects of the context. As well as this view being pertinent when approaching sustainability issues, it also provides value to designers in their emerging roles of dealing with more socially embedded concerns, such as social innovation and design for public policies.

  • 36.
    Bohné, Ulrica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Zapico, Jorge Luis
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    The EcoPanel: Designing for reflection on greener grocery shopping practices2015In: PROCEEDINGS OF ENVIROINFO AND ICT FOR SUSTAINABILITY 2015, Atlantis Press , 2015, 221-228 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the purchases of organic food are increasing rapidly, it accounts for only a small fraction of the total consumption, and there is still a big gap between consumer values awareness and the actual consumption. This article explores how detailed personal feedback could help the households to gain insight and reflect on their consumption, the text presents the design process of developing a prototype, the EcoPanel, in collaboration with a major player on the food retail market. Based on the access to detailed tracking of purchase data, the aim of the design was to provide relevant feedback to facilitate for reflection on the user's own food choices. The design prototype is intended to serve as an instrument for insight and reflection and to bring unconscious aspects of grocery shopping to conscious awareness. Following a research through design approach, this article describes the interdependent steps in designing the EcoPanel and design decisions playing a role for users' critical reflection of their food choice practices. It discusses the intention of each module in providing insight. Finally, we discuss how a social practice perspective may be useful for identifying fruitful future research into the design for more sustainable grocery shopping practices

  • 37. Bostan, I.
    et al.
    Buruk, O. T.
    Canat, Mert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Tezcan, M. O.
    Yurdakul, C.
    Göksun, T.
    Özcan, O.
    Hands as a controller: User preferences for hand specific on-skin gestures2017In: DIS 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, 1123-1134 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hand-specific on-skin (HSoS) gestures are a trending interaction modality yet there is a gap in the field regarding users' preferences about these gestures. Thus, we conducted a user-elicitation study collecting 957 gestures from 19 participants for 26 commands. Results indicate that (1) users use one hand as a reference object, (2) load different meanings to different parts of the hand, (3) give importance to hand-properties rather than the skin properties and (4) hands can turn into self-interfaces. Moreover, according to users' subjective evaluations, (5) exclusive gestures are less tiring than the intuitive ones. We present users' subjective evaluations regarding these and present a 33-element taxonomy to categorize them. Furthermore, we present two user-defined gesture sets; the intuitive set including users' first choices and natural-feeling gestures, and the exclusive set which includes more creative gestures indigenous to this modality. Our findings can inspire and guide designers and developers of HSoS.

  • 38.
    Bradley, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Software and Computer Systems, SCS.
    Collaboration between people for sustainability in the ICT society2007In: Human Interface and the Management of Information: Interacting in Information Environments, Pt 2, Proceedings / [ed] Smith, MJ; Salvendy, G, BERLIN: SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN , 2007, Vol. 4558, 703-712 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the present Net Work Period of the IT history deep changes are taken place in collaboration between people and human communication, its structure, quantity, and quality. A dominating steering factor for the design and structure of work life as well as private life is the convergence of three technologies, computer technology, tele technology and media technology (ICT). Telecommunication technology has come to play a more a more dominant role in this convergence, especially internet and web technology. Embedded (ubiquitous) computer technology is making the process invisible, and media technology converges within itself (multimedia or cross media). Well functioning organizational and psychosocial communication are an important prerequisite for successful industrial and social change in the ICT society. Managing and working in an organization organized as a network, involves communication between people, groups, units, other organisations, and various combinations of these entities. ICT applications together with deep knowledge and insights in organisational design and management (ODAM) are the keys to social change. The author describes her convergence theory on ICT and Psychosocial Life Environment with special emphasis on psychosocial communication and sustainability in the Net Era of the ICT society.

  • 39.
    Bratt, Jesper
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Designing an interactive handlebar infotainment system for light vehicles2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis studies what the crucial aspects are when designing and developing an in-vehicle infotainment system for light vehicles that should both extend functionality and improve safety. In order to ground the research, innovations made in automotive infotainment systems are examined and a design for a light vehicle infotainment system that utilizes optical gesture based touch interaction is proposed. This is done with the goal to provide drivers of light vehicles with the same safety and usability improvements that drivers of cars can enjoy. A research through design approach together with heuristics and cognitive walkthrough enabled rapid design iterations to be made in order to produce a prototype to be tested. In the end, a design proposal was presented which showed that there are several similar ways of thinking that can be applied to light vehicle infotainment designs compared to its automotive counterparts. During the design process, the importance of a simple menu; animations to convey spatial connections; and notifications to lower the overall visual clutter were identified as key aspects of a safe and usable infotainment system. 

  • 40.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    SMC Sweden 2014: Sound and Music Computing: Bridging science, art, and industry2014Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Real-time visualization of musical expression2004In: Proceedings of Network of Excellence HUMAINE Workshop "From Signals to Signs of Emotion and Vice Versa", Santorini, Greece, Institute of Communication and Computer Systems, National Technical University of Athens, 2004, 19-23 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A system for real-time feedback of expressive music performance is presented.The feedback is provided by using a graphical interface where acoustic cues arepresented in an intuitive fashion. The graphical interface presents on the computerscreen a three-dimensional object with continuously changing shape, size,position, and colour. Some of the acoustic cues were associated with the shape ofthe object, others with its position. For instance, articulation was associated withshape, staccato corresponded to an angular shape and legato to a rounded shape.The emotional expression resulting from the combination of cues was mapped interms of the colour of the object (e.g., sadness/blue). To determine which colourswere most suitable for respective emotion, a test was run. Subjects rated how welleach of 8 colours corresponds to each of 12 music performances expressingdifferent emotions.

  • 42.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    What is the color of that music performance?2005In: Proceedings of the International Computer Music Conference - ICMC 2005, Barcelona, 2005, 367-370 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The representation of expressivity in music is still a fairlyunexplored field. Alternative ways of representing musicalinformation are necessary when providing feedback onemotion expression in music such as in real-time tools formusic education, or in the display of large music databases.One possible solution could be a graphical non-verbal representationof expressivity in music performance using coloras index of emotion. To determine which colors aremost suitable for an emotional expression, a test was run.Subjects rated how well each of 8 colors and their 3 nuancescorresponds to each of 12 music performances expressingdifferent emotions. Performances were playedby professional musicians with 3 instruments, saxophone,guitar, and piano. Results show that subjects associateddifferent hues to different emotions. Also, dark colorswere associated to music in minor tonality and light colorsto music in major tonality. Correspondence betweenspectrum energy and color hue are preliminary discussed.

  • 43.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Askenfelt, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Friberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Ternström, Sten
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Sound and Music Computing at KTH2012In: Trita-TMH, ISSN 1104-5787, Vol. 52, no 1, 33-35 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The SMC Sound and Music Computing group at KTH (formerly the Music Acoustics group) is part of the Department of Speech Music and Hearing, School of Computer Science and Communication. In this short report we present the current status of the group mainly focusing on its research.

  • 44.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    de Witt, Anna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Papetti, Stefano
    University of Verona.
    Civolani, Marco
    University of Verona.
    Fontana, Federico
    University of Verona.
    Expressive sonification of footstep sounds2010In: Proceedings of ISon 2010: 3rd Interactive Sonification Workshop / [ed] Bresin, Roberto; Hermann, Thomas; Hunt, Andy, Stockholm, Sweden: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2010, 51-54 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we present the evaluation of a model for the interactive sonification of footsteps. The sonification is achieved by means of specially designed sensored-shoes which control the expressive parameters of novel sound synthesis models capable of reproducing continuous auditory feedback for walking. In a previousstudy, sounds corresponding to different grounds were associated to different emotions and gender. In this study, we used an interactive sonification actuated by the sensored-shoes for providing auditory feedback to walkers. In an experiment we asked subjects to walk (using the sensored-shoes) with four different emotional intentions (happy, sad, aggressive, tender) and for each emotion we manipulated the ground texture sound four times (wood panels, linoleum, muddy ground, and iced snow). Preliminary results show that walkers used a more active walking style (faster pace) when the sound of the walking surface was characterized by an higher spectral centroid (e.g. iced snow), and a less active style (slower pace) when the spectral centroid was low (e.g. muddy ground). Harder texture sounds lead to more aggressive walking patters while softer ones to more tender and sad walking styles.

  • 45.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Delle Monache, Stefano
    University of Verona.
    Fontana, Federico
    University of Verona.
    Papetti, Stefano
    University of Verona.
    Polotti, Pietro
    University of Verona.
    Visell, Yon
    McGill University.
    Auditory feedback through continuous control of crumpling sound synthesis2008In: Proceedings of Sonic Interaction Design: Sound, Information and Experience. A CHI 2008 Workshop organized by COST Action IC0601, IUAV University of Venice , 2008, 23-28 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A realtime model for the synthesis of crumpling sounds ispresented. By capturing the statistics of short sonic transients which give rise to crackling noise, it allows for a consistent description of a broad spectrum of audible physical processes which emerge in several everyday interaction contexts.The model drives a nonlinear impactor that sonifies every transient, and it can be parameterized depending on the physical attributes of the crumpling material. Three different scenarios are described, respectively simulating the foot interaction with aggregate ground materials, augmenting a dining scenario, and affecting the emotional content of a footstep sequence. Taken altogether, they emphasize the potential generalizability of the model to situations in which a precise control of auditory feedback can significantly increase the enactivity and ecological validity of an interface.

  • 46.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Månsson, Lisa
    Tardat, Bruno
    Musikcyklarna/Music bikes: An installation for enabling children to investigate the relationship between expressive music performance and body motion2014In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Sweden Conference 2014, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2014, 1-2 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Friberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Emotion rendering in music: Range and characteristic values of seven musical variables2011In: Cortex, ISSN 0010-9452, Vol. 47, no 9, 1068-1081 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many studies on the synthesis of emotional expression in music performance have focused on the effect of individual performance variables on perceived emotional quality by making a systematical variation of variables. However, most of the studies have used a predetermined small number of levels for each variable, and the selection of these levels has often been done arbitrarily. The main aim of this research work is to improve upon existing methodologies by taking a synthesis approach. In a production experiment, 20 performers were asked to manipulate values of 7 musical variables simultaneously (tempo, sound level, articulation, phrasing, register, timbre, and attack speed) for communicating 5 different emotional expressions (neutral, happy, scary, peaceful, sad) for each of 4 scores. The scores were compositions communicating four different emotions (happiness, sadness, fear, calmness). Emotional expressions and music scores were presented in combination and in random order for each performer for a total of 5 x 4 stimuli. The experiment allowed for a systematic investigation of the interaction between emotion of each score and intended expressed emotions by performers. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), repeated measures, with factors emotion and score was conducted on the participants' values separately for each of the seven musical factors. There are two main results. The first one is that musical variables were manipulated in the same direction as reported in previous research on emotional expressive music performance. The second one is the identification for each of the five emotions the mean values and ranges of the five musical variables tempo, sound level, articulation, register, and instrument. These values resulted to be independent from the particular score and its emotion. The results presented in this study therefore allow for both the design and control of emotionally expressive computerized musical stimuli that are more ecologically valid than stimuli without performance variations.

  • 48.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Friberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Evaluation of computer systems for expressive music performance2013In: Guide to Computing for Expressive Music Performance / [ed] Kirke, Alexis; Miranda, Eduardo R., Springer, 2013, 181-203 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we review and summarize different methods for the evaluation of CSEMPs. The main categories of evaluation methods are (1) comparisons with measurements from real performances, (2) listening experiments, and (3) production experiments. Listening experiments can be of different types. For example, in some experiments, subjects may be asked to rate a particular expressive characteristic (such as the emotion conveyed or the overall expression) or to rate the effect of a particular acoustic cue. In production experiments, subjects actively manipulate system parameters to achieve a target performance. Measures for estimating the difference between performances are discussed in relation to the objectives of the model and the objectives of the evaluation. There will be also a section with a presentation and discussion of the Rencon (Performance Rendering Contest). Rencon is a contest for comparing the expressive musical performances of the same score generated by different CSEMPs. Practical examples from previous works are presented, commented on, and analysed.

  • 49.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Friberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Influence of Acoustic Cues on the Expressive Performance of Music2008In: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, Sapporo, Japan, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Karjalainen, Matti
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Mäki-Patola, Teemu
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Kanerva, Aki
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Huovilainen, Antti
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Jordá, Sergi
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Kaltenbrunner, Martin
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Geiger, Günter
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Bencina, Ross
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    de Götzen, Amalia
    University of Padua.
    Rocchesso, Davide
    IUAV University of Venice.
    Controlling sound production2008In: Sound to Sense, Sense to Sound: A state of the art in Sound and Music Computing / [ed] Polotti, Pietro; Rocchesso, Davide, Berlin: Logos Verlag , 2008, 447-486 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 581
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