Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 936
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Aagah, Orod
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Aryannejad, Siavash
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Dynamic analysis of soil-steel composite railway bridges: FE-modeling in Plaxis2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A soil-steel composite bridge is a structure comprised of corrugated steel plates, which are joined with bolted connections, enclosed in friction soil material on both sides and on the top. The surrounding friction soil material, or backfill, is applied in sequential steps, each step involving compaction of the soil, which is a necessity for the construction to accumulate the required bearing capacity. Soil-steel composite bridges are an attractive option as compared with other more customary bridge types, owing to the lower construction time and building cost involved. This is particularly true in cases where gaps in the form of minor watercourses, roads or railways must be bridged.

    The objective of this master thesis is the modelling of an existing soil-steel composite railway bridge in Märsta, Sweden with the finite element software Plaxis. A 3D model is created and calibrated for crown deflection against measurement data collected by the Division of Structural Engineering and Bridges of the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, Sweden.

    Once the 3D model is calibrated for deflection, two 2D models with different properties are created in much the same way. In model 1, the full axle load is used and the soil stiffness varied, and in model 2 the soil stiffness acquired in the 3D model is used and the external load varied. The results are compared to measurement data. In 2D model 1 an efficient width of 1,46 m for the soil stiffness is used in combination with the full axle load, and in 2D model 2 an efficient width of 2,85 m is used for the external load, in combination with the soil stiffness acquired in the 3D model.

    Aside from this, parametric studies are performed in order to analyse the effect of certain input parameters upon output results, and in order to analyse influence line lengths.

    Recreating the accelerations and stresses in the existing bridge using finite element models is complicated, and the results reflect this. Below are shown the discrepancies between model results and measurement data for the pipe crown. The scatter in the measurement data has not been taken into consideration for this; these specific numbers are valid only for one particular train passage.

    For crown deflection, the 3D model shows a discrepancy of 4%, 2D model 1 5% and 2D model 2 8% compared with measurement data. For crown acceleration, in the same order, the discrepancy with measurements is 1%, 71% and 21% for maximum acceleration, and 46%, 35% and 28% for minimum acceleration. For maximum crown tensile stress, the discrepancy is 95%, 263% and 13%. For maximum crown compressive stress, the discrepancy is 70%, 16% and 46%.

  • 2.
    Abbasiverki, Roghayeh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Analysis of underground concrete pipelines subjected to seismic high-frequency loads2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Buried pipelines are tubular structures that are used for transportation of important liquid materials and gas in order to provide safety for human life. During an earthquake, imposed loads from soil deformations on concrete pipelines may cause severe damages, possibly causing disturbance in vital systems, such as cooling of nuclear power facilities. The high level of safety has caused a demand for reliable seismic analyses, also for structures built in the regions that have not traditionally been considered as highly seismically active. The focus in this study is on areas with seismic and geological conditions corresponding to those in Sweden and Northern Europe. Earthquakes in Sweden for regions with hard rock dominated by high-frequency ground vibrations, Propagation of such high-frequency waves through the rock mass and soil medium affect underground structures such as pipelines.

    The aim of this project is investigating parameters that affect response of buried pipelines due to high-frequency seismic excitations. The main focus of the study is on reinforced concrete pipelines. Steel pipelines are also studied for comparison purposes. The effects of water mass, burial depth, soil layer thickness and non-uniform ground thickness caused by inclined bedrock are studied. The results are compared to those obtained for low-frequency earthquakes and the relationship between strong ground motion parameters and pipelines response is investigated. It is shown that, especially for high frequency earthquake excitations, non-uniform ground thickness due to inclined bedrock significantly increase stresses in the pipelines. For the conditions studied, it is clear that high-frequency seismic excitation is less likely to cause damage to buried concrete pipelines. However, the main conclusion is that seismic analysis is motivated also for pipelines in high-frequency earthquake areas since local variation in the ground conditions can have a significant effect on the safety.

  • 3.
    Abbasiverki, Roghayeh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Ansell, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Analysis of buried reinforced concrete pipelines subjected to seismic waves2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Abbasiverki, Roghayeh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Ansell, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Larsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Seismic response of buried concrete pipelines subjected to highfrequency earthquakesIn: Geotechnical and Geological Engineering, ISSN 0960-3182, E-ISSN 1573-1529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Buried pipelines are tubular structures that cross large areas with different geological conditions. During an earthquake, imposed loads from soil deformations on concrete pipelines may cause severe damages. In this study, the use of two-dimensional finite element models of pipelines and surrounding soil for simulation of seismic waves that propagate from the bedrock through the soil are demonstrated. The models describe both longitudinal and transverse cross-sections of pipelines and the soil-pipe interaction is modelled as a nonlinear behaviour. The effects of uniform ground with different burial depths, soil layer thickness, soil stiffness and bedrock geometry on the seismic response of reinforced concrete pipelines is studied. Two earthquakes, with high and low frequency contents, are employed for the dynamic analysis. The results show that there is a much smaller risk of damage from high-frequency earthquakes, but that there is a significant effect on the response due to possible irregular ground with inclined bedrock.

  • 5.
    Abbasiverki, Roghayeh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Ansell, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Malm, Richard
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Analysis of shallowly buried reinforced concrete pipelines subjected to earthquake loads2014In: Nordic Concrete Research, ISSN 0800-6377, no 51, 111-130 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Buried reinforced concrete pipelines are widelyused in e.g. water and wastewater systems. Failure of these infrastructures mayresult in drastic effects and recently they have been brought into focus asvital components in safety systems for nuclear power installations. The highlevel of safety has here lead to a demand for reliable earthquake risk analyses.In this paper, methods are compared and the use of seismic design loadsdemonstrated. FE analysis in 2D of soil-pipe interaction under seismic wavepropagation is performed. The performance of concrete pipes subjected toseismic waves with different frequency content is evaluated with respect todifferent soil condition but also water mass effect.

  • 6. Abd-Alla, E. S. M .
    et al.
    Moriyoshi, A.
    Partl, Manfred
    EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research.
    Takahashi, K.
    Kondo, T.
    Tomoto, T.
    New wheel tracking test to analyze movements of aggregates in multi-layered asphalt specimens2006In: Journal of the Japan Petroleum Institute, ISSN 1346-8804, Vol. 49, no 5, 274-279 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a new wheel tracking test for analyzing movements of aggregates in mixtures. The test device is conducted using as examples four-layered specimens taken from two Swiss national motorways, where severe rutting (G section) and longitudinal cracking (H section) were observed. This test method was developed by Moriyoshi. Tests can be carried out under temperature distributions similar to field situation. Two-dimensional movements and strains between aggregates for four-layered specimens due to the moving wheel loads were analyzed by right angle for direction of wheel pass. For this purpose, the cross section of the slabs with a width of 30 cm was divided optically into 5 vertical subsections. The transverse permanent surface deformations, the area changes in the transversal subsections as well as the maximum deformation of the surface and layer-interface through the centerline of the applied wheel load were determined. Strain distributions between aggregates in mixtures at high temperature (45 degrees C) under 600 passes were also measured by photo analysis. Test results show consolidation of the asphalt mixtures and material flow on the surface near the wheel load. The results also demonstrate that the aggregates (size of aggregate: 2 mm or larger) in each mixture move mainly in vertical direction. Large strains (40% or larger) between aggregates at summer condition were measured in the surface mixture near wheel track after 600 passes.

  • 7.
    Abdi, Adel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Lind, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Birgisson, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Designing appropriate contracts for achieving efficient winter road and railway maintenance with high performance quality: A survey of the state of practice in Sweden2014In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 6, no 4, 399-415 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - For a long time, the winter maintenance of the Swedish road and railway network had been performed in-house by Swedish Transport Administration, Swedish local authorities i.e. municipalities and Stockholm public transport. During the last 15 years the winter operation and maintenance of these state infrastructures have been performed by public procurement and contracting from independent contractors, where in practice the lowest price is the dominating selection criteria. The aim of this paper is to investigate and identify how these contracts are designed and how satisfied the parties are with the contract and the quality of the performed work during the winter and point our directions for improvement. Design/methodology/approach - The study was conducted by a literature review and followed by semi-structured interviews and electronic questionnaire. Findings - The results of the study which are based on the interviews and the online questionnaire show that there is widespread dissatisfaction with the contracts among both clients and contractors. Practical implications - The article prepares a basis showing how a contract affects the quality of the performed winter road and railway maintenance services. Originality/value - The findings lead to a number of suggestions about how to improve the contracts, e.g. having a separate winter maintenance contract to increase the quality of performed winter maintenance measures, a more partnering-like structure where consultations and adjustment can be made during the contract period. A partnering structure also makes it less important to get all the details right in the contract.

  • 8.
    Abdulrahman, Keiwan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Potrus, Fadi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Numerical analysis and model updating of a steel-concrete composite bridge: Parametric study & Statistical evaluation2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the year 2006, only 10 years after the steel- concrete composite bridge, Vårby bridge was built, fatigue cracks were found during an inspection. To further investigate the reasons and the potential danger of the cracks, an investigation under the commission of the Swedish Transport Administration was issued in 2009. After the detection of fatigue cracks, several measurements were carried out in order to monitor the static behavior by the use of strain gauges at selected positions along the bridge. The measurements from the strain gauges monitoring the global behavior were then used to calibrate an finite element model.

     

    The present report is part of the research of understanding the behavior of steel-concrete composite bridges. Numerical analysis and model updating have been used in order to understand and determine how different parameters affects the strain range and the global behavior. The numerical analysis and parameter study were performed in the Finite Element software Abaqus and programming language Python. The outcome of the parameter study was then used to perform the model updating by the method of falsification in MATLAB.

     

    The results from the parameter study and the model updating showed that the measured strains could be reached with a wide range of parameter combinations. Even with unreasonable parameter values, the measured strains were obtained. To investigate the reason for this, a multiple linear regression analysis was performed which showed that the strain range is strongly correlated to the Young’s modulus of steel and concrete and also to the connector elasticity, which resembles the studs in the real bridge.

     

    Two different finite element models, with two completely different input parameter values, obtain the same strain range for the global behavior. It is therefore not certain to assume that a model is accurate and valid based on the fact that the predicted strain range from the finite element model is close to the measured strain range since the global behavior of a steel- concrete composite bridge can be modeled by many different sets of parameters.

  • 9.
    Acar, Yalda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Jingstål, Pontus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Influence of the Non-linear Effects in the Design of Viscous Dampers for Bridge Cables2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this master thesis the performance of external viscous dampers attached to cables in cable-stayed bridges have been studied. A comparison has been performed between a linear and a non-linear cable model. The comparison was carried out for two bridge cables, one from the Dubrovnik Bridge and the other from the Normandie Bridge. The performance of the dampers have been measured in terms of maximum achieved damping ratio and minimum amplitude of vibration.

    The analysis was performed using the finite element method. The damping ratio was measured using both the half-power bandwidth method and by calculating the loss factor. The half-power bandwidth method can only be applied to a linear system. Therefore, the loss factor was evaluated for the linear model and compared to the results obtained using the half-power bandwidth method. From the comparison, it was concluded that the damping ratio evaluated using the loss factor was similar to the results obtained when using the half-power bandwidth method. However, when calculating the loss factor, it was of great importance that the resonance frequency of the system was accurately determined. The loss factor was then calculated for the non-linear model and compared to the results obtained for the linear model. Since the loss factor measures the energy dissipated in a system, it could be utilised for the non-linear model. When computing the strain energy for the non-linear model an approximate method was used to take into consideration the strain energy caused by the static deformation of the cable.

    From the comparison between the linear and non-linear cable models, it was concluded that the optimal damper coefficients obtained by both models are not significantly different. However, there is an uncertainty in the results due to the fact that an approximate method was used when calculating the strain energy for the nonlinear model. It was also observed that a very accurate evaluation of the system’s resonance frequency was needed to calculate the loss factor. It was also observed that the variation in amplitude of vibration for varying damper coefficient was small for all modes of vibration for the Dubrovnik Bridge Cable as well as for the first mode of vibration for the Normandie Bridge Cable. The difference in the results between the two bridge cables needs to be investigated further in order to get a better understanding of the results.

  • 10. Adler, J
    et al.
    Bergholm, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Highway and Railway Engineering (closed 20110301).
    Pagakis, S
    Parmryd, I
    Noise and colocalization in fluorescence microscopy: solving a problem2008In: Microscopy and Microanalysis, ISSN 1431-9276, E-ISSN 1435-8115, Vol. 22, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ahmed, Abubeker Worake
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Mechanistic-Empirical Modelling of Flexible Pavement Performance: Verifications Using APT Measurements2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanistic-Empirical  (M-E)  pavement  design  procedures  are  composed  of  a  reliable  response model to estimate the state of stress in the pavement and distress models in order to predict the different types of pavement distresses due to the prevailing traffic and environmental conditions. One of the main objectives of this study was to develop a response model based on multilayer elastic  theory   (MLET)  with  improved  computational  performance  by   optimizing  the   time consuming parts of the MLET processes. A comprehensive comparison of the developed program with  two  widely  used  programs  demonstrated  excellent  agreement  and  improved  computational performance.  Moreover,  the  program  was  extended  to  incorporate  the  viscoelastic  behaviour  of bituminous materials through elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle. A procedure based on collocation of linear viscoelastic (LVE) solutions at selected key time durations was also proposed that improved the computational performance for LVE analysis of stationary and moving loads. A comparison  of  the  LVE  responses  with  measurements  from  accelerated  pavement  testing  (APT) revealed a good agreement. Furthermore the developed response model was employed to evaluate permanent deformation models  for  bound  and  unbound  granular  materials  (UGMs)  using  full  scale  APTs.  The  M-E Pavement  Design  Guide  (MEPDG)  model  for  UGMs  and  two  relatively  new  models  were evaluated  to  model  the  permanent  deformation  in  UGMs.  Moreover,  for  bound  materials,  the simplified  form  of  the  MEPDG  model  for  bituminous  bound  layers  was  also  evaluated.  The measured  and  predicted  permanent  deformations  were  in  general  in  good  agreement,  with  only small discrepancies between the models. Finally, as heavy traffic loading is one of the main factors affecting the performance of flexible pavement, three types of characterizations for heavy traffic axle load spectrum for M-E analysis and design of pavement structures were evaluated. The study recommended an improved approach that enhanced the accuracy and computational performance. 

  • 12.
    Ahmed, Lamis
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Impact-type vibration effects on young concrete for tunnelling2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The strive for a time-efficient construction process naturally put focus on the possibility of reducing the time of waiting between stages of construction, thereby minimizing the construction cost. If recently placed concrete, cast or sprayed, is exposed to impact vibrations at an early age while still in the process of hardening, damage that threatens the function of the hard concrete may occur. A waiting time when the concrete remains undisturbed, or a safe distance to the vibration source, is therefore needed. However, there is little, or no, fully proven knowledge of the length of this distance or time and there are no established guidelines for practical use. Therefore, conservative vibration limits are used for young and hardening concrete exposed to vibrations from e.g. blasting.

    As a first step in the dynamic analysis of a structure, the dynamic loads should always be identified and characterized. Here it is concluded that impact-type loads are the most dangerous of possible dynamic loads on young and hardening concrete. Shotcrete (sprayed concrete) on hard rock exposed to blasting and cast laboratory specimens subjected to direct mechanical impact loads have been investigated using finite element models based on the same analysis principles. Stress wave propagation is described in the same way whether it is through hard rock towards a shotcrete lining or through an element of young concrete.

    Within this project, work on evaluating and proposing analytical models are made in several steps, first with a focus on describing the behaviour of shotcrete on hard rock. It is demonstrated that wave propagation through rock towards shotcrete can be described using two-dimensional elastic finite element models in a dynamic analysis. The models must include the material properties of the rock and the accuracy of these parameters will greatly affect the results. It is possible to follow the propagation of stress waves through the rock mass, from the centre of blasting to the reflection at the shotcrete-rock interface. It is acceptable to use elastic material formulations until the strains are outside the elastic range, which thus indicates imminent material failure. Comparisons are made between numerical results and measurements from experiments in mining tunnels with ejected rock mass and shotcrete bond failure, and with measurements made during blasting for tunnel construction where rock and shotcrete remained intact. The calculated results are in good correspondence with the in situ observations and measurements, and with previous numerical modelling results. Examples of preliminary recommendations for practical use are given and it is demonstrated how the developed models and suggested analytical technique can be used for further detailed investigations.

  • 13.
    Ahmed, Lamis
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Laboratorieprovningar av stötbelastade betongprismor vid tidig ålder2015In: Tidskriften Betong, ISSN 1101-9190, no 5, 51-54 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Ahmed, Lamis
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Models for analysis of shotcrete on rock exposed to blasting2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In underground construction and tunnelling, the strive for a more time-efficient construction process naturally focuses on the possibilities of reducing the times of waiting between stages of construction. The ability to project shotcrete (sprayed concrete) on a rock surface at an early stage after blasting is vital to the safety during construction and function of e.g. a tunnel. A complication arises when the need for further blasting affects the hardening of newly applied shotcrete. If concrete, cast or sprayed, is exposed to vibrations at an early age while still in the process of hardening, damage that threatens the function of the hard concrete may occur. There is little, or no, established knowledge on the subject and there are no guidelines for practical use.

    It is concluded from previous investigations that shotcrete can withstand high particle velocity vibrations without being seriously damaged. Shotcrete without reinforcement can survive vibration levels as high as 0.5−1 m/s while sections with loss of bond and ejected rock will occur for vibration velocities higher than 1 m/s. The performance of young and hardened shotcrete exposed to high magnitudes of vibration is here investigated to identify safe distances and shotcrete ages for underground and tunnelling construction, using numerical analyses and comparison with measurements and observations. The work focuses on finding correlations between numerical results, measurement results and observations obtained during tunnelling. The outcome will be guidelines for practical use.

    The project involves development of sophisticated dynamic finite element models for which the collected information and data will be used as input, accomplished by using the finite ele­ment program Abaqus. The models were evaluated and refined through comparisons between calculated and measured data. First, existing simple engineering models were compared and evaluated through calculations and comparisons with existing data. The first model tested is a structural dynamic model that consists of masses and spring elements. The second is a model built up with finite beam elements interconnected with springs. The third is a one-dimensional elastic stress wave model. The stress response in the shotcrete closest to the rock when exposed to P-waves striking perpendicularly to the shotcrete-rock interface was simulated. Results from a non-destructive laboratory experiment were also used to provide test data for the models. The experiment studied P-wave propagation along a concrete bar, with proper­ties similar to rock. Cement based mortar with properties that resembles shotcrete was applied on one end of the bar with a hammer impacting the other. The shape of the stress waves travelling towards the shotcrete was registered using accelerometers positioned along the bar.

    Due to the inhomogeneous nature of the rock, the stress waves from the blasting attenuate on the way from the point of explosion towards the shotcrete on the rock surface. Material damping for the rock mass is therefore accounted for, estimated from previous in-situ measurements. The vibration resistance of the shotcrete-rock support system depends on the material properties of the shotcrete and here were age-dependent properties varied to investigate the behaviour of young shotcrete subjected to blast loading. The numerical simulations require insertion of realistic material data for shotcrete and rock, such as density and modulus of elasticity.

    The calculated results were in good correspondence with observations and measurements in-situ, and with the previous numerical modelling results. Compared to the engineering models, using a sophisticated finite element program facilitate modelling of more complex geometries and also provide more detailed results. It was demonstrated that wave propagation through rock towards shotcrete can be modelled using two dimensional elastic finite elements in a dynamic analysis. The models must include the properties of the rock and the accuracy of the material parameters used will greatly affect the results. It will be possible to describe the propagation of the waves through the rock mass, from the centre of the explosion to the reflection at the shotcrete-rock interface. It is acceptable to use elastic material formulations until the material strengths are exceeded, i.e. until the strains are outside the elastic range, which thus indicates material failure. The higher complexity of this type of model, compared to the engineering models, will make it possible to model more sophisticated geometries. Examples of preliminary recommendations for practical use are given and it is demonstrated how the developed models and suggested analytical technique can be used to obtain further detailed limit values.

  • 15.
    Ahmed, Lamis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Ansell, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    A comparison of models for shotcrete in dynamically loaded rock tunnels2010In: Shotcrete: Elements of a system / [ed] E. Stefan Bernard, Taylor & Francis Group, 2010, 1-10 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During blasting in tunnels and mines, the shotcrete-rock interaction is influenced by propagating stress waves. Shotcrete support in hard rock tunnels is here studied through numerical analysis and comparisons with previous numerical results, measurements and observations in situ. The stress response in the shotcrete closest to the rock when exposed to P-waves striking perpendicularly to the shotcrete-rock interface is simulated. The first model tested is an elastic stress wave model, which is onedimensional with the shotcrete assumed linearly elastic. The second is a structural dynamic model that consists of masses and spring elements. The third model is a finite element model implemented using the Abaqus/Explicit program. Two methods are used for the application of incident disturbing stress waves: as boundary conditions and as inertia loads. Results from these three types of models are compared and evaluated as a first step before a future extension to more detailed analyses using 3D models.

  • 16.
    Ahmed, Lamis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Ansell, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Behaviour of sprayed concrete on hard rock exposed to vibration from blasting operations2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Ahmed, Lamis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Ansell, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Direct shear strength of high-strength fibre concrete2010In: Magazine of Concrete Research, ISSN 0024-9831, Vol. 62, no 5, 379-390 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An experimental and theoretical study of the shear behaviour of steel-fibre-reinforced concrete is presented. Twenty-seven direct shear push-off tests were carried out on high-strength concrete, with and without steel fibre reinforcement. The test series contained uncracked and precracked specimens for the study of the slipping response and the shear stress that can be transferred across an open crack. The test variables were the fibre content and the reinforcement ratio. The test results were compared with information provided by the available codes and other, previous results. The test results indicated that incorporation of steel fibres and bars in concrete members subjected to shear leads to an improved mechanical behaviour before failure. Based on the presented experimental results, an equation governing the direct shear strength is proposed and verified against test results from other test series.

  • 18.
    Ahmed, Lamis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Ansell, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Experimental and numerical investigation of stress wave propagation in shotcrete2011In: Nordic concrete research: Research projects 2011 / [ed] D.H. Bager, 2011, 59-62 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Ahmed, Lamis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Ansell, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Laboratory investigation of stress waves in young shotcrete on rock2012In: Magazine of Concrete Research, ISSN 0024-9831, Vol. 64, no 10, 899-908 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To study the behaviour of shotcrete under dynamic load, a non-destructive laboratory experiment was set up with P-wave propagation along a concrete bar, with properties similar to rock. Cement-based mortar with properties that resemble shotcrete was applied to one end of the bar with a hammer impacting the other. The shape of the stress waves travelling towards the shotcrete was registered using accelerometers positioned along the bar. Finite-element modelling was used to verify the test results, which showed that the laboratory model with an impacting hammer could be used to initiate the same type of stress waves that result from blasting in good-quality rock. Previously recommended maximum allowed peak particle vibration velocities were verified.

  • 20.
    Ahmed, Lamis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Ansell, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Structural dynamic and stress wave models for analysis of shotcrete on rock exposed to blasting2012In: Engineering structures, ISSN 0141-0296, E-ISSN 1873-7323, Vol. 35, no 1, 11-17 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During blasting in tunnels and mines, the interaction between shotcrete (sprayed concrete) and rock is influenced by propagating stress waves. Shotcrete support in hard rock tunnels is studied here through numerical analysis using three different modelling approaches. The stress response in the shotcrete closest to the rock when exposed to P-waves striking perpendicularly to the shotcrete–rock interface is simulated. The first model tested is a structural dynamic model that consists of masses and spring elements. The second is a model built up with finite element beam elements interconnected with springs. The third is a one-dimensional elastic stress wave model. The models give comparable results, although the definition of the dynamic loads is different. The analysis results can be used to estimate whether the shotcrete will fail or not for a prescribed distance to detonating explosives inside the rock.

  • 21.
    Ahmed, Lamis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Malm, Richard
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Ansell, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Finite element simulation of shotcrete exposed to underground explosions2012In: Nordic Concrete Research, ISSN 0800-6377, no 45, 59-74 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An elastic finite element model is used tosimulate theinducedstress waves from blasting, propagating in rock towards shotcrete on a tunnel wall. Due to the inhomogeneous nature of the rock, the stress wavesattenuate onitsway from the point of explosiontowardsthe shotcrete on the rock surface. Material damping for the rock-mass is estimated from in-situ measurements. The vibration resistance of the shotcrete-rock support system depends on the material properties of the shotcrete. Age-dependent material properties are varied to investigate the behaviour of young shotcrete subjected to blast loading. Finally, finite element analysis results are presented and verified through comparison with other numerical models, measurements and observations.

  • 22.
    Ahmed, Lamis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Sjölander, AndreasKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.Ansell, AndersKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Evaluation and analysis of laboratory tests of bolys-anchored, steel-fiber-reinforced shotcrete linings2017Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 23. Akulich, A
    et al.
    Isacsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Laboratorieundersökningar av åldringsegenskaper hos dränerande asfaltbetong1992Report (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Albrecht, Martin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Enabling socio-technical transitions – electric vehicles and high voltage electricity grids as focal points of low emission futures2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today humankind is facing numerous sustainability challenges that require us to question CO2 intensive practices like those present in the transport and energy sector. To meet those challenges, many countries have adopted ambitious climate targets. Achieving such targets requires an understanding of the wider socio-technical context of transitions. The aim of this licentiate thesis is therefore to analyse such socio-technical transitions towards low-emission futures enabled by the electrification of passenger cars and high voltage grid development.

    A combination of different transitions theories (for ex. Multi-level perspective and Technological innovation systems) and institutional theory has been used. To reach the aim paper I analyses the climate impacts of electric vehicles (EVs) and policy measures to achieve a breakthrough scenario for EVs. The results show that a mixture of short and long term policies are needed that take into account the technology development stage and behavioural aspects of EV adopters. Paper II addresses the need to include the high voltage transmission grid and its planning procedures as a central part of debates on transitions. Therefore the opportunities, challenges and reasons for conflict in the established regime are studied. The results show that in order to achieve a sustainable grid development regime, it is necessary to spend time on achieving legitimacy and social sustainability. The third paper uses semi-structured expert interviews and focuses on innovation dynamics for EV adoption. By focusing on dynamics instead of single policy measures, it is possible to grasp interactions within a niche, but also in between a niche, regime and landscape. The results show that strong initial technology legitimacy was needed to start substantial innovation dynamics. This could be further strengthened with a strong and broad coalition of actors. Both those factors led, if present, to an improved variety and match of policy instruments.

    As such this thesis has shown that transitions are not just about technology or policy instruments as such but about the dynamics and processes needed to enable them. This can be relevant in other transitions that otherwise may underestimate the importance of these components.

  • 25.
    Albrecht, Martin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    System innovation dynamics around electric vehicles. The cases of Norway, Denmark and Sweden.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the comparison of electric car innovation patterns in Norway, Sweden and Denmark. Doing so, it takes a closer look at what the most essential dynamics in the systems were over time and what enabled those dynamics. The main research aim is to contribute to a wider understanding of why Norway is so much ahead of Sweden and Denmark in electric car adoption. The purpose is also to adopt a perspective that goes beyond a mere focus on economic policy instruments. In order to do so different theory elements are combined in a framework. These elements stem from the transition theory literature field, especially the technological innovation system (TIS) and the multi-level perspective (MLP). This combination allows analysing the development behind a dynamic, not just when it comes to an innovation itself but also with regards to the established regime. The data is gathered through analysis of existing documents and data as well as a series of 27 expert interviews conducted in the three case countries. The findings suggest that there are important differences in transition patterns that can account for the electric vehicle (EV) diffusion situation we can find nowadays in the three Nordic countries. An important stepping stone was the need for a very strong legitimacy of the original EV vision that is also anchored in a coordinated, sector overarching coalition of actors that thinks strategically and long term. Moreover some general beneficial dynamics could be identified across the countries in question. In Norway these beneficial dynamics can be summarised as a systems motor, in Denmark as a failed entrepreneurial motor that shifted towards a constrained municipal motor and in Sweden as a loosely, coordinated and weaker version of a systems motor.

  • 26. Alemu, Belachew Yirsaw
    Expropriation, valuation and compensation practice in Ethiopia: The case of Bahir Dar city and surrounding2013In: Property Management, ISSN 0263-7472, Vol. 31, no 2, 132-158 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to examine the expropriation, valuation and compensation practice. This paper tries to investigate how the expropriation and compensation laws are implemented when privately held land and attached real properties are taken for public purpose development in Bahir Dar city and surrounding. However, further research should be undertaken nation-wide to explore the problems throughout the country. Design/methodology/approach: The paper reports the findings of a survey of expropriatees from main practices throughout Bahir Dar city and its surroundings. Findings: There is a big gap between the actual practice of expropriation, valuation and compensation and the Laws. Lack of application of standardized methods and procedures created situations of unfair valuation and compensation. Practical implications: The practical implication is that the living status of affected people before and after expropriation could be useful. Originality/value: The value of the paper for government officials, real property valuers and investors is that transparency, consistency and fair compensation are useful.

  • 27.
    Andersson, Andreas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Adaptive and semi-active vibration control of railway bridge dynamics2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Long Life Bridges is a Marie Curie 7th Framework Project funded under the Industry and Academia Partnerships and Pathways call, Grant Agreement No. 286276. The Project commenced in September 2011 and is continuing for 4 years until August 2015. The project vision is to extend the service lives of bridges through development of advanced assessment methods. The author wishes to acknowledge the financial contribution by the European Commission in supporting the project and funding this research.

    The work presented in this report has been conducted at Roughan & O’Donovan Innovative Solutions, Dublin, Ireland, during the period of January to December 2012, under supervision of Associate Professor Alan O’Connor. The author has been seconded from the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Division of Structural Engineering and Bridges.

    Within the project, experimental work to develop a prototype damper has been carried out at Trinity College Dublin (TCD), Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering. A special thank goes to Dr. Kevin Ryan and the laboratory staff at the Department for the help in manufacturing and testing the prototype damper.

    Full-scale testing has been performed on a railway bridge in Sweden. The tests were funded directly by the Swedish Transport Administration (Trafikverket). The instrumentation and field measurements were performed by KTH in collaboration with the author.

    The work presented, denoted secondment 1.1b, deals with development of adaptive and semi-active damping systems for railway bridges. The aim of the project is to develop methods for structural vibration control with applications for railway bridge dynamics. Much of the work has been related to a case study bridge.

    There is constant demand on rail authorities to increase both the allowable axle loads and the allowable speed on existing railway lines. As an example, the Swedish Transport Administration has recently investigated the possibility of upgrading part of the main lines to allow for future high-speed trains. Some lines are also being investigated with the aim of allowing ore transports with higher axle loads and longer trains. A large portion of the bridge stock was designed for significantly lower axle loads and only very few have been designed to account for dynamic effects. Increased dynamic effects may result in exceedance of dynamic design criteria, reduced service life due to fatigue, or even failure. Through better quantification of risk, it is often possible to prove that speeds can be increased with no adverse effect. However, for bridges where the level of risk is too high, a cost-effective means of reducing dynamic effects on bridges are active and semi-active control system. Semi-active control is well established in other fields and could prove to be a beneficial technique to allow train speeds to be increased.

    The concept of structural vibration control is to attenuate the dynamic response of a structure by means of an external damping device. Due to changes in either loading or structural behaviour, the properties of the damper device may need to be changed to efficiently mitigate vibrations. Two main principles of damper devices are commonly used; tuned mass dampers and shock absorbers. Tuned mass dampers consist of a suspended mass mounted on the main structure. Due to a phase-shift, the vibration of the suspended mass partly counteracts the corresponding motion of the main structure. Changing the stiffness of the suspended mass results in a variable adaptive tuned mass damper. Shock absorbers rely on producing the counteracting force by means of increased viscous damping. Devices with variable viscous damping are often categorised as semi-active. Fully active systems rely on producing the counteracting force by means of a load actuator. Adaptive and semi-active systems generally require much less energy to operate compared to fully active systems.

  • 28.
    Andersson, Andreas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Impact loading on concrete slabs: Experimental tests and numerical simulations2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this report, the load capacity of concrete slabs subjected to concentrated loads is studied, considering both the static load capacity and the response due to impact of a falling mass. The purpose of the study is to gain more knowledge on the static and dynamic behaviour of the slabs and to use that knowledge in the assessment of the load capacity of inner lining systems in tunnels. The methodology involves experimental testing of a series of slabs, validation of numerical models and simulating the response of the inner lining system.

    A total of 18 slabs were manufactured, consisting of shotcrete and reinforcement mesh. Some of the slabs also included steel fibre reinforced concrete (SRFC). The size of the slabs were 1.75×1.75×0.12 m, suspended in four hangers #1.2 m and loaded centric on an area of 0.2×0.2 m. In addition, a series of core samples and beams were cut from two of the slabs for material testing and verification of numerical models.

    From the static load tests of the slabs, the load at cracking was obtained at 50 – 60 kN with a vertical midpoint displacement of 0.6 – 1.0 mm. The ultimate load ranged from 60 – 80 kN. The slabs showed significant ductility with a peak displacement of about 70 – 80 mm at post-failure. All slabs showed a two-way flexural failure. The concrete cover was in average 30 mm, measured from the compressive side, resulting in little difference between the crack load and the ultimate load. A vertical displacement of about 1 – 2 mm was required to obtain a crack width of 0.2 mm. Three slabs with only SRFC were tested until static failure, the ultimate load ranged from 85 – 90 kN but with less ductility compared to the slabs with rebar mesh.

    Impact load tests were performed using a steel mass of 600 kg. The free fall height was varied from 1 – 2 m. The peak impact load varied from 200 – 250 kN, without any clear correlation with the height. The corresponding impulse load varied from 4.0 – 5.5 kNs with a clear correlation to the height. All slabs subjected to impact load showed a one-way flexural failure, the residual strength after impact was sufficient to carry the static load of the steel weight. Several of the slabs showed significant fallout of concrete during impact, in one extreme case a total of 16 kg. Three slabs were tested with an outer layer of 30 mm of SRFC, none of these slabs showed any significant fallout.

    The static and dynamic response of the slabs have been simulated using nonlinear FE-models. The models generally show good agreement, both for static load, crack widths and response during impact. Similar models were used to simulate the response of the inner lining system. The results indicate a significant load capacity, both due to static and impact loading. The models are however not able to account for potential punching failure.

  • 29.
    Andersson, Andreas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Load capacity assessment and strengthening of a railway arch bridge with backfill2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a load capacity assessment and strengthening measures of a multi-span railway arch bridge with backfill are presented. The bridge is located in Stockholm, Sweden, and constitute a vital link for the national railway network. The bridge consists of 20 concrete arches with overlying backfill, each with a span of 20 m. After more than 80 years of service, severe deterioration of the concrete was found during conditional assessments. A load capacity assessment was performed and the theoretical ultimate load was found to be highly dependent on the development of soil pressures along the arch barrel. The demands from the railway authority are to increase the allowable axle load from 22,5 to 25 tonnes and extend the service life by 50 years. Due to the uncertainties in structural behaviour and progressing degradation, extensive strengthening measures for the arch barrels were decided. To allow for full traffic at all times, the strengthening was performed in stages, to minimize any temporary reduction in load capacity due to removal of existing material. The strengthening was designed using non-linear finite element analysis and each stage of strengthening has been verified using in-situ field measurements.

  • 30.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Christoffer, Svedholm
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Dynamisk kontroll av järnvägsbroar, inverkan av 3D-effekter2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report present result from dynamic analyses of railway bridges for high-speed trains. A comparison of the dynamic response in 2D vs. 3D has been performed for a limited selection of slab bridges, beam bridges and box girder bridges. Each cross-section has been optimized based on the dynamic requirements for dynamics in 2D, without any consideration of the static design. In many cases, the cross-section probably needs to be increased to fulfil the static load capacity.

    Slab bridges with a span length from 10 – 25 m and 1 – 4 spans have been analysed. In several cases, mostly for shorter spans, the natural frequency for bending is lower in 3D compared to 2D. The reason is due to a smaller contributing width, owing to shear-lag. This results in a lower resonance speed and therefore often a larger dynamic response within the same speed range. Apart from that, the dynamic response is found to be similar in 3D compared to 2D. The influence of torsional does not appear to be governing the response for the studied cases.

    Using the same method, beam bridges with span length from 20 – 40 m and 1 – 4 spans have been analysed. Similar to the slab bridges, the 3D-model of the beam bridges show lower natural frequency in bending compared to the 2D-model, owing to shear-lag. For double-track bridges, the difference in response between 2D and 3D-models are similar to the findings for the slab bridges. For single-track bridges, some cases of the 3D-model shows significantly lower response without pronounced resonance peaks in the same speed interval as the 2D-model. The reason is likely a combination of the support eccentricity and the mass of the bridge, which for vertical bending results in horizontal inertia. It is shown that this can be simulated with a modified 2D-model in most cases.

    Box girder bridges with span length from 40 – 70 m in 1 – 3 spans have also been analysed. Due to the larger torsional stiffness, the torsional mode is often much higher than the first bending mode. Also, the shear-lag effect seems to be smaller and the response from the 3D-model agrees well with the corresponding 2D-model.

    In the case dynamic assessment is performed using the simplified methods according to (Svedholm & Andersson, 2016), it is suggested that the following is considered:

    • Shear-lag and the eccentricity at the supports should be considered when estimating the first natural frequency for bending, n0, preferably using a 3D-model.

    • If the first torsional mode nT < 1.2n0, a full dynamic analysis in 3D should be performed.

    • In the case a 3D-model shows several closely spaced bending modes with similar shape, a full dynamic analysis in 3D should be performed.

  • 31.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Karoumi, Raid
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Attenuating resonant behavior of a tied arch railway bridge using increased hanger damping2012In: Bridge Maintenance, Safety, Management, Resilience and Sustainability - Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Bridge Maintenance, Safety and Management, Taylor & Francis Group, 2012, 2572-2577 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, dynamic analyses and field measurements of a tied arch railway bridge is presented. Excessive vibrations of the hangers were obtained, caused by resonance during train passages. The resulting increase of the stress level and number of stress cycles were shown to decrease the fatigue service life significantly. The most critical section is a threaded turnbuckle connection of the hangers. Due to low damping of the hangers, more than 50 % of the cumulative fatigue damage was related to free vibrations after train passage. Passive dampers were installed to attenuate the vibrations by means of increased damping. A combination of field measurements and numerical models are used to investigate the behavior of the bridge and the impact of increased hanger damping.

  • 32.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Karoumi, Raid
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Dynamics of railway bridges, analysis and verification by field tests2015In: EVACES'15, 6th International Conference On Experimental Vibration Analysis For Civil Engineering Structures / [ed] Glauco Feltrin, EDP Sciences, 2015, Vol. 24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The following paper discusses different aspects of railway bridge dynamics, comprising analysis, modelling procedures and experimental testing. The importance of realistic models is discussed, especially regarding boundary conditions, load distribution and soil-structure interaction. Two theoretical case studies are presented, involving both deterministic and probabilistic assessment of a large number of railway bridges using simplified and computationally efficient models. A total of four experimental case studies are also introduced, illustrating different aspects and phenomena in bridge dynamics. The excitation consists of both ambient vibrations, train induced vibrations, free vibrations after train passages and controlled forced excitation.

  • 33.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Karoumi, Raid
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    O'Connor, Alan
    Trinity College Dublin.
    Development of a multi-passive tuned mass damper, theory and experiments2014In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Structural Dynamics, EURODYN 2014, Porto, 2014, 1551-1556 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a bi-directional multi-passive tuned mass damper is presented. The applicationfor the damper is on vertical hangers of an existing steel arch railway bridge.The hangers have been found susceptible to resonance and the resulting stressesresults in a reduced service life due to fatigue. Due to different boundaryconditions, the natural frequencies of the hangers are different in thelongitudinal and the transverse direction. In addition, the natural frequenciesincrease during train passage, due to increased tensile force in the hangers. Aprototype of the damper has been developed, consisting of two suspended massescoupled in series. Different lateral suspensions are used to obtain differentnatural frequencies in the longitudinal and the transverse direction. One massis tuned to the conditions of the fully loaded bridge and the other mass to theunloaded bridge. The performance of the damper is verified using controlledloading under laboratory conditions and the results are compared with a finiteelement model. The damper is shown to perform as expected and the motion of thetwo masses is near uncoupled. Finally, the performance of the damper isverified by in-situ testing on the case study bridge.

  • 34.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Karoumi, Raid
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    O'Connor, Alan
    External damping of stay cables using adaptive and semi-active vibration control2013In: Proceedings of the 8th International Cable Supported Bridge Operators Conference, Edinburgh, Scotland, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the performances of different external damping systems for stay cables are studied based on numerical simulations. Two types of dampers have been analysed; a near anchorage viscous damper and a tuned mass damper (TMD) mounted near the midspan of the stay cable. For the passive case, both dampers are tuned to the fundamental mode of vibration of the cable. The optimal viscous damping for the near anchorage damper is determined based on well-known equations for a taut string. For the TMD, parametrical studies have been performed to determine the optimal damping ratio as function of the damper mass. The resulting vibration mitigation from the two systems are also studied for higher modes of vibration and the potential increase in performance using an adaptive or semi-active vibration control system is studied.

  • 35.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Karoumi, Raid
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    O'Connor, Alan
    Semi-active damping systems for railway bridges2012In: / [ed] Colin Caprani, Alan O'Connor, Dublin, 2012, 177-182 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a semi-active control system for vibration mitigation of railway bridges is presented. The real time frequency response is estimated using a short-time Fourier transform, employing curve fitting to relevant peaks for increased accuracy. A control algorithm developed in Matlab® is linked to a commercial FE-software, facilitating application on arbitrary structures. A numerical study of an existing tied arch railway bridge is presented. From earlier field measurements and numerical analysis, resonance of several hangers during train passage was observed. This was shown to significantly reduce the fatigue service life of the hangers and for the most critical section about 50% of the cumulative damage was related to free vibrations. A system of passive dampers was later installed and the increase in resulting damping was measured. Within the present study, the previous results are reanalysed and compared with a semi-active approach. The natural frequencies of the hangers vary as a result of the variation in axial force. A semi-active control system has the potential to improve the vibration response of the structure when compared to the installed passive system.

  • 36.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Karoumi, Raid
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    O'Connor, Alan
    Vibration mitigation of railway bridges using adaptive damping control2013In: Assessment, Upgrading and Refurbishment of Infrastructures, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the advantage of an adaptive damping system is presented. A damper with variable stiffness is tuned based on estimates of the real-time frequency response, facilitating optimal vibration mitigation. The performance of the developed routines is investigated on an existing tied arch railway bridge. Based on previous field measurements, resonant behaviour of several hangers was found. In combination with low structural damping, the induced stresses resulted in a reduced fatigue service life. Passive dampers are currently installed on the longer hangers, each tuned to the fundamental natural frequency of the individual hanger. However, increased axial force during train passage results in a significant variation in natural frequency, with an apparent risk of detuning the passive dampers. The predicted performance of an adaptive damping system to account for this variation in dynamic behaviour is presented and its potential application is discussed.

  • 37.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Leander, John
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Karoumi, Raid
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Extending the fatigue service life of a railway bridge by local approaches2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, fatigue assessment of a steel railway bridge is presented. The bridge is located in central Stockholm, Sweden, and is one of the most vital links for the railway network. The bridge services both freight trains and commuter trains with more than 500 passages per day. The main load bearing structure is designed as a steel grillage of welded I-beams. Fatigue critical sections have been identified at locations where secondary bracing systems are welded to the flanges of the I-beams. Both numerical simulations and extensive field measurements have shown a significant exceedance of the theoretical fatigue service life. Based on analysis of local stress concentrations, improvement of fatigue critical details have been suggested. The decrease in stress concentration is demonstrated both by numerical simulations and in-situ field measurements and shows a significant improvement when estimating the remaining fatigue service life.

  • 38.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    O'Connor, Alan
    Trinity College Dublin.
    Karoumi, Raid
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Development and testing of a bi-directional multi-passive tuned mass damperIn: Computer-Aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering, ISSN 1093-9687, E-ISSN 1467-8667Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presentsthe development and testing of a bi-directional multi-passive tuned mass damper(bi-MTMD). A prototype of the damper has been built and tested under laboratoryconditions. The damper was developed for application to a vertical hanger on anexisting tied-arch railway bridge. During train passage, resonance has beenobserved in several hangers, resulting in a reduction in the predicted fatigueservice life. The objective of the damper is to mitigate the vibrations toreduce the resulting stresses and consequently to extend the life of thehanger. The hanger has different natural frequencies for longitudinal andtransversal bending. In addition, a significant difference in natural frequencyis obtained for the loaded and unloaded bridge, due to the increase in axialforce in the hangers. The developed damper accounts for both scenarios and istuned based on previous field measurements. The results from the laboratoryexperiments are compared with a 3D FE-model of the damper.

  • 39.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    O'Connor, Alan
    Trinity College Dublin.
    Karoumi, Raid
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Development of a Bi-directional Multi-Passive Tuned Mass DamperIn: Journal of Structural Engineering, ISSN 0733-9445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the development and testing of a bi-directional multi-passivetuned mass damper (bi-MTMD). A prototype of the damper has been built andtested under laboratory conditions. The damper was developed for application toa vertical hanger on an existing tied-arch railway bridge. During trainpassage, resonance has been observed in several hangers, resulting in areduction in the predicted fatigue service life. The objective of the damper isto mitigate the vibrations to reduce the resulting stresses and consequently toextend the life of the hanger. The hanger has different natural frequencies forlongitudinal and transversal bending. In addition, a significant difference innatural frequency is obtained for the loaded and unloaded bridge, due to theincrease in axial force in the hangers. The developed damper accounts for bothscenarios and is tuned based on previous field measurements. The results fromthe laboratory experiments are compared with a 3D FE-model of the damper.

  • 40.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges. Swedish Transport Adm Trafikverket, Solna, Sweden.
    O'Connor, Alan
    Trinity College Dublin.
    Karoumi, Raid
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Passive and Adaptive Damping Systems for Vibration Mitigation and Increased Fatigue Service Life of a Tied Arch Railway Bridge2015In: Journal of Bridge Engineering, ISSN 1084-0702, Vol. 30, no 9, 748-757 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n this article, the use of external damping systems for vibration mitigation of railway bridge dynamics is studied. For a presented case study bridge, the performance of different tuned mass damper systems (TMDs) is studied. During train passage, the change in dynamic characteristics of the bridge may produce a significant detune to a passive TMD. Therefore, routines for a variable stiffness TMD using incremental frequency estimates are developed. Based on numerical simulations, the cumulative fatigue damage is calculated for different damper systems. Due to resonant behavior, the results are found to highly depend on the train speed. Based on an assumed probability density function for the train speed, fragility curves are produced to express the probability of fatigue failure as a function of the number of train passages.

  • 41.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Roslin, Mattias
    Trafikverket.
    Load capacity of inner lining system s due to impact from falling rocks2015In: SEE Tunnel: Promoting Tunneling in SEE Region / [ed] Davorin Kolic, Dubrovnik, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The inner lining concept is a method to prevent water leakage and the risk of icing inside tunnels and is frequently used in countries with cold climate. Blocks of falling ice may result is a severe safety risk in both road and railway tunnels. Although several established inner lining systems exist, finding the optimal solution considering function, maintenance- and investment cost is a challenging task. A new system has recently been used in Sweden and is due to its success planned to be used for the Stockholm Bypass, an 18 km road tunnel project in Stockholm.

    A set of design criterions has been stipulated for the inner lining system. In this paper, the case of impact loading from falling rocks is studied. The inner lining system is required to withstand the impact of a 600 kg block landing on a square surface of 0.2x0.2 m. The free fall height, i.e. the distance to the rock surface, is typically less than 0.5 m but may span up to 1.5 m in some cases. A too conservative design may result in an unnecessary thick structure and lack of knowledge of the impact phenomena may result in an unsafe design.

    An extensive experimental program has been performed, consisting of representative parts of the inner lining system. A mass of 600 kg is dropped onto the structure and the results are compared with numerical simulations. The experiments show that the current system is rather ductile but that local concrete fallouts may occur at extreme free fall heights.

  • 42.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Roslin, Mattias
    Trafikverket.
    Taube, Arvid
    Trafikverket.
    Bärförmåga hos inklädnadssystem vid stödbelastning från fallande bergblock2015In: Bergmekanikdag 2015 / [ed] BeFo, Stockholm: Stiftelsen Bergteknisk forskning , 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Inner lining system in tunnels is a method to prevent water ingress and forming of ice in the traffic area. A solution that is common in Norway is based on stretching a sealing membrane between rock anchorages that forms a gap to the primary rock strengthening. The membrane is in turn protected by a layer of shotcrete towards the traffic area. The rock strengthening is designed to resist all loads from the rock mass independent of the inner lining system. A problem is however how to perform inspections and conditional assessment of the rock strengthening, since the gap is usually small. Other topics are what loads the inner lining system should be designed for. In TRVK Tunnel 11, the load of a local falling rock of 600 kg is stipulated, assuming to act on a surface of 0.2×0.2 m. Furthermore, the inner lining system should be designed to resist what is connoted as an extreme rock load of 6 metric ton, acting on a 1×1 m area, even when a primary rock strengthening is present. Similar inner lining systems have been used in e.g. Norra länken, parts of Citybanan in Stockholm and is planned to be used for the Stockholm Bypass project.

    In the present paper, results from a recent research project are presented, aiming at investigating the structural manner of action of the aforementioned inner lining system. A series of concrete slabs have been tested, both until static failure and with a 600 kg drop weight from different heights. All tested slabs resulted in flexural failure and showed a significant ductility. For several of the slabs tested for impact loading, significant spalling from the soffit was obtained, at the most corresponding to a mass of 16 kg. Three of the slabs tested for impact load were manufactured with an outer layer of steel fibre reinforced shotcrete. None of these slabs showed any significant spalling, despite a free fall height up to 2 m.

    Several FE-analyses have also been performed, accounting for the nonlinear material properties of concrete. The results showed good agreement with the conducted experiments, both regarding static loading, cracking and impact load. A similar analysis was also done for the whole inner lining system. The results showed a larger load capacity compared to the experiments, but still with a rather localised failure.

  • 43.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Sundquist, Håkan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Karoumi, Raid
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Full Scale Tests and Structural Evaluation of Soil-Steel Flexible Culverts for High-Speed Railways2012In: Second European conference on Buried Flexible Steel structures Rydzyna April 23rd – 24th 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, results from full-scale tests on a corrugated soil-steel flexible culvert for railway traffic are presented. The bridge was instrumented with strain gauges, accelerometers and displacement gauges, measuring the response from passing trains. The aim of the measurement campaign was to gain knowledge of the dynamic behaviour due to train induced vibrations, both of the bridge structure and the overlying railway embankment. From the measured data, the load distribution and soil-stiffness can be estimated. The results also serve as input for calibration of numerical models that are used for predicting the behaviour due to high-speed trains.

  • 44.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges. The Swedish Transport Administration (Trafikverket), Sweden.
    Ülker-Kaustell, Mahir
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges. Tyréns AB, Sweden.
    Borg, Richard
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Dymén, Olivier
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Carolin, Anders
    Trafikverket.
    Karoumi, Raid
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Pilot testing of a hydraulic bridge exciter2015In: EVACES'15, 6th International Conference on Experimental Vibration Analysis For Civil Engineering Structures / [ed] Glauco Feltrin, Zurich: EDP Sciences, 2015, Vol. 24, 02001- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the development of a hydraulic bridge exciter and its first pilot testing on a full scale railway bridge in service. The exciter is based on a hydraulic load cylinder with a capacity of 50 kN and is intended for controlled dynamic loading up to at least 50 Hz. The load is applied from underneath the bridge, enabling testing while the railway line is in service. The system is shown to produce constant load amplitude even at resonance. The exciter is used to experimentally determine frequency response functions at all sensor locations, which serve as valuable input for model updating and verification. An FE-model of the case study bridge has been developed that is in good agreement with the experimental results.

  • 45.
    Andersson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Widening of The Nockeby Bridge: Methods for strengthening the torsional resistance2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    i Abstract The Nockeby Bridge, in the western part of Stockholm, is a prestressed concrete bridge with an openable swing span of steel. The bridge was built during 1970 and should now be widened with 0.5 meters on each side. The concrete bridge deck is supported by two main-beams and cross-beams are located at the position of all supports. Previous studies of the bridge show that the torsional resistance is too low and the bridge needs strengthening while widened. The aim of this master  thesis  was  to  study  and  compare  different  strengthening  methods  for  The  Nockeby Bridge.  Eight  different  bridges  in  Sweden  and  China  were  reviewed  to  find  possible  strengthening  methods  for  The  Nockeby  Bridge.  External  prestressing  tendons  and  additional  cross-beams between  the  two  main-beams  were  seen  to  have  good  influence  on  the  resistance.  The  effect from strengthening with carbon-fiber reinforced polymer was questioned during small loads and was not seen as a suitable strengthening method for The Nockeby Bridge.  Four different FE-models were generated to be able to compare two strengthening methods. The compared strengthening methods were a method with additional cross-beams between the main-beams and a method with external prestressing tendons. All FE-models were built up by solid- and  truss  elements  where  the  concrete  was  modelled  with  solid  elements  and  the  prestressed reinforcement was modelled with truss elements.  Only a few load-cases were included to limit the scope of the study. The included load-cases were deadweight,  prestressing  forces  and  vehicle  load  from  standard  vehicle  F,  G,  H  and  I.  Two influence lines were created to be able to place the vehicle loads in an unfavorable way. From the FE-models, shear  stresses were  extracted  along two  lines, one  on  each  side  of the main-beam. The torsional part of the shear stresses was calculated from these two results and compared with the torsional resistance of the bridge. While calculating the torsional resistance, the normal force in the cross-section from prestress was extracted with the function “free body cut”. The results showed that none of the tested strengthening methods were enough to  strengthen The  Nockeby  Bridge.  However, the  method  with additional  cross-beams  was  seen  as  a  better method than external prestressing tendons. A combination of the two methods might be suitable but  was  not  tested.  Adding  four  cross-beams  in  each  span  might  also  increase  the  resistance enough, but this was neither tested. It was also seen that a reduction of the torsional stiffness had a large influence on the result. Such a reduction is allowed in some cases and should be utilized if possible. Furthermore,  it  was  seen  that  solid-models  were  extremely  time  consuming  and  there  is  not  a  good alternative to design a bridge with only a solid model.

  • 46.
    Andersson, Mats B.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Hantering av osäkerhet i samband med investeringsbeslut – några metodansatser och exempel2004Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [sv]

    Before you take a decision you can normally choose amongmany different alternatives. The alternatives can be rankeddepending on what net benefits they produce. The alternativewith the best net benefit is chosen. Within economicscost-benefit analysis may be used to decide which alternativeis likely to offer the best net benefit.

    Some time after the decision it may be found that theselected alternative turned out not to be as favourable asexpected. The reason is often that there are uncertainties inthe decision process. Sometimes this is not a major problemsince it is possible to change the decision or the costconsequences may be small.

    When the National Traffic Administrations make investmentslarge volumes of capital are involved. It is often difficult orvery expensive to change an investment when started. It istherefore essential to get an early knowledge about potentialuncertainties, which can affect the decision. Uncertainties canaccrue from incorrect input data. A reason for spreading ofuncertainties is the presence of dependencies among thevariables. The uncertainties are also usually dependent upontime.

    This thesis describes some methods to take uncertaintiesinto account in cost-benefit analysis before a decision istaken. The aim is both to identify the uncertainties and tooutline methods for coping with uncertainties.

    The methods rely on results in reliability theory and riskanalyses among others. Some statistical methods and discretedata models are also applied. The aim is to increase theprobability of selecting an alternative with high and stablenet benefits over a long time period.

    The cost-benefit estimates are divided into smaller parts tomake it possible to locate uncertainties. Descriptive andanalytical models are recommended for handling the cost-benefitstructure and the uncertainties found in its components.Dependencies among variables and, in particular, timedependencies are analysed.

    Throughout the thesis the various methods are applied to anexample referring to a road investment.

  • 47.
    Andersson, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Hagersten, Elsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Optimal viscous dampers targeting multiple cable modes with FEM2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master thesis presents a study of the mitigation of rain-wind induced vibrations on horizontal cables using viscous dampers considering multiple modes. Software based on finite

    elements is developed which finds the optimal damping coefficient. This software uses a graphical user interface to facilitate the damper design process. In addition to this, the

    maximum vertical and rotational displacements have also been studied to observe the mitigation of the maximum amplitudes with increasing damper coefficient.

    The model is based on already known research, and the results are verified by comparing with case studies. The program uses both the Logarithmic Decrement method and the Half-Power Bandwitdh method to obtain the damping ratios.

    From this master thesis the following can be deduced:

    -The optimal modal damping will give the lowest maximum amplitudes.

    - The maximum vertical displacements may be interesting when considering alternative ways to optimize the damper coefficient and location.

    -The angular change delta (Δ) above the damper, increases with increasing damping coefficient.

  • 48. Andersson, O
    et al.
    Björklund, A
    Isacsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Practical Mechanical Tests for the Design and Control of Asphalt Mixes1983Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Andersson, Sara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Cross-Border Collaboration for a Sustainable Future: - a case study about Interreg V ÖKS subsidyand sustainable transportation projects2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to investigate one of the European Structural Fundprogrammes, Interreg V Öresund-Kattegat-Skagerrak (ÖKS) and the priority areaTransportation. The programme gives financial support to transportation projectsaiming to develop sustainable (environmentally friendly) transportation alternativesand solutions.

    Through studies and theories on cross-border collaboration (CBC) and goals forsustainable transportation a major need of joint strategies for solving shared problems,such as environmental concerns has been demonstrated. This approach ofcollaboration projects as a pillar for sustainable development has been the foundationof how the current Interreg programme has been studied and the starting point for thisresearch. The study aims to clarify the relationship between the overall view uponcooperation and joint development programmes (within areas stretching over nationaland administrative borders, such as transportation) and the specific Interregprogramme. A programme which during current period (2014-2020) experienced adrastic decline of number of applicants. In order to further understand the context thecurrent study has trough empirical research defined added values (advantages) of theCBC but also identified the perceived difficulties and barriers (disadvantages). Thefounding’s have further been compared and supplemented with perspectives fromrelevant actors engaged in transportation development. This material has beencollected through qualitative interviews enabling a vital and good understanding ofconcerned actors and their view of advantages and disadvantages with CBC. Theanalysis has also enabled the conclusion that the general view among the actors is thatcollaboration projects are necessary for a sustainable development. However, studiedprogramme with declined number of applicants did not succeed in attracting desiredparticipants. Consequently, the actors were also asked to share their view upon thedecline of applicants for current Interreg period. One identified explanation wasrelated to the administrative burden which was perceived too heavy by the actors. Inaddition, the financial part was perceived to be too low or poorly designed. Theknowledge about the programme was also found to be limited among some of theactors. To be able to involve more participants in the future it has been concluded thatimprovements within the three areas of defined obstacles have to be implemented.

    This investigation and findings aim to contribute to increased insights andunderstanding of the cross-border cooperation process in order to be able to reach andinvolve relevant actors in the most favourable way for successful future projects anddesired sustainable development.

  • 50.
    Andersson-Vass, Vilmer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Temperatursprickor i betong: Metodutveckling för sprickbegränsning och uppföljning av uppsprickning i en tunnelkonstruktion2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In order to reduce the risk of thermal cracks in a concrete structure it is recommended to reduce the temperature differences between already existing concrete parts and the newly cast parts. Therefore, adjacent and already cast parts of the structure are sometimes heated up prior to casting of a new concrete part. This reduces the temperature differences within the structure and thus the risk of thermal cracks. This heating is generally done via heating cables placed in the concrete. This method has two drawbacks: firstly, one has to plan for the heating cables in an early stage and secondly, the cables sometimes break when cast in. As an alternative and compliment to the heating cables, a new type of heating mat for heating of concrete structures was designed and produced during 2014. It is built the same way as frost thawing mats but has a lower electrical effect to avoid overheating when heating the concrete.

    The main subject that is investigated in this thesis is the effect the heating mat has on the underlying concrete. This was investigated in four field trials by measuring the temperature in concrete members while heating them up with the heating mats. The field trials were effected on concrete slabs and vaults and the heating mats were covered with a concrete curing mat made of 10 mm cellular plastic. The field trials were conducted in sunny and dry conditions as well as in cloudy and rainy conditions. Data from the field trials were used to produce a proposal on how to model the heating mat’s warming effect in Contest. This proposal is presented in Section 5.1.2and is the main result of this thesis. It can be used to include the heating mat’s effect in simulations to estimate thermal crack risks in Contest.

    In addition, two real castings of a tunnel structure are described in which heating mats were used to reduce the risk for thermal cracks. These two castings are studied regarding the risk for thermal cracking. Finally, an economical comparison is made where using heating mats is compared to using heating cables.

    The conclusion of this thesis is that the warming effect of the heating mat can be modeled in Contest in a simple and appropriate manner according to the proposed method. The proposed method considers that precipitation and sunshine influence the heating of the concrete. The actual temperature rise in the heated concrete might therefore be greater than what is obtained using the method in Contest, which gives a rise in temperature on the safe side. This conservative, slightly low estimation of the rise in temperature corresponds to using heating cables mounted on the upper reinforcement with a c / c distance of 40 cm. From an economic point of view, the purchase of heating mats means a relatively important initial investment cost compared to heating cables. Using heating mats instead of heating cables is therefore initially more expensive, but will eventually be profitable since the heating mats are not consumed. Based on the economic assumptions made in this thesis the heating mat was less expensive than heating cables if used more than about 30 times.

1234567 1 - 50 of 936
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf