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  • 1.
    Abdullah, Nazri
    et al.
    Universiti Tun Hussien Onn Malaysia, Malaysia .
    Kounelis, Ioannis
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Muftic, Sead
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Security Extensions for Mobile Commerce Objects2014In: SECURWARE 2014, The Eighth International Conference on Emerging Security Information, Systems and Technologies, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic commerce and its variance mobile commerce have tremendously increased their popularity in the last several years. As mobile devices have become the most popular mean to access and use the Internet, mobile commerce and its security are timely and very hot topics. Yet, today there is still no consistent model of various m–commerce applications and transactions, even less clear specification of their security. In order to address and solve those issues, in this paper, we first establish the concept of mobile commerce objects, an equivalent of virtual currencies, used for m–commerce transactions. We describe functionalities and unique characteristics of these objects; we follow with security requirements, and then offer some solutions – security extensions of these objects. All solutions are treated within the complete lifecycle of creation and use of the m–commerce objects.

  • 2. Abouelhoda, Mohamed
    et al.
    Issa, Shady
    Center for Informatics Sciences, Nile University, Giza, Egypt.
    Ghanem, Moustafa
    Tavaxy: integrating Taverna and Galaxy workflows with cloud computing support.2012In: BMC Bioinformatics, ISSN 1471-2105, E-ISSN 1471-2105, Vol. 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Over the past decade the workflow system paradigm has evolved as an efficient and user-friendly approach for developing complex bioinformatics applications. Two popular workflow systems that have gained acceptance by the bioinformatics community are Taverna and Galaxy. Each system has a large user-base and supports an ever-growing repository of application workflows. However, workflows developed for one system cannot be imported and executed easily on the other. The lack of interoperability is due to differences in the models of computation, workflow languages, and architectures of both systems. This lack of interoperability limits sharing of workflows between the user communities and leads to duplication of development efforts.

    RESULTS: In this paper, we present Tavaxy, a stand-alone system for creating and executing workflows based on using an extensible set of re-usable workflow patterns. Tavaxy offers a set of new features that simplify and enhance the development of sequence analysis applications: It allows the integration of existing Taverna and Galaxy workflows in a single environment, and supports the use of cloud computing capabilities. The integration of existing Taverna and Galaxy workflows is supported seamlessly at both run-time and design-time levels, based on the concepts of hierarchical workflows and workflow patterns. The use of cloud computing in Tavaxy is flexible, where the users can either instantiate the whole system on the cloud, or delegate the execution of certain sub-workflows to the cloud infrastructure.

    CONCLUSIONS: Tavaxy reduces the workflow development cycle by introducing the use of workflow patterns to simplify workflow creation. It enables the re-use and integration of existing (sub-) workflows from Taverna and Galaxy, and allows the creation of hybrid workflows. Its additional features exploit recent advances in high performance cloud computing to cope with the increasing data size and complexity of analysis.The system can be accessed either through a cloud-enabled web-interface or downloaded and installed to run within the user's local environment. All resources related to Tavaxy are available at http://www.tavaxy.org.

  • 3.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Berndtsson, Andreas
    Abtahi, Shirin
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Development and preliminary evaluation of an Android based heart rate variability biofeedback system2014In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE, IEEE conference proceedings, 2014, 3382-3385 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reduced Heart Rate Variability (HRV) is believed to be associated with several diseases such as congestive heart failure, diabetes and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). In these cases, HRV biofeedback may be a potential intervention method to increase HRV which in turn is beneficial to these patients. In this work, a real-time Android biofeedback application based on a Bluetooth enabled ECG and thoracic electrical bioimpedance (respiration) measurement device has been developed. The system performance and usability have been evaluated in a brief study with eight healthy volunteers. The result demonstrates real-time performance of system and positive effects of biofeedback training session by increased HRV and reduced heart rate. Further development of the application and training protocol is ongoing to investigate duration of training session to find an optimum length and interval of biofeedback sessions to use in potential interventions.

  • 4.
    Agelfors, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Speech Transmission and Music Acoustics.
    Beskow, Jonas
    Dahlquist, M
    Granström, Björn
    Lundeberg, M
    Salvi, Giampiero
    Spens, K-E
    Öhman, Tobias
    Two methods for Visual Parameter Extraction in the Teleface Project1999In: Proceedings of Fonetik, Gothenburg, Sweden, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Aguilar, Xavier
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Towards Scalable Performance Analysis of MPI Parallel Applications2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      A considerably fraction of science discovery is nowadays relying on computer simulations. High Performance Computing  (HPC) provides scientists with the means to simulate processes ranging from climate modeling to protein folding. However, achieving good application performance and making an optimal use of HPC resources is a heroic task due to the complexity of parallel software. Therefore, performance tools  and runtime systems that help users to execute  applications in the most optimal way are of utmost importance in the landscape of HPC.  In this thesis, we explore different techniques to tackle the challenges of collecting, storing, and using  fine-grained performance data. First, we investigate the automatic use of real-time performance data in order to run applications in an optimal way. To that end, we present a prototype of an adaptive task-based runtime system that uses real-time performance data for task scheduling. This runtime system has a performance monitoring component that provides real-time access to the performance behavior of anapplication while it runs. The implementation of this monitoring component is presented and evaluated within this thesis. Secondly, we explore lossless compression approaches  for MPI monitoring. One of the main problems that  performance tools face is the huge amount of fine-grained data that can be generated from an instrumented application. Collecting fine-grained data from a program is the best method to uncover the root causes of performance bottlenecks, however, it is unfeasible with extremely parallel applications  or applications with long execution times. On the other hand, collecting coarse-grained data is scalable but  sometimes not enough to discern the root cause of a performance problem. Thus, we propose a new method for performance monitoring of MPI programs using event flow graphs. Event flow graphs  provide very low overhead in terms of execution time and  storage size, and can be used to reconstruct fine-grained trace files of application events ordered in time.

  • 6.
    Aguilar, Xavier
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Fürlinger, Karl
    Laure, Erwin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Visual MPI Performance Analysis using Event Flow Graphs2015In: Procedia Computer Science, ISSN 1877-0509, Vol. 51, 1353-1362 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Event flow graphs used in the context of performance monitoring combine the scalability and low overhead of profiling methods with lossless information recording of tracing tools. In other words, they capture statistics on the performance behavior of parallel applications while pre- serving the temporal ordering of events. Event flow graphs require significantly less storage than regular event traces and can still be used to recover the full ordered sequence of events performed by the application.  In this paper we explore the usage of event flow graphs in the context of visual performance analysis. We show that graphs can be used to quickly spot performance problems, helping to better understand the behavior of an application. We demonstrate our performance analysis approach with MiniFE, a mini-application that mimics the key performance aspects of finite- element applications in High Performance Computing (HPC).

  • 7.
    Aguilar, Xavier
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Fürlinger, Karl
    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat (LMU).
    Laure, Erwin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    MPI Trace Compression Using Event Flow Graphs2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how parallel applications behave is crucial for using high-performance computing (HPC) resources efficiently. However, the task of performance analysis is becoming increasingly difficult due to the growing complexity of scientific codes and the size of machines. Even though many tools have been developed over the past years to help in this task, current approaches either only offer an overview of the application discarding temporal information, or they generate huge trace files that are often difficult to handle.

    In this paper we propose the use of event flow graphs for monitoring MPI applications, a new and different approach that balances the low overhead of profiling tools with the abundance of information available from tracers. Event flow graphs are captured with very low overhead, require orders of magnitude less storage than standard trace files, and can still recover the full sequence of events in the application. We test this new approach with the NERSC-8/Trinity Benchmark suite and achieve compression ratios up to 119x.

  • 8.
    Aguilar, Xavier
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Laure, Erwin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Fürlinger, Karl
    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München.
    Online Performance Data Introspection with IPM2014In: Proceedings of the 15th IEEE International Conference on High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC 2013), IEEE Computer Society, 2014, 728-734 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exascale systems will be heterogeneous architectures with multiple levels of concurrency and energy constraints. In such a complex scenario, performance monitoring and runtime systems play a major role to obtain good application performance and scalability. Furthermore, online access to performance data becomes a necessity to decide how to schedule resources and orchestrate computational elements: processes, threads, tasks, etc. We present the Performance Introspection API, an extension of the IPM tool that provides online runtime access to performance data from an application while it runs. We describe its design and implementation and show its overhead on several test benchmarks. We also present a real test case using the Performance Introspection API in conjunction with processor frequency scaling to reduce power consumption.

  • 9.
    Aguilar, Xavier
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Schliephake, Michael
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for High Performance Computing, PDC. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Vahtras, Olav
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for High Performance Computing, PDC. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Gimenez, Judit
    Laure, Erwin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for High Performance Computing, PDC. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Scalability analysis of Dalton, a molecular structure program2013In: Future generations computer systems, ISSN 0167-739X, Vol. 29, no 8, 2197-2204 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dalton is a molecular electronic structure program featuring common methods of computational chemistry that are based on pure quantum mechanics (QM) as well as hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM). It is specialized and has a leading position in calculation of molecular properties with a large world-wide user community (over 2000 licenses issued). In this paper, we present a performance characterization and optimization of Dalton. We also propose a solution to avoid the master/worker design of Dalton to become a performance bottleneck for larger process numbers. With these improvements we obtain speedups of 4x, increasing the parallel efficiency of the code and being able to run in it in a much bigger number of cores.

  • 10. Ahmed, J.
    et al.
    Johnsson, A.
    Yanggratoke, Rerngvit
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Networks.
    Ardelius, J.
    Flinta, C.
    Stadler, Rolf
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Communication Networks. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Predicting SLA conformance for cluster-based services using distributed analytics2016In: Proceedings of the NOMS 2016 - 2016 IEEE/IFIP Network Operations and Management Symposium, IEEE conference proceedings, 2016, 848-852 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service assurance for the telecom cloud is a challenging task and is continuously being addressed by academics and industry. One promising approach is to utilize machine learning to predict service quality in order to take early mitigation actions. In previous work we have shown how to predict service-level metrics, such as frame rate for a video application on the client side, from operational data gathered at the server side. This gives the service provider early indications on whether the platform can support the current load demand. This paper extends previous work by addressing scalability issues for cluster-based services. Operational data being generated in large volumes, from several sources, and at high velocity puts strain on computational and communication resources. We propose and evaluate a distributed machine learning system based on the Winnow algorithm to tackle scalability issues, and then compare the new distributed solution with the previously proposed centralized solution. We show that network overhead and computational execution time is substantially reduced while maintaining high prediction accuracy making it possible to achieve real-time service quality predictions in large systems.

  • 11.
    Ahmed, Tanvir Saif
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering.
    Markovic, Bratislav
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering.
    Distribuerade datalagringssystem för tjänsteleverantörer: Undersökning av olika användningsfall för distribuerade datalagringssystem2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, a study of three different uses cases has been made within the field of data storage, which are as following: Cold Storage, High Performance Storage and Virtual Machine Storage. The purpose of the survey is to give an overview of commercial distributed file systems and a deeper study of open source codes distributed file systems in order to find the most optimal solution for these use cases. Within the study, previous works concerning performance, data protection and costs were an-alyzed and compared in means to find different functionalities (snapshotting, multi-tenancy, data duplication and data replication) which distinguish modern distributed file systems. Both commercial and open distributed file systems were examined. A cost estimation for commercial and open distrib-uted file systems were made in means to find out the profitability for these two types of distributed file systems.After comparing and analyzing previous works, it was clear that the open source distributed file sys-tem Ceph was proper as a solution in accordance to the objectives that were set for High Performance Storage and Virtual Machine Storage. The cost estimation showed that it was more profitable to im-plement an open distributed file system. This study can be used as guidance to choose between different distributed file systems.

  • 12. Akhmetova, D.
    et al.
    Kestor, G.
    Gioiosa, R.
    Markidis, Stefano
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Laure, Erwin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    On the application task granularity and the interplay with the scheduling overhead in many-core shared memory systems2015In: Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Cluster Computing, ICCC, IEEE , 2015, 428-437 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Task-based programming models are considered one of the most promising programming model approaches for exascale supercomputers because of their ability to dynamically react to changing conditions and reassign work to processing elements. One question, however, remains unsolved: what should the task granularity of task-based applications be? Fine-grained tasks offer more opportunities to balance the system and generally result in higher system utilization. However, they also induce in large scheduling overhead. The impact of scheduling overhead on coarse-grained tasks is lower, but large systems may result imbalanced and underutilized. In this work we propose a methodology to analyze the interplay between application task granularity and scheduling overhead. Our methodology is based on three main points: 1) a novel task algorithm that analyzes an application directed acyclic graph (DAG) and aggregates tasks, 2) a fast and precise emulator to analyze the application behavior on systems with up to 1,024 cores, 3) a comprehensive sensitivity analysis of application performance and scheduling overhead breakdown. Our results show that there is an optimal task granularity between 1.2x10^4 and 10x10^4 cycles for the representative schedulers. Moreover, our analysis indicates that a suitable scheduler for exascale task-based applications should employ a best-effort local scheduler and a sophisticated remote scheduler to move tasks across worker threads.

  • 13.
    Akhmetova, Dana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Iakymchuk, Roman
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Ekeberg, Örjan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Laure, Erwin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Performance study of multithreaded MPI and Openmp tasking in a large scientific code2017In: Proceedings - 2017 IEEE 31st International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium Workshops, IPDPSW 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2017, 756-765 p., 7965119Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a large variety and complexity of existing HPC machines and uncertainty regarding exact future Exascale hardware, it is not clear whether existing parallel scientific codes will perform well on future Exascale systems: they can be largely modified or even completely rewritten from scratch. Therefore, now it is important to ensure that software is ready for Exascale computing and will utilize all Exascale resources well. Many parallel programming models try to take into account all possible hardware features and nuances. However, the HPC community does not yet have a precise answer whether, for Exascale computing, there should be a natural evolution of existing models interoperable with each other or it should be a disruptive approach. Here, we focus on the first option, particularly on a practical assessment of how some parallel programming models can coexist with each other. This work describes two API combination scenarios on the example of iPIC3D [26], an implicit Particle-in-Cell code for space weather applications written in C++ and MPI plus OpenMP. The first scenario is to enable multiple OpenMP threads call MPI functions simultaneously, with no restrictions, using an MPI THREAD MULTIPLE thread safety level. The second scenario is to utilize the OpenMP tasking model on top of the first scenario. The paper reports a step-by-step methodology and experience with these API combinations in iPIC3D; provides the scaling tests for these implementations with up to 2048 physical cores; discusses occurred interoperability issues; and provides suggestions to programmers and scientists who may adopt these API combinations in their own codes.

  • 14.
    Alexandru, Iordan
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology Trondheim.
    Podobas, Artur
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Software and Computer Systems, SCS.
    Natvig, Lasse
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology Trondheim.
    Brorsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Software and Computer Systems, SCS.
    Investigating the Potential of Energy-savings Using a Fine-grained Task Based Programming Model on Multi-cores2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we study the relation between energy-efficiencyand parallel executions when implemented with a fine-grained task-centricprogramming model. Using a simulation framework comprised of an ar-chitectural simulator and a power and area estimation tool, we haveinvestigated the potential energy-savings when employing parallelism onmulti-cores system. In our experiments with 2 - 8 multi-cores systems,we employed frequency and voltage scaling in order to keep the relativeperformance of the systems constant and measured the energy-efficiencyusing the Energy-delay-product. Also, we compared the energy consump-tion of the parallel execution against the serial one. Our results showthat through judicious choice of load balancing parameters, significantimprovements of around 200 % in energy consumption can be acheived.

  • 15.
    Al-Shishtawy, Ahmad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Self-Management for Large-Scale Distributed Systems2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Autonomic computing aims at making computing systems self-managing by using autonomic managers in order to reduce obstacles caused by management complexity. This thesis presents results of research on self-management for large-scale distributed systems. This research was motivated by the increasing complexity of computing systems and their management.

    In the first part, we present our platform, called Niche, for programming self-managing component-based distributed applications. In our work on Niche, we have faced and addressed the following four challenges in achieving self-management in a dynamic environment characterized by volatile resources and high churn: resource discovery, robust and efficient sensing and actuation, management bottleneck, and scale. We present results of our research on addressing the above challenges. Niche implements the autonomic computing architecture, proposed by IBM, in a fully decentralized way. Niche supports a network-transparent view of the system architecture simplifying the design of distributed self-management. Niche provides a concise and expressive API for self-management. The implementation of the platform relies on the scalability and robustness of structured overlay networks. We proceed by presenting a methodology for designing the management part of a distributed self-managing application. We define design steps that include partitioning of management functions and orchestration of multiple autonomic managers.

    In the second part, we discuss robustness of management and data consistency, which are necessary in a distributed system. Dealing with the effect of churn on management increases the complexity of the management logic and thus makes its development time consuming and error prone. We propose the abstraction of Robust Management Elements, which are able to heal themselves under continuous churn. Our approach is based on replicating a management element using finite state machine replication with a reconfigurable replica set. Our algorithm automates the reconfiguration (migration) of the replica set in order to tolerate continuous churn. For data consistency, we propose a majority-based distributed key-value store supporting multiple consistency levels that is based on a peer-to-peer network. The store enables the tradeoff between high availability and data consistency. Using majority allows avoiding potential drawbacks of a master-based consistency control, namely, a single-point of failure and a potential performance bottleneck.

    In the third part, we investigate self-management for Cloud-based storage systems with the focus on elasticity control using elements of control theory and machine learning. We have conducted research on a number of different designs of an elasticity controller, including a State-Space feedback controller and a controller that combines feedback and feedforward control. We describe our experience in designing an elasticity controller for a Cloud-based key-value store using state-space model that enables to trade-off performance for cost. We describe the steps in designing an elasticity controller. We continue by presenting the design and evaluation of ElastMan, an elasticity controller for Cloud-based elastic key-value stores that combines feedforward and feedback control.

  • 16.
    Al-Shishtawy, Ahmad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Software and Computer Systems, SCS.
    Fayyaz, Muhammad Asif
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Software and Computer Systems, SCS.
    Popov, Konstantin
    Swedish Institute of Computer Science (SICS), Kista, Sweden.
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Software and Computer Systems, SCS.
    Achieving Robust Self-Management for Large-Scale Distributed Applications2010In: Self-Adaptive and Self-Organizing Systems (SASO), 2010 4th IEEE International Conference on: SASO 2010, IEEE Computer Society, 2010, 31-40 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Achieving self-management can be challenging, particularly in dynamic environments with resource churn (joins/leaves/failures). Dealing with the effect of churn on management increases the complexity of the management logic and thus makes its development time consuming and error prone. We propose the abstraction of robust management elements (RMEs), which are able to heal themselves under continuous churn. Using RMEs allows the developer to separate the issue of dealing with the effect of churn on management from the management logic. This facilitates the development of robust management by making the developer focus on managing the application while relying on the platform to provide the robustness of management. RMEs can be implemented as fault-tolerant long-living services. We present a generic approach and an associated algorithm to achieve fault-tolerant long-living services. Our approach is based on replicating a service using finite state machine replication with a reconfigurable replica set. Our algorithm automates the reconfiguration (migration) of the replica set in order to tolerate continuous churn. The algorithm uses P2P replica placement schemes to place replicas and uses the P2P overlay to monitor them. The replicated state machine is extended to analyze monitoring data in order to decide on when and where to migrate. We describe how to use our approach to achieve robust management elements. We present a simulation-based evaluation of our approach which shows its feasibility.

  • 17.
    Al-Shishtawy, Ahmad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    ElastMan: Autonomic Elasticity Manager for Cloud-Based Key-Value Stores2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing spread of elastic Cloud services, together with the pay-asyou-go pricing model of Cloud computing, has led to the need of an elasticity controller. The controller automatically resizes an elastic service, in response to changes in workload, in order to meet Service Level Objectives (SLOs) at a reduced cost. However, variable performance of Cloud virtual machines and nonlinearities in Cloud services, such as the diminishing reward of adding a service instance with increasing the scale, complicates the controller design. We present the design and evaluation of ElastMan, an elasticity controller for Cloud-based elastic key-value stores. ElastMan combines feedforward and feedback control. Feedforward control is used to respond to spikes in the workload by quickly resizing the service to meet SLOs at a minimal cost. Feedback control is used to correct modeling errors and to handle diurnal workload. To address nonlinearities, our design of ElastMan leverages the near-linear scalability of elastic Cloud services in order to build a scale-independent model of the service. Our design based on combining feedforward and feedback control allows to efficiently handle both diurnal and rapid changes in workload in order to meet SLOs at a minimal cost. Our evaluation shows the feasibility of our approach to automation of Cloud service elasticity.

  • 18.
    Al-Shishtawy, Ahmad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    ElastMan: Elasticity manager for elastic key-value stores in the cloud2013In: Proceedings of the 2013 ACM Cloud and Autonomic Computing Conference, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, 7:1-7:10 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing spread of elastic Cloud services, together with the pay-as-you-go pricing model of Cloud computing, has led to the need of an elasticity controller. The controller automatically resizes an elastic service in response to changes in workload, in order to meet Service Level Objectives (SLOs) at a reduced cost. However, variable performance of Cloud Virtual Machines and nonlinearities in Cloud services, such as the diminishing reward of adding a service instance with increasing the scale, complicates the controller design. We present the design and evaluation of ElastMan, an elasticity controller for Cloud-based elastic key-value stores. ElastMan combines feedforward and feedback control. Feedforward control is used to respond to spikes in the workload by quickly resizing the service to meet SLOs at a minimal cost. Feedback control is used to correct modeling errors and to handle diurnal workload. To address nonlinearities, our design of ElastMan leverages the near-linear scalability of elastic Cloud services in order to build a scale-independent model of the service. We have implemented and evaluated ElastMan using the Voldemort key-value store running in an OpenStack Cloud environment. Our evaluation shows the feasibility and effectiveness of our approach to automation of Cloud service elasticity.

  • 19.
    Al-Shishtawy, Ahmad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    ElastMan: Autonomic elasticity manager for cloud-based key-value stores2013In: HPDC 2013 - Proceedings of the 22nd ACM International Symposium on High-Performance Parallel and Distributed Computing, 2013, 115-116 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing spread of elastic Cloud services, together with the pay-as-you-go pricing model of Cloud computing, has led to the need of an elasticity controller. The controller automatically resizes an elastic service in response to changes in workload, in order to meet Service Level Objectives (SLOs) at a reduced cost. However, variable performance of Cloud virtual machines and nonlinearities in Cloud services complicates the controller design. We present the design and evaluation of ElastMan, an elasticity controller for Cloud-based elastic key-value stores. ElastMan combines feedforward and feedback control. Feedforward control is used to respond to spikes in the workload by quickly resizing the service to meet SLOs at a minimal cost. Feedback control is used to correct modeling errors and to handle diurnal workload. We have implemented and evaluated ElastMan using the Voldemort key-value store running in a Cloud environment based on OpenStack. Our evaluation shows the feasibility and effectiveness of our approach to automation of Cloud service elasticity.

  • 20.
    Amighi, Afshin
    et al.
    University of Twente.
    de Carvalho Gomes, Pedro
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Gurov, Dilian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Huisman, Marieke
    University of Twente.
    Provably Correct Control-Flow Graphs from Java Programs with Exceptions2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an algorithm to extract flow graphs from Java bytecode, including exceptional control flows. We prove its correctness, meaning that the behavior of the extracted control-flow graph is a sound over-approximation of the behavior of the original program. Thus any safety property that holds for the extracted control-flow graph also holds for the original program. This makes control-flow graphs suitable for performing various static analyses, such as model checking.The extraction is performed in two phases. In the first phase the program is transformed into a BIR program, a stack-less intermediate representation of Java bytecode, from which the control-flow graph is extracted in the second phase. We use this intermediate format because it results in compact flow graphs, with provably correct exceptional control flow. To prove the correctness of the two-phase extraction, we also define an idealized extraction algorithm, whose correctness can be proven directly. Then we show that the behavior of the control-flow graph extracted via the intermediate representation is an over-approximation of the behavior of the directly extracted graphs, and thus of the original program. We implemented the indirect extraction as the CFGEx tool and performed several test-cases to show the efficiency of the algorithm.

  • 21.
    Amighi, Afshin
    et al.
    University of Twente.
    de Carvalho Gomes, Pedro
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Gurov, Dilian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Huisman, Marieke
    University of Twente.
    Sound Control-Flow Graph Extraction for Java Programs with Exceptions2012In: Software Engineering and Formal Methods: 10th International Conference, SEFM 2012, Thessaloniki, Greece, October 1-5, 2012. Proceedings, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, 33-47 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an algorithm to extract control-flow graphs from Java bytecode, considering exceptional flows. We then establish its correctness: the behavior of the extracted graphs is shown to be a sound over-approximation of the behavior of the original programs. Thus, any temporal safety property that holds for the extracted control-flow graph also holds for the original program. This makes the extracted graphs suitable for performing various static analyses, in particular model checking. The extraction proceeds in two phases. First, we translate Java bytecode into BIR, a stack-less intermediate representation. The BIR transformation is developed as a module of Sawja, a novel static analysis framework for Java bytecode. Besides Sawja’s efficiency, the resulting intermediate representation is more compact than the original bytecode and provides an explicit representation of exceptions. These features make BIR a natural starting point for sound control-flow graph extraction. Next, we formally define the transformation from BIR to control-flow graphs, which (among other features) considers the propagation of uncaught exceptions within method calls. We prove the correctness of the two-phase extraction by suitably combining the properties of the two transformations with those of an idealized control-flow graph extraction algorithm, whose correctness has been proved directly. The control-flow graph extraction algorithm is implemented in the ConFlEx tool. A number of test-cases show the efficiency and the utility of the implementation.

  • 22.
    Andersson, Birger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Bergholtz, Maria
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Edirisuriya, A.
    Ilayperuma, T.
    Jayaweera, P.
    Johannesson, Paul
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Zdravkovic, Jelena
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Enterprise sustainability through the alignment of goal models and business models2008In: CEUR Workshop Proc., 2008, 73-87 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business modelling can be used as a starting point for business analysis. The core of a business model is information about resources, events, agents, and their relations. The motivation of a business model can be found in the goals of an enterprise and those are made explicit in a goal model. This paper discusses the alignment of business models with goal models and proposes a method for constructing business models based on goal models. The method assists in the design of business models that conform to the explicit goals of an enterprise. Main benefits are clear and uniform goal formulations, well founded business model designs, and increased traceability between models.

  • 23.
    Andersson, Dan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Data- och elektroteknik.
    Implementation av prototyp för inomhuspositionering2013Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Development of technology constantly creates new opportunities but it can also mean major chang-es for companies and organizations. Today phones, tablets, laptops, mobile communications and cloud technology make it possible to be no longer bound by the time, location or device in order to work. The change means that a new office type that is more flexible and space efficient due to no fixed workplaces, is becoming more common. A problem with this type of offices that are known as flex-offices is that it is not obvious where or when a colleague is in the office, especially if it is large office with multiple floors.

    The aim of this work is to develop and implement a Location-Based Service for the company Connecta AB. The service will enable users to use their mobile phone to share their current workplace location in an office environment.

    The result of this work is a Location-Based Service that enables a user to use an Android phone with support for Near Field Communcication to share their current workplace position. The cloud-based server solution, Windows Azure is used to store indexed workplace positions.

  • 24. Anzanpour, A.
    et al.
    Rahmani, Amir-Mohammad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Industrial and Medical Electronics. University of Turku, Finland.
    Liljeberg, P.
    Tenhunen, Hannu
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Industrial and Medical Electronics. University of Turku, Finland.
    Context-aware early warning system for in-home healthcare using internet-of-things2016In: 2nd International Summit on Internet of Things, IoT 360° 2015, Springer, 2016, 517-522 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early warning score (EWS) is a prediction method to notify caregivers at a hospital about the deterioration of a patient. Deterioration can be identified by detecting abnormalities in patient’s vital signs several hours prior the condition of the patient gets life-threatening. In the existing EWS systems, monitoring of patient’s vital signs and the determining the score is mostly performed in a paper and pen based way. Furthermore, currently it is done solely in a hospital environment. In this paper, we propose to import this system to patients’ home to provide an automated platform which not only monitors patents’ vital signs but also looks over his/her activities and the surrounding environment. Thanks to the Internet-of-Things technology, we present an intelligent early warning method to remotely monitor in-home patients and generate alerts in case of different medical emergencies or radical changes in condition of the patient. We also demonstrate an early warning score analysis system which continuously performs sensing, transferring, and recording vital signs, activity-related data, and environmental parameters.

  • 25.
    Apelkrans, Mats
    et al.
    Dept of Informatics, Jönköping International Business School.
    Håkansson, Anne
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Information Coordination Using Meta-agents in Information Logistics Processes2008In: Proceedings of Knowledge-Based and Intelligent Information & Engineering Systems: KES2008 / [ed] Ignac Lovrek, Robert J. Howlett, Lakhmi C. Jain, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2008, 788-798 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to coordinate and deliver information in the right time and to the right place, theories from multi-agent systems and information logistics are combined. We use agents to support supply chain by searching for company specific information. Hence, there are a vast number of agents working at the Internet, simultaneously, which requires supervising agents. In this paper, we suggest using meta-agents to control the behaviour of a number of intelligent agents, where the meta-agents are working with coordination of the communication that takes place in a supply chain system. As an example, we look at a manufacturing company receiving orders on items from customers, which need to be produced. The handling of this distributed information flow can be thought of as an Information Logistics Processes and the similarities of the functioning of processes and intelligent agents’ behaviour are illuminated.

  • 26.
    Arad, Cosmin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Dowling, Jim
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Haridi, Seif
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Message-Passing Concurrency for Scalable, Stateful, Reconfigurable Middleware2012In: Middleware 2012: ACM/IFIP/USENIX 13th International Middleware Conference, Montreal, QC, Canada, December 3-7, 2012. Proceedings / [ed] Priya Narasimhan and Peter Triantafillou, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, 208-228 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Message-passing concurrency (MPC) is increasingly being used to build systems software that scales well on multi-core hardware. Functional programming implementations of MPC, such as Erlang, have also leveraged their stateless nature to build middleware that is not just scalable, but also dynamically reconfigurable. However, many middleware platforms lend themselves more naturally to a stateful programming model, supporting session and application state. A limitation of existing programming models and frameworks that support dynamic reconfiguration for stateful middleware, such as component frameworks, is that they are not designed for MPC.

    In this paper, we present Kompics, a component model and programming framework, that supports the construction and composition of dynamically reconfigurable middleware using stateful, concurrent, message-passing components. An added benefit of our approach is that by decoupling our component execution model, we can run the same code in both simulation and production environments. We present the architectural patterns and abstractions that Kompics facilitates and we evaluate them using a case study of a non-trivial key-value store that we built using Kompics. We show how our model enables the systematic development and testing of scalable, dynamically reconfigurable middleware.

  • 27.
    Arad, Cosmin Ionel
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Programming Model and Protocols for Reconfigurable Distributed Systems2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Distributed systems are everywhere. From large datacenters to mobile devices, an ever richer assortment of applications and services relies on distributed systems, infrastructure, and protocols. Despite their ubiquity, testing and debugging distributed systems remains notoriously hard. Moreover, aside from inherent design challenges posed by partial failure, concurrency, or asynchrony, there remain significant challenges in the implementation of distributed systems. These programming challenges stem from the increasing complexity of the concurrent activities and reactive behaviors in a distributed system on the one hand, and the need to effectively leverage the parallelism offered by modern multi-core hardware, on the other hand.

    This thesis contributes Kompics, a programming model designed to alleviate some of these challenges. Kompics is a component model and programming framework for building distributed systems by composing message-passing concurrent components. Systems built with Kompics leverage multi-core machines out of the box, and they can be dynamically reconfigured to support hot software upgrades. A simulation framework enables deterministic execution replay for debugging, testing, and reproducible behavior evaluation for largescale Kompics distributed systems. The same system code is used for both simulation and production deployment, greatly simplifying the system development, testing, and debugging cycle.

    We highlight the architectural patterns and abstractions facilitated by Kompics through a case study of a non-trivial distributed key-value storage system. CATS is a scalable, fault-tolerant, elastic, and self-managing key-value store which trades off service availability for guarantees of atomic data consistency and tolerance to network partitions. We present the composition architecture for the numerous protocols employed by the CATS system, as well as our methodology for testing the correctness of key CATS algorithms using the Kompics simulation framework.

    Results from a comprehensive performance evaluation attest that CATS achieves its claimed properties and delivers a level of performance competitive with similar systems which provide only weaker consistency guarantees. More importantly, this testifies that Kompics admits efficient system implementations. Its use as a teaching framework as well as its use for rapid prototyping, development, and evaluation of a myriad of scalable distributed systems, both within and outside our research group, confirm the practicality of Kompics.

  • 28.
    Ardelius, John
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    On the Performance Analysis of Large Scale, Dynamic, Distributed and Parallel Systems.2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluating the performance of large distributed applications is an important and non-trivial task. With the onset of Internet wide applications there is an increasing need to quantify reliability, dependability and performance of these systems, both as a guide in system design as well as a means to understand the fundamental properties of large-scale distributed systems. Previous research has mainly focused on either formalised models where system properties can be deduced and verified using rigorous mathematics or on measurements and experiments on deployed applications. Our aim in this thesis is to study models on an abstraction level lying between the two ends of this spectrum. We adopt a model of distributed systems inspired by methods used in the study of large scale system of particles in physics and model the application nodes as a set of interacting particles each with an internal state whose actions are specified by the application program. We apply our modeling and performance evaluation methodology to four different distributed and parallel systems. The first system is the distributed hash table (DHT) Chord running in a dynamic environment.  We study the system under two scenarios. First we study how performance (in terms of lookup latency) is affectedon a network with finite communication latency. We show that an average delay in conjunction with other parameters describing changes in the network (such as timescales for network repair and join and leave processes)induces fundamentally different system performance. We also verify our analytical predictions via simulations.In the second scenario we introduce network address translators (NATs) to the network model. This makes the overlay topology non-transitive and we explore the implications of this fact to various performance metrics such as lookup latency, consistency and load balance. The latter analysis is mainly simulation based.Even though these two studies focus on a specific DHT, many of our results can easily be translated to other similar ring-based DHTs with long-range links, and the same methodology can be applied evento DHT's based on other geometries.The second type of system studied is an unstructured gossip protocol running a distributed version of the famous Belman-Ford algorithm. The algorithm, called GAP, generates a spanning tree over the participating nodes and the question we set out to study is how reliable this structure is(in terms of generating accurate aggregate values at the root)  in the presence of node churn. All our analytical results are also verified  using simulations.The third system studied is a content distribution network (CDN) of interconnected caches in an aggregation access network. In this model, content which sits at the leaves of the cache hierarchy tree, is requested by end users. Requests can then either be served by the first cache level or sent further up the tree. We study the performance of the whole system under two cache eviction policies namely LRU and LFU. We compare our analytical results with traces from related caching systems.The last system is a work stealing heuristic for task distribution in the TileraPro64 chip. This system has access to a shared memory and is therefore classified as a parallel system. We create a model for the dynamic generation of tasks as well as how they are executed and distributed among the participating nodes. We study how the heuristic scales when the number of nodes exceeds the number of processors on the chip as well as how different work stealing policies compare with each other. The work on this model is mainly simulation-based.

  • 29.
    Arman, Ala
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Al-Shishtawy, Ahmad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Elasticity controller for Cloud-based key-value stores2012In: Parallel and Distributed Systems (ICPADS), 2012 IEEE 18th International Conference on, IEEE , 2012, 268-275 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clouds provide an illusion of an infinite amount of resources and enable elastic services and applications that are capable to scale up and down (grow and shrink by requesting and releasing resources) in response to changes in its environment, workload, and Quality of Service (QoS) requirements. Elasticity allows to achieve required QoS at a minimal cost in a Cloud environment with its pay-as-you-go pricing model. In this paper, we present our experience in designing a feedback elastically controller for a key-value store. The goal of our research is to investigate the feasibility of the control theoretic approach to the automation of elasticity of Cloud-based key-value stores. We describe design steps necessary to build a feedback controller for a real system, namely Voldemort, which we use as a case study in this work. The design steps include defining touchpoints (sensors and actuators), system identification, and controller design. We have designed, developed, and implemented a prototype of the feedback elasticity controller for Voldemort. Our initial evaluation results show the feasibility of using feedback control to automate elasticity of distributed keyvalue stores.

  • 30. Armengaud, Eric
    et al.
    Biehl, Matthias
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Bourrouilh, Quentin
    Breunig, Michael
    Farfeleder, Stefan
    Hein, Christian
    Oertel, Markus
    Wallner, Alfred
    Zoier, Markus
    Integrated tool chain for improving traceability during the development of automotive systems2012In: ERTS2 2012 | Embedded Real Time Software and Systems, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tool integration is a key factor for improving development efficiency and product quality during the development of safety-relevant embedded systems. We present in this work a demonstrator based on the most recent outcomes of the CESAR project. The proposed integrated tool-chain aims at better linking development activities together, thus improving traceability during requirements engineering, system design, safety analysis and V&V activities using a model-based development approach. We analyze the proposed tool-chain from three different points of view: (1) tool integrator, (2) technology provider, and (3) end-user. These different points of view enable the description of the different technologies used at the different levels and the analysis of the benefits for the end-user.

  • 31.
    Artho, Cyrille
    et al.
    KTH.
    Ölveczky, P.C.
    Preface2017In: 5th International Workshop on Formal Techniques for Safety-Critical Systems, FTSCS 2016, Springer Verlag , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Risks Related to the Use of Software Tools when Developing Cyber-Physical Systems: A Critical Perspective on the Future of Developing Complex, Safety-Critical Systems2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing complexity and size of modern Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) has led to a sharp decline in productivity among CPS designers. Requirements on safety aggravate this problem further, both by being difficult to ensure and due to their high importance to the public.

    Tools, or rather efforts to facilitate the automation of development processes, are a central ingredient in many of the proposed innovations to mitigate this problem. Even though the safety-related implications of introducing automation in development processes have not been extensively studied, it is known that automation has already had a large impact on operational systems. If tools are to play a part in mitigating the increase in safety-critical CPS complexity, then their actual impact on CPS development, and thereby the safety of the corresponding end products, must be sufficiently understood.

    An survey of relevant research fields, such as system safety, software engineering and tool integration, is provided to facilitate the discussion on safety-related implications of tool usage. Based on the identification of industrial safety standards as an important source of information and considering that the risks posed by separate tools have been given considerable attention in the transportation domain, several high-profile safety standards in this domain have been surveyed. According to the surveyed standards, automation should primarily be evaluated on its reliable execution of separate process steps independent of human operators. Automation that only supports the actions of operators during CPS development is viewed as relatively inconsequential.

    A conceptual model and a reference model have been created based on the surveyed research fields. The former defines the entities and relationships most relevant to safety-related risks associated with tool usage. The latter describes aspects of tool integration and how these relate to each other. By combining these models, a risk analysis could be performed and properties of tool chains which need to be ensured to mitigate risk identified. Ten such safety-related characteristics of tool chains are described.

    These safety-related characteristics provide a systematic way to narrow down what to look for with regard to tool usage and risk. The hypothesis that a large set of factors related to tool usage may introduce risk could thus be tested through an empirical study, which identified safety-related weaknesses in support environments tied both to high and low levels of automation. The conclusion is that a broader perspective, which includes more factors related to tool usage than those considered by the surveyed standards, will be needed.

    Three possible reasons to disregard such a broad perspective have been refuted, namely requirements on development processes enforced by the domain of CPS itself, certain characteristics of safety-critical CPS and the possibility to place trust in a proven, manual development process. After finding no strong reason to keep a narrow perspective on tool usage, arguments are put forward as to why the future evolution of support environments may actually increase the importance of such a broad perspective.

    Suggestions for how to update the mental models of the surveyed safety standards, and other standards like them, are put forward based on this identified need for a broader perspective.

  • 33.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Biehl, Matthias
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    El-Khoury, Jad
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Tool Integration Beyond Wasserman2011In: Advanced Information Systems Engineering Workshops / [ed] Camille Salinesi, Oscar Pastor, Berlin: Springer-Verlag , 2011, 270-281 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The typical development environment today consists of many specialized development tools, which are partially integrated, forming a complex tool landscape with partial integration. Traditional approaches for reasoning about tool integration are insufficient to measure the degree of integration and integration optimality in today’s complex tool landscape. This paper presents a reference model that introduces dependencies between, and metrics for, integration aspects to overcome this problem. This model is used to conceive a method for reasoning about tool integration and identify improvements in an industrial case study. Based on this we are able to conclude that our reference model does not detract value from the principles that it is based on, instead it highlights improvements that were not well visible earlier. We conclude the paper by discussing open issues for our reference model, namely if it is suitable to use during the creation of new systems, if the used integration aspects can be subdivided further to support the analysis of secondary issues related to integration, difficulties related to the state dependency between the data and process aspects within the context of developing embedded systems and the analysis of non-functional requirements to support tool integration.

  • 34.
    Attarzadeh-Niaki, Seyed Hosein
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronics and Embedded Systems.
    Sander, Ingo
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronics and Embedded Systems.
    Integrating Functional Mock-up units into a formal heterogeneous system modeling framework2015In: 18th CSI International Symposium on Computer Architecture and Digital Systems, CADS 2015, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Functional Mock-up Interface (FMI) standard defines a method for tool- and platform-independent model exchange and co-simulation of dynamic system models. In FMI, the master algorithm, which executes the imported components, is a timed differential equation solver. This is a limitation for heterogeneous embedded and cyber-physical systems, where models with different time abstractions co-exist and interact. This work integrates FMI into a heterogeneous system modeling and simulation framework as process constructors and co-simulation wrappers. Consequently, each external model communicates with the framework without unnecessary semantic adaptation while the framework provides necessary mechanisms for handling heterogeneity. The presented methods are implemented in the ForSyDe-SystemC modeling framework and tested using a case study.

  • 35.
    Awan, Ahsan Javed
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS. KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Performance Characterization of In-Memory Data Analytics on a Scale-up Server2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The sheer increase in volume of data over the last decade has triggered research in cluster computing frameworks that enable web enterprises to extract big insights from big data. While Apache Spark defines the state of the art in big data analytics platforms for (i) exploiting data-flow and in-memory computing and (ii) for exhibiting superior scale-out performance on the commodity machines, little effort has been devoted at understanding the performance of in-memory data analytics with Spark on modern scale-up servers. This thesis characterizes the performance of in-memory data analytics with Spark on scale-up servers.

    Through empirical evaluation of representative benchmark workloads on a dual socket server, we have found that in-memory data analytics with Spark exhibit poor multi-core scalability beyond 12 cores due to thread level load imbalance and work-time inflation. We have also found that workloads are bound by the latency of frequent data accesses to DRAM. By enlarging input data size, application performance degrades significantly due to substantial increase in wait time during I/O operations and garbage collection, despite 10% better instruction retirement rate (due to lower L1 cache misses and higher core utilization).

    For data accesses we have found that simultaneous multi-threading is effective in hiding the data latencies. We have also observed that (i) data locality on NUMA nodes can improve the performance by 10% on average, (ii) disabling next-line L1-D prefetchers can reduce the execution time by up-to 14%. For GC impact, we match memory behaviour with the garbage collector to improve performance of applications between 1.6x to 3x. and recommend to use multiple small executors that can provide up-to 36% speedup over single large executor.

  • 36.
    Awan, Ahsan Javed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Brorsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Ayguade, Eduard
    Barcelona Super Computing Center and Technical University of Catalunya.
    Architectural Impact on Performance of In-memoryData Analytics: Apache Spark Case StudyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While cluster computing frameworks are contin-uously evolving to provide real-time data analysis capabilities,Apache Spark has managed to be at the forefront of big data an-alytics for being a unified framework for both, batch and streamdata processing. However, recent studies on micro-architecturalcharacterization of in-memory data analytics are limited to onlybatch processing workloads. We compare micro-architectural per-formance of batch processing and stream processing workloadsin Apache Spark using hardware performance counters on a dualsocket server. In our evaluation experiments, we have found thatbatch processing are stream processing workloads have similarmicro-architectural characteristics are bounded by the latency offrequent data access to DRAM. For data accesses we have foundthat simultaneous multi-threading is effective in hiding the datalatencies. We have also observed that (i) data locality on NUMAnodes can improve the performance by 10% on average and(ii)disabling next-line L1-D prefetchers can reduce the executiontime by up-to 14% and (iii) multiple small executors can provideup-to 36% speedup over single large executor

  • 37.
    Awan, Ahsan Javed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Brorsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Ayguade, Eduard
    Technical University of Catalunya, Barcelona Super Computing Center.
    How Data Volume Affects Spark Based Data Analytics on a Scale-up Server2015In: Big Data Benchmarks, Performance Optimization, and Emerging Hardware: 6th Workshop, BPOE 2015, Kohala, HI, USA, August 31 - September 4, 2015. Revised Selected Papers, Springer, 2015, Vol. 9495, 81-92 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sheer increase in volume of data over the last decade has triggered research in cluster computing frameworks that enable web enterprises to extract big insights from big data. While Apache Spark is gaining popularity for exhibiting superior scale-out performance on the commodity machines, the impact of data volume on the performance of Spark based data analytics in scale-up configuration is not well understood. We present a deep-dive analysis of Spark based applications on a large scale-up server machine. Our analysis reveals that Spark based data analytics are DRAM bound and do not benefit by using more than 12 cores for an executor. By enlarging input data size, application performance degrades significantly due to substantial increase in wait time during I/O operations and garbage collection, despite 10 % better instruction retirement rate (due to lower L1 cache misses and higher core utilization). We match memory behaviour with the garbage collector to improve performance of applications between 1.6x to 3x.

  • 38.
    Awan, Ahsan Javed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Brorsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Ayguade, Eduard
    Barcelona Super Computing Center and Technical University of Catalunya.
    Node architecture implications for in-memory data analytics on scale-in clusters2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While cluster computing frameworks are continuously evolving to provide real-time data analysis capabilities, Apache Spark has managed to be at the forefront of big data analytics. Recent studies propose scale-in clusters with in-storage processing devices to process big data analytics with Spark However the proposal is based solely on the memory bandwidth characterization of in-memory data analytics and also does not shed light on the specification of host CPU and memory. Through empirical evaluation of in-memory data analytics with Apache Spark on an Ivy Bridge dual socket server, we have found that (i) simultaneous multi-threading is effective up to 6 cores (ii) data locality on NUMA nodes can improve the performance by 10% on average, (iii) disabling next-line L1-D prefetchers can reduce the execution time by up to 14%, (iv) DDR3 operating at 1333 MT/s is sufficient and (v) multiple small executors can provide up to 36% speedup over single large executor.

  • 39.
    Awan, Ahsan Javed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Brorsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Ayguade, Eduard
    Barcelona Super Computing Center and Technical University of Catalunya.
    Micro-architectural Characterization of Apache Spark on Batch and Stream Processing Workloads2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While cluster computing frameworks are continuously evolving to provide real-time data analysis capabilities, Apache Spark has managed to be at the forefront of big data analytics for being a unified framework for both, batch and stream data processing. However, recent studies on micro-architectural characterization of in-memory data analytics are limited to only batch processing workloads. We compare the micro-architectural performance of batch processing and stream processing workloads in Apache Spark using hardware performance counters on a dual socket server. In our evaluation experiments, we have found that batch processing and stream processing has same micro-architectural behavior in Spark if the difference between two implementations is of micro-batching only. If the input data rates are small, stream processing workloads are front-end bound. However, the front end bound stalls are reduced at larger input data rates and instruction retirement is improved. Moreover, Spark workloads using DataFrames have improved instruction retirement over workloads using RDDs.

  • 40.
    Ayguadé, Eduard
    et al.
    European Center for Parallelism of Barcelona (CEPBA), Technical University of Catalunya (UPC).
    Brorsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Microelectronics and Information Technology, IMIT.
    Brunst, H.
    ) Center for High Performance Computing (ZHR), TU Dresden.
    Hoppe, H. -C
    Pallas GmbH.
    Karlsson, S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Microelectronics and Information Technology, IMIT.
    Martorell, X.
    European Center for Parallelism of Barcelona (CEPBA), Technical University of Catalunya (UPC).
    Nagel, W. E.
    ) Center for High Performance Computing (ZHR), TU Dresden.
    Schlimbach, F.
    Pallas GmbH.
    Utrera, G.
    European Center for Parallelism of Barcelona (CEPBA), Technical University of Catalunya (UPC).
    Winkler, M.
    ) Center for High Performance Computing (ZHR), TU Dresden.
    OpenMP Performance Analysis in the INTONE Project2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Azizpour, Hossein
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Visual Representations and Models: From Latent SVM to Deep Learning2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Two important components of a visual recognition system are representation and model. Both involves the selection and learning of the features that are indicative for recognition and discarding those features that are uninformative. This thesis, in its general form, proposes different techniques within the frameworks of two learning systems for representation and modeling. Namely, latent support vector machines (latent SVMs) and deep learning.

    First, we propose various approaches to group the positive samples into clusters of visually similar instances. Given a fixed representation, the sampled space of the positive distribution is usually structured. The proposed clustering techniques include a novel similarity measure based on exemplar learning, an approach for using additional annotation, and augmenting latent SVM to automatically find clusters whose members can be reliably distinguished from background class. 

    In another effort, a strongly supervised DPM is suggested to study how these models can benefit from privileged information. The extra information comes in the form of semantic parts annotation (i.e. their presence and location). And they are used to constrain DPMs latent variables during or prior to the optimization of the latent SVM. Its effectiveness is demonstrated on the task of animal detection.

    Finally, we generalize the formulation of discriminative latent variable models, including DPMs, to incorporate new set of latent variables representing the structure or properties of negative samples. Thus, we term them as negative latent variables. We show this generalization affects state-of-the-art techniques and helps the visual recognition by explicitly searching for counter evidences of an object presence.

    Following the resurgence of deep networks, in the last works of this thesis we have focused on deep learning in order to produce a generic representation for visual recognition. A Convolutional Network (ConvNet) is trained on a largely annotated image classification dataset called ImageNet with $\sim1.3$ million images. Then, the activations at each layer of the trained ConvNet can be treated as the representation of an input image. We show that such a representation is surprisingly effective for various recognition tasks, making it clearly superior to all the handcrafted features previously used in visual recognition (such as HOG in our first works on DPM). We further investigate the ways that one can improve this representation for a task in mind. We propose various factors involving before or after the training of the representation which can improve the efficacy of the ConvNet representation. These factors are analyzed on 16 datasets from various subfields of visual recognition.

  • 42.
    Azizpour, Hossein
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Arefiyan, Mostafa
    Naderi Parizi, Sobhan
    Carlsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Spotlight the Negatives: A Generalized Discriminative Latent Model2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discriminative latent variable models (LVM) are frequently applied to various visualrecognition tasks. In these systems the latent (hidden) variables provide a formalism formodeling structured variation of visual features. Conventionally, latent variables are de-fined on the variation of the foreground (positive) class. In this work we augment LVMsto includenegativelatent variables corresponding to the background class. We formalizethe scoring function of such a generalized LVM (GLVM). Then we discuss a frameworkfor learning a model based on the GLVM scoring function. We theoretically showcasehow some of the current visual recognition methods can benefit from this generalization.Finally, we experiment on a generalized form of Deformable Part Models with negativelatent variables and show significant improvements on two different detection tasks.

  • 43.
    Azizpour, Hossein
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Carlsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Self-tuned Visual Subclass Learning with Shared Samples An Incremental Approach2013Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer vision tasks are traditionally defined and eval-uated using semantic categories. However, it is known to thefield that semantic classes do not necessarily correspondto a unique visual class (e.g. inside and outside of a car).Furthermore, many of the feasible learning techniques athand cannot model a visual class which appears consistentto the human eye. These problems have motivated the useof 1) Unsupervised or supervised clustering as a prepro-cessing step to identify the visual subclasses to be used ina mixture-of-experts learning regime. 2) Felzenszwalb etal. part model and other works model mixture assignmentwith latent variables which is optimized during learning 3)Highly non-linear classifiers which are inherently capableof modelling multi-modal input space but are inefficient atthe test time. In this work, we promote an incremental viewover the recognition of semantic classes with varied appear-ances. We propose an optimization technique which incre-mentally finds maximal visual subclasses in a regularizedrisk minimization framework. Our proposed approach uni-fies the clustering and classification steps in a single algo-rithm. The importance of this approach is its compliancewith the classification via the fact that it does not need toknow about the number of clusters, the representation andsimilarity measures used in pre-processing clustering meth-ods a priori. Following this approach we show both quali-tatively and quantitatively significant results. We show thatthe visual subclasses demonstrate a long tail distribution.Finally, we show that state of the art object detection meth-ods (e.g. DPM) are unable to use the tails of this distri-bution comprising 50% of the training samples. In fact weshow that DPM performance slightly increases on averageby the removal of this half of the data.

  • 44.
    Baig, Roger
    et al.
    Fundacio Privada per la Xarxa Lliure, Oberta i Neural Guifi.net. Mas l’Esperanca, 08503 Gurb, Catalonia.
    Dowling, Jim
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Escrich, Pau
    Fundacio Privada per la Xarxa Lliure, Oberta i Neural Guifi.net. Mas l’Esperanca, 08503 Gurb, Catalonia.
    Freitag, Felix
    Department of Computer Architecture. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya. Barcelona, Spain .
    Meseguer, Roc
    Department of Computer Architecture. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya. Barcelona, Spain.
    Moll, Agusti
    Fundacio Privada per la Xarxa Lliure, Oberta i Neural Guifi.net. Mas l’Esperanca, 08503 Gurb, Catalonia.
    Navarro, Leandro
    Department of Computer Architecture. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya. Barcelona, Spain.
    Pietrosemoli, Ermanno
    The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP). Trieste, Italy.
    Pueyo, Roger
    Fundacio Privada per la Xarxa Lliure, Oberta i Neural Guifi.net. Mas l’Esperanca, 08503 Gurb, Catalonia.
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Zennaro, Marco
    The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP). Trieste, Italy.
    Deploying Clouds in the Guifi Community Network2015In: Proceedings of the 2015 IFIP/IEEE International Symposium on Integrated Network Management, IM 2015, IEEE , 2015, 1020-1025 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes an operational geographically distributed and heterogeneous cloudinfrastructure with services and applications deployed in the Guifi community network. The presentedcloud is a particular case of a community cloud, developed according to the specific needs and conditions of community networks. We describe the concept of this community cloud, explain our technical choices for building it, and our experience with the deployment of this cloud. We review our solutions and experience on offering the different service models of cloud computing (IaaS, PaaS and SaaS) in community networks. The deployed cloud infrastructure aims to provide stable and attractive cloud services in order to encourage community network user to use, keep and extend it with new services and applications.

  • 45.
    Baig, Roger
    et al.
    Fundacio Privada per la Xarxa Lliure, Oberta i Neural Guifi.net. Mas l’Esperanca, 08503 Gurb, Catalonia.
    Freitag, Felix
    Department of Computer Architecture. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya. Barcelona, Spain .
    Khan, Amin M.
    Department of Computer Architecture. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya. Barcelona, Spain.
    Moll, Agusti
    Fundacio Privada per la Xarxa Lliure, Oberta i Neural Guifi.net. Mas l’Esperanca, 08503 Gurb, Catalonia.
    Navarro, Leandro
    Department of Computer Architecture. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya. Barcelona, Spain.
    Pueyo, Roger
    Fundacio Privada per la Xarxa Lliure, Oberta i Neural Guifi.net. Mas l’Esperanca, 08503 Gurb, Catalonia.
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Community clouds at the edge deployed in Guifi.net2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community clouds are a cloud deployment model in which the cloud infrastructure is built with specific features for a community of users with shared concerns, goals, and interests. Commercialcommunity clouds already operate in several application areas such as in the finance, government and health, fulfilling community-specific requirements. In this demo, a community cloud for citizens is presented. It is formed by devices at the edge of the network, contributed by the members of acommunity network and brought together into a distributed community cloud system through the Cloudy distribution. The demonstration shows to the audience in a live access the deployedcommunity cloud from the perspective of the user, by accessing a Cloudy node, inspecting the services available in the community cloud, and showing the usage of some of its services.

  • 46.
    Baig, Roger
    et al.
    Fundacio Privada per la Xarxa Lliure, Oberta i Neural Guifi.net. Mas l’Esperanca, 08503 Gurb, Catalonia.
    Freitag, Felix
    Department of Computer Architecture. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya. Barcelona, Spain .
    Moll, Agusti
    Fundacio Privada per la Xarxa Lliure, Oberta i Neural Guifi.net. Mas l’Esperanca, 08503 Gurb, Catalonia.
    Navarro, Leandro
    Department of Computer Architecture. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya. Barcelona, Spain.
    Pueyo, Roger
    Fundacio Privada per la Xarxa Lliure, Oberta i Neural Guifi.net. Mas l’Esperanca, 08503 Gurb, Catalonia.
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Cloud-based community services in community networks2016In: 2016 International Conference on Computing, Networking and Communications, ICNC 2016, IEEE conference proceedings, 2016, 1-5 p., 7440621Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wireless networks have shown to be a cost effective solution for an IP-based communication infrastructure in under-served areas. Services and application, if deployed within these wireless networks, add value for the users. This paper shows how cloud infrastructures have been made operational in a community wireless network, as a particular case of a community cloud, developed according to the specific requirements and conditions of the community. We describe the conditions and requirements of such a community cloud and explain our technical choices and experience in its deployment in the community network. The user take-up has started, and our case supports the tendency of cloud computing moving towards the network edge.

  • 47.
    Baig, Roger
    et al.
    Fundacio Privada per la Xarxa Lliure, Oberta i Neural Guifi.net. Mas l’Esperanca, 08503 Gurb, Catalonia.
    Freitag, Felix
    Department of Computer Architecture. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya. Barcelona, Spain .
    Moll, Agusti
    Fundacio Privada per la Xarxa Lliure, Oberta i Neural Guifi.net. Mas l’Esperanca, 08503 Gurb, Catalonia.
    Navarro, Leandro
    Department of Computer Architecture. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya. Barcelona, Spain.
    Pueyo, Roger
    Fundacio Privada per la Xarxa Lliure, Oberta i Neural Guifi.net. Mas l’Esperanca, 08503 Gurb, Catalonia.
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Community network clouds as a case for the IEEE Intercloud standardization2015In: 2015 IEEE Conference on Standards for Communications and Networking, CSCN 2015, 2015, 269-274 p., 7390456Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The IEEE P2302 Intercloud WG conducts work since 2011 on the project Standard for Intercloud Interoperability and Federation with the goal to define a standard architecture and building components for large-scale interoperability of independent cloud providers. While the standardization process has achieved fine-grained definitions of several Intercloud components, a deployment of the Intercloud to demonstrate the architectural feasibility is not yet operational. In this paper, we describe a deployed community network cloud and we show how it matches in several aspects the vision of the Intercloud. Similar to the Intercloud, the community network cloud consists of many small cloud providers, which for interoperability use a set of common services. In this sense, the community network cloud is a real use case for elements that the Intercloud standardization WG envisions, and can feed back to and even become part of the Intercloud. In fact, a study on Small or Medium Enterprise (SME) provided commercial services in the community network cloud indicates the importance of the success of the Intercloud standardization initiative for SMEs.

  • 48.
    Baldini, Gianmarco
    et al.
    Institute for the Protection and Security of the Citizen (IPSC), Italy.
    Kounelis, Ioannis
    Institute for the Protection and Security of the Citizen (IPSC), Italy.
    Nai Fovino, Igor
    Institute for the Protection and Security of the Citizen (IPSC), Italy.
    Neisse, Ricardo
    Institute for the Protection and Security of the Citizen (IPSC), Italy.
    A Framework for Privacy Protection and Usage Control of Personal Data in a Smart City Scenario2013In: Critical Information Infrastructures Security: 8th International Workshop, CRITIS 2013, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, September 16-18, 2013, Revised Selected Papers, Springer Publishing Company, 2013, 212-217 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we address trust and privacy protection issues related to identity and personal data provided by citizens in a smart city environment. Our proposed solution combines identity management, trust negotiation, and usage control. We demonstrate our solution in a case study of a smart city during a crisis situation.

  • 49.
    Balliu, Musard
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Logics for Information Flow Security:From Specification to Verification2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Software is becoming  increasingly  ubiquitous and today we find software running everywhere. There is software driving our favorite  game  application or  inside the web portal we use to read the morning  news, and   when we book a vacation.  Being so commonplace, software has become an easy target to compromise  maliciously or at best to get it wrong. In fact, recent trends and highly-publicized attacks suggest that vulnerable software  is at  the root of many security attacks.     

    Information flow security is the research field that studies  methods and techniques to provide strong security guarantees against  software security attacks and vulnerabilities.  The goal of an  information flow analysis is to rigorously check how  sensitive information is used by the software application and ensure that this information does not escape the boundaries of the application, unless it is properly granted permission to do so by the security policy at hand.  This process can   be challenging asit first requires to determine what the applications security policy is and then to provide a mechanism  to enforce that policy against the  software application.  In this thesis  we address the problem of (information flow) policy specification and policy enforcement by leveraging formal methods, in particular logics and language-based analysis and verification techniques.

    The thesis contributes to the state of the art of information flow security in several directions, both theoretical and practical. On the policy specification side, we provide a  framework to reason about  information flow security conditions using the notion of knowledge. This is accompanied  by logics that  can be used  to express the security policies precisely in a syntactical manner. Also, we study the interplay between confidentiality and integrity  to enforce security in  presence of active attacks.  On the verification side, we provide several symbolic algorithms to effectively check whether an application adheres to the associated security policy. To achieve this,  we propose techniques  based on symbolic execution and first-order reasoning (SMT solving) to first extract a model of the target application and then verify it against the policy.  On the practical side, we provide  tool support by automating our techniques and  thereby making it possible  to verify programs written in Java or ARM machine code.  Besides the expected limitations, our case studies show that the tools can be used to  verify the security of several realistic scenarios.

    More specifically, the thesis consists of two parts and six chapters. We start with an introduction giving an overview of the research problems and the results of the thesis. Then we move to the specification part which  relies on knowledge-based reasoning and epistemic logics to specify state-based and trace-based information flow conditions and on the weakest precondition calculus to certify security in  presence of active attacks.  The second part of the thesis addresses the problem of verification  of the security policies introduced in the first part.  We use symbolic execution  and  SMT solving techniques to enable   model checking of the security properties.  In particular, we implement a tool that verifies noninterference  and declassification policies for Java programs. Finally, we conclude with relational verification of low level code, which is also supported by a tool.

  • 50.
    Balliu, Musard
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Dam, Mads
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Guanciale, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Automating Information Flow Analysis of Low Level Code2014In: Proceedings of CCS’14, November 3–7, 2014, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low level code is challenging: It lacks structure, it uses jumps and symbolic addresses, the control ow is often highly optimized, and registers and memory locations may be reused in ways that make typing extremely challenging. Information ow properties create additional complications: They are hyperproperties relating multiple executions, and the possibility of interrupts and concurrency, and use of devices and features like memory-mapped I/O requires a departure from the usual initial-state nal-state account of noninterference. In this work we propose a novel approach to relational verication for machine code. Verication goals are expressed as equivalence of traces decorated with observation points. Relational verication conditions are propagated between observation points using symbolic execution, and discharged using rst-order reasoning. We have implemented an automated tool that integrates with SMT solvers to automate the verication task. The tool transforms ARMv7 binaries into an intermediate, architecture-independent format using the BAP toolset by means of a veried translator. We demonstrate the capabilities of the tool on a separation kernel system call handler, which mixes hand-written assembly with gcc-optimized output, a UART device driver and a crypto service modular exponentiation routine.

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