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  • 1.
    A Asif, Farazee M
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Circular Manufacturing Systems: A development framework with analysis methods and tools for implementation2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The society today lives on the philosophy of ‘take-make-use-dispose.’ In the long run, this is not sustainable as the natural resources and the waste carrying capacity of the earth are limited. Therefore, it is essential to reduce dependency on the natural resources by decoupling the growth from the consumption. In this venture, both the society and the manufacturing industry have a vital role to play. The society needs to shift towards Circular Economy that rests upon the philosophy of ‘take-make-use-reuse’ and the manufacturing industry has to be a major stakeholder in this shift. Despite being proven to be both economically and environmentally beneficial, successful examples of circular systems are few today. This is primarily due to two reasons; firstly, there is a lack of systemic and systematic approach to guide industries and secondly, there is a lack of analysis methods and tools that are capable of assessing different aspects of circular manufacturing systems. Taking on to these challenges, the objective of this research is to bring forward a framework with methods and decision support tools that are essential to implement circular manufacturing systems. The initial conceptual framework with the systemic approach is developed based on extensive review and analysis of research, which is further adapted for industrial implementation. Systematic analysis methods, decision support and implementation tools are developed to facilitate this adaptation. This development has been supported by four cases from diverse manufacturing sectors. Behind each decision support tool, there are analysis methods built upon mainly system dynamics principles. These tools are based on simulation platforms called Stella and Anylogic. Among other things, these tools are capable of assessing the performance of closed-loop supply chains, consequences of resource scarcity, potential gains from resource conservation and overall economic and environmental performance of circular manufacturing systems.

  • 2.
    A Asif, Farazee M
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Bianchi, Carmine
    University of Palermo (ITALY) Faculty of Political Sciences - Department of International Studies .
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Performance analysis of the closed loop supply chain2012In: Journal of Remanufacturing, ISSN 2210-4690, Vol. 2, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The question of resource scarcity and emerging pressure of environmental legislations has brought a new challenge for the manufacturing industry. On the one hand, there is a huge population that demands a large quantity of commodities; on the other hand, these demands have to be met by minimum resources and pollution. Resource conservative manufacturing (ResCoM) is a proposed holistic concept to manage these challenges. The successful implementation of this concept requires cross functional collaboration among relevant fields, and among them, closed loop supply chain is an essential domain. The paper aims to highlight some misconceptions concerning the closed loop supply chain, to discuss different challenges, and in addition, to show how the proposed concept deals with those challenges through analysis of key performance indicators (KPI).

    Methods

    The work presented in this paper is mainly based on the literature review. The analysis of performance of the closed loop supply chain is done using system dynamics, and the Stella software has been used to do the simulation. Findings The results of the simulation depict that in ResCoM; the performance of the closed loop supply chain is much enhanced in terms of supply, demand, and other uncertainties involved. The results may particularly be interesting for industries involved in remanufacturing, researchers in the field of closed loop supply chain, and other relevant areas. Originality The paper presented a novel research concept called ResCoM which is supported by system dynamics models of the closed loop supply chain to demonstrate the behavior of KPI in the closed loop supply chain.

  • 3.
    A Monfared, Behzad
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Design and Construction of a Small Ammonia Heat Pump2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In view of the fact that most of the synthetic refrigerants, in case of leakage or release, are harmful to the environment by contributing in global warming or depleting stratospheric ozone layer, many research works have been done recently to find alternative refrigerants posing no or negligible threat to the environment. Among alternative refrigerants, ammonia, a natural refrigerant with zero Global Warming Potential (GWP) and Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP), can be a sensible choice.Although ammonia has been used for many years in large industrial systems, its application in small units is rare. In this project a small heat pump with about 7 kW heating capacity at -5 °C and +40 °C evaporation and condensation temperatures is designed and built to work with ammonia as refrigerant. The heat pump is expected to produce enough heat to keep a single-family house warm in Sweden and to provide tap hot water for the house. After successful completion of this project, it is planned to install the heat pump in a house to test it throughout a heating season to study its performance in real working conditions.Since ammonia is flammable and toxic in high concentrations, the refrigerant charge is tried to be kept low in the heat pump to reduce the risk of fire or poisoning in case of unwanted release of refrigerant to the surroundings. The compact design of the heat pump helps reducing the refrigerant charge. Besides, considering the limited space normally reserved for installation of a heat pump in a house, the compact design of the heat pump is necessary.

  • 4.
    Aare, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Kleiven, Svein
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Halldin, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Injury tolerances for oblique impact helmet testing2004In: International Journal of Crashworthiness, ISSN 1358-8265, Vol. 9, no 1, 15-23 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most frequently sustained severe injuries in motorcycle crashes are injuries to the head, and many of these are caused by rotational force. Rotational force is most commonly the result of oblique impacts to the head. Good testing methods for evaluating the effects of such impacts are currently lacking. There is also a need for improving our understanding of the effects of oblique impacts on the human head. Helmet standards currently in use today do not measure rotational effects in test dummy heads. However rotational force to the head results in large shear strains arising in the brain, which has been proposed as a cause of traumatic brain injuries like diffuse axonal injuries (DAI). This paper investigates a number of well-defined impacts, simulated using a detailed finite element (FE) model of the human head, an FE model of the Hybrid III dummy head and an FE model of a helmet. The same simulations were performed on both the FE human head model and the FE Hybrid III head model, both fitted with helmets. Simulations on both these heads were performed to describe the relationship between load levels in the FE Hybrid III head model and strains in the brain tissue in the FE human head model. In this study, the change in rotational velocity and the head injury criterion (HIC) value were chosen as appropriate measurements. It was concluded that both rotational and translational effects are important when predicting the strain levels in the human brain.

  • 5.
    Aarno, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Lingelbach, F.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Constrained path planning and task-consistent path adaptation for mobile manipulators2005In: 2005 12th International Conference on Advanced Robotics, 2005, 268-273 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents our ongoing research in the design of a versatile service robot capable of operating in a home or office environment. Ideas presented here cover architectural issues and possible applications for such a robot system with focus on tasks requiring constrained end-effector motions. Two key components of such system is a path planner and a reactive behavior capable of force relaxation and path adaptation. These components are presented in detail along with an overview of the software architecture they fit into.

  • 6.
    Abacar, Armando
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Optimization of Maputo Power Plant2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Electricidade de Moçambique, E.P. (EDM) is the power utility in Mozambique, responsible to generate, transport and distribute electricity all over the country. The company has three gas turbines installed at Maputo Power Plant. All units burn diesel oil and are used only for back up. Currently only the unit #2 is available for operation.

    The main constraint that EDM faces is the high operation costs due to diesel price. Hence the company is considering converting units #2 and #3 to burn natural gas, resource available locally. The country is currently exporting natural gas to the neighbouring Republic of South Africa.

    This MSc thesis project calculates the power output of all gas turbines when burning natural gas and optimizes the power plant capacity by proposing modifications of the current power turbine cycles to allow sustainable operation

  • 7. Abbas, Ghazanfar
    et al.
    Chaudhry, M. Ashraf
    Raza, Rizwan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Singh, Manish
    Liu, Qinghua
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Qin, Haiying
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Study of CuNiZnGdCe-Nanocomposite Anode for Low Temperature SOFC2012In: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Letters, ISSN 1941-4900, Vol. 4, no 4, 389-393 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composite electrodes of Cu0.16Ni0.27Zn0.37Ce0.16Gd0.04 (CNZGC) oxides have been successfully synthesized by solid state reaction method as anode material for low temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LTSOFC). These electrodes are characterized by XRD followed by sintering at various time periods and temperatures. Particle size of optimized composition was calculated 40-85 nm and sintered at 800 degrees C for 4 hours. Electrical conductivity of 4.14 S/cm was obtained at a temperature of 550 degrees C by the 4-prob DC method. The activation energy was calculated 4 x 10(-2) eV at 550 degrees C. Hydrogen was used as fuel and air as oxidant at anode and cathode sides respectively. I-V/I-P curves were obtained in the temperature range of 400-550 degrees C. The maximum power density was achieved for 570 mW/cm(2) at 550 degrees C.

  • 8.
    Abbas, Ghazanfar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Raza, Rizwan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Ashfaq, M.
    Chaudhry, M. Ashraf
    Khan, Ajmal
    Ahmad, Imran
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Electrochemical study of nanostructured electrode for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LTSOFC)2014In: International journal of energy research (Print), ISSN 0363-907X, E-ISSN 1099-114X, Vol. 38, no 4, 518-523 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zn-based nanostructured Ba0.05Cu0.25Fe0.10Zn0.60O (BCFZ) oxide electrode material was synthesized by solid-state reaction for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell. The cell was fabricated by sandwiching NK-CDC electrolyte between BCFZ electrodes by dry press technique, and its performance was assessed. The maximum power density of 741.87 mW-cm(-2) was achieved at 550 degrees C. The crystal structure and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and SEM. The particle size was calculated to be 25 nm applying Scherer's formula from XRD data. Electronic conductivities were measured with the four-probe DC method under hydrogen and air atmosphere. AC Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of the BCFZ oxide electrode was also measured in hydrogen atmosphere at 450 degrees C.

  • 9. Abbas, Ghazanfar
    et al.
    Raza, Rizwan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology. COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Pakistan .
    Chaudhry, M. A.
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Preparation and characterization of nanocomposite calcium doped ceria electrolyte with alkali carbonates (NK-CDC) for SOFC2010In: ASME 2010 8th International Conference on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology, FUELCELL 2010, ASME Press, 2010, 427-432 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The entire world's challenge is to find out the renewable energy sources due to rapid depletion of fossil fuels because of their high consumption. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are believed to be the best alternative source which converts chemical energy into electricity without combustion. Nanostructured study is required to develop highly ionic conductive electrolyte for SOFCs. In this work, the calcium doped ceria (Ce0.8Ca0.2O 1.9) coated with 20% molar ratio of two alkali carbonates (CDC-M: MCO3, where M= Na and K) electrolyte was prepared by co-precipitation method in this study. Ni based electrode was used to fabricate the cell by dry pressing technique. The crystal structure and surface morphology was characterized by X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The particle size was calculated in the range of 10-20nm by Scherrer's formula and compared with SEM and TEM results. The ionic conductivity was measured by using AC Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) method. The activation energy was also evaluated. The performance of the cell was measured 0.567W/cm2 at temperature 550°C with hydrogen as a fuel.

  • 10.
    Abbas, Ghazanfar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology. COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Pakistan.
    Raza, Rizwan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology. COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Pakistan.
    Khan, M. Ajmal
    Ahmad, Imran
    Chaudhry, M. Ashraf
    Sherazi, Tauqir A.
    Mohsin, Munazza
    Ahmad, Mukhtar
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Synthesize and characterization of nanocomposite anodes for low temperature solid oxide fuel cell2015In: International journal of hydrogen energy, ISSN 0360-3199, E-ISSN 1879-3487, Vol. 40, no 1, 891-897 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solid oxide fuel cells have much capability to become an economical alternative energy conversion technology having appropriate materials that can be operated at comparatively low temperature in the range of 400-600 degrees C. The nano-scale engineering has been incorporated to improve the catalytic activity of anode materials for solid oxide fuel cells. Nanostructured Al0.10NixZn0.90-xO oxides were prepared by solid state reaction, which were then mixed with the prepared Gadolinium doped Ceria GDC electrolyte. The crystal structure and surface morphology were characterized by XRD and SEM. The particle size was evaluated by XRD data and found in the range of 20-50 nm, which was then ensured by SEM pictures. The pellets of 13 mm diameter were pressed by dry press technique and electrical conductivities (DC and AC) were determined by four probe techniques and the values have been found to be 10.84 and 4.88 S/cm, respectively at hydrogen atmosphere in the temperature range of 300-600 degrees C. The Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) analysis exhibits the pure electronic behavior at hydrogen atmosphere. The maximum power density of ANZ-GDC composite anode based solid oxide fuel cell has been achieved 705 mW/cm(2) at 550 degrees C.

  • 11.
    Abbas, Maryam
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Knowledge Management vid uppdragsarbete2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 12.
    Abbas Sohani, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Waste heat recovery from SSAB’s Steel plant in Oxelösund using a Heat Pump2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project was focused on waste heat potentials in the iron and steel industry. High temperature industrial heat pumps (HTIHP) for medium temperature, waste heat recovery were modelled. The SSAB iron and steel plant in Oxelösund was used as an example. The iron and steel industry in Sweden is a large energy consumer, together with the pulp and paper industry. There is also a large potential for waste heat recovery in the steel industry. This is already done in for instance Luleå [1].

    Iron and steel production methods and waste heat recovery in the world, especially in the US and Sweden, have been reviewed in a literature study. Current methods and potentials of waste heat recovery in the iron and steel industry of Sweden were especially reviewed. The SSAB iron and steel plant in Oxelösund has been planning for decades, not only to heat the city of Oxelösund as today, but also to expand to the nearby city of Nyköping 12 km away [2].

    Typically the maximum temperature entering the district heating network of Nyköping would be 110 °C on the coldest day. The heat pump output from a waste heat recovery plant generally does not have to reach such a high temperature. However, 80 °C maximum forward temperature would surely be enough to use recovered heat all the time. Even a lower temperature like 75 °C would probably be sufficient – as only a few heat exchangers in individual houses then would have to be changed, to accept that lower temperature. The extra degrees between 80 °C (75 °C) and 110 °C can be taken with heat from e.g. existing biofuel furnaces locally in Nyköping.

    Using heat pumps in this context is not self-evident. Generally the heat flows from a steel plant are available at such high temperatures that no heat pump ideally is needed. However collecting the heat at those high temperatures, in an old plant, can get very expensive and interfere with the processes. Therefore the study is focusing on medium temperature (30 – 40 °C) waste heat potentials implementing High Temperature Industrial Heat Pumps (HTIHP). The heat is now being rejected by a cooling tower. That way, easily available waste heat, can cover 50% of the total need from Nyköping. Assuming a COP of around 5 and adding the electricity needed to run the heat pump, the total will result in totally 62% of the energy need for Nyköping.

    The Oxelösund Plant is just an example and the study is really focusing on HITIHP for this and similar purposes. Appropriate components and refrigerants have been evaluated and the general layouts of proper HITIHP types are suggested. A literature study on the best choice of refrigerant in the high temperature heat pump has been done.

    A two stage high temperature heat pump has been modeled and simulated using the available heat sink capacity and temperature, together with the demanded temperatures in the district heating network. The simulation has mainly been performed using the EES software. R245fa is e.g. a good candidate as refrigerant in a second stage (high temperature stage) of a two stage cascade heat pump. With R245fa even higher temperatures than 90°C to the district heating can be achieved. Earlier, R134a would be used in this application but R245fa has e.g. a lower GWP (around 1000 instead of around 1300) [3]. Many different refrigerants have been simulated in the first of two stages of a smaller screw compressor driven cascade heat pump. Also a two stage turbo compressor throttling heat pump, using a flash tank, has been simulated, showing a good performance. In the latter case both, refrigerants R1234ze(z) and R245fa have good characteristics but R1234ze(z) has a much lower GWP.

    All COPs, compressor energy consumptions, condenser pressures, pressure ratios were compared. R245fa-R245fa and R600-R245fa were studied in the two stage cascade systems. They came out with the best results. R717-R245fa also showed a very good performance, but had other limitations. In two stage flash tank systems, R1234ze(z) had the best performance (COP) and no temperature loss between the two stages (like in the cascade systems). If SSAB Oxelösund’s blast furnace and cooling tower water would not be available, the turbo heat pump can produce the demanded heat, using sea water as heat source instead.

    The CO2 emission reduction is very hard to calculate. That will be more of a political conviction problem. A very rough cost estimation of the projects investment cost is also done. It will cost between 420 and 450 MSEK. This cost estimation includes a heat pump and 12 km pipe to Nyköping. The cost of heat delivered in Nyköping will vary between 0,2 and 0,65 SEK/kWh when the cost of electricity is varied between 0,5 and 2 SEK/kWh (include taxes). In that price the capital costs for the heat pump and pipe is included. The high cost level 0, 65 SEK/kWh assumes that sea water is used as heat source.

    A cooling towers waste heat can be recovered, using a high temperature heat pump. This heat can thus be delivered from Oxelösund to Nyköping. The economic viability of this idea is only superficially covered. Factors like if the old furnace in Nyköping needs upgrading, which could be postponed, could possibly tip the project into go. Maitenance cost, of the existing cooling tower, is another such factor, initiating the project. A waste heat pipe between Oxelösund and Nyköping has been studied at least since the middle of the 1970:s by e.g. Lars Åke Cronholm [4]. Could it be the right time now?

  • 13. Abbasi Hoseini, A.
    et al.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Andersson, H. I.
    Finite-length effects on dynamical behavior of rod-like particles in wall-bounded turbulent flow2015In: International Journal of Multiphase Flow, ISSN 0301-9322, E-ISSN 1879-3533, Vol. 76, 13-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combined Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) measurements have been performed in dilute suspensions of rod-like particles in wall turbulence. PIV results for the turbulence field in the water table flow apparatus compared favorably with data from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of channel flow turbulence and the universality of near-wall turbulence justified comparisons with DNS of fiber-laden channel flow. In order to examine any shape effects on the dynamical behavior of elongated particles in wall-bounded turbulent flow, fibers with three different lengths but the same diameter were used. In the logarithmic part of the wall-layer, the translational fiber velocity was practically unaffected by the fiber length l. In the buffer layer, however, the fiber dynamics turned out to be severely constrained by the distance z to the wall. The short fibers accumulated preferentially in low-speed areas and adhered to the local fluid speed. The longer fibers (l/z > 1) exhibited a bi-modal probability distribution for the fiber velocity, which reflected an almost equal likelihood for a long fiber to reside in an ejection or in a sweep. It was also observed that in the buffer region, high-speed long fibers were almost randomly oriented whereas for all size cases the slowly moving fibers preferentially oriented in the streamwise direction. These phenomena have not been observed in DNS studies of fiber suspension flows and suggested l/z to be an essential parameter in a new generation of wall-collision models to be used in numerical studies.

  • 14.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    A comparison between particle characteristics between two railway brake pads2013Report (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    Sharif university of Technology, Iran.
    A feasibilty study to establish freight cars overhaul center (Master thesis), Sharif university of technology2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 16.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    A study of nanostructured particles in railway tunnels2013Report (Other academic)
  • 17. Abbasi, Saeed
    Implementing theory of constraint in choosing six sigma project2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Nanostructured particles in/outside compartment of running train, an on board measurement2013Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Non-exhaust Nano particle emission in Rail traffic2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Towards elimination of airborne particles from rail traffic2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the investigation of wear particles from rail transport started in the late 1910s, the high mass concentrations of these particles have prompted concern among researchers interested in air quality. However, effective action has yet to be taken because relevant knowledge is still missing. This thesis provides knowledge of airborne wear particles originating from rail transport. Some aspects of their characteristic parameters, such as size, mass concentration, number concentration, and morphology, were investigated in the field and in laboratory tests. We also discuss means to mitigate non-exhaust emissions, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various test set-ups in the seven appended journal papers:Paper A reviews recent studies of exhaust and non-exhaust emissions from rail vehicles. The results, measurements, adverse health effects, and proposed or applied solutions presented in this literature are summarized in this paper.Paper B summarizes the results of field tests we conducted. The effects of curve negotiation and braking under different real conditions were investigated in a field test in which on-board measurements were made. The elemental composition and morphology of the particles emitted and their potential sources were also investigated.Paper C describes how a pin-on-disc machine can be used to reproduce real operating conditions during mechanical train braking in a controlled laboratory setting. The results were validated by comparing the field test results with the results of laboratory studies.Paper D presents comprehensive results of laboratory studies of airborne particles from different braking materials. A new index is introduced in this paper, which can be used as a quantitative metric for assessing airborne wear particle emission rates.Paper E describes the effects of using various friction modifiers and lubricants on the characteristics of airborne particles from wheel–rail contact under lubricated and unlubricated conditions.Paper F reports work to simulate thermoelastic instability in the cast-iron braking material. We simulated the fluctuation of the flash temperature by considering the temperature dependency of the material properties and the transformation of the contact state due to thermomechanical phenomena and wear.Paper G reviews new full- and sub-scale measurements of non-exhaust emissions from ground transport. The advantages and disadvantages of on-board measurements, pin-on-disc tests, dynamometer tests, and test rig studies are discussed in this paper.

  • 21.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Ekstrand-Hammarström, Barbara
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI),.
    Bergström, Ulrika
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI),.
    Bucht, Anders
    Deptartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, 901 89, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Jansson, Anders
    Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University, Stockholm, 106 91, Sweden.
    Biological response in lung cells by brake dust from a novel set-up to generate one sourcewear particles2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Jansson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olander, Lars
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Services Engineering.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    A pin-on-disc study of the rate of airborne wear particle emissions from railway braking materials2012In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 284, 18-29 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study investigates the characteristics of particles generated from the wear of braking materials, and provides an applicable index for measuring and comparing wear particle emissions. A pin-on-disc tribometer equipped with particle measurement instruments was used. The number concentration, size, morphology, and mass concentration of generated particles were investigated and reported for particles 10 nm-32 mu m in diameter. The particles were also collected on filters and investigated using EDS and SEM. The effects of wear mechanisms on particle morphology and changes in particle concentration are discussed. A new index, the airborne wear particle emission rate (AWPER), is suggested that could be used in legislation to control non-exhaust emissions from transport modes, particularly rail transport.

  • 23.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Jansson, Anders
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Particle emissions from rail traffic: a literature review2013In: Critical reviews in environmental science and technology, ISSN 1064-3389, E-ISSN 1547-6537, Vol. 43, no 23, 2211-2244 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Particle emissions are a drawback of rail transport. This work is a comprehensive presentation of recent research into particle emissions from rail vehicles. Both exhaust and non-exhaust particle emissions are considered when examining particle characteristics such as  PM10, and PM2.5 concentration levels, size, morphology, composition, as well as adverse health effects, current legislation, and available and proposed solutions for reducing such emissions. High concentration levels in enclosed rail traffic environments are reported and some toxic effects of the particles. We find that only a few limited studies have examined the adverse health effects of non-exhaust particle emissions and that no relevant legislation exists. Thus further research in this area is warranted.

  • 24.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Moslemi, Kianoush
    A new approach for optimization of heating system in tank wagons2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olander, Lars
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Services Engineering.
    Larsson, Christina
    Bombardier Transportation Sweden AB, Västerås, Sweden.
    Jansson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Tribologi.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    A field test study of airborne wear particles from a running regional train2012In: IMechE, Part F: Journal of Rail and Rapid Transit, ISSN 0954-4097, Vol. 226, no 1, 95-109 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inhalable airborne particles have inverse health affect. In railways, mechanical brakes, the wheel–rail contact, current collectors, ballast, sleepers, and masonry structures yield particulate matter. Field tests examined a Swedish track using a train instrumented with particle measurement devices, brake pad temperature sensors, and speed and brake sensors. The main objective of this field test was to study the characteristics of particles generated from disc brakes on a running train with an on-board measuring set-up.

    Two airborne particle sampling points were designated, one near a pad–rotor disc brake contact and a second under the frame, not near a mechanical brake or the wheel–rail contact; the numbers and size distributions of the particles detected were registered and evaluated under various conditions (e.g. activating/deactivating electrical brakes or negotiating curves). During braking, three speed/temperature-dependent particle peaks were identified in the fine region, representing particles 280 nm, 350 nm, and 600 nm in diameter. In the coarse region, a peak was discerned for particles 3–6 μm in diameter. Effects of brake pad temperature on particle size distribution were also investigated. Results indicate that the 280 nm peak increased with increasing temperature, and that electrical braking significantly reduced airborne particle numbers. FESEM images captured particles sizing down to 50 nm. The ICP-MS results indicated that Fe, Cu, Zn, Al, Ca, and Mg were the main elements constituting the particles.

     

  • 26.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    A study of friction modifiers on airborne wear particles from wheel-rail contact2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wheel-rail contact and its wear process are crucial issues in maintenance and operating of rolling stocks. During wheel-rail contact, materials in mating faces are worn off and some of them transferred to airborne particles. Eventhough the wear process in wheel-rail contact are well-known, few studies have been conducted on the airborne particles from wheel-rail contact.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of using different friction modifier on the amount of airbotne particles from wheel-rail contact in a laboratory simulation. In this regard, a series laboratory tests were used by using round head pin (R=25mm) and dead weight 40 N in a pin-on-disc machine. This set-up simulates a contact pressure around 750 MPa on the pin head.

    The amount of airborne particles and their characteristics were investigated in dry-contact, and non-dry contacts whereas a lubricant, Binol rail 510 and a friction modifier, tramsilence were used. According to the results, the effects of using Binol rail to reduce the amount of airborne particles were considerable.

  • 27.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Airborne wear particles from train traffic2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Experiences of measuring airborne wear particles from braking materials and the wheel - Rail contact2012In: 9th International Conference on Contact Mechanics and Wear of Rail/Wheel Systems, CM 2012, Southwest Jiaotong University , 2012, 608-609 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During braking both of the discs and pads of disc brakes are worn. Since disc brakes are not sealed, some of the generated wear particles can become airborne. The same condition also holds for block brakes utilized in rail vehicles. Furthermore, the wheel-rail contact is also subjected to wear processes during braking as well as during normal running. This contact also contributes to generation of airborne particles. Several studies have found an association between adverse health effects and the concentration of particles in the atmosphere, so it is of interest to improve our knowledge of the airborne wear particles. The present work includes results from full scale testing of rail vehicles. Particle size distribution, morphology and elemental contents are presented and discussed. Due to high back ground concentration levels in field tests, dedicated laboratory test set ups on a reduced scale were designed and utilized for airborne particle studies with zero background level. Promising correlation between field test and the lab set up is identified. Different ways of using this test set up for evaluating how the composition of the airborne particles is classified with respect to their health effects are discussed. Furthermore, different ways of using the proposed method to rank and to quantify airborne particle emission factors are presented.

  • 29.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Experiences of measuring airborne wear particles from braking materials and wheel-rail contact2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During braking both of the discs and pads of disc brakes are worn. Since disc brakes are not sealed, some of the generated wear particles can become airborne.  Wheel-rail is also subjected to wear process during braking as well as normal running. They also contribute to generate airborne particles. Several studies have found an association between adverse health effects and the concentration of particles in the atmosphere, so it is of interest to improve our knowledge of the airborne wear particles generated by disc brakes.

    The present work includes results from full scale testing of rail vehicles. Particle size distribution, morphology and elemental contents are presented and discussed for different combinations of disc and pad materials. Due to high back ground concentration levels in field tests, dedicated laboratory test set ups on a reduced scale were designed and utilized for airborne particle studies with zero background level.

    Promising correlation between field test and the lab set up is identified. Different ways of using this test set up for evaluating how the composition of the airborne particles is classified with respect to their health effects are discussed. Furthermore, different ways of using the proposed method to rank and to quantify airborne particle emission factors are presented.

  • 30.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Lack of applicable criteria in non-exhaust emission legislation: AWPER index a practical solution2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olander, Lars
    A field investigation of the size and morphology and chemical composition of airborne particles in rail transport2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olander, Lars
    Larsson, christina
    A field investigation of the size, morphology and chemical composition of airborne particles in rail transport2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The health effects of inhalable airborne particles are well documented. In the European Union the European Council mandates that the level of airborne particles with a diameter smaller than 10 µm (PM10) must not exceed an annual average of 40 µg/m3. Examples of possible sources from rail transport are mechanical brakes, wheel rail contact, current collectors, ballast, sleepers and masonry structures. In this regard, a series of field tests have been conducted on a regular Swedish track using a regional train instrumented with: particle measurement devices, temperature sensors in brake pads and sensors to measure the magnitude of train speed and a GPS.

    Two sampling points for airborne particles were designated in the train under frame. One of the sampling points was near a pad to rotor disc brake contact and a second global sampling point was chosen under the frame, but not near a mechanical brake or the wheel-rail contact. The first one was highly influenced by brake pad wear debris and the other one was influenced by all of the brake pads, wheel and rail wear debris as well as re-suspension. In each sampling points, three tubes were linked to three particle measurement devices. Two sets of Ptrak, Dustrak and Grimm devices were used. The Ptrak 8525 was an optical particle measurement device which could measure particle diameter in the size interval of 20 nm up to 1 micrometer. The Dustrak was used to measure particle mass concentration. The Grimm 1.109 was an aerosol spectrometer which counted number of particles from 0.25 micrometer to 32 micrometer in 31 intervals. These two Grimm devices were equipped with Millipore filters in the devices outlets to capture particles for further studies on morphology and matter of particles.

    The total number and size distribution of the particles for these two sampling points were registered and evaluated in different situations such as activating and deactivating electrical brake or train curve negotiating.

    During braking, three peaks of 250 nm, 350 nm and 600 nm in diameter, with the 350 nm peak dominating were identified in the fine particle region. In the coarse particle region, a peak of around 3-6 µm in diameter was discovered. The brake pad temperature effects on particle size distribution were also investigated and the results showed that the peak around 250 nm increased. Furthermore, the activation of electrical braking significantly reduced the number of airborne particles.

    A SEM was used to capture the images from collected particles on filters. Furthermore, an ICP-Ms method was used to investigate the elemental contents of the particulates on the filter.  In this case the main contribution belonged to Fe, Si, Al, Ca, Cu, Zn. The higher amount of some elements weights such as calcium, silicon, sodium and aluminum in the global sampling point filters revealed that ballast and concrete sleepers were the main sources for these particles although some of them originated from rail, wheel, brake disc and brake pad as well.

  • 33.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Tritscher, Trosten
    TSI.
    Krinke, Thomas
    TSI.
    On-board study of nano- and micrometer-particle characteristics of a running electric train2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Zhu, Yi
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Pin-on-disc study of the effects of railway friction modifiers on airborne wear particles from wheel-rail contact2013In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, Vol. 60, 136-139 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of wheel–rail interaction is crucial to wheel and rail maintenance. In this interaction, some of theworn-off material is transformed into airborne particles. Although such wear is well understood, few studiestreat the particles generated. We investigated friction modifiers' effects on airborne particles characteristicsgenerated in wheel-rail contacts in laboratory conditions. Pin-on-disc machine testing with a round-head pinloaded by a dead weight load 40 N simulated maximum contact pressure over 550 MPa. Airborne particlecharacteristics were investigated in dry contacts and in ones lubricated with biodegradable rail grease andwater- and oil-based friction modifiers. The number of particles declined with the grease; the number ofultrafine particles increased with the water-based friction modifier, mainly due to water vaporization.

  • 35.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Particle emission from rail vehicles: A literature review2012In: Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part F: Journal of Rail and Rapid Transit, Sage Publications, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emission of airborne particles is a side effect from rail transport. This work reviews recent research on particle emissions from rail vehicles. Both exhaust and non-exhaust particle emissions are characterized by size, morphology, composition, and size distribution. Current legislation, knowledge of adverse health effects, and available and proposed solutions for emission reductions are also treated. There has been much focus on exhaust emissions, but only a few limited studies have investigated non-exhaust particle emissions, which contain a significant amount of metallic materials. A new method for measuring the airborne wear particle emission rate (AWPER) is proposed as a first step to guide new legislations and to focus further research on non-exhaust airborne emission, i.e., research on the generation mechanisms for particle emissions and their adverse health effects.

  • 36.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Technical note: Experiences of studying airborne wear particles from road and rail transport2013In: Aerosol and Air Quality Research, ISSN 1680-8584, Vol. 13, no 4, 1161-1169 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Airborne particles and their adverse effects on air quality have been recognized by humans since ancient times. Current exhaust emission legislations increase the relative contribution of wear particles on the PM levels. Consequently, wearbased particle emissions from rail and road transport have raised concerns as ground transportation is developing quickly. Although scientific research on airborne wear-based particles started in 1909, there is almost no legislation that control the generation of wear-based particles. In addition, there is no accepted and approved standard measurement technique for monitoring and recording particle characteristics. The main objective of this study is to review recent experimental work in this field and to discuss their set-ups, the sampling methods, the results, and their limitations, and to propose measures for reducing these limitations.

  • 37.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements. Department of Mechanical engineering, Golpayegan University of Technology.
    Teimourimanesh, Shahab
    Chalmers.
    Vernersson, Tore
    Chalmers.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Lunden, Roger
    Chalmers.
    Temperature and Thermoelastic Instability at Tread Braking Using Cast Iron Friction Material2013In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 314, no 1–2, 171-180 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Braking events in railway traffic often induce high frictional heating and thermoelastic instability (TEI) at the interfacing surfaces. In the present paper, two approaches are adopted to analyse the thermomechanical interaction in a pin-on-disc experimental study of railway braking materials. In a first part, the thermal problem is studied to find the heat partitioning between pin and disc motivated by the fact that wear mechanisms can be explained with a better understanding of the prevailing thermal conditions. The numerical model is calibrated using the experimental results. In a second part, the frictionally induced thermoelastic instabilities at the pin-disc contact are studied using a numerical method and comparing them with the phenomena observed in the experiments. The effects of temperature on material properties and on material wear are considered. It is found from the thermal analysis that the pin temperature and the heat flux to the pin increase with increasing disc temperatures up to a transition stage. This agrees with the behaviour found in the experiments. Furthermore, the thermoelastic analysis displays calculated pressure and the temperature distributions at the contact interface that are in agreement with the hot spot behaviour observed in the experiments.

  • 38.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Teimourimanesh, Shahab
    Chalmers.
    Vernersson, Tore
    Chalmers.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Lunden, Roger
    Chalmers.
    Temperature and thermo-elastic instability of tread braking friction materials2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Wahlström, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olander, Lars
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Services Engineering.
    Larsson, Christina
    Bombardier Transportation Sweden AB, Västerås, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Tribologi.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    A study of airborne wear particles generated from organic railway brake pads and brake discs2011In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 273, no 1, 93-99 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brake pads on wheel-mounted disc brakes are often used in rail transport due to their good thermal properties and robustness. During braking, both the disc and the pads are worn. This wear process generates particles that may become airborne and thus affect human health. The long term purpose of ‘Airborne particles in Rail transport’ project is to gain knowledge on the wear mechanisms in order to find means of controlling the number and size distribution of airborne particles. In this regard, a series of full-scale field tests and laboratory tests with a pin-on-disc machine have been conducted. The morphology and the matter of particles, along with their size distribution and concentration, have been studied. The validity of results from the pin-on-disc simulation has been verified by the field test results. Results show an ultra-fine peak for particles with a diameter size around 100 nm in diameter, a dominant fine peak for particles with a size of around 350 nm in diameter, and a coarse peak with a size of 3-7 μm in diameter. Materials such as iron, copper, aluminium, chromium, cobalt, antimony, and zinc have been detected in the nano-sized particles.

  • 40.
    Abbassi, Behrang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Hultling, Johannes
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Smarta Elnät – Modell och Marknad2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Smart Grid technology has during the last decade been established as a way to create a greater flexibility on the electricity grid that will be needed as the development moves towards an increased share of renewable primary energy sources in the electricity production. One part of the Smart Grid technology is the ability to shift loads in time, to adapt to either price or emissions, known as Demand Response. This project, which was conducted at KTH in collaboration with the consulting corporation Capgemini, examines the economic, environmental and social aspects of the Demand Response technology.

     

    In the project, three household products are used in a model that derives the potential savings in costs and emissions of CO2e. The results show that the actual savings measured in SEK are small, but that the savings measured in percent can be as high as 20 percent. Reduction of CO2e emissions is slightly lower. Furthermore, the study shows that the savings increase as more flexibility is given to the model and as the fluctuations of price increases. A scenario that includes more intermittent electricity production, and end users ready to commit to the technology,  is therefore vital for the success of the Demand Response technology. The results also show that an optimization cannot be done in such way that both minimize costs and CO2e emissions simultaneously.

     

    A discussion on the strategic opportunities for Capgemini shows that focus should be on collecting, interpreting and compiling the large amounts of data that the technology will result in. There are also possibilities in peripheral services tied together with the Smart Grid technology, such as the development of a charging infrastructure for electric cars.

  • 41.
    Abbaszadeh Shahri, Abbas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Larsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Johansson, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Updated relations for the uniaxial compressive strength of marlstones based on P-wave velocity and point load index test2016In: INNOVATIVE INFRASTRUCTURE SOLUTIONS, ISSN 2364-4176, Vol. 1, no 1, UNSP 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although there are many proposed relations for different rock types to predict the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) as a function of P-wave velocity (V-P) and point load index (Is), only a few of them are focused on marlstones. However, these studies have limitations in applicability since they are mainly based on local studies. In this paper, an attempt is therefore made to present updated relations for two previous proposed correlations for marlstones in Iran. The modification process is executed through multivariate regression analysis techniques using a provided comprehensive database for marlstones in Iran, including UCS, V-P and Is from publications and validated relevant sources comprising 119 datasets. The accuracy, appropriateness and applicability of the obtained modifications were tested by means of different statistical criteria and graph analyses. The conducted comparison between updated and previous proposed relations highlighted better applicability in the prediction of UCS using the updated correlations introduced in this study. However, the derived updated predictive models are dependent on rock types and test conditions, as they are in this study.

  • 42.
    Abdi, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Analysis of heat recovery in supermarket refrigeration system using carbon dioxide as refrigerant2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate the heat recovery potential in supermarket refrigeration systems using CO2 as refrigerants. The theoretical control strategy to recover heating demand from refrigeration system is explained thoroughly and the heat recovery process from two existing supermarket using CO2 booster units is analyzed and evaluated. The measured data of refrigeration systems is obtained through Iwmac interface, processed using Excel and Refprop. The aim is to see what control strategy is used in these systems and weather it matches the theoretical one and at what level heat is recovered from the system.

    Besides, a simulation model is made by EES to investigate the potential of higher rate of heat recovery in the supermarkets. The simulation results are compared with field measurement and validated by measured values. Then, the ability of refrigeration system to do heat recovery at quite high rates for covering the total heating demand without using parallel heating system is evaluated and efficiency of the system is calculated. At the next step the heat recovery potential at other refrigeration solutions such as R404A conventional and CO2-ammonia cascade systems are studied and the results are compared to booster units. Finally, the potential for selling heat from the refrigeration system in supermarket to district heating network is investigated. Two different scenarios are made for such purpose and the results are evaluated.

    The heat recovery control strategy of existing supermarkets does not match the theoretical strategy and regarding the capacity of the system, heat is recovered to low extent. Simulation shows that heat can be recovered to higher extent at quite high heating COP of 3-5. Additionally the other heat recovery solutions for R404A conventional and CO2-ammonia cascade systems are found to be competitive to CO2 booster system.  The analysis of selling heat to district heating network shows that CO2 booster system is capable of covering the demand at reasonable heating COP as the first priority and selling the rest to district heating network at heating COP of 2 as second priority.  

  • 43.
    Abdul Hayee, Muhammad
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Characterization and utilization of agroforestryresidues as energy source in Brazil2012Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Brazil is very much rich in agriculture and forestry. The agro industry occupies an area of 28840726 ha. The more important crops are sugarcane (7080920 ha), rice (289030 ha), wheat (1853220 ha), coconut (283205 ha), cassava (1894460 ha), corn (13767400 ha) and grass (140000 ha). These crops generated 597 million tons of residues. Forest plantations in Brazil supplied 102.9 million m3 of industrial roundwood, of which nearly half is for renewable fuelwood and charcoal. Part of this plantation output is destined for the pulp and paper industry:

    The renewable sources are fulfilling 46.4% of the total Brazilian energy demands.

    Energy forestation in Brazil includes mainly Eucalyptus and Bracatingas.

    In this study three biomasses abundant in the Brazil are studied:  i.e. Eucalyptus, Garapeira/Peroba (wood dust) and Sewage Sludge.

    The wood samples (Eucalyptus and Peroba/Garapeira) have higher heating value than the sewage sludge because the wood samples have higher amounts of carbon and hydrogen than the sewage sludge. The sewage sludge has higher ash content and lower amount of volatiles and fixed carbon than the wood samples resulting in a lower heating value.

    The pyrolysis of eucalyptus, garapeira/peroba and sewage sludge has been studied in a thermobalance over a wide range of degradation temperatures. Between 225 °C - 375 °C (for eucalyptus) and 225 °C - 425 °C (for garapeira), the thermal decomposition of the biomass leads to significant weight loss.

    The weight loss for Eucalyptus between 265°C and 350°C is 0.48 % / °C and taking into account a heating rate of 10°C/min, the weight loss is 4.8 % /min. Garapeira has a similar behaviour than eucalyptus. The weight loss for garapeira between 265°C and 365°C is 0.4 % / °C and taking into account a heating rate of 10°C/min, the weight loss is 4 % /min.

    The behaviour of the sewage sludge to the increase of temperature from 25°C to 700 °C in an inert atmosphere do not show such different zones as the behaviour of the woody biomass. Between 150 °C and 235°C the weight loss of the sewage sludge was 0.07 %/°C (0.7 %/min). The highest weight loss takes place between 300 °C and 390 °C (0.15 %/°C or 1.5 %/min). In the third zone, between 500 °C and 600°C, the weight loss was 0.03 %/°C (0.3 %/min).

    The pyrolysis is assumed to be a first order decomposition. The activation energy (E) and the pre exponential factor (A) are calculated for the studied samples.

    The proximate analysis shows differences between the woody biomass and the sewage sludge. The sewage sludge has higher ash content and lower fixed carbon and volatiles. Eucalyptus has lower carbon fixed and higher volatiles than peroba-garapeira.

  • 44.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Resource Conservative Manufacturing: New Generation of Manufacturing2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of resource scarcity and emerging pressure of environmentallegislations have put the manufacturing industry with a new challenge. On theone side, there is a huge population that demands a large quantity ofcommodities, on the other side, these demands have to be met by minimumresources and with permissible pollution that the earth’s ecosystem can handle.In this situation, technologic breakthrough that can offer alternative resourceshas become essential. Unfortunately, breakthroughs do not follow any rule ofthumb and while waiting for a miracle, the manufacturing industry has to findways to conserve resources. Within this research the anatomy of a large body ofknowledge has been performed to find the best available practices for resourceconservation. Critical review of the research revealed that none of the availablesolutions are compatible with the level of resource conservation desired by themanufacturing industry or by society. It has also been discovered that a largegap exists between the solutions perceived by the scientists and theapplicability of those solutions. Through careful evaluation of the state-of-theart,the research presented in this thesis introduced a solution of maximizingresource conservation i.e., material, energy and value added, as used inmanufacturing. The solutions emerged from the novel concept named asResource Conservative Manufacturing, which is built upon the concept ofMultiple Lifecycle of product. Unlike other research work, the researchdocumented in this thesis started with the identification of the problem andfrom which a ‘wish to do’ list was drawn. The seriousness of the problem andpotential of adopting the proposed concept has been justified with concreteinformation. A great number of arguments have been presented to show theexisting gaps in the research and from that, a set of solutions to conserveresources has been proposed. Finally, one of the prime hypotheses concerningclosed loop supply chain has been validated through the system dynamicsmodeling and simulation.

  • 45.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Nicolescu, Cornel Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Minimizing Uncertainty Involved in Designing the Closed-loop Supply Network for Multiple-lifecycle of Products2010In: Annals Of DAAAM for 2010 & Proceedings of 21st DAAAM Symposium: Intelligent Manufacturing and Automation / [ed] Branko Katalinic, Zadar: DAAAM International , 2010, 1055-1056 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To ensure multiple-lifecycle of products through remanufacturing intervention requires a well-functioning closed-loop supply network. Generally, the unpredictability of quantity, timing and quality (physical/functional) of the returned products and demand fluctuation of the remanufactured products are the main sources of uncertainty of closed-loop supply network. To some extent, efficient recollection strategies and separate distribution channels for remanufactured products can minimize the uncertainty. Nevertheless, efficient recollection does not necessarily close the loop if the recovered products do not enter into the main stream of the supply network. Beside, products that are distributed through separate channels create an open loop. Thus, the problem of uncertainty remains unsolved. The aim of this paper is to propose solutions to minimize the uncertainty involved in designing a well-functioning closed-loop supply network using the system dynamics principle and tool.

  • 46.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Semere, Daniel Tesfamariam
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nicolescu, Cornel Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Haumann, M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    METHODS ANALYSIS OF REMANUFACTURING OPTIONS FOR REPEATED LIFECYCLE OF STARTERS AND ALTERNATORS2010In: 7th International DAAAM Baltic Conference"INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING"22-24 April 2010, Tallinn, Estonia / [ed] R. Kyttner, Estonia: Tallinn University of Technology , 2010, 340-345 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Design for Repeatedly Utilization (DFRU) is a proposed conceptto be used in the product realizationprocess to ensure optimum useable life (forinstance in terms of economy, resourceusage, environmental impact etc.) ofproducts or parts of products enablingmultiple lifecycle. In the DFRU approachproducts are restored as new like productsthrough remanufacturing processes. Theterm remanufacturing has been interpreteddifferently by different researchers and theindustries that are involved inremanufacturing business use differentapproaches to remanufacture theirproducts. In this paper the starter motorand alternator of automotives has beenused to demonstrate the novel concepts.The purpose of this paper is to expresswhat remanufacturing means in ourconcept, model their major lifecycleaspects and create a simulation modelfrom it. This is a preliminary work towardsdefining and specifying the processes,methods and design properties in DFRU.The work will be further extended to aholistic business model which can facilitateDFRU approach in an efficient way. Infuture the model will be developed andadopted to create new models for otherproducts appropriate for remanufacturingand eventually DFRU.

  • 47.
    Abed, Kason
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    FEM-analys av torkapparat2011Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 48.
    Abelin, Sarah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Investigation of integrated waterlevel sensor solution forsubmersible pumps: A study of how sensors can be combined towithstand build-up materials and improvereliability in harsh environment2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Monitoring water level in harsh environment in order to handle the start and stop function of drainage pumps has been a major issue. Several environmental factors are present, which affect and disturb sensor measurements. Current solutions with mechanical float switches, mounted outside of pumps, wear out, get entangled and account for more than half of all the emergency call outs to pumping stations. Since pumps are frequently moved around, a new sensor solution is needed which can be integrated within the pump house and is able to continuously monitor water level to optimize the operation of the pump and to decrease wear, cost and energy consumption.

    This thesis presents an investigation how different sensor techniques can be combined to improve reliability for monitoring water level and handle the start and stop function of drainage pumps in harsh environment. The main focus has been to identify suitable water level sensing techniques and to investigate how sensors are affected by build-up materials building up on the pump surface and covering the sensor probes. A support vector machine algorithm is implemented to fuse sensor data in order to increase reliability of the sensor solution in contaminated condition.

    Results show that a combination of a pressure sensor and a capacitive sensor is the most suitable combination for withstanding build-up materials. For operating conditions when sensors are covered with soft or viscous build-ups, sensors were able to monitor water level through the build-up materials. No solution was found that could satisfactorily monitor water level through solidified build-up materials.

  • 49.
    Abeywardana, Asela M.A.J.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Solar-Biomass hybrid system for process heat supply in medium scale hotels in Sri Lanka2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed at evaluating and demonstrating the feasibility of using Concentrated Solar Thermal technology combined with biomass energy technology as a hybrid renewable energy system to supply the process heat requirements in small scale industries in Sri Lanka. Particularly, the focus was to apply the concept to the expanding hotel industry, for covering the thermal energy demand of a medium scale hotel.

    Solar modules utilize the rooftop area of the building to a valuable application. Linear Fresnel type of solar concentrator is selected considering the requirement of the application and the simplicity of fabrication and installation compared to other technologies. Subsequently, a wood-fired boiler is deployed as the steam generator as well as the balancing power source to recover the effects due to the seasonal variations in solar energy. Bioenergy, so far being the largest primary energy supply in the country, has a good potential for further growth in industrial applications like small hotels. 

    When a hotel with about 200-guests capacity and annual average occupancy of 65% is considered, the total annual CO2 saving is accounted as 207 tons compared with an entirely fossil fuel (diesel) fired boiler system. The annual operational cost saving is around $ 40,000 and the simple payback period is within 3-4 years. The proposed hybrid system can generate additional 26 employment opportunities in the proximity of the site location area.  

    This solar-biomass hybrid concept mitigates the weaknesses associated with these renewable technologies when employed separately. The system has been designed in such a way that the total heat demand of hot water and process steam supply is managed by renewable energy alone. It is thus a self-sustainable, non-conventional, renewable energy system. This concept can be stretched to other critical medium temperature applications like for example absorption refrigeration. The system is applicable to many other industries in the country where space requirement is available, solar irradiance is rich and a solid biomass supply is assured.

  • 50. Abeyweera, Ruchira
    et al.
    Senanayake, Nihal S.
    Senaratne, Chamindie
    Jayasuriya, Jeevan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology. EIT InnoEnergy, Sweden.
    Fransson, Torsten H.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology. EIT InnoEnergy, Sweden.
    Capacity Building Through a Web Based Master Degree Programme in Sustainable Energy Engineering2017In: PROCEEDINGS OF 2017 IEEE GLOBAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION CONFERENCE (EDUCON2017), IEEE, 2017, 800-805 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open Distance Learning is gaining popularity as a successful alternative for on-campus higher education especially with the emergence of web based platforms which enable the online delivery of courses worldwide. This emerging educational pedagogy can successfully be employed as means of capacity building of the people living in the less fortunate parts of the world where higher education especially at master level are scarce. This paper presents a two-year collaborative master study programme in sustainable energy engineering offered in synchronous with an on-campus study programme conducted by the KTH Royal Institute of Technology of Sweden, to students of Sri Lanka, which was facilitated by the Open University of Sri Lanka. The paper describes the need of such a programme, the format of course delivery and assessment thereof, plus the benefits gained. This programme has produced 72 post graduates in Sri Lanka alone and more than 200 distant postgraduates worldwide in the field of sustainable energy engineering during last 10 years period. In terms of capacity building in the energy sector in Sri Lanka this is considered a great achievement. The experience gained by the local staff in the role of local facilitators who engaged in some of the academic related activities such as evaluation of students' presentation and co-supervision of thesis projects have been greatly appreciated as being additional benefits to the staff in terms of their own academic development and capacity building. Finally, conclusions are made on how remote programmes of study could successfully be delivered to places where such know-how is scarce by adapting appropriate technologies in training personnel at postgraduate level to meet the needs of the industry.

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