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  • 1.
    Abas, Riad Abdul
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Property measurements towards understanding process phenomena2005Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this industrially important work was to gain an increasing understanding of the properties of materials such as CMSX-4 nickel base super alloy, mould powder used in continuous casting of steel and coke used in blast furnace, with special reference to the thermal diffusivities. The measurements were carried out in a wide temperature range, solid, liquid, glassy and crystalline states.

    For CMSX-4 alloy, the thermal conductivities were calculated from the experimental thermal diffusivities. Both the diffusivities and conductivities were found to increase with increasing temperature. Microscopic analysis showed the presence of intermetallic phases such as NiTi and NiTi2 below 1253 K. In this region, the mean free path of the phonons is likely to be limited by scattering against lattice defects. Between 1253 K and solidus temperature, these phases dissolved in the alloy adding to the impurities in the matrix, which, in turn, caused a decrease in the thermal diffusivity. This effect was confirmed by annealing the samples at 1573 K. The thermal diffusivities of the annealed samples measured at 1277, 1403 and 1531 K were found to be lower than the thermal diffusivities of non-annealed samples and the values did not show any noticeable change with time. It could be related to the attainment of equilibrium with the completion of the dissolution of γ and γ´ phases during the annealing process.

    Liquid CMSX-4 does not show any change of thermal diffusivity with temperature. It may be attributed to the decreasing the mean free path being shorter than characteristic distance between two neighbouring atoms.

    On the other hand thermal diffusivities of mould powder having glassy and crystalline states decrease with increasing temperature at lower temperature and are constant at higher temperature except for one glassy sample.

    Analogously, the thermal diffusivity measurements of mould powder did not show any significant change with temperature in liquid state. It is likely to be due to the silicate network being largely broken down.

    The thermal diffusivity is increased with increasing crystallisation degree of mould powder, which is expected from theoretical considerations.

    The coke sample, taken from deeper level of the blast furnace, is found to have larger thermal diffusivity. This could be correlated to the average crystallite size along the structural c-axis, Lc, which is indicative of the higher degree of graphitisation. This was also confirmed by XRD measurements of the different coke samples. The degree of graphitisation was found to increase with increasing temperature. Further, XRD measurements of coke samples taken from different levels in the shaft of the blast furnace show that the graphitisation of coke was instantaneous between room temperature and 1473 K.

  • 2. Abbasalizadeh, A.
    et al.
    Teng, Lidong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Sietsma, J.
    Yang, Y.
    Rare Earth Extraction from NdFeB Magnets and Rare Earth Oxides Using Aluminum Chloride/Fluoride Molten Salts2015In: Rare Earths Industry: Technological, Economic, and Environmental Implications, Elsevier, 2015, 357-373 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the current research, the feasibility of the recovery of neodymium and dysprosium from spent NdFeB magnets (about 6wt% Dy) was investigated using molten salt processes. The salt bath consisted of a eutectic composition of an NaCl-KCl-LiCl mixture. To enable the efficient dissolution of metal in the molten salt phase, AlCl3 was used as a chlorinating agent. Iron-free electrodeposition was carried out successfully. Energy-dispersive spectroscopic analysis of the electrodeposit revealed that co-deposition of the dysprosium occurs along with neodymium at the cathode. The process shows that this method is well suited for recovering rare earth metals from magnetic scrap containing these metals.Furthermore, the setup design for recovery of neodymium and dysprosium from their oxides was investigated with regard to previous studies on the neodymium magnets. The stability of different fluoride and chloride salts was studied by means of thermodynamic calculation. Aluminum fluoride-based molten salt systems were studied in detail as the electrolyte for electrochemical extraction of rare earth oxides into rare earth metal elements with Al.

  • 3.
    Abbasalizadeh, Aida
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Teng, Lidong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Sridhar, Seetharaman
    Grinder, Olle
    Izumi, Yukari
    Barati, Mansoor
    Highlights of the Salt Extraction Process2013In: JOM: The Member Journal of TMS, ISSN 1047-4838, E-ISSN 1543-1851, Vol. 65, no 11, 1552-1558 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the salient features of a new process for the recovery of metal values from secondary sources and waste materials such as slag and flue dusts. It is also feasible in extracting metals such as nickel and cobalt from ores that normally are difficult to enrich and process metallurgically. The salt extraction process is based on extraction of the metals from the raw materials by a molten salt bath consisting of NaCl, LiCl, and KCl corresponding to the eutectic composition with AlCl3 as the chlorinating agent. The process is operated in the temperature range 973 K (700 degrees C) to 1173 K (900 degrees C). The process was shown to be successful in extracting Cr and Fe from electric arc furnace (EAF) slag. Electrolytic copper could be produced from copper concentrate based on chalcopyrite in a single step. Conducting the process in oxygen-free atmosphere, sulfur could be captured in the elemental form. The method proved to be successful in extracting lead from spent cathode ray tubes. In order to prevent the loss of AlCl3 in the vapor form and also chlorine gas emission at the cathode during the electrolysis, liquid aluminum was used. The process was shown to be successful in extracting Nd and Dy from magnetic scrap. The method is a highly promising process route for the recovery of strategic metals. It also has the added advantage of being environmentally friendly.

  • 4. Abbasalizadeh, Aida
    et al.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Venkatesan, Prakash
    Sietsma, Jilt
    Yang, Yongxiang
    Novel Reactive Anode for Electrochemical Extraction of Rare Earth Metals from Rare Earth Oxides2017In: RARE METAL TECHNOLOGY 2017 / [ed] Kim, H Alam, S Neelameggham, NR Oosterhof, H Ouchi, T Guan, X, SPRINGER INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING AG , 2017, 87-92 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrolytic production of metallic neodymium is carried out in fused fluoride salts containing neodymium oxide. Two major challenges pertaining to neodymium production are (a) low oxide solubility, (b) possibility of anodic fluorine gas evolution if the electrolysis rate exceeds feeding rate of neodymium oxide. In this study, a novel method is proposed in which iron fluoride (FeF3) is used as a fluorinating agent to convert neodymium oxide into neodymium fluoride. Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) results of as-converted salt show a complete conversion of neodymium oxide into neodymium fluoride. In the electrolysis process, iron is used as a reactive anode with electrochemical dissolution of iron into the melt, thus preventing fluorine gas evolution at the anode. Therefore, the fluorinating agent is constantly regenerated in situ which enables the continuous conversion of neodymium oxide feed. The cathodic product is a Nd-Fe alloy which can be directly used as a master alloy for the production of NdFeB permanent magnets.

  • 5.
    Abbasalizadeh, Aida
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Teng, Lidong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Seetharaman, S.
    Dysprosium extraction using molten salt process2014In: Rare metal technology 2014: proceedings of a symposium sponsored by The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) held during TMS 2014, 143rd Annual Meeting & Exhibition, February 16-20, 2014, San Diego Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, 2014, 207-208 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Abbasalizadeh, Aida
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Teng, Lidong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Sridhar, S.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Neodymium extraction using salt extraction process2015In: Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy Section C - Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy, ISSN 0371-9553, E-ISSN 1743-2855, Vol. 124, no 4, 191-198 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper deals with the feasibility of the neodymium recovery from spent Nd-Fe-B magnets using molten salt electrodeposition method. The salt bath consisted of a mixture of LiCl- KCl-NaCl corresponding to the eutectic composition. The experimental set-up with its salient features is presented. AlCl3 was used as flux and graphite rods dipped in the salt bath served as electrodes. The voltage for the electrolysis was chosen on the basis of the decomposition potential of NdCl3. The reaction sequence can be described as Iron-free neodymium deposition could be carried out successfully. In view of the proximity of the electrode potentials, the co-deposition of the aluminium and neodymium was observed to occur at the cathode, as revealed by SEM/EDS and XRD analyses of the electrodeposit.

  • 7.
    Abbasi, Mahmoud
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanocomposite of chitosan/SiO2/carbon nanotubes and its application for dyes removal2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 145, 105-113 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adsorption characteristics of Direct Blue 71 (DB71) and Reactive Blue 19 (RB19) from aqueous solution onto novel magnetic nanocomposite of Chitosan/SiO2/CNTs (MNCSC) have been investigated. The morphology of MNCSC was characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effect of initial dye concentration, contact time, adsorbent dosage and initial pH as experimental parameters on the removal of dyes were investigated. The adsorption experiments indicated the maximum adsorption capacity occurred at pH 6.8 for DB71 and pH 2.0 for RB19. The experimental data were analyzed by isotherm models and equilibrium results were fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model and the maximum adsorption capacity of the MNCSM was determined to be 61.35 mg/g for DB71 (R-2 = 0.996) and 97.08 mg/g for RB19 (R-2 = 0.998). Adsorption data were analyzed with three kinetics models and pseudo second-order equation could best describe for adsorption of dyes. Finally, the thermodynamic parameters were determined. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Characterisation of airborne particles from rail traffic2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the investigation of wear particles in rail transport started in late-1910s, the high mass concentration of these particles has raised worries among researchers concerned with air quality. However, effective action has yet to be taken because of lack of relevant knowledge. This thesis provides applicable information for the airborne wear particles in rail transport. Some aspects of their characteristics such as diameter size, mass concentration, number concentration, and morphology of particles were investigated in field tests and laboratory tests.The effects on particle characterisations from different operational conditions in the field tests, and applying different braking materials, conducting tests in different applied loads or sliding velocities in the laboratory tests were studied. The main advantage of conducting laboratory tests was to focus on studying particles from one source. The possibility of repetition, using high sensitive instruments and conducting tests at low costs are the other advantages of laboratory studies. Paper A describes how a pin-on-disc machine was used to reproduce similar real operational conditions during mechanical braking in a train. The results were validated by comparing the field tests results with the laboratory studies. The particles morphology and size distribution were also studied.Paper B presents a summary of field tests results. The effects of curve negotiating and applying braking in different real conditions were investigated with an on-board measurement.The element composition of the particles and their potential sources were also investigated outside of the particles morphologies.Paper C presents comprehensive results from laboratory studies on airborne particles from different braking materials. The differences in the particle characteristics in similar test conditions were attributable to different material compositions and dominant wear mechanisms. A new index was introduced in this paper and is suggested to be used as a qualitative factor with regard to the airborne wear particle emission rate.Paper D is a review of the recent studies of exhaust emission and non-exhaust emission from rail vehicles. A summary of results, measurements, adverse health effects, and proposed or applied solutions are reviewed in this paper.

  • 9.
    Abdel-Karim, R.
    et al.
    Department of Metallurgy, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University.
    Reda, Y.
    Department of Metallurgy, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University.
    Muhammed, Mamoun A.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    El-Raghy, S.
    Department of Metallurgy, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University.
    Shoeib, M.
    Metals Technology Department Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute.
    Ahmed, H.
    Department of Metallurgy, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University.
    Electrodeposition and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Ni-Fe Alloys2011In: Journal of Nanomaterials, ISSN 1687-4110, 519274- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocrystalline Ni-Fe deposits with different composition and grain sizes were fabricated by electrodeposition. Deposits with iron contents in the range from 7 to 31% were obtained by changing the Ni(2+)/Fe(2+) mass ratio in the electrolyte. The deposits were found to be nanocrystalline with average grain size in the range 20-30 nm. The surface morphology was found to be dependent on Ni(2+)/Fe(2+) mass ratio as well as electroplating time. The grains size decreased with increasing the iron content, especially in case of short time electroplating. Increasing the electroplating time had no significant effect on grain size. The microhardness of the materials followed the regular Hall-Petch relationship with amaximum value (762 Hv) when applying Ni(2+)/Fe(2+) mass ratio equal to 9.8.

  • 10. Abdi, Y.
    et al.
    Derakhshandeh, J.
    Hashemi, P.
    Mohajerzadeh, S.
    Karbassian, F.
    Nayeri, F.
    Arzi, E.
    Robertson, M. D.
    Radamson, Henry H.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Microelectronics and Information Technology, IMIT.
    Light-emitting nano-porous silicon structures fabricated using a plasma hydrogenation technique2005In: Materials Science and Engineering B: Solid-State Materials for Advanced Technology, ISSN 0921-5107, Vol. 124-125, no SUPPL., 483-487 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preparation of porous silicon films by DC-plasma hydrogenation and subsequent annealing of amorphous silicon films on silicon and glass substrates is reported for the first time. The effects of varying plasma power and annealing temperatures have been investigated and characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, transmission-electron microscopy, and photoluminescence. A plasma density of about 5.5 W/m2 and hydrogenation-annealing temperatures of about 400 °C was found to be suitable for the formation of nano-crystalline silicon films with grain diameters of the order of 3-10 nm. The intensity and wavelength of the emitted visible light were found to depend on the hydrogenation and annealing conditions, and patterning of the silicon films using standard lithography allowed the creation of light-emitting patterns.

  • 11.
    Abdul Abas, Riad
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Experimental Studies of Thermal Diffusivities concerning some Industrially Important Systems2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this industrially important work was to gain an increasing understanding of the properties of some industrially important materials such as CMSX-4 nickel base super alloy, 90Ti.6Al.4V alloy, 25Cr:6Ni stainless steel, 0.7% carbon steel, AISI 304 stainless steel-alumina composites, mould powder used in continuous casting of steel as well as coke used in blast furnace with special reference to the thermal diffusivities. The measurements were carried out in a wide temperature range covering solid, liquid, glassy and crystalline states.

    For CMSX-4 alloy, the thermal conductivities were calculated from the experimental thermal diffusivities. Both the diffusivities and conductivities were found to increase with increasing temperature. Microscopic analysis showed the presence of intermetallic phases γ´ such as Ni3Al below 1253 K. In this region, the mean free path of the electrons and phonons is likely to be limited by scattering against lattice defects. Between 1253 K and solidus temperature, these phases dissolved in the alloy adding to the impurities in the matrix, which, in turn, caused a decrease in the thermal diffusivity. This effect was confirmed by annealing the samples at 1573 K. The thermal diffusivities of the annealed samples measured at 1277, 1403 and 1531 K were found to be lower than the thermal diffusivities of non-annealed samples and the values did not show any noticeable change with time. It could be related to the attainment of equilibrium with the completion of the dissolution of γ´ phase during the annealing process. Liquid CMSX-4 does not show any change of thermal diffusivity with temperature. It may be attributed to the decrease of the mean free path being shorter than characteristic distance between two neighbouring atoms.

    Same tendency could be observed in the case of 90Ti.6Al.4V alloy. Since the thermal diffusivity increases with increasing temperature below 1225 K and shows slight decrease or constancy at higher temperature. For 25Cr:6Ni stainless steel, the thermal diffusivity is nearly constant up to about 700 K. Beyond that, there is an increase with temperature both during heating as well as cooling cycle. On the other hand, the slope of the curve increases above 950 K, which can be due to the increase of bcc phase in the structure. 0.7% carbon steel shows a decrease in the thermal diffusivity at temperature below Curie point, where the structure contains bcc+ fcc phases. Above this point the thermal diffusivity increases, where the structure contains only fcc phase. The experimental thermal conductivity values of these alloys show good agreement with the calculated values using Mills model.

    Thermal diffusivity measurements as a function of temperature of sintered AISI 304 stainless steel-alumina composites having various composition, viz, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8 and 10 wt% Al2O3 were carried out in the present work. The thermal diffusivity as well as the thermal conductivity were found to increase with temperature for all composite specimens. The thermal diffusivity/conductivity decreases with increasing weight fraction of alumina in the composites. The experimental results are in good agreement with simple rule of mixture, Eucken equation and developed Ohm´s law model at weight fraction of alumina below 5 wt%. Beyond this, the thermal diffusivity/ conductivity exhibits a high discrepancy probably due to the agglomeration of alumina particles during cold pressing and sintering.

    On the other hand, thermal diffusivities of industrial mould flux having glassy and crystalline states decrease with increasing temperature at lower temperature and are constant at higher temperature except for one glassy sample. The thermal diffusivity is increased with increasing crystallisation degree of mould flux, which is expected from theoretical considerations.

    Analogously, the thermal diffusivity measurements of mould flux do not show any significant change with temperature in liquid state. It is likely to be due to the silicate network being largely broken down.

    In the case of coke, the sample taken from deeper level of the pilot blast furnace is found to have larger thermal diffusivity. This can be correlated to the average crystallite size along the structural c-axis, Lc, which is indicative of the higher degree of graphitisation. This was also confirmed by XRD measurements of the different coke samples. The degree of graphitisation was found to increase with increasing temperature. Further, XRD and heat capacity measurements of coke samples taken from different levels in the shaft of the pilot blast furnace show that the graphitisation of coke was instantaneous between 973 and 1473 K.

  • 12.
    Abdul Abas, Riad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Hayashi, M.iyuki
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Thermal Diffusivity measurement of CMSX-4 alloy by Laser flash method2007In: International journal of thermophysics, ISSN 0195-928X, E-ISSN 1572-9567, Vol. 28, no 1, 109-122 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work, thermal diffusivity measurements have been carried out on industrial samples of CMSX-4 nickel-base superalloy using the laser-flash method with emphasis on studying the effect of temperature and microstructure on the thermal diffusivity. The measurements were performed in the temperature range from 298 to 1623 K covering both solid as well as liquid ranges. Below 1253 K, the thermal-diffusivity values were found to increase with increasing temperature. Microstructural investigations of quenched samples revealed that below 1253 K, an ordered phase, usually referred to as the -phase was present together with the disordered fcc phase, often referred to as the γ phase. Between 1253 K and the solidus temperature, the phase was found to dissolve in the matrix alloy causing an increase in the disordering of the alloy, and thereby a small decrease in the thermal-diffusivity values. The thermal-diffusivity values of samples pre-annealed at 1573 K exhibited constancy in the temperature range from 1277 to 1513 K, which is attributed to the attainment of thermodynamic equilibrium. These equilibrium values were found to be lower than the results for samples not subjected to annealing. The thermal-diffusivity values of the alloy in the liquid state were found to be independent of temperature.

  • 13.
    Abdul Abas, Riad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Hayashi, Miyuki
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Thermal Diffusivity Measurements of some Industrially Important Alloys by a Laser Flash Method2007In: International journal of materials reseach, ISSN 1862-5282, Vol. 98, no 6, 535-540 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work, thermal diffusivity measurements of three industrially significant alloys, viz. 90Ti.6Al.4V, stainless steel with 25Cr and 6Ni as well as plain carbon steel with 0.7 % carbon have been carried out as a function of temperature. The aim of this work is to study the effect of temperature and microstructure on the thermal diffusivities of these alloys. For the 90Ti.6Al.4V alloy, thermal diffusivity increases with temperature below 1225 K. Above this temperature, the values started decreasing probably due to the dissolution of Ti3Al intermediate phase in the matrix, which would result in an increase in the disorder of the structure. For 25Cr: 6Ni stainless steel, the thermal diffusivity is nearly constant up to about 700 K. Above this, there is an increase in the thermal diffusivities with temperature during the heating cycle, which was reproducible during thermal cycling. On the other hand, the slope of the curve increases above 950 K.

    In the case of the 0.7 % carbon steel, the thermal diffusivity shows a decreasing trend with temperature below the Curie point for the alloy, where the alloy consists of bcc + fcc phases. Above this point, only the fcc phase is prevalent and the thermal diffusivity was found to increase with temperature. Heat transfer is carried out by lattice vibration (phonons) as well as electrons. The contribution of electrons varies depending upon the type of alloy. In this study, the highest electron contribution was found in 0.7 % carbon steel, while the lowest was in stainless steel. The thermal conductivity values of these alloys are in good agreement with the calculated values using the model proposed by Mills.

  • 14.
    Abedin, Ahmad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Moeen, Mahdi
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Cappetta, Carmine
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Östling, Mikael
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Radamson, Henry H.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Sensitivity of the crystal quality of SiGe layers grown at low temperatures by trisilane and germane2016In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 613, 38-42 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work investigates the crystal quality of SiGe layers grown at low temperatures using trisilane, and germane precursors. The crystal quality sensitivity was monitored for hydrogen chloride and/or minor oxygen amount during SiGe epitaxy or at the interface of SiGe/Si layers. The quality of the epi-layerswas examined by quantifying noise parameter, K-1/f obtained from the power spectral density vs. 1/f curves. The results indicate that while it is difficult to detect small defect densities in SiGe layers by physical material characterization, the noise measurement could reveal the effects of oxygen contamination as low as 0.16mPa inside and in the interface of the layers.

  • 15.
    Abouzari, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Solid solution strengthening effect on creep strength of austenitic stainless steel2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sanicro 25 is a newly developed austenitic stainless steel, designed for the next generation of Ultrasupercritical coal-fired boilers in electrical power plants. This material is applicable in reheater and superheater tubes, where the material temperature is up to 700

    °C. One of the main strengthening mechanisms in high temperature materials is solid solution strengthening. A combination of this mechanism and precipitation hardening, promotes creep strength of heat resistance materials. The aim of this work was to characterize the effects of solid solution strengthening on creep strength of Sanicro 25.Previous works has been done for effects of phosphorous in copper and also for influence of laves phase on the creep properties of CrMo alloys. The results of these two works are used and the model is adapted to austenitic stainless steel. First a Zero starting state was defined which was Alloy 316H and then the calculation was made for Sanicro 25. Thermodynamic calculations were made using DICTRA and Thermo-Calc. Elastic misfit parameter was determined using ab initio calculations. The results from the simulation in this work indicate that solutes with larger size misfit compare to the parent atoms have better solid solution strengthening effect. A decrease in the creep strength by increasing temperature has been observed which could be attributed to growth of laves phase.

  • 16.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Ji, Guangchao
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Rödby, Kristian
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Björlin, Anders
    Kiwok AB.
    Östlund, Anders
    Kiwok AB.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems. Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Textile-Electronic Integration in Wearable Measurement Garments for Pervasive Healthcare Monitoring2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Guangchao, Li
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Rödby, Kristian
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems. Högskolan i Borås.
    A Knitted Garment using Intarsia Technique for Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback: Evaluation of Initial Prototype.2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18. Ackland, G. J.
    et al.
    Hepburn, D. J.
    Wallenius, Janne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Reactor Physics.
    Interatomic forces for transition metals including magnetism2010In: 139th Annual Meeting & Exhibition - Supplemental Proceedings, Vol 2: Materials Characterization, Computation And Modeling And Energy, 2010, 85-92 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a formalism for extending the second moment tight-binding model[1], incorporating ferro- and anti-ferromagnetic interaction terms which are needed for the FeCr system. For antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic materials, an explicit additional variable representing the spin is required. In a mean-field approximation this spin can be eliminated. and the potential becomes explicitly temperature dependent. For ferromagnetic interactions, this degree of freedom can be eliminated, and the formalism reduces to the embedded atom method (EAM[2]), and we show the equivalence of existing EAM potentials to "magnetic" Potentials.

  • 19. Adamson, Goran
    et al.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Holm, Magnus
    Moore, Philip
    ADAPTIVE ROBOT CONTROL AS A SERVICE IN CLOUD MANUFACTURING2015In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASME 10TH INTERNATIONAL MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING CONFERENCE, 2015, VOL 2, ASME Press, 2015, Vol. 2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interest for implementing the concept of Manufacturing-as-a-Service is increasing as concepts for letting the manufacturing shop-floor domain take advantage of the cloud appear. Combining technologies such as Internet of Things, Cloud Computing, Semantic Web, virtualisation and service-oriented technologies with advanced manufacturing models, information and communication technologies, Cloud Manufacturing is emerging as a new manufacturing paradigm. The ideas of on-demand, scalable and pay-for-usage resource-sharing in this concept will move manufacturing towards distributed and collaborative missions in volatile partnerships. This will require a control approach for distributed planning and execution of cooperating manufacturing activities. Without control based on both global and local environmental conditions, the advantages of Cloud Manufacturing will not be fulfilled. By utilising smart and distributable decision modules such as event-driven Function Blocks, run-time manufacturing operations in a. distributed environment may be adjusted to prevailing manufacturing conditions. Packaged in a cloud service for manufacturing equipment control, they will satisfy the control needs. By combining different resource types, such as hard, soft and capability resources, the cloud service Robot Control-as-a-Service can be realised. This paper describes the functional perspective and enabling technologies for a distributed control approach for robotic assembly tasks in Cloud Manufacturing.

  • 20. Adekunle, K. F.
    et al.
    Cho, S. W.
    Patzelt, C.
    Blomfeldt, Thomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Skrifvars, M.
    Impact and flexural properties of flax fabrics and lyocell fiber reinforced bio-based thermoset for automotive and structural applications2012In: ECCM 2012 - Composites at Venice, Proceedings of the 15th European Conference on Composite Materials, European Conference on Composite Materials, ECCM , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A bio-based thermoset resin was reinforced with flax fabrics and Lyocell fiber. The effect of different weave architecture was studied with four flax fabrics with different architecture: plain, twill (two different types) and dobby. The effect of the outer ply thickness was studied and characterized with flexural and impact testing. Composites manufactured with plain weave reinforcement had the best mechanical properties. The tensile strength, tensile modulus, flexural strength, flexural modulus and impact strength was 280 MPa, 32 GPa, 250 MPa, 25 GPa and 75 kJ/m2 respectively.

  • 21. Adekunle, Kayode
    et al.
    Cho, Sung-Woo
    Patzelt, Christian
    Blomfeldt, Thomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    Impact and flexural properties of flax fabrics and Lyocell fiber-reinforced bio-based thermoset2011In: Journal of reinforced plastics and composites (Print), ISSN 0731-6844, E-ISSN 1530-7964, Vol. 30, no 8, 685-697 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A bio-based thermoset resin was reinforced with flax fabrics and Lyocell fiber. The effect of different weave architectures was studied with four flax fabrics with different architectures: plain, twill (two different types), and dobby. The effect of the outer ply thickness was studied and characterized with flexural and impact testing. Composites manufactured with plain weave reinforcement had the best mechanical properties. The tensile strength, tensile modulus, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and impact strength were 280MPa, 32GPa, 250MPa, 25GPa, and 75 kJ/m (2), respectively. Reinforcements with twill-weave architecture did not impart appreciable flexural strength or flexural modulus even when the outer thickness was increased. Plain- and dobby (basket woven style)-weave architectures gave better reinforcing effects and the flexural properties increased with an increase in outer thickness. Water absorption properties of the composites were studied and it was observed that the hybridization with Lyocell fiber reduced the water uptake. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy was used to study the micro-structural properties of the composites.

  • 22.
    Adler, Jeanette
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Film Formation and Surface Tension Studies of Powder Coatings2005Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In industrial use of paint systems a swift processing is crucial. Another very important issue is to improve the quality of the final coating. This report investigates the film formation process of powder coatings, specially the spreading of individual powder particles. The obtained results can be used to understand and control the film formation process. In this way the desired levelling can be achieved and thus the desired gloss or other surface characteristics that may be required. This means that the method could be used when evaluating different polymer and additive combinations that could be used to change film formation behaviour or curing time for powder coating systems to suit various substrates. It makes it possible to avoid and minimize different surface defects as orange peel or cratering in the powder coated film.

    We used a reflection optical microscope to better understand the film formation process and especially the spreading of a powder melt on surfaces with various surface energies. The obtained data were: the particle diameter, the area, area ratio and the contact angle of the powder particle as a function of time and temperature. This information can be used to derive the surface tension of any powder melt.

    In this report we evaluate the dependencies of temperature, heat rate and surface energy for powder coatings on different substrates. The method provides information that can be used to optimize the film formation of a specific powder coating/substrate combination. This method can be used to evaluate the powder spreading and levelling on different substrates from a surface tension point of view.

    We found, as expected, that the powder flows out on a hydrophilic surface and is inhibited by a hydrophobic. The increase of the area ratio on a hydrophilic surface was about five times as the initial area coverage and on a hydrophobic surface only two times the initial area coverage. The contact angle between the melted powder particle on the different surface types could be calculated. The melt surface tension could be calculated since three substrates surfaces with various surface energies were used. The melt surface tension was found to be about 18.5 mN/m.

  • 23.
    Adolfi, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Slag inclusion formation during solidification of steel alloys and in cast iron2007Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores the formation of segregation and inclusions during solidification of steel and cast iron. A better understanding of the formation mechanism should result in decreasing fraction of defects during solidification of ingot and strand material.

    Density driven macrosegregation was studied both experimentally and theoretically to see the effect of channel segregation on the total segregation. Formation of these pencil-like segregations is due to natural convection in the solidifying metal caused by liquid enrichment of elements with lower density compared to the bulk. It is suggested to change the composition to compensate for this density difference.

    Inclusion precipitation can be finite by limitations in segregation. Saturated liquid is found in the last solidified areas, often between dendrites. Here the enrichment of the liquid is possible due to microsegregation. Meanwhile crystals form and solidify the elements with low solubility in the solid is pushed out in the remaining liquid. Soon the liquid is saturated to the level where spontaneous formation of inclusions occurs. Microstructure studies by aid of SEM and micro-probe measurements are analysed to find at what point during solidification process the inclusions start to form. In steel making this formation has a detrimental effect on the mechanical properties in contrary to the production of nodular cast iron where the inclusions have a beneficial effect on the graphite formation.

    Inoculation of cast iron aims at reaching higher number density of graphite nodules, nodule morphology modification and control of nodule distribution during solidification. Late precipitation of nucleation sites has shown to have a positive impact on preventing chill. To find the most potent inoculation agent different additives were tested. Special effort has been made to analyse the effect of oxides and sulphides as nucleation sites.

  • 24.
    Adolfi, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Casting of Metals.
    Lagerstedt, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Casting of Metals.
    Sarnet, Jan
    Scana Steel Björneborg AB.
    Fredriksson, Hasse
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Casting of Metals.
    Macrosegregation In Ingot Cast Tool Steel2004Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Adolfi, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Mori, Kenji
    Fredriksson, Hasse
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    MnS precipitation during solidification in presence of oxide nuclei2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Adolfsson, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Solid Mechanics.
    Gudmundson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Solid Mechanics.
    Matrix crack induced stiffness reductions in [(0(m)/90(n)/+theta(p)/-theta(q))(s)](m) composite laminates1995In: Composites Engineering, ISSN 0961-9526, Vol. 5, no 1, 107-123 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two- and three-dimensional linearly elastic glass/epoxy and carbon/epoxy laminates of the type [(0m/90n/ + theta(p)/ - theta(q))s]M containing periodically distributed matrix cracks have been analysed by aid of the finite element method. The presented finite element model enables modelling of several important thick and thin ply stacking sequences like cross-plies, angle plies and quasi-isotropic laminates. Due to periodicity it suffices to model a representative volume element of the laminate. The boundaries of this unit cell represent prospective crack surfaces. In this way varying crack configurations and crack densities could be simulated. By application of periodic boundary conditions the stiffness tensors for laminates containing different crack configurations were calculated. The results are presented in the form of reduced engineering stiffness parameters as functions of matrix crack densities for a thick quasi-isotropic [(0-degree/90-degrees/ + 45-degrees/ -45-degrees)s]M glass/epoxy laminate, a thick [(0-degree/90-degrees + 55-degrees/ - 55-degrees)s]M carbon/epoxy laminate and a thin (0-degree/ +45-degrees/ -45-degrees)s glass/epoxy laminate. Comparisons are made to an approximate analytic model developed previously. An excellent agreement between the analytic predictions and the finite element results was found for all cases under consideration.

  • 27. Affatato, S.
    et al.
    Leardini, W.
    Jedenmalm, Anneli
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Ruggeri, O.
    Toni, A.
    Larger diameter bearings reduce wear in metal-on-metal hip implants2007In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, ISSN 0009-921X, E-ISSN 1528-1132, no 456, 153-158 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty has the longest clinical history of all total arthroplasties. We asked whether large diameter femoral heads would result in less wear than those with small diameters. We also asked if there is a threshold diameter that ensures good wear behavior. We tested three batches of cast high-carbon cobalt-chromium-molybdenum hip implants (28 mm, 36 min, and 54 min diameters) in a hip simulator for 5 million cycles. We used bovine serum as lubricant and weighed the samples at regular intervals during testing. The 28-mm configuration had almost twice the wear of the 54-mm configuration, but we observed no difference between the 36-mm and the 54-mm configurations. The similarity in the wear performances of the larger configurations supports the presence of a threshold diameter that ensures good wear behavior.

  • 28. Affatato, S.
    et al.
    Leardini, W.
    Jedenmalm, Anneli
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Zavalloni, M.
    Ruggeri, O.
    Tarterini, F.
    Viceconti, M.
    Microstructural effects on the wear resistance of CO-CR implant alloys2006In: Proceedings of the 8th Biennial Conference on Engineering Systems Design and Analysis, 2006, -951 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modem metal-on-metal articulation have been proposed to reduce the incidence of osteolysis due to polyethylene particles debris, as a late complication. The tribology of large metal-on-metal articulations allows theoretical advantages with respect to other configurations, especially for the lubrication regime. This study was aimed to compare the wear performances of different diameters of clinically available acetabular metallic components manufactured in a cast cobalt-chrome alloy. To evaluate the influence of the material properties of wear and microstructure, metal-on-metal components were tested in a hip joint simulator for five million cycles with bovine calf serum as lubricant. In particular, three different configurations of metal-on-metal components (28-mm, 36-mm, 54-mm) were tested. After the test all specimens were examined with optical and electronic scanning microscope. A statistical difference were observed among the three groups tested in the run-in and steady-state wear rates, favoring the larger femoral heads. The results of this study indicate that the 54-mm diameter femoral heads prove a better wear behavior than the smaller configurations.

  • 29.
    Afraz, Syed Ali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Mechanical, Microstructural and Corrosion performance for MIM materials based on coarse (-45µm) powders of ferritic stainless steel2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the mechanical, microstructural and corrosion performance of the ferritic stainless steel coarse powders, used in Metal Injection Molding (MIM) process. Three coarser powders made by Höganäs AB, were examined along with a commercially available fine MIM powder and samples from sheet metal. The studied powders were individually mixed with binders and then injection molded in the shape of dog bone shaped tensile bars. These green samples were then debinded and sintered to examine under different characterization methods. The methods used for examining the samples were tensile test, hardness test, metallography, SEM, chemical analysis, and salt spray test. After a comparative study of these different materials, it turns out that the chemical composition and the process parameters have more effect on materials properties compared to only particle size distribution in studied materials. After this study, 434 coarse powder was preferred upon the PolyMIM 430 fine powder, because of its lower price and same performance as that of PolyMIM 430.

  • 30.
    Afzal, Muhammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Wang, Baoyuan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Xia, Chen
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Zhang, Wei
    He, Yunjuan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Jayasuriya, Jeevan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Zhu, Binzhu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Fabrication of novel electrolyte-layer free fuel cell with semi-ionic conductor (Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-delta- Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9) and Schottky barrier2016In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 328, 136-142 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perovskite Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-delta (BSCF) is synthesized via a chemical co-precipitation technique for a low temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LTSOFC) (300-600 degrees C) and electrolyte-layer free fuel cell (EFFC) in a comprehensive study. The EFFC with a homogeneous mixture of samarium doped ceria (SDC): BSCF (60%:40% by weight) which is rather similar to the cathode (SDC: BSCF in 50%:50% by weight) used for a three layer SOFC demonstrates peak power densities up to 655 mW/cm(2), while a three layer (anode/ electrolyte/cathode) SOFC has reached only 425 mW/cm(2) at 550 degrees C. Chemical phase, crystal structure and morphology of the as-prepared sample are characterized by X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The electrochemical performances of 3-layer SOFC and EFFC are studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). As-prepared BSCF has exhibited a maximum conductivity above 300 S/cm at 550 degrees C. High performance of the EFFC device corresponds to a balanced combination between ionic and electronic (holes) conduction characteristic. The Schottky barrier prevents the EFFC from the electronic short circuiting problem which also enhances power output. The results provide a new way to produce highly effective cathode materials for LTSOFC and semiconductor designs for EFFC functions using a semiconducting-ionic material.

  • 31.
    Afzal, Muhammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Xia, Chen
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology. Hubei University, China.
    Lanthanum-doped Calcium Manganite (La0.1Ca0.9MnO3) Cathode for Advanced Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)2016In: MATERIALS TODAY-PROCEEDINGS, ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV , 2016, Vol. 3, no 8, 2698-2706 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present here a new perovskite oxide with low lanthanum content doped in calcium manganite, La0.1Ca0.9MnO3 (LCM) as a functional material for low temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LTSOFC) and electrolyte-layer free fuel cell (EFFC). The LCM introduces an intrinsic mixed-ion and electron conduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis shows high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity with an extremely low activation energy which enables an excellent cathode activity. Fuel cells using LCM as cathode with oxide ion conducting electrolyte samarium doped ceria (SDC) and NCAL as an anode, demonstrate a maximum power density of 650 mW cm(-2) at 550 degrees C, which is higher than most of the cathode materials reported for SOFC at this temperature. For EFFC, maximum power density of 750 mW cm(-2) is achieved using LCM as a semiconductor material with SDC ion conducting material. The present work highlights the development of new active air electrode especially for developing low temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

  • 32.
    Agde Tjernlund, Jessica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Solid Mechanics (Div.).
    Length-scale effects in yielding and damage development in polymer materials2005Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
  • 33.
    Agde Tjernlund, Jessica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Gamstedt, Kristofer
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Gudmundson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Length-scale effects on damage development in tensile loading of glass-sphere filled epoxy2006In: International Journal of Solids and Structures, ISSN 0020-7683, E-ISSN 1879-2146, Vol. 43, no 24, 7337-7357 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Particle-reinforced polymers are widely used in load-carrying applications. The effect of particle size on damage development in the polymer is still relatively unexplored. In this study, the effect of glass-sphere size on the damage development in tensile loaded epoxy has been investigated. The diameter of the glass spheres ranged from approximately 0.5-50 mu m. The first type of damage observed was debonding at the sphere poles, which subsequently grew along the interface between the glass spheres and epoxy matrix. These cracks were observed to kink out into the matrix in the radial direction perpendicular to the applied load. The debonding stresses increased with decreasing sphere diameter, whereas the length to diameter ratio of the resulting matrix cracks increased with increasing sphere diameter. These effects could not be explained by elastic stress analysis and linear-elastic fracture mechanics. Possible explanations are that a thin interphase shell may form in the epoxy close to the glass spheres, and that there is a length-scale effect in the yield process which depends on the strain gradients. Cohesive fracture processes can contribute to the influence of sphere size on matrix-crack length. Better knowledge on these underlying size-dependent mechanisms that control damage development in polymers and polymer composites is useful in development of stronger materials. From a methodology point of view, the glass-sphere composite test can be used as an alternative technique (although still in a qualitative way) to hardness vs. indentation depth to quantify length-scale effects in inelastic deformation of polymers.

  • 34.
    Agde Tjernlund, Jessica
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Solid Mechanics.
    Gamstedt, Kristofer
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Solid Mechanics.
    Xu, Zhi-Hui
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Materials Science and Engineering.
    Influence of molecular weight on strain-gradient yielding in polystyrene2004In: Polymer Engineering and Science, ISSN 0032-3888, E-ISSN 1548-2634, Vol. 44, no 10, 1987-1997 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experimental observations have indicated that the presence of strain gradients has an influence on the inelastic behavior of polymers as well as in other materials such as ceramics and metals. The present study has experimentally quantified length-scale effects in inelastic deformations of the polymer material polystyrene (PS) with respect to the molecular length. The experimental technique that has been used is nano-indentation to various depths with a Berkovich indenter. The hardness has been calculated with the method by Oliver and Pharr, and also by direct measurements of the area from atomic force microscopy. The experiments showed that the length-scale effects in inelastic deformations exist in polystyrene at ambient conditions. The direct method gave a smaller hardness than the Oliver-Pharr method. It was also shown that the length-scale parameter according to Nix and Gao increases with increasing molecular weight. For high molecular weights above a critical value of entanglement, there was no pertinent increase in the length-scale parameter. The length-scale parameter for strain-gradient plasticity has a size of around 0.1 μm for polystyrene.

  • 35.
    Aggerstam, Thomas
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Microelectronics and Applied Physics, MAP.
    Gallium nitride templates and its related materials for electronic and photonic devices2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

     

  • 36.
    Aghasibeig, Maniya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Hasse
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Laser cladding of a featureless iron-based alloy2012In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 209, 32-37 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laser cladding experiments with powder injection technique were carried out to create coatings of Fe-8.1Cr6.4Mn-5.3Si-6.9Mo-3.6C alloy on AISI 1018 steel substrates using a diode laser. Analysis of the clad layers showed that an almost featureless structure was formed at different dilutions between 1% and 4%. The featureless phase with a high hardness of 1155 HV was characterized as a metastable solid solution of e phase. However, the featureless structure appeared to be very brittle with numerous cracks. After heat-treatment, it decomposed into a bainitic structure with a high hardness of 884 HV.

  • 37.
    Agnarsson, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Microelectronics and Applied Physics, MAP.
    Qi, B.
    Götelid, Mats
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Microelectronics and Applied Physics, MAP.
    Olafsson, S.
    Gislason, H. P.
    The effect of hard nitridation on Al(2)O(3) using a radio frequency operated plasma cell2011In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 519, no 22, 7796-7802 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on an atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of hard nitridation of sapphire (alpha.-Al(2)O(3)) substrate, using an Epi UNI-Bulb RF plasma cell at substrate temperatures ranging from 250 to 600 degrees C. Our results show that an AlN(1-x)O(x) layer forms on sapphire after extended nitridation at all temperatures, following a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode, with less islands forming at higher temperatures. We also observe a layer-dependent charging shift in XPS, separating smooth AlN(1-x)O(x) layers from rough AlN(1-x)O(x) islands due to their different electronic coupling to the substrate. Although the island growth is suppressed at higher temperatures, the surface roughness increases at higher temperatures as seen by AFM. We also observe sputtering effects with protrusions and pits.

  • 38.
    Ahlin, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Gärdin, Marcus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Automated Classification of Steel Samples: An investigation using Convolutional Neural Networks2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Automated image recognition software has earlier been used for various analyses in the steel making industry. In this study, the possibility to apply such software to classify Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images of two steel samples was investigated. The two steel samples were of the same steel grade but with the difference that they had been treated with calcium for a different length of time. 

    To enable automated image recognition, a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) was built. The construction of the software was performed with open source code provided by Keras Documentation, thus ensuring an easily reproducible program. The network was trained, validated and tested, first for non-binarized images and then with binarized images. Binarized images were used to ensure that the network's prediction only considers the inclusion information and not the substrate.

    The non-binarized images gave a classification accuracy of 99.99 %. For the binarized images, the classification accuracy obtained was 67.9%.  The results show that it is possible to classify steel samples using CNNs. One interesting aspect of the success in classifying steel samples is that further studies on CNNs could enable automated classification of inclusions. 

  • 39.
    Ahmad, Yousef
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Oxidation of Graphite and Metallurgical Coke: A Numerical Study with an Experimental Approach2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    At the royal institute of technology (KTH) in the department of applied process metallurgy, a novel modelling approach has been developed which allows a dynamic coupling between the commercial thermodynamic software Thermo-Calc and the commercial computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software Ansys Fluent, only referred to as Fluent in the study. The dynamic coupling approach is used to provide numerical CFD-models with thermodynamic data for the thermo-physical properties and for the fluid-fluid chemical reactions occurring in metallurgical processes. The main assumption forthe dynamic coupling approach is the existence of local equilibrium in each computational cell. By assuming local equilibrium in each computational cell it is possible to use thermodynamic data from thermodynamic databases instead of kinetic data to numerically simulate chemical reactions. The dynamic coupling approach has been used by previous studies to numerically simulate chemical reactions in metallurgical processes with good results. In order to validate the dynamic coupling approach further, experimental data is required regarding surface reactions. In this study, a graphiteand metallurgical coke oxidation experimental setup was suggested in order to provide the needed experimental data. With the experimental data, the ability of the dynamic couplings approach to numerically predict the outcome of surface reactions can be tested.By reviewing the literature, the main experimental apparatus suggested for the oxidationexperiments was a thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA). The TGA can provide experimental data regarding the reaction rate, kinetic parameters and mass loss as a function of both temperature and time. An experimental setup and procedure were also suggested.In order to test the ability of Fluent to numerically predict the outcome of surface reactions, without any implementation of thermodynamic data from Thermo-Calc, a benchmarking has been conducted. Fluent is benchmarked against graphite oxidation experiments conducted by Kim and No from the Korean advanced institute of science and technology (KAIST). The experimental graphite oxidation rates were compared with the numerically calculated graphite oxidation rates obtained from Fluent. A good match between the experimental graphite oxidation rates and the numerically calculated graphite oxidation rates were obtained. A parameter study was also conducted in order to study the effect of mass diffusion, gas flow rate and the kinetic parameters on the numerically calculated graphite oxidation rate. The results of the parameter study were partially supported by previous graphite oxidation studies. Thus, Fluent proved to be a sufficient numerical tool for numerically predicting the outcome of surface reactions regarding graphite oxidation at zero burn-off degree.

  • 40. Ahmed, H. M.
    et al.
    Viswanathan, N. N.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    KTH.
    Gas-Condensed Phase Reactions - A Novel Route to Synthesize Alloys and Intermetallics Involving Refractory Metals2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reduction and simultaneous reduction-carburization of oxide mixtures to get intermetallics and composite materials may open up shorter process routes towards the end-user needs. The use of natural gas or hydrogen would be environment-friendly. With these aims, the corresponding kinetics were studied by thermogravimetry, gas chromatography as well as laser-flash method. It was found that, under identical conditions, the Arrhenius activation energy for the reduction is proportional to the thermodynamic stability of the compound reduced. Intermetallics could be synthesized successfully and the product was found to have nanograins. Also, Metallic coating on copper surfaces was successfully developed.

  • 41.
    Ahmed, Hesham M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Investigations of the Kinetics of Reduction and Reduction/Carburization of NiO-WO3 Precursors.2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Kinetic studies of reduction of the mixtures of NiO and WO3 having different Ni/(Ni+W) molar ratios in flowing hydrogen gas were investigated by means of Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Fluidized Bed (FB) technique as well as Thermal diffusivity measurements under isothermal conditions. In the case of TGA, the reaction progress was monitored by mass loss, while evolved gas analysis by a gas chromatograph was the indicator of the reaction progress in the case of FB. The results indicate that the reduction reaction proceeds through three consecutive steps, viz.

    NiO-WO3 Ni-WO3 Ni-WO2 Ni-W

    The present results show that the fluidized bed technique can be successfully utilized in bulk production of intermetallics containing W and a transition metal (or a composite material) wherein the process conditions would have a strong impact on the particle size of the end product.

    During the investigations, it was found that there was a delay in the reaction during the hydrogen reduction of NiO-WO3 mixed oxides in a fluidized bed reactor. In order to understand the same, a theoretical model was developed to estimate the apparent reaction rate constant for the reduction reaction from the intrinsic chemical reaction rate constant. Appropriate differential mass balance equations based on intrinsic chemical reaction rate constants and thermodynamic equilibria were developed. The proposed model was successfully applied in predicting the overall reaction kinetics of a fluidized bed reactor. This model is also suitable for scale-up calculations.

    SEM images showed that the particle size of the final product was dependent on the Ni/(Ni+W) molar ratio; smaller particles were formed at higher nickel contents. X-ray diffractions of the reduced precursors exhibited slight shift of Ni peaks from the standard one indicating the dissolution of W into Ni.

    A new method for studying kinetics of the hydrogen reduction of NiO-WO3 precursors was developed in which the reaction progress was monitored by following the change of thermal diffusivity of the precursors. Activation energies of reduction as well as sintering were calculated. This method is considered unique as it provides information regarding the physical changes like sintering, change of porosity and agglomeration along with the chemical changes occurring during the gas/solid reaction.

    As a continuation of the kinetic studies, Ni-W-C ternary carbides were synthesized by simultaneous reduction–carburization of Ni-W-O system using H2-CH4 gas mixtures by TGA. The results showed that the reduction of the oxide mixture was complete before the carburization took place. The nascent particles of the metals formed by reduction could react with the gas mixture with well-defined carbon potential to form a uniform product of Ni-W-C. The above-mentioned experiments were conducted in such a way to ensure that the reaction was controlled by the chemical reaction. The activation energies of the reduction as well as carburization processes at different stages were calculated accordingly.

    The present dissertation demonstrates the potential of the investigations of gas/solid reactions towards tailoring the process towards materials with optimized properties as for example introduction of interstitials. The present process design is extremely environment-friendly with reduced number of unit processes and the product being H2O.

  • 42.
    Ahmed, Hesham M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    El-Geassy, A. H. A.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Kinetics of Reduction of NiO-WO3 Mixtures by Hydrogen2010In: Metallurgical and materials transactions. B, process metallurgy and materials processing science, ISSN 1073-5615, E-ISSN 1543-1916, Vol. 41, no 1, 161-172 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The kinetics of reduction of the oxide mixtures of Ni-W with different Ni/(Ni-W) molar ratios within the range of 923 K to 1173 K in flowing hydrogen gas was investigated by means of thermogravimetric analysis under isothermal conditions. The products were examined by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and electron dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) analyses. Five different oxide mixtures apart from the pure oxides were studied in the present work. The results indicate that the reduction reaction proceeds through three consecutive steps that are as follows: NiO-WO3 -> Ni-WO3 -> Ni-WO2 -> Ni-W From the experimental results, the Arrhenius activation energies of the three steps were evaluated for all of the studied compositions. The activation energy for the first step was calculated to be approximately 18 kJ/mol. For the second and third stages, the activation energy values varied from 62 to 38 kJ/mol for the second stage and 51 to 34 kJ/mol for the third stage depending on the Ni/(Ni + W) molar ratio in the precursors; the activation energy increased with increasing ratios. SEM images showed that the grain size of the final product was dependent on the Ni/(Ni + W) molar ratio; smaller grains were formed at higher nickel contents.

  • 43.
    Ahmed, Hesham M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    El-Geassy, Abdel-Hady A.
    Viswanathan, Nurni Neelakantan
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Kinetics and Mathematical Modeling of Hydrogen Reduction of NiO-WO(3) Precursors in Fluidized Bed Reactor2011In: ISIJ International, ISSN 0915-1559, Vol. 51, no 9, 1383-1391 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work, Fluidized bed reduction of NiO-WO(3) precursors was investigated isothermally at temperatures 973-1 273 K. The reaction progress was monitored by analysis of H(2)O evolved during the reaction process using a gas chromatograph instrument. A theoretical model based on intrinsic chemical reaction rate constants and thermodynamic equilibria was developed to estimate the apparent reaction rate constant for the reduction reaction. In developing the model, the particles are considered to be in a completely mixed condition and gas flow is described as plug flow. The proposed model is also suitable for scale-up calculations. The interfacial chemical reaction model was found to fit the experimental results. The apparent activation energy values of the reduction process at different stages were calculated accordingly. The present investigation proved that the fluidized bed technique can be successfully utilized in bulk production of intermetallics containing W and a transition metal (or a composite material) wherein the process conditions would have a strong impact on the particle size of the end product.

  • 44.
    Ahmed, Hesham M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Isothermal dynamic thermal diffusivity studies of the reduction of NiO and NiWO(4) precursors by hydrogen2011In: International Journal of Materials Research - Zeitschrift für Metallkunde, ISSN 1862-5282, Vol. 102, no 11, 1336-1344 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal diffusivity measurements of uniaxially cold pressed NiO and NiWO(4) were carried out in a dynamic mode in order to monitor the kinetics of hydrogen reduction of the above-mentioned materials using a laser flash unit. The calculated activation energy was found to be higher than that for chemically-controlled reaction obtained earlier by thermogravimetry. The difference has been attributed to physical changes occurring along with the chemical reaction. The activation energy of sintering of the products was evaluated to be 33 and 36 kJ.mol(-1) for NiO and NiWO(4), respectively. Thermal conductivities were calculated taking into consideration the change in heat capacity considering the compositional and the structural changes with the progress of the reaction. The potentiality of the laser-flash method as a complementary technique to thermogravimetry in understanding the mechanism of gas solid reactions is discussed.

  • 45.
    Ahmed, Hesham M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Reduction-Carburization of NiO-WO3 Under Isothermal Conditions Using H2-CH4 Gas Mixture2010In: Metallurgical and materials transactions. B, process metallurgy and materials processing science, ISSN 1073-5615, E-ISSN 1543-1916, Vol. 41, no 1, 173-181 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ni-W-C ternary carbides were synthesized by simultaneous reduction–carburization of NiO-WO3 oxide precursors using H2-CH4 gas mixtures in the temperature range of 973 to 1273 K. The kinetics of the gas–solid reaction were followed closely by monitoring the mass changes using the thermogravimetric method (TGA). As a thin bed of the precursors were used, each particle was in direct contact with the gas mixture. The results showed that the hydrogen reduction of the oxide mixture was complete before the carburization took place. The nascent particles of the metals formed by reduction could react with the gas mixture with well-defined carbon potential to form a uniform product of Ni-W-C. Consequently, the reaction rate could be conceived as being controlled by the chemical reaction. From the reaction rate, Arrhenius activation energies for reduction and carburization were evaluated. Characterization of the carbides produced was carried out using X-ray diffraction and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) combined with electron dispersion spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analyses. The grain sizes also were determined. The process parameters, such as the temperature of the reduction–carburization reaction and the composition of the gas mixture, had a strong impact on the carbide composition as well as on the grain size. The results are discussed in light of the reduction kinetics of the oxides and the thermodynamic constraints.

  • 46.
    Ahmed, Hesham M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    Viswanathan, N. N.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Process Science.
    On The Kinetics of Hydrogen Reduction of NiO-WO3 Precursors in Fluidized Bed- A Modeling Approach2011In: ISIJ International, ISSN 0915-1559, Vol. 51, no 9, 1383-1391 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work, Fluidized bed reduction of NiO-WO3 precursors was investigated isothermally at temperatures 973-1 273 K. The reaction progress was monitored by analysis of H2O evolved during the reaction process using a gas chromatograph instrument. A theoretical model based on intrinsic chemical reaction rate constants and thermodynamic equilibria was developed to estimate the apparent reaction rate constant for the reduction reaction. In developing the model, the particles are considered to be in a completely mixed condition and gas flow is described as plug flow. The proposed model is also suitable for scale-up calculations. The interfacial chemical reaction model was found to fit the experimental results. The apparent activation energy values of the reduction process at different stages were calculated accordingly. The present investigation proved that the fluidized bed technique can be successfully utilized in bulk production of intermetallics containing W and a transition metal (or a composite material) wherein the process conditions would have a strong impact on the particle size of the end product.

  • 47.
    Ahmed, Hesham M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Viswanathan, Nurini N.
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Dynamic Thermal Diffusivity Measurements - A Tool for Studying Gas-Solid Reactions2011In: DIFFUSION IN SOLIDS AND LIQUIDS VI, PTS 1 AND 2, 2011, 217-222 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work, the thermal diffusivity measurements of uniaxially cold pressed NiWO(4) has been carried out. The measurements were performed isothermally at temperatures between 973 and 1273 K under H(2) gas using the laser flash technique. The experimental thermal diffusivity values were found to increase with the reduction progress as well as with increasing temperature. The calculated activation energy was found to be higher than that for chemically controlled reaction. The difference has been attributed to factors like agglomeration of the product as well as sintering of the precursor along with the chemical reaction. In order to sort out the sintering effect on the thermal diffusivity values, complementary experiments have been done on pressed NiWO(4) and Ni-W, produced by the reduction of NiWO(4) at 1123K, under Argon gas. The porosity change and its effect on thermal diffusivity values have been studied.

  • 48.
    Ahmed, Hesham
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Mis, Michal
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    El-Geassy, Abdel-Hady
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Seethararnan, Seshadri
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Reduction-Carburization of the Oxides of Ni and W Towards the Synthesis of Ni-W-C Carbides2010In: ADVANCED MATERIALS FORUM V, PT 1 AND 2  / [ed] Rosa LG; Margarido F, 2010, Vol. 636-637, 952-962 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ternary Ni-W-C cemented carbides were synthesized directly from mixture powder of NiO-WO3 by simultaneous reduction-carburization in mixed H-2-CH4 gas environment in a thin bed reactor in the temperature range 973-1273K. The kinetics of the reaction was closely followed by monitoring the mass change using thermogravimetric method (TGA). The nascent particles of the metals formed by reduction could react with the gas mixture with well-defined carbon potential to form a uniform product of Ni-W-C. The gas mixture ratio was adjusted in such a way that the Ni-W-C formed was close to the two phase tie line. In view of the fact that each particle was in direct contact with the gas mixture, the reaction rate could be conceived as being controlled by the combined reduction-carburization reaction. From the reaction rate, the Arrhenius activation energies were evaluated. Characterization of the carbides produced was carried out by using X-ray diffraction, SEM-EDS as well as high resolution electron microscope (HREM). The grain sizes were also determined. Correlations were found between the carbide composition as well as grain size and the process parameters such as temperature of the reduction-carburization reaction as well as the composition of the gas mixture. The results are discussed in the light of the kinetics of the reduction of oxides and the thermodynamic constraints.

  • 49. Ahmed, Hesham
    et al.
    Morales-Estrella, R.
    Viswanathan, Nurin
    Seetharaman, Seshadri
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Gas-Solid Reaction Route toward the Production of Intermetallics from Their Corresponding Oxide Mixtures2016In: METALS, ISSN 2075-4701, Vol. 6, no 8, 190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Near-net shape forming of metallic components from metallic powders produced in situ from reduction of corresponding pure metal oxides has not been explored to a large extent. Such a process can be probably termed in short as the "Reduction-Sintering" process. This methodology can be especially effective in producing components containing refractory metals. Additionally, in situ production of metallic powder from complex oxides containing more than one metallic element may result in in situ alloying during reduction, possibly at lower temperatures. With this motivation, in situ reduction of complex oxides mixtures containing more than one metallic element has been investigated intensively over a period of years in the department of materials science, KTH, Sweden. This review highlights the most important features of that investigation. The investigation includes not only synthesis of intermetallics and refractory metals using the gas solid reaction route but also study the reaction kinetics and mechanism. Environmentally friendly gases like H-2, CH4 and N-2 were used for simultaneous reduction, carburization and nitridation, respectively. Different techniques have been utilized. A thermogravimetric analyzer was used to accurately control the process conditions and obtain reaction kinetics. The fluidized bed technique has been utilized to study the possibility of bulk production of intermetallics compared to milligrams in TGA. Carburization and nitridation of nascent formed intermetallics were successfully carried out. A novel method based on material thermal property was explored to track the reaction progress and estimate the reaction kinetics. This method implies the dynamic measure of thermal diffusivity using laser flash method. These efforts end up with a successful preparation of nanograined intermetallics like Fe-Mo and Ni-W. In addition, it ends up with simultaneous reduction and synthesis of Ni-WN and Ni-WC from their oxide mixtures in single step.

  • 50.
    Ahuja, Rajeev
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Physics.
    Li, Sa
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Physics.
    Johansson, Börje Örje
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Physics.
    High pressure structural transitions in Cm metal2006In: Mater Res Soc Symp Proc, 2006, 247-254 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high pressure behaviour of Cm metal is investigated theoretically using ab initio electronic structure methods. Our calculations reproduce the structural phase transitions which are obsereved in recent experiment performed by Heatman et al. [Science 309, 110 (2005)]. Calculated transition pressures are in reasonable agreement with the experimental values. Calculations performed for an antiferromagnetic state is essential to reproduce the stability of Cm-III phase. Thus, the stability of the Cm-III phase is related to the spin polarization of its 5f electrons.

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