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  • 1. Abrahamsson, S.
    et al.
    Blom, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Agostinho, A.
    Jans, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Jost, A.
    Müller, M.
    Nilsson, Linnea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Bernhem, K.
    Lambert, T. J.
    Heintzmann, R.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Multifocus structured illumination microscopy for fast volumetric super-resolution imaging2017In: Biomedical Optics Express, ISSN 2156-7085, E-ISSN 2156-7085, Vol. 8, no 9, p. 4135-4140, article id #294866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We here report for the first time the synergistic implementation of structured illumination microscopy (SIM) and multifocus microscopy (MFM). This imaging modality is designed to alleviate the problem of insufficient volumetric acquisition speed in superresolution biological imaging. SIM is a wide-field super-resolution technique that allows imaging with visible light beyond the classical diffraction limit. Employing multifocus diffractive optics we obtain simultaneous wide-field 3D imaging capability in the SIM acquisition sequence, improving volumetric acquisition speed by an order of magnitude. Imaging performance is demonstrated on biological specimens.

  • 2.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Ji, Guangchao
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Rödby, Kristian
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Björlin, Anders
    Kiwok AB.
    Östlund, Anders
    Kiwok AB.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems. Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Textile-Electronic Integration in Wearable Measurement Garments for Pervasive Healthcare Monitoring2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Alander, Jarmo
    et al.
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, University of Vaasa.
    Autere, Antti
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, University of Vaasa.
    Kanniainen, Olli
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, University of Vaasa.
    Koljonen, Janne
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, University of Vaasa.
    Nordling, Torbjörn E M
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, University of Vaasa.
    Välisuo, Petri
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, University of Vaasa.
    Near infrared wavelength relevance detection of ultraviolet radiation-induced erythema2008In: Journal of Near Infrared Spectroscopy, ISSN 0967-0335, E-ISSN 1751-6552, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 233-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acute effects of sun-bathing on the near-infrared absorption spectra of human skin were studied by exposing the shoulders of a male test subject to bright Finnish high summer mid-day sun. The spectra were measured before, immediately after and for several days after exposure. Four different spectral. processing and classification methods were applied to the data set to identify differences caused by exposure to the sun. The spectrophotometer and measuring procedure were found to cause some systematic errors, calling for further development, even though they could, to a large extent, be compensated for computationally. Spectral regions indicating ultraviolet radiation-induced erythema were Located and the degree of erythema could be predicted correctly but the signal is weak. This paper discusses promising wavelength selection methods to study the dermal effects of exposure to the sun, as well as difficulties and remedies of near infrared spectroscopic measurements of the skin.

  • 4. Ambrosi, D.
    et al.
    Ateshian, G. A.
    Arruda, E. M.
    Cowin, S. C.
    Dumais, J.
    Goriely, A.
    Holzapfel, Gerhard A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Biomechanics.
    Humphrey, J. D.
    Kemkemer, R.
    Kuhl, E.
    Olberding, J. E.
    Taber, L. A.
    Garikipati, K.
    Perspectives on biological growth and remodeling2011In: Journal of the mechanics and physics of solids, ISSN 0022-5096, E-ISSN 1873-4782, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 863-883Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The continuum mechanical treatment of biological growth and remodeling has attracted considerable attention over the past fifteen years. Many aspects of these problems are now well-understood, yet there remain areas in need of significant development from the standpoint of experiments, theory, and computation. In this perspective paper we review the state of the field and highlight open questions, challenges, and avenues for further development.

  • 5. Aslund, M.
    et al.
    Fredenberg, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Telman, M.
    Danielsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Detectors for the future of X-ray imaging2010In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 139, no 1-3, p. 327-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, developments in detectors for X-ray imaging have improved dose efficiency. This has been accomplished with for example, structured scintillators such as columnar CsI, or with direct detectors where the X rays are converted to electric charge carriers in a semiconductor. Scattered radiation remains a major noise source, and fairly inefficient anti-scatter grids are still a gold standard. Hence, any future development should include improved scatter rejection. In recent years, photon-counting detectors have generated significant interest by several companies as well as academic research groups. This method eliminates electronic noise, which is an advantage in low-dose applications. Moreover, energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors allow for further improvements by optimising the signal-to-quantum-noise ratio, anatomical background subtraction or quantitative analysis of object constituents. This paper reviews state-of-the-art photon-counting detectors, scatter control and their application in diagnostic X-ray medical imaging. In particular, spectral imaging with photon-counting detectors, pitfalls such as charge sharing and high rates and various proposals for mitigation are discussed.

  • 6.
    Asplund, Maria
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Conjugated Polymers for Neural Interfaces: Prospects, possibilities and future challenges2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of neuroprosthetics the possibility to use implanted electrodes for communication with the nervous system is explored. Much effort is put into the material aspects of the electrode implant to increase charge injection capacity, suppress foreign body response and build micro sized electrode arrays allowing close contact with neurons. Conducting polymers, in particular poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) (PEDOT), have been suggested as materials highly interesting for such neural communication electrodes. The possibility to tailor the material both mechanically and biochemically to suit specific applications, is a substantial benefit with polymers when compared to metals. PEDOT also have hybrid charge transfer properties, including both electronic and ionic conduction, which allow for highly efficient charge injection.

     

    Part of this thesis describes a method of tailoring PEDOT through exchanging the counter ion used in electropolymerisation process. Commonly used surfactants can thereby be excluded and instead, different biomolecules can be incorporated into the polymer. The electrochemical characteristics of the polymer film depend on the ion. PEDOT electropolymerised with heparin was here determined to have the most advantageous properties. In vitro methods were applied to confirm non-cytotoxicity of the formed PEDOT:biomolecular composites. In addition, biocompatibility was affirmed for PEDOT:heparin by evaluation of inflammatory response and neuron density when implanted in rodent cortex.

     

    One advantage with PEDOT often stated, is its high stability compared to other conducting polymers. A battery of tests simulating the biological environment was therefore applied to investigate this stability, and especially the influence of the incorporated heparin. These tests showed that there was a decline in the electroactivity of PEDOT over time. This also applied in phosphate buffered saline at body temperature and in the absence of other stressors. The time course of degradation also differed depending on whether the counter ion was the surfactant polystyrene sulphonate or heparin, with a slightly better stability for the former.

     

    One possibility with PEDOT, often overlooked for biological applications, is the use of its semi conducting properties in order to include logic functions in the implant. This thesis presents the concept of using PEDOT electrochemical transistors to construct textile electrode arrays with in-built multiplexing. Using the electrolyte mediated interaction between adjacent PEDOT coated fibres to switch the polymer coat between conducting and non conducting states, then transistor function can be included in the conducting textile. Analogue circuit simulations based on experimentally found transistor characteristics proved the feasibility of these textile arrays. Developments of better polymer coatings, electrolytes and encapsulation techniques for this technology, were also identified to be essential steps in order to make these devices truly useful.

     

    In summary, this work shows the potential of PEDOT to improve neural interfaces in several ways. Some weaknesses of the polymer and the polymer electronics are presented and this, together with the epidemiological data, should point in the direction for future studies within this field.

  • 7.
    Ayllon, David
    et al.
    Department of Signal Theory and Communications.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Gil-Pita, Roberto
    Department of Signal Theory and Communications.
    Cole equation and parameter estimation from electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements: A comparative study2009In: EMBC: 2009 ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY SOCIETY, VOLS 1-20, Buenos Aires: IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology , 2009, p. 3779-3782Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since there are several applications of Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) that use the Cole parameters as base of the analysis, to fit EBI measured data onto the Cole equation is a very common practice within Multifrequency-EBI and spectroscopy. The aim of this paper is to compare different fitting methods for EBI data in order to evaluate their suitability to fit the Cole equation and estimate the Cole parameters. Three of the studied fittings are based on the use of Non-Linear Least Squares on the Cole model, one using the real part only, a second using the imaginary part and the third using the complex impedance. Furthermore, a novel fitting method done on the impedance plane, without using any frequency information has been implemented and included in the comparison. Results show that the four methods perform relatively well but the best fitting in terms of standard error of estimate is the fitting obtained from the resistance only. The results support the possibility of measuring only the resistive part of the bioimpedance to accurately fit Cole equation and estimate the Cole parameters, with entailed advantages.

  • 8. Bauer, Margit
    et al.
    Mazza, Edoardo
    Jabareen, Mahmood
    Sultan, Leila
    Bajka, Michael
    Lang, Uwe
    Zimmermann, Roland
    Holzapfel, Gerhard A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Solid Mechanics (Div.).
    Assessment of the in vivo biomechanical properties of the human uterine cervix in pregnancy using the aspiration test A feasibility study2009In: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, ISSN 0301-2115, E-ISSN 1872-7654, Vol. 144, p. S77-S81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To date no diagnostic tool is yet available to objectively assess the in vivo biomechanical properties of the uterine cervix during gestation. Methods: We show the first clinical application of an aspiration device to assess the in vivo biomechanical properties of the cervix in pregnancy with the aim to describe the physiological biomechanical changes throughout gestation in order to eventually detect pregnant women at risk for cervical insufficiency (CI). Results: Out of 15 aspiration measurements, 12 produced valid results. The stiffness values were in the range between 0.013 and 0.068 bar/mm. The results showed a good reproducibility of the aspiration test. In our previous test series on non-pregnant cervices our repetitive measurements showed a standard deviation of > 20% compared to <+/- 10% to our data on pregnant cervices. Stiffness values are decreasing with gestational age which indicates a progressive softening of cervical tissue towards the end of pregnancy. Three pregnant women had two subsequent measurements within a time interval of four weeks. Decreasing stiffness values in the range of 20% were recorded. Discussion: This preliminary study on the clinical practicability of aspiration tests showed promising results in terms of reproducibility (reliability) and clinical use (feasibility). Ongoing studies will provide further insights on its usefulness in clinical practice and in the detection of substantial changes of the cervix in pregnancy indicative for threatened preterm birth or cervical insufficiency.

  • 9.
    Biasetti, Jacopo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Biomechanics.
    Gasser, T. Christian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Biomechanics.
    Auer, Martin
    VASCOPS GmbH, Graz, Austria.
    Hedin, Ulf
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Universty Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Labruto, Fausto
    Department of Radoilogy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hemodynamics of the Normal Aorta Compared to Fusiform and Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with Emphasis on a Potential Thrombus Formation Mechanism2010In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, ISSN 0090-6964, E-ISSN 1573-9686, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 380-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAAs), i.e., focal enlargements of the aorta in the abdomen are frequently observed in the elderly population and their rupture is highly mortal. An intra-luminal thrombus is found in nearly all aneurysms of clinically relevant size and multiply affects the underlying wall. However, from a biomechanical perspective thrombus development and its relation to aneurysm rupture is still not clearly understood. In order to explore the impact of blood flow on thrombus development, normal aortas (n = 4), fusiform AAAs (n = 3), and saccular AAAs (n = 2) were compared on the basis of unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations. To this end patient-specific luminal geometries were segmented from Computerized Tomography Angiography data and five full heart cycles using physiologically realistic boundary conditions were analyzed. Simulations were carried out with computational grids of about half a million finite volume elements and the Carreau-Yasuda model captured the non-Newtonian behavior of blood. In contrast to the normal aorta the flow in aneurysm was highly disturbed and, particularly right after the neck, flow separation involving regions of high streaming velocities and high shear stresses were observed. Naturally, at the expanded sites of the aneurysm average flow velocity and wall shear stress were much lower compared to normal aortas. These findings suggest platelets activation right after the neck, i.e., within zones of pronounced recirculation, and platelet adhesion, i.e., thrombus formation, downstream. This mechanism is supported by recirculation zones promoting the advection of activated platelets to the wall.

  • 10.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Nowak, Jacek
    Lind, Britta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Hayashi, Shirley
    Mazza do Nascimento, Marcelo
    Riella, Miquel
    Seeberger, Astrid
    Effects of hemodialysis on the cardiovascular system: Quantitative analysis using wave intensity wall analysis and tissue velocity imaging2010In: Heart and Vessels, ISSN 0910-8327, E-ISSN 1615-2573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in cardiovascular function induced by a single session of hemodialysis (HD) by the analysis of cardiovascular dynamics using wave intensity wall analysis (WIWA) and of systolic and diastolic myocardial function using tissue velocity imaging (TVI). Grey-scale cine loops of the left common carotid artery, conventional echocardiography and TVI images of the left ventricle were acquired before and after HD in 45 patients (17 women, mean age 54) with ESRD. The WIWA indexes, W1 preload-adjusted W1, W2 and preload-adjusted W2, and the TVI variables, isovolumic contraction velocity (IVCV), isovolumic contraction time (IVCT), peak systolic velocity (PSV), displacement, isovolumic relaxation velocity (IVRV), isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT), peak early diastolic velocity (E’) and peak late diastolic velocity (A’), were compared before and after HD. The WIWA measurements showed significant increases in W1 (p < 0.05) and preload-adjusted W1 (p < 0.01) after HD. W2 was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) after HD, whereas the change in preload-adjusted W2 was not significant. Systolic velocities, IVCV (p < 0.001) and PSV (p < 0.01), were increased after HD, whereas the AV-plane displacement were decreased (p < 0.01). For the measured diastolic variables, E’ was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) and IVRT was significantly prolonged (p < 0.05), after HD. A few correlations were found between WIWA and TVI variables. The WIWA and TVI measurements indicate that a single session of HD improves systolic function. The load dependency of the diastolic variables seems to be more pronounced than for the systolic variables. Preload-adjusted wave intensity indexes may contribute in the assessment of true LV contractility and relaxation.

  • 11.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Shahgaldi, Kambiz
    Lind, Britta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Winter, Reidar
    Brodin, Lars-Ake
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Differences in myocardial velocities during supine and upright exercise stress echocardiography in healthy adults2009In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 216-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue Velocity Imaging (TVI) is a method for quantitative analysis of longitudinal myocardial velocities, which can be used during exercise and pharmacological stress echocardiography. It is of interest to evaluate cardiac response to different types of stress tests and the differences between upright and supine bicycle exercise tests have not been fully investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare cardiac response during supine and upright exercise stress tests. Twenty young healthy individuals underwent supine and upright stress test. The initial workload was set to 30 W and was increased every minute by a further 30 W until physical exhaustion. Tissue Doppler data from the left ventricle were acquired at the end of every workload level using a GE Vivid7 Dimension system (> 200 frames s(-1)). In the off-line processing, isovolumic contraction velocity (IVCV), peak systolic velocity (PSV), isovolumic relaxation velocity (IVRV), peak early diastolic velocity (E') and peak late diastolic velocity (A') were identified at every workload level. No significant difference between the tests was found in PSV. On the contrary, E' was shown to be significantly higher (P < 0.001) during supine exercise than during upright exercise and IVRV was significantly lower (P < 0.001) during supine exercise compared to upright exercise. Upright and supine exercise stress echocardiography give a comparable increase in measured systolic velocities and significant differences in early diastolic velocities.

  • 12.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Lind, Britta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Peolsson, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Shahgaldi, Kambiz
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Nowak, Jacek
    Ultrasonographic strain imaging is superior to conventional non-invasive measures of vascular stiffness in the detection of age-dependent differences in the mechanical properties of the common carotid artery2010In: European Journal of Echocardiography, ISSN 1525-2167, E-ISSN 1532-2114, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 630-636Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Elastic properties of large arteries have been shown to deteriorate with age and in the presence of atherosclerotic vascular disease. In this study, the performance of ultrasonographic strain measurements was compared to conventional measures of vascular stiffness in the detection of age-dependent differences in the elastic properties of the common carotid artery.

    Methods and results: In 10 younger (25-28 years, 4 women) and 10 older (50-59 years, 4 women) healthy individuals, global and regional circumferential and radial strain variables were measured in the short-axis view of the right common carotid artery using ultrasonographic two-dimensional (2D) strain imaging with recently introduced speckle tracking technique. Conventional elasticity variables, elastic modulus (Ep) and β stiffness index, were calculated using M-mode sonography and non-invasive blood pressure measurements. Global and regional circumferential systolic strain and strain rate values were significantly higher (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 for regional late systolic strain rate) in the younger individuals, whereas the values of conventional elasticity variables in the same group were lower (p < 0.05). Among all strain and conventional elasticity variables, principal component analysis and its regression extension identified only circumferential systolic strain variables as contributing significantly to the observed discrimination between the younger and older age groups.

    Conclusion: Ultrasonographic 2D-strain imaging is a sensitive method for the assessment of elastic properties in the common carotid artery, being in this respect superior to conventional measures of vascular elasticity. The method has potential to become a valuable non-invasive tool in the detection of early atherosclerotic vascular changes.

  • 13. Borsbo, Bjorn
    et al.
    Gerdle, Bjorn
    Peolsson, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Impact of the interaction between self-efficacy, symptoms and catastrophising on disability, quality of life and health in with chronic pain patients2010In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, no 17, p. 1387-1396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. To investigate the interactions between self-efficacy - including subcomponents - and symptoms (pain, depression and anxiety), catastrophising, disability, quality of life and health in a population of patients with chronic pain. Method. The study used 433 patients with chronic pain including 47 patients with spinal cord injury-related pain, 150 patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders and 236 patients with fibromyalgia. The participants answered a postal questionnaire that provided background data, pain intensity and duration and psychological- and health-related variables. Results. In the multivariate context, depression, anxiety, catastrophising and disability were intercorrelated. Self-efficacy correlated positively with variables of quality of life and general health. These two groups of variables were negatively correlated. The pain variables - duration of pain, pain intensity and spreading of pain - formed a third group of variables. Self-efficacy function was negatively correlated to these three pain variables. When regressing disability, quality of life and health, we found that self-efficacy had a positive impact whereas symptoms, catastrophising and pain had a negative influence on these aspects. Different patterns of influencing variables were discerned for the three different analyses, and specific patterns of the subscales of self-efficacy corresponded to specific patterns of negative factors for the outcome of disability, quality of life and health. Conclusion. There is a complex interaction of psychological factors and symptoms and their positive and negative influence on disability, quality of life and health. The results indicate that it might be important to assess and influence both enhancing and detoriating factors to ensure an effective pain management programme.

  • 14.
    Buendia, Ruben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Gil-Pita, Roberto
    Department of Theory of the Signal and Communications.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Cole Parameter Estimation from the Modulus of the Electrical Bioimpeadance for Assessment of Body Composition: A Full Spectroscopy Approach2011In: Journal of Electrical Bioimpedance, ISSN 1891-5469, E-ISSN 1891-5469, Vol. 2, p. 72-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Activities around applications of Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (EBIS) have proliferated in the past decade significantly. Most of these activities have been focused in the analysis of the EBIS measurements, which eventually might enable novel applications. In Body Composition Assessment (BCA) the most common analysis approach currently used in EBIS is based on the Cole function, which most often requires curve fitting. One of the most implemented approaches for obtaining the Cole parameters is performed in the impedance plane through the geometrical properties that the Cole function exhibit in such domain as depressed semi-circle. To fit the measured impedance data to a semi-circle in the impedance plane, obtaining the Cole parameters in an indirect and sequential manner has several drawbacks. Applying a Non-Linear Least Square (NLLS) iterative fitting on the spectroscopy measurement, obtains the Cole parameters considering the frequency information contained in the measurement. In this work, from experimental total right side EBIS measurements, the BCA parameters have been obtained to assess the amount and distribution of whole body fluids. The values for the BCA parameters have been obtained using values for the Cole parameters estimated with both approaches: circular fitting on the impedance plane and NLLS impedance-only fitting. The comparison of the values obtained for the BCA parameters with both methods confirms that the NLLS impedance-only is an effective alternative as Cole parameter estimation method in BCA from EBIS measurements. Using the modulus of the Cole function as the model for the fitting would eliminate the need for performing a phase detection in the acquisition process, simplifying the hardware specifications of the measurement instrumentation when implementing a bioimpedance spectrometer.

  • 15.
    Buendia, Ruben
    et al.
    School of Engineering, University of Borås.
    Gil-Pita, Roberto
    Department of Theory of the Signal and Communications, University of Alcala, Madrid, Spain.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Cole parameter estimation from total right side electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements: Influence of the number of frequencies and the upper limit2011In: 2011 ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY SOCIETY (EMBC), 2011, p. 1843-1846Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Applications based on measurements of Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (EBIS) analysis are proliferating. The most spread and known application of EBIS is the non-invasive assessment of body composition. Fitting to the Cole function to obtain the Cole parameters, R<sub>0</sub> and R<sub>&#x221E;</sub>, is the core of the EBIS analysis to obtain the body fluid distribution. An accurate estimation of the Cole parameters is essential for the Body Composition Assessment (BCA) and the estimation process depends on several factors. One of them is the upper frequency limit used for the estimation and the other is the number of measured frequencies in the measurement frequency range. Both of them impose requirements on the measurement hardware, influencing largely in the complexity of the bioimpedance spectrometer. In this work an analysis of the error obtained when estimating the Cole parameters with several frequency ranges and different number of frequencies has been performed. The study has been done on synthetic EBIS data obtained from experimental Total Right Side (TRS) measurements. The results suggest that accurate estimations of R<sub>0</sub> and R<sub>&#x221E;</sub> for BCA measurements can be achieved using much narrower frequency ranges and quite fewer frequencies than electrical bioimpedance spectrometers commercially available nowadays do.

  • 16.
    Buendia, Ruben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Bosacus, I.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Gil-Pita, Roberto
    Department of Theory of the Signal and Communications, University of Alcala, Madrid, Spain.
    Johannsson, G.
    Ellegård, L.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Robust approach against capacitive coupling for the estimation of body fluids using clinical bioimpedance spectroscopy measurementsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Buendia, Ruben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Gil-Pita, Roberto
    Department of Theory of the Signal and Communications, University of Alcala, Madrid, Spain.
    Experimental validation of a method for removing the capacitive leakage artifact from electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements2010In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 21, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Often when performing electrical bioimpedance (EBI) spectroscopy measurements, the obtained EBI data present a hook-like deviation, which is most noticeable at high frequencies in the impedance plane. The deviation is due to a capacitive leakage effect caused by the presence of stray capacitances. In addition to the data deviation being remarkably noticeable at high frequencies in the phase and the reactance spectra, the measured EBI is also altered in the resistance and the modulus. If this EBI data deviation is not properly removed, it interferes with subsequent data analysis processes, especially with Cole model-based analyses. In other words, to perform any accurate analysis of the EBI spectroscopy data, the hook deviation must be properly removed. Td compensation is a method used to compensate the hook deviation present in EBI data; it consists of multiplying the obtained spectrum, Z meas (ω), by a complex exponential in the form of exp(–jωTd). Although the method is well known and accepted, Td compensation cannot entirely correct the hook-like deviation; moreover, it lacks solid scientific grounds. In this work, the Td compensation method is revisited, and it is shown that it should not be used to correct the effect of a capacitive leakage; furthermore, a more developed approach for correcting the hook deviation caused by the capacitive leakage is proposed. The method includes a novel correcting expression and a process for selecting the proper values of expressions that are complex and frequency dependent. The correctness of the novel method is validated with the experimental data obtained from measurements from three different EBI applications. The obtained results confirm the sufficiency and feasibility of the correcting method.

  • 18.
    Buendia, Ruben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Harris, Matthew
    Phillips Research.
    Caffarel, Jeniffer
    Phillips Research.
    Gil-Pita, Roberto
    Department of Theory of the Signal and Communications, University of Alcala, Madrid, Spain.
    Hook Effect correction & resistance-based Cole fitting prior Cole model-based analysis: Experimental validation2010In: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2010, IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology , 2010, p. 6563-6566Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analysis of measurements of Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) is on the increase for performing non-invasive assessment of health status and monitoring of pathophysiological mechanisms. EBI measurements might contain measurements artefacts that must be carefully removed prior to any further analysis. Cole model-based analysis is often selected when analysing EBI data and might lead to miss-conclusion if it is applied on data contaminated with measurement artefacts. The recently proposed Correction Function to eliminate the influence of the Hook Effect from EBI data and the fitting to the real part of the Cole model to extract the Cole parameters have been validated on experimental measurements. The obtained results confirm the feasible experimental use of these promising pre-processing tools that might improve the outcome of EBI applications using Cole model-based analysis.

  • 19.
    Buendia, Ruben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701). University of Alcala, Spain; Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; University of Boras, Sweden.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701). University of Boras, Sweden.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701). University of Boras, Sweden; Karolinska Instituet, Sweden.
    Bosacus, I.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Gil-Pita, Roberto
    Department of Theory of the Signal and Communications, University of Alcala, Madrid, Spain.
    Johannsson, G.
    Ellegård, L.
    Ward, L.
    Estimation of body fluids with bioimpedance spectroscopy: state of the art methods and proposal of novel methods2015In: Physiological Measurement, ISSN 0967-3334, E-ISSN 1361-6579, Vol. 36, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Determination of body fluids is a useful common practice in determination of disease mechanisms and treatments. Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) methods are non-invasive, inexpensive and rapid alternatives to reference methods such as tracer dilution. However, they are indirect and their robustness and validity are unclear. In this article, state of the art methods are reviewed, their drawbacks identified and new methods are proposed. All methods were tested on a clinical database of patients receiving growth hormone replacement therapy. Results indicated that most BIS methods are similarly accurate (e.g. < 0.5 +/- 3.0% mean percentage difference for total body water) for estimation of body fluids. A new model for calculation is proposed that performs equally well for all fluid compartments (total body water, extra-and intracellular water). It is suggested that the main source of error in extracellular water estimation is due to anisotropy, in total body water estimation to the uncertainty associated with intracellular resistivity and in determination of intracellular water a combination of both.

  • 20.
    Buendía López, Rubén
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Model Based Enhancement of Bioimpedance Spectroscopy Analysis: Towards Textile Enabled Applications2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Several signal processing approaches have been developed to overcome the effect of stray capacitances in Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (EBIS) measurements. EBIS measurements obtained with textile-enabled instrumentation are more vulnerable to stray capacitances. Currently, the most widespread approach for correcting the effect of stray capacitances in EBIS is the time delay (

    Td) compensation method, which also has several drawbacks. In this study, the Td method is revisited and its limitations and its lack of a scientific basis are demonstrated. To determine better ways to overcome the effect of stray capacitances, a simplified measurement model is proposed that is based on previous models of artefacts in EBIS measurements described in the literature. The model consists of a current divider with a parasitic capacitance (Cpar) in parallel with the load. Cpar creates a pathway for the measurement current to leak away from the load, provoking a capacitive leakage effect. In this thesis, three approaches with different limitations are proposed to overcome the capacitive leakage effect. The first approach estimates Cpar and subtracts it from the measurements, thus finding the load. Cpar can be estimated because the susceptance of biological tissue is null at infinite frequency. Therefore, at high frequencies, the susceptance of the tissue can be neglected, and the slope of the susceptance of the measurement is Cpar. The accuracy of Cpar depends on the maximum frequency measured and the value of Cpar. Therefore, it may not be possible to accurately estimate small values of Cpar in the typical frequency ranges used in EBIS. The second and third approaches use the Cole fitting process to estimate the Cole parameters, which form the basis for most EBIS applications. Because the conductance of the measurement is free from the effect of Cpar, performing Cole fitting on the conductance avoids the effect of Cpar in the fitting process. With a poor skin-electrode contact, this approach may not be sufficiently accurate. The third approach would be to perform the Cole fitting on the modulus with a reduced upper frequency limit because the modulus and the low-medium frequencies are very robust against the effect of artefacts. In this approach, a slight capacitive leakage effect is unavoidable. Since it is common to find tainted measurements, especially among those obtained with textile-enabled instrumentation, it is important to find viable methods to avoid their effect. The three methods studied showed that they could reduce the effect of tainted measurements.

  • 21.
    Burvall, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Barrett, Harrison H.
    Myers, Kyle J.
    Dainty, Christopher
    Singular-value decomposition of a tomosynthesis system2010In: Optics Express, ISSN 1094-4087, E-ISSN 1094-4087, Vol. 18, no 20, p. 20699-20711Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tomosynthesis is an emerging technique with potential to replace mammography, since it gives 3D information at a relatively small increase in dose and cost. We present an analytical singular-value decomposition of a tomosynthesis system, which provides the measurement component of any given object. The method is demonstrated on an example object. The measurement component can be used as a reconstruction of the object, and can also be utilized in future observer studies of tomosynthesis image quality.

  • 22. Capece, Sabrina
    et al.
    Chiessi, Ester
    Cavalli, Roberta
    Giustetto, Pierangela
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Paradossi, Gaio
    A general strategy for obtaining biodegradable polymer shelled microbubbles as theranostic devices2013In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 49, no 51, p. 5763-5765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fabrication of multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been recently addressed by several research groups. A versatile strategy for the synthesis of UCA precursors in the form of biodegradable vesicles with a biocompatible crosslinked polymer shell is described. Upon ultrasound irradiation, acoustic droplet vaporization transforms such particles into microbubbles behaving as UCAs. This proof of concept entails the features of a potential theranostic microdevice.

  • 23. Carlsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Söderqvist, Emil
    KTH, Superseded Departments, KTH Syd.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    Källner, Göran
    Hultman, Jan
    Elmqvist, Håkan
    Saha, Samir
    Initial experience with a thin single segment pressure and conductance catheter for measurement of left ventricular volume2001In: Annual Reports of the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, 2001, p. 103-106Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To evaluate a thin and soft multifunctionalcatheter for the simultaneous real time monitoring of leftventricular volume and pressure with special consideration toside elTects such as interference with normal cardiacelectrophysiology.Methods and results: In four pigs, pressure and volumewere simultaneously recorded by using the thin single segmentpressure and conductance catheter. Measurements were doneunder varied cardiac conditions: at baseline, during preloadreduction and afterload Increase. Volumes were calibrated withintracardiac ultrasound measurements. During preloadreduction the pressure and volume decreased as expected. Acautious afterload increase resulted in a corresponding pressureand volume increase, the maximum of the pressure curvechanged from early to late. Both SV and EDV increased. Thevery few arrhythmias were mainly caused by surgicalinterference.Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that our thinsingle segment conductance catheter for the simultaneousmeasurement of LV volume and pressure has a performancethat warrants further development with the goal to make themethod available for human use. In particular, the catheter didnot cause any arrhythmias.

  • 24.
    Chen, Yawen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for High Performance Computing, PDC.
    Shen, Hong
    Zhang, Haibo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    A Novel P-shape Tessellation Approach on Double-Loop Networks2009In: 2009 IEEE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON IT IN MEDICINE & EDUCATION, VOLS 1 AND 2, PROCEEDINGS, NEW YORK: IEEE , 2009, p. 507-511Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Double loop computer networks are widely used in the design and implementation of local area networks and parallel processing architectures. However the embedding problems on double-loop networks have not been well studied due to the complexity of double-loop networks. Since the traditional L-shape, designed to compute the diameter of double-loop networks, is not efficient to solve embedding problems, we propose a novel tessellation approach to partition the geometric plane of double-loop networks into a set of parallelogram shaped tiles, called P-shape. Our proposed tessellation technique, P-shape, is a useful theoretical tool for embedding meshes on double-loop networks, and can be extended to analyze other problems as a bridge between regular graphs and double-loop networks.

  • 25. Comellas, E.
    et al.
    Gasser, T. Christian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Bellomo, F. J.
    Oller, S.
    A homeostatic-driven turnover remodelling constitutive model for healing in soft tissues2016In: Journal of the Royal Society Interface, ISSN 1742-5689, E-ISSN 1742-5662, Vol. 13, no 116, article id 20151081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remodelling of soft biological tissue is characterized by interacting biochemical and biomechanical events, which change the tissue's microstructure, and, consequently, its macroscopic mechanical properties. Remodelling is a well-defined stage of the healing process, and aims at recovering or repairing the injured extracellular matrix. Like other physiological processes, remodelling is thought to be driven by homeostasis, i.e. it tends to re-establish the properties of the uninjured tissue. However, homeostasis may never be reached, such that remodelling may also appear as a continuous pathological transformation of diseased tissues during aneurysm expansion, for example. A simple constitutive model for soft biological tissues that regards remodelling as homeostatic-driven turnover is developed. Specifically, the recoverable effective tissue damage, whose rate is the sum of a mechanical damage rate and a healing rate, serves as a scalar internal thermodynamic variable. In order to integrate the biochemical and biomechanical aspects of remodelling, the healing rate is, on the one hand, driven by mechanical stimuli, but, on the other hand, subjected to simple metabolic constraints. The proposed model is formulated in accordance with continuum damage mechanics within an open-system thermodynamics framework. The numerical implementation in an in-house finite-element code is described, particularized for Ogden hyperelasticity. Numerical examples illustrate the basic constitutive characteristics of the model and demonstrate its potential in representing aspects of remodelling of soft tissues. Simulation results are verified for their plausibility, but also validated against reported experimental data.

  • 26.
    Decrop, Deborah
    et al.
    KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Pardon, Gaspard
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Kokalj, Tadej
    KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Robert, Puers
    KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Haraldsson, Tommy
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Lammertyn, Jeroen
    KU Leuven, Belgium.
    van der Wijngaart, Wouter
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Single-step manufacturing of femtoliter microwell arrays in a novel surface energy mimicking polymer2015In: 18th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems (IEEE TRANSDUCER 2015), IEEE , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a novel polymer material formulation and stamp-molding technique that enable rapid single-step manufacturing of hydrophilic-in-hydrophobic microwell arrays. We developed a modified thiol-ene-epoxy polymer (mOSTE+) formulation that mimics the surface energy of its mold during polymerization. The polymer inherits the surface energy from the mold through molecular self-assembly, in which functional monomers self-assemble at the interface between the liquid prepolymer and the mold surface. Combining this novel mOSTE+ material with a stamp-molding process leads to simultaneous surface energy mimicking and micro-structuring. This method was used to manufacture microwells with hydrophilic bottom and hydrophobic sidewall, depressed in a surrounding hydrophobic surface. The microwell arrays were successfully tested for the self-assembly of 62’000 femtoliter-droplets. Such femtoliter droplet arrays are useful for, e.g., digital ELISA and single cell/molecule analysis applications.

  • 27.
    Eriksson, Magnus G.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Flemmer, Henrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Wikander, Jan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Haptic Simulation of the Milling Process in Temporal Bone Operations2005In: Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 13: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, IOS Press, 2005, Vol. 111, p. 133-136Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A VR-simulation system for educating surgeons of the temporal bone milling processes is presented in this paper. E. g. the milling process that occurs during the removal of certain cancer tumors in the brain. The research project is recently started up and this paper is an introduction to the bone milling simulation topic. We present how the graphical rendering of the temporal bone is done. Acquired data are managed using the Marching cubes algorithm to perform a visual representation. A re-production of iso-surfaces will represent the material removal occurred during the milling process. Force models are discussed and will be implemented in the H3D API, which is used to control the virtual simulation and collision detection. Equipment, implementation and future work are also presented in the paper.

  • 28.
    Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan A.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Gullstrand, Lennart
    Immediate effect of visual and auditory feedback to control the running mechanics of well-trained athletes2011In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 253-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The correlation between mechanical factors of running and running economy as measured by metabolic cost is a subject of much interest in the study of locomotion. However, no change in running technique has been shown to result in an immediate improvement in running economy on an intra-individual basis. To evaluate the effect of a modified running technique, it is probably necessary that the individual trains with the new technique for a longer period using a feedback system to control the new kinematics. In this study, we examine the feasibility of using visual and auditory feedback to adapt running technique according to a simplistic model of the mechanical cost of running. The model considers only the mechanical work against gravity, which is the product of the magnitude of the vertical displacement of the runner's centre of mass and the step-frequency. In the experiments reported here, 18 trained runners, running at 16km center dot h-1 on a treadmill, were given feedback on these parameters together with indicated target levels. In almost all cases, the runners were able to adjust their technique accordingly.

  • 29.
    Etcheverry Cabrera, Sebastian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Laser Physics.
    Advanced all-fiber optofluidic devices2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Significant technological advances of the last years have been possible by developments in Optofluidics, which is a field that deals with the integration of optics and microfluidics into single devices.

    The work described in this thesis is based on five scientific publications related to the use of fiber optic technology to build integrated optofluidic devices. The first three publications are within the field of life-science and point towards in-vivo and point-of-care applications, whereas the last two publications cover the study and the use of plasmonic nanoparticles for electrical modulation of light.

    Aiming at developing useful tools for in-vivo biological applications, the first publication consists of designing and testing a functional optical fiber for real-time monitoring and selective collection of fluorescent microparticles. This probe relies on a microstructured optical fiber with a hole along its cladding, which is used to selectively aspirate individual particles of interest once their fluorescence signal is detected. On the same line of research, the second publication contemplates the fabrication of a fiber probe that traps single microparticles and allows for remote detection of their optical properties. This probe is also based on a microstructured fiber that enables particle trapping by fluidic forces. The third publication addresses the development of an all-fiber miniaturized flow cytometer for point-of-care applications. This system can analyze, with excellent accuracy and sensitivity, up to 2500 cells per second by measuring their fluorescence and scattering signal. A novel microfluidic technique, called Elasto-inertial microfluidics, is employed for aligning the cells into a single-stream to optimize detection and throughput.

    The fourth publication involves the experimental and theoretical study of the electrical-induced alignment of plasmonic gold nanorods in suspension and its applicability to control light transmission. This study is done by using an all-fiber optofluidic device, based on a liquid-core fiber, which facilitates the interaction of light, electric fields, and liquid suspensions. Results show that nanorods can be aligned in microseconds, providing a much better performance than liquid-crystal devices. Finally, the fifth publication consists of an upgrade of the previous device by integrating four electrodes in the cladding of the liquid-core fiber. This improvement enables nanosecond response time and the possibility of digitally switching nanorods between two orthogonal aligned states, overcoming the limitation of slow thermal relaxation.

    The work presented here shows that optofluidics based on optical fibers is a robust and convenient platform, as well as a promising direction for the developing of novel instruments in fields such as life-science, non-linear optics, plasmonic, and sensing.

  • 30. Falkmer, Torbjern
    et al.
    Dahlman, Joakim
    Dukic, Tania
    Bjällmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Fixation identification in centroid versus start-point modes using eye-tracking data2008In: Perceptual and Motor Skills, ISSN 0031-5125, E-ISSN 1558-688X, Vol. 106, no 3, p. 710-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fixation-identification algorithms, needed for analyses of eye movements, may typically be separated into three categories, viz. (i) velocity-based algorithms, (ii) area-based algorithms, and (iii) dispersion-based algorithms. Dispersion-based algorithms are commonly used but this application introduces some difficulties, one being optimization. Basically, there are two modes to reach this goal of optimization, viz., the start-point mode and the centroid mode. The aim of the present study was to compare and evaluate these two dispersion-based algorithms. Manual inspections were made of 1,400 fixations in each mode. Odds ratios showed that by using the centroid mode for fixation detection, a valid fixation is 2.86 times more likely to be identified than by using the start-point mode. Moreover, the algorithm based on centroid mode dispersion showed a good interpretation speed, accuracy, robustness, and ease of implementation, as well as adequate parameter settings.

  • 31.
    Ferreira, Javier
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering. Högskolan i Borås.
    Modular textile-enabled bioimpedance system for personalized health monitoring applications2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing number of factors, including costs, technological advancements, ageing populations, and medical errors, are leading industrialized countries to invest in research on alternative solutions to improve their health-care systems and increase patients’ quality of life. Personal health systems (PHS) examplify the use of information and communication technologies that enable a paradigm shift from the traditional hospital-centered healthcare delivery model toward a preventive and person-centered approach. PHS offer the means to monitor a patient’s health using wearable, portable or implantable systems that offer ubiquitous, unobtrusive biodata

    acquisition, allowing remote monitoring of treatment and access to the patient’s status. Electrical bioimpedance (EBI) technology is non-invasive, quick and relatively affordable technique that can be used for assessing and monitoring different health conditions, e.g., body composition assessments for nutrition. When combined with state-of-the-art advances in sensors and textiles, EBI technologies are fostering the implementation of wearable bioimpedance monitors that use functional garments for personalized healthcare applications. This research work is

    focused on the development of wearable EBI-based monitoring systems for ubiquitous health monitoring applications. The monitoring systems are built upon portable monitoring instrumentation and custom-made textile electrode garments.

    Portable EBI-based monitors have been developed using the latest material technology and advances in system-on-chip technology. For instance, a portable EBI spectrometer has been validated against a commercial spectrometer for total body composition assessment using functional textile electrode garments. The development of wearable EBI-based monitoring units using functional garments and dry textile electrodes for body composition assessment and respiratory monitoring has been shown to be a feasible approach. The availability of these measurement systems indicates progress toward the real implementation of personalized healthcare systems.

  • 32.
    Ferreira, Javier
    et al.
    School of Engineering, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Seoane, Fernando
    School of Engineering, University of Borås, Sweden;Department of Signal & Systems, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296, Gothenburg, SWEDEN.
    Ansede, Antonio
    Technical University of Catalonia.
    Bragós, Ramon
    Technical University of Catalonia.
    AD5933-based spectrometer for electrical bioimpedance applications2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To build an Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) spectrometer using the Impedance Measurement System-On-Chip AD5933 together with a 4-Electrode Analog Front End (4E-AFE) has been proven practicable. Such small measurement devices can make possible several new applications of EBI technology, especially when combined with functional textiles, which can enable wearable applications for personal health and home monitoring. After the implementation and functional validation of the 4E-AFE-enabled spectrometer, the next natural step is to validate for which EBI applications the 4E-AFE-enabled system is suitable. To test the applicability of this novel spectrometer on several EBI applications, 2R1C equivalent models have been experimentally obtained and impedance spectroscopy measurements have been performed with the system under study and with the SFB7 EBI spectrometer manufactured by ImpediMed. The 2R1C circuit parameters have been estimated with the BioImp software from the spectra obtained with both EBI spectrometers and the estimated values have been compared with the original values used in each circuit model implementation. The obtained results indicated that the 4E-AFE-enabled system cannot beat the performance of the SFB7 in accuracy but it performs better in preciseness. In any case the overall performance indicates that the 4E-AFE-enabled system can perform spectroscopy measurements in the frequency range from 5 to 100 kHz.

  • 33.
    Fornara, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Qin, Jian
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Laurent, Sophie
    University of Mons.
    Muller, Robert
    University of Mons.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Bifunctional polylactide coated iron oxide nanoparticles for drug delivery and MRI contrast enhancementIn: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Fredenberg, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Spectral Mammography with X-Ray Optics and a Photon-Counting Detector2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Early detection is vital to successfully treating breast cancer, and mammography screening is the most efficient and wide-spread method to reach this goal. Imaging low-contrast targets, while minimizing the radiation exposure to a large population is, however, a major challenge. Optimizing the image quality per unit radiation dose is therefore essential. In this thesis, two optimization schemes with respect to x-ray photon energy have been investigated: filtering the incident spectrum with refractive x-ray optics (spectral shaping), and utilizing the transmitted spectrum with energy-resolved photon-counting detectors (spectral imaging).

    Two types of x-ray lenses were experimentally characterized, and modeled using ray tracing, field propagation, and geometrical optics. Spectral shaping reduced dose approximately 20% compared to an absorption-filtered reference system with the same signal-to-noise ratio, scan time, and spatial resolution. In addition, a focusing pre-object collimator based on the same type of optics reduced divergence of the radiation and improved photon economy by about 50%.

    A photon-counting silicon detector was investigated in terms of energy resolution and its feasibility for spectral imaging. Contrast-enhanced tumor imaging with a system based on the detector was characterized and optimized with a model that took anatomical noise into account. Improvement in an ideal-observer detectability index by a factor of 2 to 8 over that obtained by conventional absorption imaging was found for different levels of anatomical noise and breast density. Increased conspicuity was confirmed by experiment. Further, the model was extended to include imaging of unenhanced lesions. Detectability of microcalcifications increased no more than a few percent, whereas the ability to detect large tumors might improve on the order of 50% despite the low attenuation difference between glandular and cancerous tissue. It is clear that inclusion of anatomical noise and imaging task in spectral optimization may yield completely different results than an analysis based solely on quantum noise.

  • 35.
    Fredenberg, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Cederström, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Danielsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Energy filtering with x-ray lenses: Optimization for photon-counting mammography2010In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 139, p. 339-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromatic properties of the multi-prism and prism-array x-ray lenses (MPL and PAL) can potentially be utilized for efficient energy filtering and dose reduction in mammography. The line-shaped foci of the lenses are optimal for coupling to photon-counting silicon strip detectors in a scanning system. A theoretical model was developed and used to investigate the benefit of two lenses compared to an absorption-filtered reference system. The dose reduction of the MPL filter was 15% compared to the reference system at matching scan time, and the spatial resolution was higher. The dose of the PAL-filtered system was found to be 20% lower than for the reference system at equal scan time and resolution, and only 20% higher than for a monochromatic beam. An investigation of some practical issues remains, including the feasibility of brilliant-enough x-ray sources and manufacturing of a polymer PAL.

  • 36.
    Fredenberg, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Cederström, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Nillius, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Ribbing, Carolina
    Uppsala Univ..
    Karlsson, Staffan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Danielsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    A low-absorption x-ray energy filter for small-scale applications2009In: Optics Express, ISSN 1094-4087, E-ISSN 1094-4087, Vol. 17, no 14, p. 11388-11398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an experimental and theoretical evaluation of an x-ray energy filter based on the chromatic properties of a prism-array lens (PAL). It is intended for small-scale applications such as medical imaging. The PAL approximates a Fresnel lens and allows for high efficiency compared to filters based on ordinary refractive lenses, however at the cost of a lower energy resolution. Geometrical optics was found to provide a good approximation for the performance of a flawless lens, but a field-propagation model was used for quantitative predictions. The model predicted a 0.29 ΔE/E energy resolution and an intensity gain of 6.5 for a silicon PAL at 23.5 keV. Measurements with an x-ray tube showed good agreement with the model in energy resolution and peak energy, but a blurred focal line contributed to a 29% gain reduction. We believe the blurring to be caused mainly by lens imperfections, in particular at the periphery of the lens.

  • 37.
    Fredenberg, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Cederström, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Åslund, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Nillius, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Danielsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    An efficient pre-object collimator based on an x-ray lens2009In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 626-633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A multiprism lens (MPL) is a refractive x-ray lens with one-dimensional focusing properties. If used as a pre-object collimator in a scanning system for medical x-ray imaging, it reduces the divergence of the radiation and improves on photon economy compared to a slit collimator. Potential advantages include shorter acquisition times, a reduced tube loading, or improved resolution. We present the first images acquired with a MPL in a prototype for a scanning mammography system. The lens showed a gain of flux of 1.32 compared to a slit collimator at equal resolution, or a gain in resolution of 1.31–1.44 at equal flux. We expect the gain of flux in a clinical setup with an optimized MPL and a custom-made absorption filter to reach 1.67, or 1.45–1.54 gain in resolution.

  • 38.
    Fredenberg, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Cederström, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Åslund, Magnus
    Ribbing, Carolina
    Uppsala universitet.
    Danielsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    A Tunable Energy Filter for Medical X-Ray Imaging2008In: X-Ray Optics and Instrumentation, ISSN 1687-7632, Vol. 2008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A multiprism lens (MPL) is a refractive X-ray lens, and its chromatic properties can be employed in an energy filtering setup to obtain a narrow tunable X-ray spectrum. We present the first evaluation of such a filter for medical X-ray imaging. The experimental setup yields a 6.6 gain of flux at 20 keV, and we demonstrate tunability by altering the energy spectrum to center also around 17 and 23 keV. All measurements are found to agree well with ray-tracing and a proposed geometrical model. Compared to a model mammography system with absorption filtering, the experimental MPL filter reduces dose 13–25% for 3–7 cm breasts if the spectrum is centered around the optimal energy. Additionally, the resolution is improved 2.5 times for a 5 cm breast. The scan time is increased 3 times but can be reduced with a slightly decreased energy filtering and resolution.

  • 39.
    Fredenberg, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Hemmendorff, Magnus
    Cederström, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Åslund, Magnus
    Danielsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography with a photon-counting detector2010In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 2017-2029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Spectral imaging is a method in medical x-ray imaging to extract information about the object constituents by the material-specific energy dependence of x-ray attenuation. In particular, the detectability of a contrast agent can be improved over a lumpy background. We have investigated a photon-counting spectral imaging system with two energy bins for contrast-enhanced mammography. System optimization and the potential benefit compared to conventional non-energy-resolved imaging was studied.

    Methods: A framework for system characterization was set up that included quantum and anatomical noise, and a theoretical model of the system was benchmarked to phantom measurements.

    Results: It was found that optimal combination of the energy-resolved images corresponded approximately to minimization of the anatomical noise, and an ideal-observer detectability index could be improved more than a factor of two compared to absorption imaging in the phantom study. In the clinical case, an improvement close to 80% was predicted for an average glandularity breast, and a factor of eight for dense breast tissue. Another 70% was found to be within reach for an optimized system.

    Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography is feasible and beneficial with the current system, and there is room for additional improvements.

  • 40.
    Fredenberg, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Lundqvist, Mats
    Cederström, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Åslund, Magnus
    Danielsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Energy resolution of a photon-counting silicon strip detector2010In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, p. 156-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A photon-counting silicon strip detector with two energy thresholds was investigated for spectral X-ray imaging in a mammography system. Preliminary studies already indicate clinical benefit of the detector, and the purpose of the present study is optimization with respect to energy resolution. Factors relevant for the energy response were measured, simulated, or gathered from previous studies, and used as input parameters to a cascaded detector model. Threshold scans over several X-ray spectra were used to calibrate threshold levels to energy, and to validate the model. The energy resolution of the detector assembly was assessed to range over ΔE/E=0.12–0.26 in the mammography region. Electronic noise dominated the peak broadening, followed by charge sharing between adjacent detector strips, and a channel-to-channel threshold spread. The energy resolution may be improved substantially if these effects are reduced to a minimum. Anti-coincidence logic mitigated double counting from charge sharing, but erased the energy resolution of all detected events, and optimization of the logic is desirable. Pile-up was found to be of minor importance at typical mammography rates.

  • 41.
    Fredenberg, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Åslund, Magnus
    Sectra Mamea AB.
    Cederström, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Lundqvist, Mats
    Sectra Mamea AB.
    Danielsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Medical Imaging.
    Observer model optimization of a spectral mammography system2010In: MEDICAL IMAGING 2010: PHYSICS OF MEDICAL IMAGING / [ed] Samei E; Pelc NJ, 2010, Vol. 7622Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spectral imaging is a method in medical x-ray imaging to extract information about the object constituents by the material-specific energy dependence of x-ray attenuation. Contrast-enhanced spectral imaging has been thoroughly investigated, but unenhanced imaging may be more useful because it comes as a bonus to the conventional non-energy-resolved absorption image at screening; there is no additional radiation dose and no need for contrast medium. We have used a previously developed theoretical framework and system model that include quantum and anatomical noise to characterize the performance of a photon-counting spectral mammography system with two energy bins for unenhanced imaging. The theoretical framework was validated with synthesized images. Optimal combination of the energy-resolved images for detecting large unenhanced tumors corresponded closely, but not exactly, to minimization of the anatomical noise, which is commonly referred to as energy subtraction. In that case, an ideal-observer detectability index could be improved close to 50% compared to absorption imaging. Optimization with respect to the signal-to-quantum-noise ratio, commonly referred to as energy weighting, deteriorated detectability. For small microcalcifications or tumors on uniform backgrounds, however, energy subtraction was suboptimal whereas energy weighting provided a minute improvement. The performance was largely independent of beam quality, detector energy resolution, and bin count fraction. It is clear that inclusion of anatomical noise and imaging task in spectral optimization may yield completely different results than an analysis based solely on quantum noise.

  • 42. Fröberg, Asa
    et al.
    Mårtensson, Mattias
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    D'Hooge, Jan
    Arndt, Anton
    High variability in strain estimation errors when using a commercial ultrasound speckle tracking algorithm on tendon tissue2016In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 57, no 10, p. 1223-1229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Ultrasound speckle tracking offers a non-invasive way of studying strain in the free Achilles tendon where no anatomical landmarks are available for tracking. This provides new possibilities for studying injury mechanisms during sport activity and the effects of shoes, orthotic devices, and rehabilitation protocols on tendon biomechanics. Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using a commercial ultrasound speckle tracking algorithm for assessing strain in tendon tissue. Material and Methods: A polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) phantom, three porcine tendons, and a human Achilles tendon were mounted in a materials testing machine and loaded to 4% peak strain. Ultrasound long-axis cine-loops of the samples were recorded. Speckle tracking analysis of axial strain was performed using a commercial speckle tracking software. Estimated strain was then compared to reference strain known from the materials testing machine. Two frame rates and two region of interest (ROI) sizes were evaluated. Results: Best agreement between estimated strain and reference strain was found in the PVA phantom (absolute error in peak strain: 0.21 +/- 0.08%). The absolute error in peak strain varied between 0.72 +/- 0.65% and 10.64 +/- 3.40% in the different tendon samples. Strain determined with a frame rate of 39.4Hz had lower errors than 78.6Hz as was the case with a 22mm compared to an 11mm ROI. Conclusion: Errors in peak strain estimation showed high variability between tendon samples and were large in relation to strain levels previously described in the Achilles tendon.

  • 43.
    Gasser, T. Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Biomechanics.
    Martufi, Giampaolo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Biomechanics.
    Auer, M.
    Folkesson, M.
    Swedenborg, J.
    Micromechanical Characterization of Intra-luminal Thrombus Tissue from Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms2010In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, ISSN 0090-6964, E-ISSN 1573-9686, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 371-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reliable assessment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm rupture risk is critically important in reducing related mortality without unnecessarily increasing the rate of elective repair. Intra-luminal thrombus (ILT) has multiple biomechanical and biochemical impacts on the underlying aneurysm wall and thrombus failure might be linked to aneurysm rupture. Histological slices from 7 ILTs were analyzed using a sequence of automatic image processing and feature analyzing steps. Derived microstructural data was used to define Representative Volume Elements (RVE), which in turn allowed the estimation of microscopic material properties using the non-linear Finite Element Method. ILT tissue exhibited complex microstructural arrangement with larger pores in the abluminal layer than in the luminal layer. The microstructure was isotropic in the abluminal layer, whereas pores started to orient along the circumferential direction towards the luminal site. ILT's macroscopic (reversible) deformability was supported by large pores in the microstructure and the inhomogeneous structure explains in part the radially changing macroscopic constitutive properties of ILT. Its microscopic properties decreased just slightly from the luminal to the abluminal layer. The present study provided novel microstructural and micromechanical data of ILT tissue, which is critically important to further explore the role of the ILT in aneurysm rupture. Data provided in this study allow an integration of structural information from medical imaging for example, to estimate ILT's macroscopic mechanical properties.

  • 44.
    Gatty, Hithesh K.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Leijonmarck, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Antelius, Mikael
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Roxhed, Niclas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    An amperometric nitric oxide sensor with fast response and ppb-level concentration detection relevant to asthma monitoring2015In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 209, p. 639-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A MEMS-based amperometric nitric oxide (NO) gas sensor is reported in this paper. The sensor is designed to detect NO gas for the purpose of asthma monitoring. The unique property of this sensor lies in the combination of a microporous high-surface area electrode that is coated with Nafion (TM), together with a liquid electrolyte. The sensor is able to detect gas concentrations of the order of parts-per-billion (ppb) and has a measured NO sensitivity of 0.045 nA/ppb and an operating range between 25 and 65% relative humidity. The settling time of the sensor is measured to 8s. The selectivity to interfering gases such as ammonia (NH3) and carbon monoxide (CO) was high when placing an activated carbon fiber filter above the sensor. The ppb-level detection capability of this sensor combined with its relatively fast response, high selectivity to CO and NH3 makes the sensor potentially applicable in gas monitoring for asthma detection.

  • 45.
    Govind, Satish C.
    et al.
    BMJ Heart Center, Bangalore, India.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nowak, J.
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quintana, M.
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Raumina, S.
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ramesh, S.S.
    BMJ Heart Center, Bangalore, India.
    Keshava, R.
    BMJ Heart Center, Bangalore, India.
    Saha, S.
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Isolated Type 2 Diabetes mellitus Causes Myocardial Dysfunction That Becomes Worse in the Presence of Cardiovascular Diseases: Results of the Myocardial Doppler in Diabetes (MYDID): Study 12005In: Cardiology, ISSN 0008-6312, E-ISSN 1421-9751, Vol. 103, no 4, p. 189-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) often suffer disproportionately and have a worse outcome when burdened with cardiovascular complications compared with those without DM. A specific heart muscle disease reportedly caused by DM per se may explain this. We sought to investigate whether an echo Doppler diagnosis of such a myocardial disease is clinically relevant in DM with or without coexistent coronary artery disease (CAD) and/or hypertension ( HTN). Subjects and Methods: Two hundred subjects (127 males, 73 females, 56 +/- 10 years) including controls (n=23), patients with HTN (n=20), CAD (n=35), uncomplicated DM (n=59), DM+HTN (n=27), DM+ CAD (n=16) and DM+CAD+HTN (n=20) underwent tissue Doppler-enhanced dobutamine stress echocardiography. Myocardial function was assessed by measuring left ventricular myocardial peak systolic velocity (PSV) and early diastolic velocity at rest and during peak stress, besides measurements of standard Doppler variables. Results: Average left ventricular PSV at rest was significantly lower in CAD (4.7 +/- 1.5) compared with controls (5.7 center dot +/- 1.2) and in DM+CAD+HTN (4.6 +/- 1.4) compared with DM (5.6 +/- 1.3; all p < 0.05). During peak stress, lower PSV persisted in CAD (9.5 +/- 3.1) and DM+CAD+HTN (8.1 +/- 2.7), while appearing de novo in DM (11.3 +/- 2.6) and HTN (11.0 +/- 2.3) unlike in the controls (12.5 +/- 2.5; all p < 0.001). When pooled together, DM subjects with CAD and/or HTN or both had significantly lower PSV (9.1 +/- 2.7) than those without (10.0 +/- 2.8; p < 0.001). Early diastolic velocity response was equally lower in both groups compared with the controls. Conclusion: The results suggest that dobutamine stress unmasks myocardial functional disturbances caused by uncomplicated DM. The discrete disturbances become quantitatively more pronounced in the presence of coexistent cardiovascular diseases.

  • 46.
    Govind, Satish C.
    et al.
    Bhagwan Mahavir Jain Heart Center, Bangalore, India.
    Roumina, S.
    Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Nowak, J.
    Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ramesh, S. S.
    Bhagwan Mahavir Jain Heart Center, Bangalore, India.
    Saha, S. K.
    Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Differing myocardial response to a single session of hemodialysis in end-stage renal disease with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease2006In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 4, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Though hemodialysis (HD) acutely improves cardiac function, the impact of background diseases like coronary artery disease (CAD) and Type 2 diabetes (DM) in the setting of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is not known. Tissue velocity echocardiography (TVE) offers a fast choice to follow changes in myocardial function after HD in ESRD with concomitant DM and/or CAD. Methods: 46 subjects (17 with ESRD, Group 1; 15 with DM, Group 2; 14 with DM+CAD, Group 3) underwent standard and TVE prior to and shortly after HD. Besides standard Doppler variables, regional myocardial systolic and diastolic velocities, as well as systolic strain rate were post processed. Results: Compared with pre-HD, post-HD body weight (kg) significantly decreased in all the three groups (51 ± 9 vs. 48 ± 8, 62 ± 10 vs.59 ± 10, and 61 ± 9 vs. 58 ± 9 respectively; all p < 0.01). Left ventricular end diastolic dimensions (mm) also decreased post- HD (46 ± 5 vs. 42 ± 7, 53 ± 7 vs. 50 ± 7, 51 ± 7 vs. 47 ± 8 respectively; all p < 0.01). Regional longitudinal peak systolic velocity in septum (cm/s) significantly increased post-HD in Group 1(5.7 ± 1.6 vs. 7.2 ± 2.3; p < 0.001) while remained unchanged in the other two groups. Similar trends were noted in other left ventricular walls. When the myocardial velocities (cm/s) were computed globally, the improvement was seen only in Group 1 (6.3 ± 1.5 vs. 7.9 ± 2.0; p < 0.001). Global early regional diastolic velocity (cm/s) improved in Group 1, remained unchanged in Group 2, while significantly decreased in Group 3(-5.9 ± 1.3 vs. -4.1 ± 1.8; p < 0.01). Global systolic strain rate (1/sec) increased in the first 2 Groups but remained unchanged (-0.87 ± 0.4 vs. -0.94 ± 0.3; p = ns) in Group 3. Conclusion: A single HD session improves LV function only in ESRD without coexistent DM and/or CAD. The present data suggest that not only dialysis-dependent changes in loading conditions but also co-existent background diseases determine the myocardial response to HD.

  • 47.
    Govind, Satish C.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Saha, S.
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge.
    Ramesh, S. S.
    BMJ Heart Center, Bangalore, India.
    Arvind, S. R.
    BMJ Heart Center, Bangalore, India.
    Quintana, M.
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Impaired Myocardial Functional Reserve in Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus Without Coronary Artery Disease: Searching for the Possible Link With Congestive Heart Failure in the Myocardial Doppler in Diabetes (MYDID) Study II2006In: American Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0895-7061, E-ISSN 1941-7225, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 851-857Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although the impact of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN) on myocardial function has recently been studied using tissue Doppler echocardiography (TDE), the independent role of both conditions, and the influence of other risk factors on myocardial function has not been completely defined, particularly in absence of coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of this study was to assess the myocardial functional reserve in patients with DM or HTN with apparently normal left ventricular (LV) systolic function.

    Methods: Standard and dobutamine stress echocardiography using TDE was performed in 128 subjects: 59 had DM, 20 had HTN, 27 had both DM and HTN (HTN + DM), and 22 subjects were controls (C). Subjects with known CAD and depressed LV function were excluded. In addition, standard two-dimensional and Doppler measurements, LV regional peak systolic (PSV), early (E') and late (A') diastolic velocities, strain (S%) and strain rate (SR), were assessed at rest and peak stress.

    Results: The LV mass did not differ, although relative wall thickness was significantly higher in subjects with HTN + DM and HTN. The PSV did not differ at rest but was lowest in subjects with HTN + DM at peak stress. The E' wave velocity was significantly lower in subjects with HTN + DM both at rest and during peak stress, as were S% and SR.

    Conclusions: The addition of DM to HTN has a negative effect on LV systolic and diastolic functions. A depressed myocardial functional reserve might be postulated as one of the pathophysiologic mechanisms for the excessive occurrence of congestive heart failure in patients with DM or HTN.

  • 48.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institutet (KI), CLINTEC – Division of Medical Imaging and Technology.
    Contrast agent for early diagnostics and monitoring of progression of liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma)2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Ultrasound. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Diagnostic Power of Different Tissue Doppler Parameters during Ultrasound Cardio-Vascular Investigation2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The department of Medical Technology, where I have done Master thesis project, develops and researches new method and technique within areas where ultrasound can be used to obtain the image of anatomical structure, functional capabilities and to suggest required treatment.

    Nowadays cardio-vascular diseases, such as infarct, atherosclerosis and ischemic syndrome, are one of the most widespread diseases in the world that’s why timely detection, identification and treatment are so important.

    The Master of Science qualification report consists 3 major parts: Medico-biological part, Design and Research parts.

    In Medico-biological part has been analyzed anatomical and physiological structure of the heart, current status of echocardiography with comparing with other techniques, summary of ultrasound methods with list of parameters that can be achieved is presented.

    In Design part has been developed new graphical modality based on Delta-V pump model using vector based statistical analysis for identification patients with ischemia. Software algorithm for automatically determine characteristic points for state diagram written in MatLab has been developed and implemented.

    In Research part in the first task using commercially available software based on Principal Component Analysis collected data from the hospital patients has been studied, results proved hypothesis concerning time variables importance; in the second task graphical module has been examined using collected data from the hospital patients both normal and with different cardio-vascular disease, and the results show good detection power of the algorithm.

    At the end of the project presentation has been done and report has been published.

    This project has been done in collaboration with the biggest medical institute in Sweden – Karolinska Institute - and results will be used in medical practice in Karolinska University Hospital in Huddinge and for future scientific needs.

     

  • 50.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Three modality contrast imaging using multi-functionalized microballoons2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In vivo multimodality imaging is a fast growing field in medical research and, although the achievements at clinical level of this diagnostic method are recent, it is already one of the most promising approaches in the diagnosis of diseases in many research addressed medical centres. At present in this area, the USA plays the protagonist role as a result of the amount of resources engaged in the arena in the last decade. Both government and private companies agree, when considering the potential of this approach, that it is one of the foremost medical advancements as it will lead to early diagnosis of diseases with high impact on the societies of western countries. Multimodality imaging is currently viewed as a simple and powerful integration of two or more imaging methods (e.g. PET-CT). 3MICRON is an ambitious project which gathers some of the most advanced European medical and technical institutions together to address the design of new strategies in diagnostics, and to push the potential of medical imaging beyond the state-of-the-art. The multimodality approaches are supported by a class of next-generation micro/nanodevices called microballoons. These subsystems are able to implement the function of an ultrasound contrast agent with other imaging methods (SPECT, MRI). In the future, they may act as a minimally invasive drug delivery method and hyperthermia device. In 3MICRON, this multi-functional device will be tested in vitro and in vivo in order to assess bioclearance and cytoxicity effects toward high impact diseases, e.g. cardiovascular and inflammation pathologies. Finally, selected types of microballoons will undergo pre-clinical screening for a consolidated assessment of the “bench-to-bed” pathway for these new microdevices.

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