Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 3184
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Aare, Magnus
    et al.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Injuries from motorcycle- and moped crashes in Sweden from 1987 to 1999.2003In: Injury control and safety promotion, ISSN 1566-0974, E-ISSN 1744-4985, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 131-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to study injuries from motorcycle and moped crashes in Sweden from 1987 to 1999. Databases at the National Board for Health and Welfare and codes from both ICD9 and ICD10 systems were used, including patterns of age, gender, E-code and type of injury. Length of hospital stay, type of injuries and trends over time was evaluated. To get a more detailed picture of the age distribution, type of vehicle used and number of killed, data from the Swedish National Road Administration were also used. In Sweden, 27,122 individuals received in-patient care due to motorcycle and moped injuries between 1987 and 1999. The motorcycle and moped injury rate was reduced in the second half of the studied period and so were the total days of treatment per year. Males had eight times the incidence of injuries compared to females. Riders under the age of 26 and in particular those at an age of 15 had the highest incidence rate. Head injuries were the most frequent diagnosis, followed by fractures to the lower limbs. Concussion was the most frequent head injury. Focal and diffuse brain injuries combined showed the same frequency as concussion. It is concluded that more preventative strategies must be presented before the injury rate can be reduced.

  • 2.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Ekstrand-Hammarström, Barbara
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI),.
    Bergström, Ulrika
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI),.
    Bucht, Anders
    Deptartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, 901 89, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Jansson, Anders
    Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University, Stockholm, 106 91, Sweden.
    Biological response in lung cells by brake dust from a novel set-up to generate one sourcewear particles2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3. Aberg, A. C.
    et al.
    Thorstensson, A.
    Tarassova, O.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Calculations of mechanisms for balance control during narrow and single-leg standing in fit older adults: A reliability study2011In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 352-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For older people balance control in standing is critical for performance of activities of daily living without falling. The aims were to investigate reliability of quantification of the usage of the two balance mechanisms M(1) 'moving the centre of pressure' and M(2) 'Segment acceleration' and also to compare calculation methods based on a combination of kinetic (K) and kinematic (Km) data, (K-Km), or Km data only concerning M(2). For this purpose nine physically fit persons aged 70-78 years were tested in narrow and single-leg standing. Data were collected by a 7-camera motion capture system and two force plates. Repeated measure ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests were used to detect differences between the standing tasks. Reliability was estimated by ICCs, standard error of measurement including its 95% Cl, and minimal detectable change, whereas Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to investigate agreement between the two calculation methods. The results indicated that for the tasks investigated, M(1) and M(2) can be measured with acceptable inter- and intrasession reliability, and that both Km and K-Km based calculations may be useful for M(2), although Km data may give slightly lower values. The proportional M(1) :M(2) usage was approximately 9:1, in both anterio-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) directions for narrow standing, and about 2:1 in the AP and of 1:2 in the ML direction in single-leg standing, respectively. In conclusion, the tested measurements and calculations appear to constitute a reliable way of quantifying one important aspect of balance capacity in fit older people.

  • 4. Aberg, B
    et al.
    Koul, B L
    Liska, J
    Brodin, L A
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Landou, C
    Delayed left ventricular free wall rupture complicating coronary artery bypass surgery. A case report.1985In: Scandinavian journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery, ISSN 0036-5580, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 273-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rupture of the left ventricular free wall is a not uncommon life-threatening complication of acute myocardial infarction and after prosthetic mitral valve replacement. To our knowledge, no case of left ventricular rupture after coronary artery bypass surgery has been reported. A case is now described in which coronary artery bypass grafting was complicated by delayed rupture, which was successfully repaired. Different etiologic factors are discussed, but the cause considered most likely was trauma from elevation of and traction on the heart in exposure of its posterior aspect.

  • 5. Abrahamsson, T. R.
    et al.
    Jakobsson, H. E.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Björkstén, B.
    Engstrand, Lars
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jenmalm, M. C.
    Low gut microbiota diversity in early infancy precedes asthma at school age2014In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 842-850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first year of life is associated with allergic diseases in infancy, but little is known how early microbial diversity is related to allergic disease later in school age. Objective To assess microbial diversity and characterize the dominant bacteria in stool during the first year of life in relation to the prevalence of different allergic diseases in school age, such as asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) and eczema. Methods The microbial diversity and composition was analysed with barcoded 16S rDNA 454 pyrosequencing in stool samples at 1week, 1month and 12months of age in 47 infants which were subsequently assessed for allergic disease and skin prick test reactivity at 7years of age (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830). Results Children developing asthma (n=8) had a lower diversity of the total microbiota than non-asthmatic children at 1week (P=0.04) and 1month (P=0.003) of age, whereas allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (n=13), eczema (n=12) and positive skin prick reactivity (n=14) at 7years of age did not associate with the gut microbiota diversity. Neither was asthma associated with the microbiota composition later in infancy (at 12months). Children having IgE-associated eczema in infancy and subsequently developing asthma had lower microbial diversity than those that did not. There were no significant differences, however, in relative abundance of bacterial phyla and genera between children with or without allergic disease. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first month of life was associated with asthma but not ARC in children at 7years of age. Measures affecting microbial colonization of the infant during the first month of life may impact asthma development in childhood.

  • 6.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Patient Safety (Closed 20130701).
    Gyllensten, Illapha Cuba
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701).
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS) (Closed 20130701).
    Software tool for analysis of breathing-related errors in transthoracic electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements2012In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 407, no 1, p. 012028-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades, Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (EBIS) has been applied in a range of different applications and mainly using the frequency sweep-technique. Traditionally the tissue under study is considered to be timeinvariant and dynamic changes of tissue activity are ignored and instead treated as a noise source. This assumption has not been adequately tested and could have a negative impact and limit the accuracy for impedance monitoring systems. In order to successfully use frequency-sweeping EBIS for monitoring time-variant systems, it is paramount to study the effect of frequency-sweep delay on Cole Model-based analysis. In this work, we present a software tool that can be used to simulate the influence of respiration activity in frequency-sweep EBIS measurements of the human thorax and analyse the effects of the different error sources. Preliminary results indicate that the deviation on the EBIS measurement might be significant at any frequency, and especially in the impedance plane. Therefore the impact on Cole-model analysis might be different depending on method applied for Cole parameter estimation.

  • 7. Acero Sanchez, Josep Ll.
    et al.
    Joda, Hamdi
    Henry, Olivier Y. F.
    Solnestam, Beata W.
    Kvastad, Linda
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sahlén, Pelin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Laddach, Nadja
    Ramakrishnan, Dheeraj
    Riley, Ian
    Schwind, Carmen
    Latta, Daniel
    O'Sullivan, Ciara K.
    Electrochemical Genetic Profiling of Single Cancer Cells2017In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 89, no 6, p. 3378-3385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent understandings in the development and spread of cancer have led to the realization of novel single cell analysis platforms focused on circulating tumor cells (CTCs). A simple, rapid, and inexpensive analytical platform capable of providing genetic information on these rare cells is highly desirable to support clinicians and researchers alike to either support the selection or adjustment of therapy or provide fundamental insights into cell function and cancer progression mechanisms. We report on the genetic profiling of single cancer cells, exploiting a combination of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and electrochemical detection. Cells were isolated using laser capture and lysed, and the mRNA was extracted and transcribed into DNA. Seven markers were amplified by MLPA, which allows for the simultaneous amplification of multiple targets with a single primer pair, using MLPA probes containing unique barcode sequences. Capture probes complementary to each of these barcode sequences were immobilized on a printed circuit board (PCB) manufactured electrode array and exposed to single-stranded MLPA products and subsequently to a single stranded DNA reporter probe bearing a HRP molecule, followed by substrate addition and fast electrochemical pulse amperometric detection. We present asimple, rapid, flexible, and inexpensive approach for the simultaneous quantification of multiple breast cancer related mRNA markers, with single tumor cell sensitivity.

  • 8. Adiels, Martin
    et al.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Taskinen, Marja-Riitta
    Boren, Jan
    Kinetic Studies to Elucidate Impaired Metabolism of Triglyceride-rich Lipoproteins in Humans2015In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 6, article id 342Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To develop novel strategies for prevention and treatment of dyslipidemia, it is essential to understand the pathophysiology of dyslipoproteinemia in humans. Lipoprotein metabolism is a complex system in which abnormal concentrations of various lipoprotein particles can result from alterations in their rates of production, conversion, and/or catabolism. Traditional methods that measure plasma lipoprotein concentrations only provide static estimates of lipoprotein metabolism and hence limited mechanistic information. By contrast, the use of tracers labeled with stable isotopes and mathematical modeling, provides us with a powerful tool for probing lipid and lipoprotein kinetics in vivo and furthering our understanding of the pathogenesis of dyslipoproteinemia.

  • 9. Adori, Csaba
    et al.
    Barde, Swapnali
    Bogdanovic, Nenad
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Reinscheid, Rainer R.
    Kovacs, Gabor G.
    Hokfelt, Tomas
    Neuropeptide S- and Neuropeptide S receptor-expressing neuron populations in the human pons2015In: Frontiers in Neuroanatomy, ISSN 1662-5129, E-ISSN 1662-5129, Vol. 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a regulatory peptide with potent pharmacological effects. In rodents, NPS is expressed in a few pontine cell clusters. Its receptor (NPSR1) is, however, widely distributed in the brain. The anxiolytic and arousal promoting effects of NPS make the NPS NPSR1 system an interesting potential drug target in mood-related disorders. However, so far possible disease-related mechanisms involving NPS have only been studied in rodents. To validate the relevance of these animal studies for i.a. drug development, we have explored the distribution of NPS-expressing neurons in the human pons using in situ hybridization and stereological methods and we compared the distribution of NPS mRNA expressing neurons in the human and rat brain. The calculation revealed a total number of 22,317 +/- 2411 NPS mRNA-positive neurons in human, bilaterally. The majority of cells (84%) were located in the parabrachial area in human: in the extension of the medial and lateral parabrachial nuclei, in the Kolliker-Fuse nucleus and around the adjacent lateral lemniscus. In human, in sharp contrast to the rodents, only very few NPS-positive cells (5%) were found close to the locus coeruleus. In addition, we identified a smaller cell cluster (11% of all NPS cells) in the pontine central gray matter both in human and rat, which has not been described previously even in rodents. We also examined the distribution of NPSR1 mRNA-expressing neurons in the human pons. These cells were mainly located in the rostral laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, the cuneiform nucleus, the microcellular tegmental nucleus region and in the periaqueductal gray. Our results show that both NPS and NPSR1 in the human pons are preferentially localized in regions of importance for integration of visceral autonomic information and emotional behavior. The reported interspecies differences must, however, be considered when looking for targets for new pharmacotherapeutical interventions.

  • 10. Adori, Csaba
    et al.
    Glueck, Laura
    Barde, Swapnali
    Yoshitake, Takashi
    Kovacs, Gabor G.
    Mulder, Jan
    Magloczky, Zsofia
    Havas, Laszlo
    Boelcskei, Kata
    Mitsios, Nicholas
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Szolcsanyi, Janos
    Kehr, Jan
    Ronnback, Annica
    Schwartz, Thue
    Rehfeld, Jens F.
    Harkany, Tibor
    Palkovits, Miklos
    Schulz, Stefan
    Hokfelt, Tomas
    Critical role of somatostatin receptor 2 in the vulnerability of the central noradrenergic system: new aspects on Alzheimer's disease2015In: Acta Neuropathologica, ISSN 0001-6322, E-ISSN 1432-0533, Vol. 129, no 4, p. 541-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer's disease and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders are associated with deterioration of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), a probable trigger for mood and memory dysfunction. LC noradrenergic neurons exhibit particularly high levels of somatostatin binding sites. This is noteworthy since cortical and hypothalamic somatostatin content is reduced in neurodegenerative pathologies. Yet a possible role of a somatostatin signal deficit in the maintenance of noradrenergic projections remains unknown. Here, we deployed tissue microarrays, immunohistochemistry, quantitative morphometry and mRNA profiling in a cohort of Alzheimer's and age-matched control brains in combination with genetic models of somatostatin receptor deficiency to establish causality between defunct somatostatin signalling and noradrenergic neurodegeneration. In Alzheimer's disease, we found significantly reduced somatostatin protein expression in the temporal cortex, with aberrant clustering and bulging of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive afferents. As such, somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) mRNA was highly expressed in the human LC, with its levels significantly decreasing from Braak stages III/IV and onwards, i.e., a process preceding advanced Alzheimer's pathology. The loss of SSTR2 transcripts in the LC neurons appeared selective, since tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine beta-hydroxylase, galanin or galanin receptor 3 mRNAs remained unchanged. We modeled these pathogenic changes in Sstr2 (-/-) mice and, unlike in Sstr1 (-/-) or Sstr4 (-/-) genotypes, they showed selective, global and progressive degeneration of their central noradrenergic projections. However, neuronal perikarya in the LC were found intact until late adulthood (< 8 months) in Sstr2 (-/-) mice. In contrast, the noradrenergic neurons in the superior cervical ganglion lacked SSTR2 and, as expected, the sympathetic innervation of the head region did not show any signs of degeneration. Our results indicate that SSTR2-mediated signaling is integral to the maintenance of central noradrenergic projections at the system level, and that early loss of somatostatin receptor 2 function may be associated with the selective vulnerability of the noradrenergic system in Alzheimer's disease.

  • 11. Affatato, S.
    et al.
    Leardini, W.
    Jedenmalm, Anneli
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Ruggeri, O.
    Toni, A.
    Larger diameter bearings reduce wear in metal-on-metal hip implants2007In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, ISSN 0009-921X, E-ISSN 1528-1132, no 456, p. 153-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty has the longest clinical history of all total arthroplasties. We asked whether large diameter femoral heads would result in less wear than those with small diameters. We also asked if there is a threshold diameter that ensures good wear behavior. We tested three batches of cast high-carbon cobalt-chromium-molybdenum hip implants (28 mm, 36 min, and 54 min diameters) in a hip simulator for 5 million cycles. We used bovine serum as lubricant and weighed the samples at regular intervals during testing. The 28-mm configuration had almost twice the wear of the 54-mm configuration, but we observed no difference between the 36-mm and the 54-mm configurations. The similarity in the wear performances of the larger configurations supports the presence of a threshold diameter that ensures good wear behavior.

  • 12.
    Aguilar, Antonio
    et al.
    Digital Enterprise Research Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
    van der Putten, Wil
    Department of Medical Physics, University College Hospital Galway, Galway, Ireland .
    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    Positive Patient Identification using RFID and Wireless  Networks2006In: Proceedings of the HISI 11th Annual Conference and Scientific Symposium, Dublin, Ireland, Dublin, Ireland, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased focus on patient safety in hospitals has yielded a flood of new technologies and tools seeking to improve the quality of patient care at the point-of-care. Hospitals are complex institutions by nature, and are constantly challenged to improve the quality of healthcare delivered to patients while trying to reduce the rate of medical errors and improve patient safety. Here a simple mistake such as patient misidentification, specimen misidentification, wrong medication, or wrong blood transfusion can cause the loss of a patient's life. The focus of this paper is the implementation and evaluation of a handheld-based patient identification system that uses radio frequency identification (RFID) and 802.11b wireless networks to identify patients. In this approach, each patient is given a RFID wristband which contains demographic information (patient ID number, patient summary, hospital code) of the patient. A handheld device equipped with 802.11b wireless connectivity and a RFID reader is then used by the medical staff to read the patient's wristband and identify the patient. This work was carried out at the Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering at the University College Hospital Galway, Ireland and in co-operation with the National University of Ireland, Galway.

  • 13.
    Ahlborg, Liv
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Weurlander, Maria
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hedman, Leif
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nisell, Henry
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindqvist, Pelle G
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Felländer-Tsai, Li
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Enochsson, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Individualized feedback during simulated laparoscopic training: a mixed methods study2015In: International Journal of Medical Education, ISSN 2042-6372, E-ISSN 2042-6372, Vol. 6, p. 93-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the value of individualized feedback on performance, flow and self-efficacy during simulated laparoscopy. Furthermore, we wished to explore attitudes towards feedback and simulator training among medical students.

    METHODS: Sixteen medical students were included in the study and randomized to laparoscopic simulator training with or without feedback. A teacher provided individualized feedback continuously throughout the procedures to the target group. Validated questionnaires and scales were used to evaluate self-efficacy and flow. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to evaluate differences between groups regarding laparoscopic performance (instrument path length), self-efficacy and flow. Qualitative data was collected by group interviews and interpreted using inductive thematic analyses.

    RESULTS: Sixteen students completed the simulator training and questionnaires. Instrument path length was shorter in the feedback group (median 3.9 m; IQR: 3.3-4.9) as compared to the control group (median 5.9 m; IQR: 5.0-8.1), p<0.05. Self-efficacy improved in both groups. Eleven students participated in the focus interviews. Participants in the control group expressed that they had fun, whereas participants in the feedback group were more concentrated on the task and also more anxious. Both groups had high ambitions to succeed and also expressed the importance of getting feedback. The authenticity of the training scenario was important for the learning process.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the importance of individualized feedback during simulated laparoscopy training. The next step is to further optimize feedback and to transfer standardized and individualized feedback from the simulated setting to the operating room.

  • 14. Ahlstrom, L.
    et al.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Hagberg, M.
    Ahlberg, K.
    Women with Neck Pain on Long-Term Sick Leave — Approaches Used in the Return to Work Process: A Qualitative Study2016In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose There are difficulties in the process of return to work (RTW) from long-term sick leave, both in general and regarding sick leave because of neck pain in particular. Neck pain is difficult to assess, problematic to rehabilitate, and hard to cure; and it is not always easy to decide whether the pain is work-related. The outcome of RTW could be dependent upon individuals’ approaches, defensive or offensive behaviors, and choices related to their self-efficacy. The aim of this study was to identify approaches used in the RTW process among women with neck pain on long-term sick leave from human service organizations. Methods This is a qualitative descriptive study based on grounded theory. A Swedish cohort of 207 women with a history of long-term sick leave with neck pain from human service organizations answered open-ended written questions at 0, 6, and 12 months, and 6 years; and 16 women were interviewed. Results Individuals expressed their coping approaches in terms of fluctuating in work status over time: either as a strategy or as a consequence. Periods of sick leave were interwoven with periods of work. The women were either controlling the interaction or struggling in the interaction with stakeholders. Conclusions Return to work outcomes may be improved if the fluctuating work status over time is taken into account in the design of rehabilitation efforts for women with a history of long-term sick leave and with chronical musculoskeletal conditions.

  • 15.
    Ahlstrom, L
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Akademin.
    Hagberg, M
    Sahlgrenska Akademin.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Workplace Rehabilitation and Supportive Conditions at Work: A Prospective Study2013In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 248-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To investigate the impact of rehabilitation measures on work ability and return to work (RTW), specifically the association between workplace rehabilitation/supportive conditions at work and work ability and RTW over time, among women on long-term sick leave. Methods Questionnaire data were collected (baseline, 6 and 12 months) from a cohort of women (n = 324). Linear mixed models were used for longitudinal analysis of the repeated measurements of work ability index (WAI), work ability score and working degree. These analyses were performed with different models; the explanatory variables for each model were workplace rehabilitation, supportive conditions at work and time. Results The individuals provided with workplace rehabilitation and supportive conditions (e.g. influence at work, possibilities for development, degree of freedom at work, meaning of work, quality of leadership, social support, sense of community and work satisfaction) had significantly increased WAI and work ability score over time. These individuals scored higher work ability compared to those individuals having workplace rehabilitation without supportive conditions, or neither. Additionally, among the individuals provided with workplace rehabilitation and supportive conditions, working degree increased significantly more over time compared to those individuals with no workplace rehabilitation and no supportive conditions. Conclusion The results highlight the importance of integrating workplace rehabilitation with supportive conditions at work in order to increase work ability and improve the RTW process for women on long-term sick leave.

  • 16.
    Ahlstrom, Linda
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Grimby-Ekman, Anna
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Hagberg, Mats
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Dellve, Lotta
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Measures of work ability and association with sick leave, symptoms and health: A prospective study of female workers on long term sick leave2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 404-412Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Ahlstrom, Linda
    et al.
    Högskolan Borås.
    Larsson Fallman, Sara
    Högskolan Borås.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Public Health and Community Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Return to work from long-term sick leave: a five-year prospective study of the importance of adjustment latitudes at work and home2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Adjustment latitude among employees, i.e. adjusting work to individual’s health capacity, has been associated with successful return to work (RTW) in cross-sectional studies. The aim is to investigate the long-term importance of adjustment latitude at the workplace and at home, as well as attitudes (own and colleagues) for increased work ability (WA), working degree (WD) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among female human service workers (HSW) on long-term sick leave in Sweden.

    Methods

    A cohort of female HSW (n=324) on long-term sick leave (>60 day) received a questionnaire at four times (0, 6, 12, 60 months). Prevalence ratios (PR) were used to examine possible relationships between explanatory factors and outcomes. Linear mixed models were used for longitudinal analysis of the repeated measurements of WA Score (0-10), WD (0-100%) and HRQoL (0-100). Analyses were performed with different models; the explanatory variables for each model were adjustment latitude, attitudes towards breaks at work, shared or single household and amount of household work.

    Result

    Having more adjustment latitude at work was associated with both increased WA and RTW compared to having few adjustment latitude opportunities. Adjustments related to working-pace were strongly associated with increased WD (PR 3.29(95%CI=1.71-6.26)), as were adjustments to working-place. Having opportunities to take short breaks at work, and a general acceptance at work to take short breaks was associated with increased WA. At home, a higher responsibility for household work (PR 1.98(95%CI=1.33-2.95)) was related to increased WA and RTW. Individuals with possibilities for adjustment latitude, especially pace and place, at work, and an acceptance to take breaks at work, increased in WA score significantly more over time and had higher WA score compared with individuals not having such opportunities at work. These prospective results were similar for the outcome WD and HRQoL.

    Conclusions

    The results highlight the importance of possibilities for adjustment latitude at work and at home, as well as accepting attitudes to take short breaks to increase WA and RTW among female human service workers previously on long-term sick leave.

  • 18.
    Ahltorp, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH.
    Skeppstedt, M.
    Dalianis, H.
    Kvist, M.
    Using text prediction for facilitating input and improving readability of clinical text2013In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, IOS Press, 2013, no 1-2, p. 1149-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Text prediction has the potential for facilitating and speeding up the documentation work within health care, making it possible for health personnel to allocate less time to documentation and more time to patient care. It also offers a way to produce clinical text with fewer misspellings and abbreviations, increasing readability. We have explored how text prediction can be used for input of clinical text, and how the specific challenges of text prediction in this domain can be addressed. A text prediction prototype was constructed using data from a medical journal and from medical terminologies. This prototype achieved keystroke savings of 26% when evaluated on texts mimicking authentic clinical text. The results are encouraging, indicating that there are feasible methods for text prediction in the clinical domain.

  • 19.
    Ahmad Termida, Nursitihazlin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Franklin, Joel P.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Examining the effects of out-of-home and in-home constraints on leisure activity participation in different seasons of the year2016In: Transportation, ISSN 0049-4488, E-ISSN 1572-9435, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using multi-day, multi-period travel diaries data of 56 days (four waves of two-week diaries) for 67 individuals in Stockholm, this study aims to examine the effects of out-of-home and in-home constraints (e.g. teleworking, studying at home, doing the laundry, cleaning and taking care of other household member[s]) on individuals’ day-to-day leisure activity participation decisions in four different seasons. This study also aims to explore the effects of various types of working schedules (fixed, shift, partial- and full-flexible) on individuals’ decisions to participate in day-to-day leisure activities. A pooled model (56 days) and wave-specific models (14 days in each wave) are estimated by using dynamic ordered Probit models. The effects of various types of working schedules are estimated by using 28 days of two waves’ data. The results show that an individual’s leisure activity participation decision is significantly influenced by out-of-home work durations but not influenced by in-home constraints, regardless of any seasons. Individuals with shift working hours engage less in day-to-day leisure activities than other workers’ types in both spring and summer seasons. The thermal indicator significantly affects individuals’ leisure activity participation decisions during the autumn season. Individuals exhibit routine behaviour characterized by repeated decisions in participating in day-to-day leisure activities that can last up to 14 days, regardless of any seasons.

  • 20. Ahmad, Yasmeen
    et al.
    Boisvert, Francois-Michel
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lamond, Angus I.
    Systematic Analysis of Protein Pools, Isoforms, and Modifications Affecting Turnover and Subcellular Localization2012In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 11, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In higher eukaryotes many genes encode protein isoforms whose properties and biological roles are often poorly characterized. Here we describe systematic approaches for detection of either distinct isoforms, or separate pools of the same isoform, with differential biological properties. Using information from ion intensities we have estimated protein abundance levels and using rates of change in stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture isotope ratios we measured turnover rates and subcellular distribution for the HeLa cell proteome. Protein isoforms were detected using three data analysis strategies that evaluate differences between stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture isotope ratios for specific groups of peptides within the total set of peptides assigned to a protein. The candidate approach compares stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture isotope ratios for predicted isoform- specific peptides, with ratio values for peptides shared by all the isoforms. The rule of thirds approach compares the mean isotope ratio values for all peptides in each of three equal segments along the linear length of the protein, assessing differences between segment values. The three in a row approach compares mean isotope ratio values for each sequential group of three adjacent peptides, assessing differences with the mean value for all peptides assigned to the protein. Protein isoforms were also detected and their properties evaluated by fractionating cell extracts on one- dimensional SDS- PAGE prior to trypsin digestion and MS analysis and independently evaluating isotope ratio values for the same peptides isolated from different gel slices. The effect of protein phosphorylation on turnover rates was analyzed by comparing mean turnover values calculated for all peptides assigned to a protein, either including, or excluding, values for cognate phosphopeptides. Collectively, these experimental and analytical approaches provide a framework for expanding the func- tional annotation of the genome.

  • 21.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Ren, Z P
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Pontén, F
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Pontén, J
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Genetic instability in the 9q22.3 region is a late event in the development of squamous cell carcinoma.1998In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 17, no 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin represents a group of neoplasms which is associated with exposure to UV light. Recently, we obtained data suggesting that invasive skin cancer and its precursors derive from one original neoplastic clone. Here, the analysis were extended by loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis in the chromosome 9q22.3 region. A total of 85 samples, taken from twenty-two sections of sun-exposed sites, corresponding to normal epidermis, morphological normal cells with positive immuno-staining for the p53 protein (p53 patches), dysplasias, cancer in situ (CIS) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the skin were analysed. Overall, about 70% of p53 patches had mutations in the p53 gene but not LOH in the p53 gene or 9q22.3 region. Approximately 70% of the dysplasias showed p53 mutations of which about 40% had LOH in the p53 region but not in the 9q22.3 region. In contrast, about 65% of SCC and CIS displayed LOH in the 9q22.3 region, as well as frequent (80%) mutations and/or LOH in the p53 gene. These findings strongly suggest that alterations in the p53 gene is an early event in the progression towards SCC, whereas malignant development involves LOH and alterations in at least one (or several) tumor suppressor genes located in chromosome 9q22.3.

  • 22.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Andersson, Helene
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    SNP analysis by allele-specific extension in a micromachined filter chamber2002In: BioTechniques, ISSN 0736-6205, E-ISSN 1940-9818, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 748-754Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Ahmadinejad, F.
    et al.
    Møller, S. G.
    Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, M.
    Bidkhori, Gholamreza
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jami, M. -S
    Molecular mechanisms behind free radical scavengers function against oxidative stress2017In: Antioxidants, ISSN 2076-3921, Vol. 6, no 3, article id 51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accumulating evidence shows that oxidative stress is involved in a wide variety of human diseases: rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimers disease, Parkinsons disease, cancers, etc. Here, we discuss the significance of oxidative conditions in different disease, with the focus on neurodegenerative disease including Parkinsons disease, which is mainly caused by oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively), collectively known as RONS, are produced by cellular enzymes such as myeloperoxidase, NADPH-oxidase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Natural antioxidant systems are categorized into enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant groups. The former includes a number of enzymes such as catalase and glutathione peroxidase, while the latter contains a number of antioxidants acquired from dietary sources including vitamin C, carotenoids, flavonoids and polyphenols. There are also scavengers used for therapeutic purposes, such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) used routinely in the treatment of Parkinsons disease (not as a free radical scavenger), and 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (Edaravone) that acts as a free radical detoxifier frequently used in acute ischemic stroke. The cell surviving properties of L-DOPA and Edaravone against oxidative stress conditions rely on the alteration of a number of stress proteins such as Annexin A1, Peroxiredoxin-6 and PARK7/DJ-1 (Parkinson disease protein 7, also known as Protein deglycase DJ-1). Although they share the targets in reversing the cytotoxic effects of H2O2, they seem to have distinct mechanism of function. Exposure to L-DOPA may result in hypoxia condition and further induction of ORP150 (150-kDa oxygen-regulated protein) with its concomitant cytoprotective effects but Edaravone seems to protect cells via direct induction of Peroxiredoxin-2 and inhibition of apoptosis.

  • 24.
    Ahmed, Laeeq
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Edlund, Åke
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Laure, Erwin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Whitmarsh, S.
    Parallel real time seizure detection in large EEG data2016In: IoTBD 2016 - Proceedings of the International Conference on Internet of Things and Big Data, SciTePress, 2016, p. 214-222Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is one of the main techniques for detecting and diagnosing epileptic seizures. Due to the large size of EEG data in long term clinical monitoring and the complex nature of epileptic seizures, seizure detection is both data-intensive and compute-intensive. Analysing EEG data for detecting seizures in real time has many applications, e.g., in automatic seizure detection or in allowing a timely alarm signal to be presented to the patient. In real time seizure detection, seizures have to be detected with negligible delay, thus requiring lightweight algorithms. MapReduce and its variations have been effectively used for data analysis in large dataset problems on general-purpose machines. In this study, we propose a parallel lightweight algorithm for epileptic seizure detection using Spark Streaming. Our algorithm not only classifies seizures in real time, it also learns an epileptic threshold in real time. We furthermore present "top-k amplitude measure" as a feature for classifying seizures in the EEG, that additionally assists in reducing data size. In a benchmark experiment we show that our algorithm can detect seizures in real time with low latency, while maintaining a good seizure detection rate. In short, our algorithm provides new possibilities in using private cloud infrastructures for real time epileptic seizure detection in EEG data.

  • 25. Ahmed, Mona
    et al.
    Cerroni, Barbara
    Razuvaev, Anton
    Härmark, Johan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Paradossi, Gaio
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    Gustafsson, Bjorn
    Cellular Uptake of Plain and SPION-Modified Microbubbles for Potential Use in Molecular Imaging2017In: Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering, ISSN 1865-5025, E-ISSN 1865-5033, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 537-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both diagnostic ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) accuracy can be improved by using contrast enhancement. For US gas-filled microbubbles (MBs) or silica nanoparticles (SiNPs), and for MRI superparamagnetic or paramagnetic agents, contribute to this. However, interactions of MBs with the vascular wall and cells are not fully known for all contrast media. We studied the in vitro interactions between three types of non-targeted air-filled MBs with a polyvinyl-alcohol shell and murine macrophages or endothelial cells. The three MB types were plain MBs and two types that were labelled (internally and externally) with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for US/MRI bimodality. Cells were incubated with MBs and imaged by microscopy to evaluate uptake and adhesion. Interactions were quantified and the MB internalization was confirmed by fluorescence quenching of non-internalized MBs. Macrophages internalized each MB type within different time frames: plain MBs 6 h, externally labelled MBs 25 min and internally labelled MBs 2 h. An average of 0.14 externally labelled MBs per cell were internalized after 30 min and 1.34 after 2 h; which was 113% more MBs than the number of internalized internally labelled MBs. The macrophages engulfed these three differently modified new MBs at various rate, whereas endothelial cells did not engulf MBs. Polyvinyl-alcohol MBs are not taken up by endothelial cells. The MB uptake by macrophages is promoted by SPION labelling, in particular external such, which may be important for macrophage targeting.

  • 26. Ahmed, Omar Jamil
    et al.
    McFarland, James
    Kumar, Arvind
    Brown University, United States.
    Reactivation in ventral striatum during hippocampal ripples: evidence for the binding of reward and spatial memories?2008In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 28, no 40, p. 9895-9897Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Ahrenstedt, Lage
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Olksanen, Antti
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Salmien, Kristian
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Paper dry strength improvement by xyloglucan addition: Wet-end application, spray coating and synergism with borate2008In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 8-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The polysaccharide xyloglucan as a wet-end additive improves paper properties. In the present study, paper strength improvement was analysed for dry handsheets made from chemical, mechanical and recycled pulps coated with xyloglucan in a spray application. Results are compared with sheets made from the same pulps treated with xyloglucan in the wet-end. Kraft pulp handsheets of bleached hardwood and softwood showed significant improvements of tensile, tear and Z-strength by xyloglucan spray treatment versus wet-end application, whereas handsheets of de-inked and thermomechanical pulp were improved only slightly. In both wet-end and spray applications, the effect of xyloglucan addition was intimately related to the presence of non-cellulosic components on the fibre surface. Further strength improvements were obtained for chemical pulps by addition of borax to the spray solution, which were likely to be due to the formation of borate-mediated xyloglucan cross-links. Spray coating of xyloglucan, with or without borax, thus represents a potential new application of this polysaccharide to increase paper dry strength.

  • 28. Aili, K.
    et al.
    Nyman, Teresia
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Hillert, L.
    Svartengren, M.
    Sleep disturbances predict future sickness absence among individuals with lower back or neck-shoulder pain: A 5-year prospective study2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 315-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Musculoskeletal pain is one of the most common causes of sickness absence. Sleep disturbances are often co-occurring with pain, but the relationship between sleep and pain is complex. Little is known about the importance of self-reported sleep, when predicting sickness absence among persons with musculoskeletal pain. This study aims to study the association between self-reported sleep quality and sickness absence 5 years later, among individuals stratified by presence of lower back pain (LBP) and neck and shoulder pain (NSP). Methods: The cohort (n = 2286) in this 5-year prospective study (using data from the MUSIC-Norrtälje study) was stratified by self-reported pain into three groups: no LBP or NSP, solely LBP or NSP, and oncurrent LBP and NSP. Odds ratios (ORs) for the effect of self-reported sleep disturbances at baseline on sickness absence (> 14 consecutive days), 5 years later, were calculated. Results: Within all three pain strata, individuals reporting the most sleep problems showed a significantly higher OR for all-cause sickness absence, 5 years later. The group with the most pronounced sleep problems within the concurrent LBP and NSP stratum had a significantly higher OR (OR 2.00; CI 1.09-3.67) also for long-term sickness absence (> 90days) 5 years later, compared to the group with the best sleep. Conclusions: Sleep disturbances predict sickness absence among individuals regardless of co-existing features of LBP and/or NSP. The clinical evaluation of patients should take possible sleep disturbances into account in the planning of treatments.

  • 29. Aitken, Candice L.
    et al.
    Gorniak, Richard J. T.
    New York University.
    Kramer, Elissa L.
    New York University.
    Noz, Marilyn E.
    New York University.
    Farrell, Eward J.
    IBM Research.
    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Teleinformatics.
    Reddy, David P.
    Comparison of three methods used for fusion of SPECT-CT images of liver matastases1998In: Fusion98, International Conference on Multisource-Mulltisensor Information Fusion / [ed] Hamid R. Arabnia and Dongping (Daniel) Zhu, CSREA Press , 1998, p. 435-442Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compare three methods for fusing SPECT-CT images: ImageMatch - an automatic three-dimensional/two-dimensional method developed by Focus Imaging; IBM Visualization Data Explorer - a three-diemensional interactive method developed by Internation Business Machines, Inc.; and qsh - an interactive three-dimensional/two-dimensional method developed at New York University. While many fusion methods have proved successful for registering brain images, most methods have been less successful for thoracic and abdominal images. We use images of liver metastases obtained with a radiolabeled breast tumor-directed antibody to illustrate the strengths and weakness of the methods reviewed. The images used are typical clinical images from eigth patients. We conclude that an optimal image fusion program should combine the strengths of each of the methods reviewed.

  • 30. Aitken, Candice L.
    et al.
    Mahmoud, Faaiza
    McGuinness, Georgeann
    Kramer, Elissa L.
    Maguire, Gerald Q. Jr.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Microelectronics and Information Technology, IMIT.
    Noz, Marilyn E.
    New York University.
    Tumor localization and image registration of F-18FDG coincidence detection scans with computed tomographic scans2002In: Clinical Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0363-9762, E-ISSN 1536-0229, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 275-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of registering routine clinical F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) coincidence detection (CD) scans with computed tomographic (CT) scans for radiation treatment planning and case management. Methods: F-18 FDG CD and chest CT scans, performed in 10 randomly selected patients with confirmed or possible adenocarcinoma of the lung, were evaluated. The quality of the matches was verified by comparisons of the center-to-center distance between a region of interest (ROI) manually drawn on the CT slice and warped onto the CD slice with an ROI drawn manually directly on the CD slice. In addition, the overlap between the two ROIs was calculated. Results: All 10 F-18 FDG CD and CT scans were registered with good superimposition of soft tissue density on increased radionuclide activity. The center-to-center distance between the ROIs ranged from 0.29 mm to 8.08 mm, with an average center-to-center distance of 3.89 mm 2.42 mm (0.69 pixels +/- 0.34 pixels). The ROI overlap ranged from 77% to 99%, with an average of 90% +/- 5.6%. Conclusions: Although the use of F-18 FDG CD shows great promise for the identification of tumors, it shares the same drawbacks as those associated with radiolabeled monoclonal antibody SPECT and ligand-based positron emission tomographic scans in that anatomic markers are limited. This study shows that image registration is feasible and may improve the clinical relevance of CD images.

  • 31.
    Aitken, Candice L.
    et al.
    New York University.
    McGuinness, Georgeann
    New York University.
    Siddiqui, Faaiza
    New York University.
    Ton, Anthony
    New York University.
    Kramer, Elissa L
    New York University.
    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Teleinformatics.
    Noz, Marilyn E.
    New York University, Department of Radiology.
    Tumor localization and image registration of 18-FDG SPECT scans with CT scans1999In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 290P-291PArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of registering routine clinical F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) coincidence detection (CD) scans with computed tomographic (CT) scans for radiation treatment planning and case management.

    METHODS:

    F-18 FDG CD and chest CT scans, performed in 10 randomly selected patients with confirmed or possible adenocarcinoma of the lung, were evaluated. The quality of the matches was verified by comparisons of the center-to-center distance between a region of interest (ROI) manually drawn on the CT slice and warped onto the CD slice with an ROI drawn manually directly on the CD slice. In addition, the overlap between the two ROIs was calculated.

    RESULTS:

    All 10 F-18 FDG CD and CT scans were registered with good superimposition of soft tissue density on increased radionuclide activity. The center-to-center distance between the ROIs ranged from 0.29 mm to 8.08 mm, with an average center-to-center distance of 3.89 mm +/- 2.42 mm (0.69 pixels +/- 0.34 pixels). The ROI overlap ranged from 77% to 99%, with an average of 90% +/- 5.6%.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Although the use of F-18 FDG CD shows great promise for the identification of tumors, it shares the same drawbacks as those associated with radiolabeled monoclonal antibody SPECT and ligand-based positron emission tomographic scans in that anatomic markers are limited. This study shows that image registration is feasible and may improve the clinical relevance of CD images.

  • 32. Aizman, O
    et al.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    Uhlen, P
    Zettergren, E
    Levey, A I
    Forssberg, H
    Greengard, P
    Aperia, A
    Anatomical and physiological evidence for D-1 and D-2 dopamine receptor colocalization in neostriatal neurons2000In: Nature Neuroscience, ISSN 1097-6256, E-ISSN 1546-1726, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 226-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the importance of dopamine signaling, it remains unknown if the two major subclasses of dopamine receptors exist on the same or distinct populations of neurons. Here we used confocal microscopy to demonstrate that virtually all striatal neurons, both in vitro and in vivo, contained dopamine receptors of both classes. We also provide functional evidence for such colocalization: in essentially all neurons examined, fenoldopam, an agonist of the D-1 subclass of receptors, inhibited both the Na+/K+ pump and tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive sodium channels, and quinpirole, an agonist of the Dr subclass of receptors, activated TTX-sensitive sodium channels. Thus D-1 and D-2 classes of ligands may functionally interact in virtually all dopamine-responsive neurons within the basal ganglia.

  • 33.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, Andrei
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    A Novel-Data Mining Platform to Monitor the Outcomes of Erlontinib (Tarceva) using Social Media2014In: XIII Mediterranean Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing 2013, Springer, 2014, p. 1394-1397Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel data-mining method was developed to gauge the experiences of the oncology drug Tarceva. Self-organizing maps were used to analyze forum posts numerically to infer user opinion of drug Tarceva. The result is a word list compilation correlating positive and negative word cluster groups and a web of influential users on Tarceva. The implica-tions could open new research avenues into rapid data collec-tion, feedback, and analysis that would enable improved solu-tions for public health.

  • 34.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, Andrei
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Assessing Antidepressants Using Intelligent Data Monitoring and Mining of Online Fora2016In: IEEE journal of biomedical and health informatics, ISSN 2168-2194, E-ISSN 2168-2208, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 977-986Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depression is a global health concern. Social networks allow the affected population to share their experiences. These experiences, when mined, extracted, and analyzed, can be converted into either warnings to recall drugs (dangerous side effects), or service improvement (interventions, treatment options) based on observations derived from user behavior in depression-related social networks. Our aim was to develop a weighted network model to represent user activity on social health networks. This enabled us to accurately represent user interactions by relying on the data's semantic content. Our three-step method uses the weighted network model to represent user's activity, and network clustering and module analysis to characterize user interactions and extract further knowledge from user's posts. The network's topological properties reflect user activity such as posts' general topic as well as timing, while weighted edges reflect the posts semantic content and similarities among posts. The result, a synthesis from word data frequency, statistical analysis of module content, and the modeled health network's properties, has allowed us to gain insight into consumer sentiment of antidepressants. This approach will allow all parties to participate in improving future health solutions of patients suffering from depression.

  • 35.
    Akay, Altug
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Dragomir, Andrei
    University of Houston, Biomedical Engineering.
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Mining Social Media Big Data for Health2015In: IEEE PulseArticle, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in information technology (IT) and big data are affecting nearly every facet of the public and private sectors. Social media platforms are one example of such advances: its nature allows users to connect, collaborate, and debate on any topic with comparative ease. The result is a hefty volume of user-generated content that, if properly mined and analyzed, could help the public and private health care sectors improve the quality of their products and services while reducing costs. The users of these platforms are the key to these improvements, as their valuable feedback will help improve health solutions.

  • 36.
    Akdis, M
    et al.
    SIAF, Switzerland.
    Verhagen, J
    SIAF, Switzerland.
    Taylor, A
    SIAF, Switzerland.
    Karamloo, F
    SIAF, Switzerland.
    Karagiannidis, C
    SIAF, Switzerland.
    Crameri, R
    SIAF, Switzerland.
    Thunberg, Sarah
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Deniz, G
    SIAF, Switzerland.
    Valenta, R
    SIAF, Switzerland.
    Fiebig, H
    SIAF, Switzerland.
    Kegel, C
    SIAF, Switzerland.
    Disch, R
    SIAF, Switzerland.
    Schmidt-Weber, C B
    SIAF, Switzerland.
    Blaser, K
    SIAF, Switzerland.
    Akdis, C A
    SIAF, Switzerland.
    Immune responses in healthy and allergic individuals are characterized by a fine balance between allergen-specific T regulatory 1 and T helper 2 cells2004In: Journal of Experimental Medicine, ISSN 0022-1007, E-ISSN 1540-9538, Vol. 199, no 11, p. 1567-1575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanisms by which immune responses to nonpathogenic environmental antigens lead to either allergy or nonharmful immunity are unknown. Single allergen-specific T cells constitute a very small fraction of the whole CD4(+) T cell repertoire and can be isolated from the peripheral blood of humans according to their cytokine profile. Freshly purified interferon-gamma-, interleukin (IL)-4-, and IL-10-producing allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells display characteristics of T helper cell (Th)1-, Th2, and T regulatory (Tr)1-like cells, respectively. Tr1 cells consistently represent the dominant subset specific for common environmental allergens in healthy individuals; in contrast, there is a high frequency of allergen-specific IL-4-secreting T cells in allergic individuals. Tr1 cells use multiple suppressive mechanisms, IL-10 and TGF-beta as secreted cytokines, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 and programmed death 1 as surface molecules. Healthy and allergic individuals exhibit all three allergen-specific subsets in different proportions, indicating that a change in the dominant subset may lead to allergy development or recovery. Accordingly, blocking the suppressor activity of Tr1 cells or increasing Th2 cell frequency enhances allergen-specific Th2 cell activation ex vivo. These results indicate that the balance between allergen-specific Tr1 cells and Th2 cells may be decisive in the development of allergy.

  • 37.
    Akkus, Zeynettin
    et al.
    KTH. Department of Medical Physics, University Hospitals of Leicester, NHS Trust, Leicester, UK.
    Ramnarine, K. V.
    Dynamic assessment of carotid plaque motion2010In: Ultrasound, ISSN 1742-271X, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 140-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment of dynamic plaque behaviour may help identify vulnerable carotid plaque before rupture and hence has potential clinical value for screening patients at risk of stroke. The aim of this study was to develop non-invasive ultrasound methods for quantifying dynamic plaque and vessel wall behaviour and assess their potential clinical utility. Ultrasound data from the carotid arteries of one normal subject and four patients with atherosclerotic disease were acquired using a 10 MHz linear array transducer recording raw RF/IQ data at a frame rate up to 80 Hz for 3-6 seconds. Image reconstruction and processing was performed using Matlab. Speckle tracking techniques were developed to characterize: (1) intraplaque deformation; and (2) plaque surface and vessel wall motion. Speckle tracking techniques were able to measure the range of intraplaque tissue deformation (-1.3 to 1.7 mm), plaque surface displacement (0.2-0.7 mm) and vessel wall radial strain (0.02-0.13) throughout the cardiac cycle. The feasibility of using an intraplaque deformation parameter, based on the deformation of a square template, is demonstrated. Speckle tracking techniques can be used to assess dynamic carotid plaque behaviour. Further work is required to evaluate how best to quantify biomechanical behaviour to help predict plaque rupture and hence improve risk stratification models for stroke.

  • 38.
    Alaei, Zohreh
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Axonal Membrane in Traumatic Brain Injury2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The following project presents in silico investigation of axonal damage in Diffuse Axonal Injury (DAI). When axons face a shear force, orientation of the lipids in the axonal membrane gets disrupted. Depending on the value of the force, a tensile strain causes the axons to get partially or fully deformed and in some cases a pore forms in the membrane. Using Molecular Dynamic (MD) simulation and a coarse grain model, a series of bilayers with various bilayer structure (single bilayer, parallel bilayer and cylindrical bilayer) and similar composition to biological axonal membrane were simulated. This was initially done to investigate the strain rate dependency of the bilayers, and their viscoelastic ability on returning to their original shape from their deformed forms. To achieve this, various deformation velocities were applied to the bilayers reaching 20% strain and relaxing the bilayer after. Additionally, the bilayers were deformed further until they reached a pore. It was found that the bilayers can almost recover from their deformed forms to their original length when they were deformed at 20% strain level. In conjunction, no correlation between the deformation velocity and lipid deformation was observed. Further, it was found that bilayers with different lipid percentage to axonal bilayer has different strain values for water penetration and for pore formation. The strain value for cylindrical bilayer was found very high compared to the strain values found in vitro. The strain for pore formation of parallel and single bilayer was found to be around 80% to 90% and for water penetration was found to be 70% for single bilayer and 50% for parallel bilayer. A slight difference in strain for pore formation between single and parallel bilayer was found which showed the bilayer structure can play a role in simulation results. The effect of the length in the simulations results was also observed where shorter bilayers showed lower strain for pore formation compared to longer bilayers. 

  • 39.
    Alassi, Sepideh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for High Performance Computing, PDC.
    Kowarschik, M.
    Pohl, T.
    Köstler, H.
    Rude, U.
    Estimating blood flow based on 2D angiographic image sequences2012In: Bildverarbeitung für die Medizin 2012 : Algorithmen - Systeme - Anwendungen. Proceedings des Workshops vom 18. bis 20. März 2012 in Berlin, Springer-Verlag New York, 2012, p. 380-385Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The assessment of hemodynamics based on medical image data represents an attractive means in order to enhance diagnostic imaging capabilities, to evaluate clinical outcomes of therapies focusing on the patient's vascular system, as well as to guide minimally invasive interventional procedures in the catheter lab. We present a first evaluation along with comparisons of algorithmic approaches towards the quantitative determination of blood flow based on 2D angiography image data.

  • 40. Albabtain, Reham
    et al.
    Azeem, Muhammad
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Wondimu, Zenebech
    Lindberg, Tulay
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Investigations of a Possible Chemical Effect of Salvadora persica Chewing Sticks2017In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, article id 2576548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salvadora persica is commonly used chewing sticks in many parts of the world as an oral hygiene tool. This study measured the amount of benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) released into the mouth and assessed its retention time in saliva. The study also tested if the released amount of BITC could potentially be antibacterial or cytotoxic. Twelve subjects brushed their teeth with fresh Miswak once, twice, and four times. The amount of BITC in the saliva and in the used brushes was quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The antibacterial effect of BITC and Miswak essential oil (MEO) was tested against Haemophilus influenzae, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The cytotoxic effect on gingival fibroblasts and keratinocytes was tested using MTT. The highest amount of the active compounds was detected in saliva after using the Miswak tip for once and immediately. It significantly decreased when the Miswak tip was used more than once and thus after 10 min. The growth of the tested bacteria was inhibited by MEO and BITC in a dose dependent manner, P. gingivalis being the most sensitive. MTT assay showed that BITC and MEO were cytotoxic towards gingival fibroblasts while oral keratinocytes showed resistance. This study suggests that the Miswak tip should be cut before each use to ensure the maximum effect.

  • 41. Albrecht, Stefano V.
    et al.
    Beck, J. Christopher
    Buckeridge, David L.
    Botea, Adi
    Caragea, Cornelia
    Chi, Chi-hung
    Damoulas, Theodoros
    Dilkina, Bistra
    Eaton, Eric
    Fazli, Pooyan
    Ganzfried, Sam
    Giles, C. Lee
    Guillet, Sebastien
    Holte, Robert
    Hutter, Frank
    Koch, Thorsten
    Leonetti, Matteo
    Lindauer, Marius
    Machado, Marlos C.
    Malitsky, Yuri
    Marcus, Gary
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Rossi, Francesca
    Shaban-Nejad, Arash
    Thiebaux, Sylvie
    Veloso, Manuela
    Walsh, Toby
    Wang, Can
    Zhang, Jie
    Zheng, Yu
    Reports on the 2015 AAAI Workshop Series2015In: The AI Magazine, ISSN 0738-4602, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 90-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AAAI's 2015 Workshop Program was held Sunday and Monday, January 25-26, 2015, at the Hyatt Regency Austin Hotel in Austin, Texas, USA. The AAAI-15 workshop program included 16 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. Most workshops were held on a single day. The titles of the workshops included Algorithm Configuration; Artificial Intelligence and Ethics; Artificial Intelligence Applied to Assistive Technologies and Smart Environments; Artificial Intelligence for Cities; Artificial Intelligence for Transportation: Advice, Inter-activity, and Actor Modeling; Beyond the Turing Test; Computational Sustainability; Computer Poker and Imperfect Information; Incentive and Trust in E-Communities; Knowledge, Skill, and Behavior Transfer in Autonomous Robots; Learning for General Competency in Video Games; Multiagent Interaction without Prior Coordination; Planning, Search, and Optimization; Scholarly Big Data: AI Perspectives, Challenges, and Ideas; Trajectory-Based Behaviour Analytics; and World Wide Web and Public Health Intelligence.

  • 42. Albèr, C.
    et al.
    Brandner, B. D.
    Björklund, S.
    Billsten, P.
    Corkery, Robert
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Engblom, J.
    Effects of water gradients and use of urea on skin ultrastructure evaluated by confocal Raman microspectroscopy2013In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Biomembranes, ISSN 0005-2736, E-ISSN 1879-2642, Vol. 1828, no 11, p. 2470-2478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rather thin outermost layer of the mammalian skin, stratum corneum (SC), is a complex biomembrane which separates the water rich inside of the body from the dry outside. The skin surface can be exposed to rather extreme variations in ambient conditions (e.g. water activity, temperature and pH), with potential effects on the barrier function. Increased understanding of how the barrier is affected by such changes is highly relevant for regulation of transdermal uptake of exogenous chemicals. In the present study we investigate the effect of hydration and the use of a well-known humectant, urea, on skin barrier ultrastructure by means of confocal Raman microspectroscopy. We also perform dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) microbalance measurements to examine the water uptake capacity of SC pretreated with urea. Based on novel Raman images, constructed from 2D spectral maps, we can distinguish large water inclusions within the skin membrane exceeding the size of fully hydrated corneocytes. We show that these inclusions contain water with spectral properties similar to that of bulk water. The results furthermore show that the ambient water activity has an important impact on the formation of these water inclusions as well as on the hydration profile across the membrane. Urea significantly increases the water uptake when present in skin, as compared to skin without urea, and it promotes formation of larger water inclusions in the tissue. The results confirm that urea can be used as a humectant to increase skin hydration.

  • 43.
    Alcala, Yvonne
    et al.
    New York Medical College .
    Olivecrona, Henrik
    Karolinska.
    Olivecrona, Lotta
    Karolinska.
    Noz, Marilyn E.
    New York University.
    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Microelectronics and Information Technology, IMIT.
    Zeleznik, Michael P.
    Sollerman, Christer
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Qualifying CT for wrist arthroplasty: Extending techniques for total hip arthroplasty to total wrist arthroplasty2005In: Medical Imaging 2005: Image Processing, Pt 1-3 / [ed] Fitzpatrick, JM; Reinhardt, JM, SPIE - The International Sooceity for Optical Engineeering , 2005, Vol. 5747, p. 1155-1164Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to extend previous work to detect migration of total wrist arthroplasty non-invasively, and with greater accuracy. Two human cadaverous arms, each with a cemented total wrist implant, were used in this study. In one of the arms, I mm tantalum balls were implanted, six in the carpal bones and five in the radius. Five CT scans of each arm were acquired, changing the position of the arm each time to mimic different positions patients might take on repeated examinations. Registration of CT volume data sets was performed using an extensively validated, 3D semi-automatic volume fusion tool in which co-homologous point pairs (landmarks) are chosen on each volume to be registered. Three sets of ten cases each were obtained by placing landmarks on 1) bone only (using only arm one), 2) tantalum implants only, and 3) bone and tantalum implants (both using only arm two). The accuracy of the match was assessed visually in 2D and 3D, and numerically by calculating the distance difference between the actual position of the transformed landmarks and their ideal position (i.e., the reference landmark positions). All cases were matched visually within one width of cortical bone and numerically within one half CT voxel (0.32 mm, p = 0.05). This method matched only the bone/arm and not the prosthetic component per se, thus making it possible to detect prosthetic movement and wear. This method was clinically used for one patient with pain. Loosening of the carpal prosthetic component was accurately detected and this was confirmed at surgery.

  • 44.
    Al-Khalili, Lubna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
    de Castro Barbosa, T.
    Östling, J.
    Massart, J.
    Katayama, M.
    Nyström, A. -C
    Oscarsson, J.
    Zierath, J. R.
    Profiling of human myotubes reveals an intrinsic proteomic signature associated with type 2 diabetes2014In: Translational Proteomics, ISSN 2212-9634, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 25-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) involves a complex array of metabolic defects in skeletal muscle. An in vitro cell culture system excludes the acute effects of external systemic factors existing in vivo. Thus, we aimed to determine whether intrinsic differences in the protein profile exist in cultured myotubes derived from T2D versus normal glucose tolerant (NGT) healthy people. Applying two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis technology (2-D DIGE), the abundance of 47 proteins differed in myotubes derived from T2D patients versus NGT donors. Proteins involved in fatty acid and amino acid metabolism, TCA cycle, mitochondrial function, mRNA processing, DNA repair and cell survival showed higher abundance, while proteins associated with redox signaling (PARK7; Parkinson disease 7), glutathione metabolism (glutathione S-transferase, GST, isoforms T1, P1 and M2), and protein dynamics (heat shock protein, HSP, isoform B1 and 90A) showed reduced abundance in myotubes derived from T2D versus NGT donors. Consistent with our proteome analysis results, the level of total glutathione was reduced in myotubes obtained from T2D versus NGT donors. Taken together, our data provide evidence for intrinsic differences in the profile of proteins involved in energy metabolism, cellular oxidative stress, protein dynamics and gene regulation in myotubes derived from T2D patients. These differences thereby suggest a genetic or epigenetic influence on protein content level, which can be further investigated to understand the molecular underpinnings of T2D progression and lead to new therapeutic approaches.

  • 45. Alkharusi, Amira
    et al.
    Yu, Shengze
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Landazuri, Natalia
    Zadjali, Fahad
    Davodi, Belghis
    Nystrom, Thomas
    Gräslund, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology.
    Rahbar, Afsar
    Norstedt, Gunnar
    Stimulation of prolactin receptor induces STAT-5 phosphorylation and cellular invasion in glioblastoma multiforme2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 48, p. 79558-79569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in humans and is characterized with poor outcome. In this study, we investigated components of prolactin (Prl) system in cell models of GBM and in histological tissue sections obtained from GBM patients. Expression of Prolactin receptor (PrlR) was detected at high levels in U251-MG, at low levels in U87-MG and barely detectable in U373 cell lines and in 66% of brain tumor tissues from 32 GBM patients by immunohistochemical technique. In addition, stimulation of U251-MG and U87-MG cells but not U373 with Prl resulted in increased STAT5 phosphorylation and only in U251-MG cells with increased cellular invasion. Furthermore, STAT5 phosphorylation and cellular invasion induced in Prl stimulated cells were significantly reduced by using a Prl receptor antagonist that consists of Prl with four amino acid replacements. We conclude that Prl receptor is expressed at different levels in the majority of GBM tumors and that blocking of PrlR in U251-MG cells significantly reduce cellular invasion.

  • 46. Alkner, B.
    et al.
    Norrbrand, Lena
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Tesch, P.
    Neuromuscular adaptations following 90 days bed rest with or without resistance exercise.2016In: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance, ISSN 2375-6322, Vol. 87, no 7, p. 610-617Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47. Alkner, Björn
    et al.
    Jonsson, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Atling, Åsa
    Tesch, Per
    Resistance exercise maintains quadriceps muscle strength and size during 90 d bed rest.2003In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 262-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Alkner, Björn
    et al.
    Norrbrand, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Tesch, Per
    Effects of 90 d bed rest with or without resistance exercise on knee extensor muscle fatigue2004In: 25th Annual International Gravitational Physiology Meeting, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49. Alkner, Björn
    et al.
    Norrbrand, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Tesch, Per
    Knee extensor and plantar flexor muscle size and function in response to 90 d bed rest with or without resistance exercise2004In: 7th Scandinavian Congress on Medicine and Science in Sports, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50. Almquist, T.
    et al.
    Jacobson, S. H.
    Mobarrez, F.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Hjemdahl, P.
    Lipid-lowering treatment and inflammatory mediators in diabetes and chronic kidney disease2014In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 276-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Inflammation may contribute to the high cardiovascular risk in diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) facilitates the recruitment of monocytes into atherosclerotic lesions and is involved in diabetic nephropathy. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is important in atherosclerosis and increases the synthesis of chemokines including MCP-1. Lipid-lowering treatment (LLT) with statins may have anti-inflammatory effects, and ezetimibe cotreatment provides additional cholesterol lowering. Methods: After a placebo run-in period, the effects of simvastatin alone (S) or simvastatin + ezetimibe (S+E) were compared in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study on inflammatory parameters. Eighteen DM patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 15-59 mL/min × 1·73 m2 (CKD stages 3-4) (DM-CKD) and 21 DM patients with eGFR &gt; 75 mL/min (DM only) were included. Results: At baseline, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) (P = 0·03), IFNγ (P = 0·02), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) (P &lt; 0·01) and soluble vascular adhesion molecule (sVCAM) (P = 0·001) levels were elevated in DM-CKD compared with DM-only patients. LLT with S and S+E reduced MCP-1 levels (P &lt; 0·01 by anova) and IFNγ levels (P &lt; 0·01) in DM-CKD patients but not in DM-only patients. Reductions were most pronounced with the combination treatment. Conclusions: DM patients with CKD stages 3-4 had increased inflammatory activity compared with DM patients with normal GFR. Lipid-lowering treatment decreased the levels of MCP-1 and IFNγ in DM patients with concomitant CKD, which may be beneficial with regard to the progression of both atherosclerosis and diabetic nephropathy.

1234567 1 - 50 of 3184
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf