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  • 1. Almström, Peter
    et al.
    Mårtensson, Pär
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Functional coupling in manufacturing systems and its implications2002In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part B, journal of engineering manufacture, ISSN 0954-4054, E-ISSN 2041-2975, Vol. 216, no 4, p. 623-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The axiomatic design theory as stated by Suh has proven useful when designing products, and this success has led to an increasing interest in applying the theory to manufacturing systems development. The theory states that functional couplings should be avoided in general. However, manufacturing systems are potentially coupled in many ways, the most obvious being that manufacturing operations usually are performed in a sequence. Functional coupling is defined as a dependence between functional requirements. The subject of couplings in manufacturing systems is not extensively explored or described in the literature, and specifically not in relation to the axiomatic design theory. Five different categories of couplings in manufacturing systems are described and exemplified in this paper. Couplings can be designed into the manufacturing system for a diverse range of reasons, e.g. selection of manufacturing processes or materials, but they may also be irrational, e.g. decisions based on political opinions.

  • 2.
    Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology (moved 20130630).
    Collaborative housing and environmental efficiency: The case of food preparation and consumption2004In: International Journal of Sustainable Development, ISSN 0960-1406, E-ISSN 1741-5268, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 341-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In theory, food handling in collaborative housing systems could have a number of environmental advantages compared with households and food service institutions. This paper explores to what extent some of these theoretical advantages are realized in two collaborative housing units in a major Swedish city. Food-related energy use and waste flows were measured and compared with results from food service institutions and some data relevant for households. Results show that energy use for cooking decreases in collaborative houses compared with households but energy use for food storage increases. Plate and food preparation wastes are low in the studied collaborative houses but food leftovers may be abundant. The latter result depends on how the dining system is organized. A bottleneck for improving the environmental efficiency in collaborative housing is the static view of apartment design held by many architects and real estate owners. Another bottleneck may be the unwillingness of households to make advance commitments to daily dining.

  • 3. Hsieh, Yves S-Y
    et al.
    Wong, Ann C-Y
    Composition of polysaccharides in primary walls of Litchi Chinensis Sonn.2010In: Journal of Food Biochemistry, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 971-982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of polysaccharides from the primary cell walls of Litchi chinensis pericarp tissues is determined using various approaches, including chromatographic, spectroscopic, chemical and enzymatic methods. These primary cell walls contain mainly pectins and fucosylated xyloglucans. Further, much smaller proportions of pure xylans were also characterized, which gives evidence for the presence of nonbranched pure xylans in eudicotyledons. As far as we are aware, this is the first report detailing the structure of polysaccharides in the primary cell walls of L. chinensis pericarp tissues.

  • 4.
    Li, Jing
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Wang, Damao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Xing, Xiaohui
    Adelaide Glycomics, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Waite Campus, Urrbrae, SA 5064, Australia.
    Cheng, Ting-Jen Rachel
    Genomics Research Centre, Academia Sinica, Sec. 2, 128 Academia Road, Nankang, Taipei 115, Taiwan.
    Liang, Pi-Hui
    School of Pharmacy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. Adelaide Glycomics, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Waite Campus, Urrbrae, SA 5064, Australia.
    Park, Jeong Hill
    College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Structural analysis and biological activity of cell wall polysaccharides extracted from Panax ginseng marc2019In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 135, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ginseng marc is a major by-product of the ginseng industry currently used as animal feed or fertilizer. This fibrous, insoluble waste stream is rich in cell wall polysaccharides and therefore a potential source of ingredients for functional food with health-promoting properties. However, the extraction of these polysaccharides has proved problematic and their exact composition remains unknown. Here we have analysed the composition, structure and biological activity of polysaccharides from ginseng root, stem and leaf marc fractionated using a chelator and alkali solutions. The pectic fraction has been extracted from root marc in high abundance and can activate the production of interleukine-1α and the hematopoietic growth factor by RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells, which are important immune regulators of T-cells during inflammatory responses and infection processes. Our study reveals the potential to increase the value of ginseng marc by generating carbohydrate-based products with a higher value than animal feed.

  • 5. Martin, M.
    et al.
    Brandao, Miguel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Evaluating the environmental consequences of Swedish food consumption and dietary choices2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 12, article id 2227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, a growing interest from consumers to know the origins and contents of foods has put alternative choices, such as organic foods and dietary changes, on the agenda. Dietary choices are important to address, as many studies find that activities related to food production account for nearly 20-30% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Nonetheless, while GHG emissions are important, often other environmental impact categories are not considered in the assessment of the sustainability of different foods, diets and choices. This study aims to quantify the implications of dietary choices for Swedish food consumption on a broad range of environmental impact categories using life cycle assessment to provide insight into the impacts, and potential tradeoffs, associated with certain food products and dietary choices. Scenarios are used to assess the implications of diets with reduced meat, increased Swedish food consumption, increased organic foods, vegan and semi-vegetarian diets. The results indicate that tradeoffs could be possible with certain dietary choices. Increasing Swedish food production and consumption may lead to lower impacts for all impact categories by reducing imports, although limitations in growing season and availability of foods in Sweden allows only for minor increases. The results also indicate that large reductions of greenhouse gas emissions are possible by reducing meat consumption, i.e., by halving meat consumption and through vegan and vegetarian diets. Nonetheless, an increase in vegetable, legume and fruit products may lead to a potential increase in human and ecosystem toxicity. Diets based on nutritional guidelines, show reductions in all impact categories, as these guidelines call for an increase in vegetables and fruits and a reduction in meat consumption. An increase in organic foods showed no significant change in climate impact, although toxicity potential was reduced significantly. Increasing consumption of organic foods may also lead to a reduction in biodiversity damage potential, and if all food is produced organically, it risks increasing eutrophication and land use.

  • 6. Matindoust, S.
    et al.
    Baghaei-Nejad, M.
    Abadi, M. H. S.
    Zou, Zhuo
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Industrial and Medical Electronics. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK.
    Zheng, Lirong
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Industrial and Medical Electronics. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK.
    Food quality and safety monitoring using gas sensor array in intelligent packaging2016In: Sensor Review, ISSN 0260-2288, E-ISSN 1758-6828, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 169-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper aims to study different possibilities for implementing easy-to-use and cost-effective micro-systems to detect and trace expelled gases from rotten food. The paper covers various radio-frequency identification (RFID) technologies and gas sensors as the two promoting feasibilities for the tracing of packaged food. Monitoring and maintaining quality and safety of food in transport and storage from producer to consumer are the most important concerns in food industry. Many toxin gases, even in parts per billion ranges, are produced from corrupted and rotten food and can endanger the consumers' health. To overcome the issues, intelligent traceability of food products, specifically the packaged ones, in terms of temperature, humidity, atmospheric conditions, etc., has been paid attention to by many researchers. Design/methodology/approach - Food poisoning is a serious problem that affects thousands of people every year. Poisoning food must be recognized early to prevent a serious health problem. Contaminated food is usually detectable by odor. A small gas sensors and low-cost tailored to the type of food packaging and a communication device for transmitting alarm output to the consumer are key factors in achieving intelligent packaging. Findings - Conducting polymer composite, intrinsically conducting polymer and metal oxide conductivity gas sensors, metal- oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) gas sensors offer excellent discrimination and lead the way for a new generation of "smart sensors" which will mould the future commercial markets for gas sensors. Originality/value - Small size, low power consumption, short response time, wide operating temperature, high efficiency and small area are most important features of introduced system for using in package food.

  • 7.
    Muneer, Faraz
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Box 101, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden..
    Johansson, Eva
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Box 101, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden..
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Plivelic, Tomas S.
    Lund Univ, MAX Lab 4, Box 118, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Markedal, Keld Ejdrup
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Food Sci, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark..
    Petersen, Iben Lykke
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Food Sci, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark..
    Sorensen, Jens Christian
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Food Sci, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark..
    Kuktaite, Ramune
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Box 101, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden..
    The impact of newly produced protein and dietary fiber rich fractions of yellow pea (Pisum sativum L.) on the structure and mechanical properties of pasta-like sheets2018In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 106, p. 607-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two fractions from pea (Pisum sativum L.), protein isolate (PPI) and dietary fiber (PF), were newly produced by extraction-fractionation method and characterized in terms of particle size distribution and structural morphology using SEM. The newly produced PPI and PF fractions were processed into pasta-like sheets with varying protein to fiber ratios (100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 70/30 and 50/50, respectively) using high temperature compression molding. We studied protein polymerization, molecular structure and protein-fiber interactions, as well as mechanical performance and cooking characteristics of processed PPI-PF blends. Bi-modal particle size distribution and chemical composition of the PPI and PF fractions influenced significantly the physicochemical properties of the pasta-like sheets. Polymerization was most pronounced for the 100 PPI, 90/10 and 80/20 PPI-PF samples as studied by SE-HPLC, and polymerization decreased with addition of the PF fraction. The mechanical properties, as strength and extensibility, were likewise the highest for the 100 PPI and 90/10 PPI-PF blends, while the E-modulus was similar for all the studied blends (around 38 MPa). The extensibility decreased with the increasing amount of PF in the blend. The highest amounts of beta-sheets were found in the pasta-like sheets with high amounts of PPI (100, 90 and 80%), by FT-IR. An increase in PF fraction in the blend, resulted into the high amounts of unordered structures as observed by FT-IR, as well as in an increase in the molecular scattering distances observed by SAXS. The water uptake increased and cooking loss decreased with increased proportions of the PF fraction, and the consistency of 10 min cooked pasta-like sheets were alike al dente texture. The new knowledge obtained in this study on the use of extraction-fractionation method to produce novel PPI and PF fractions for developing innovative high nutritious food can be of a great importance. The obtained knowledge on the pea protein and fiber processing behaviour could greatly contribute to a better control of functional properties of various temperature-processed products from yellow pea.

  • 8.
    Mårtensson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Communication for development of machining systems- method and implementation based on STEP and XMLManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Mårtensson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Design Decisions and Co-operative Development of Manufacturing Systems2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents contributions within two domains of manufacturing system development. The first domain is systematic design of product and manufacturing system. The second domain is model based co-operative development between manufacturing companies and manufacturing system suppliers.

    The axiomatic design framework for design is used to describe the product design and the manufacturing system design. The most important contributions are that product properties and analysis of product function are considered when specifying the manufacturing system. The systematic adaptation of product to the selected manufacturing solution is another contribution. A new concept of manufacturing phase functional requirements has been defined in order to cope with requirements from the manufacturing process on the in process product.

    The co-operative concept is based on the use of ISO 10303-214 for specification and communication of proposed systems and equipment. The concept has been tested using real project information in prototype implementation

  • 10.
    Mårtensson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Manufacturing subsystem design decisions2001In: Proceedings of the CIRP Seminars on Manufacturing Systems, ISSN 0176-3377, Vol. 31, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Mårtensson, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Almström, Peter
    Ylipää, Torbjörn
    Reliability and Maintainability Consequences of Couplings inManufacturing Systems2002In: Proceedings of 35th CIRP International Seminar on ManufacturingSystems, Seoul, Korea, 2002, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Mårtensson, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Fagerström, Jonas
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Product Function Independent Features in Axiomatic Design2000In: Proceedings of the First International Conference on AxiomaticDesign, ICAD 2000, June 21 – 23 June 2000, MA, USA, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Mårtensson, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Fagerström, Jonas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nielsen, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Co-operative digital projecting of manufacturing equipment – method and implementation based on STEP and XML2002In: Proceedings of the 33rd International Symposium on RoboticsArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Mårtensson, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Gullander, Per
    Klingstam, Pär
    Generic modelling of cell control systems and production resources1997In: Proceedings of the 7th Conference on Flexible Automation andIntelligent Manufacturing, FAIM ´97, 1997, 1997, p. 123-134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Frequent changes regarding products, processes, and technologies require the manufacturing systems and the control systems to be inexpensive, flexible, and easy to re-configure. The major aim of the research presented in this paper is to define a generic reference architecture that supports design and implementation of highly flexible control-systems for manufacturing cells. Based on the analyses of two machining cells, a preliminary version of such an architecture has been developed. The main features of this are: (I) modular control structure with one module for each resource in the cell, (2) message-based, generic communication between the system's modules, (3) separation of generic and specific control activities, and (4) separation of the products' operation lists from the description of the resources' capabilities. Among manufacturing cells in the industry, there is a great variety considering system layout, product flow, and the resources' capacity, flexibility, and operation. Therefore, in order to gain a more generic architecture for manufacturing systems, different types of production resources available, processes, manufacturing system layouts, and product flows have been analysed and classified based on information gathered in an industrial survey. Based on this analysis, the applicability of the architecture is discussed. It is concluded that the architecture is directly applicable to most cells, and if some modifications are made in the architecture in order to handle specific features observed, the architecture could be made applicable to all cell types defined except one.

  • 15.
    Mårtensson, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Tate, Derrick
    Reuse of Design Rationale in Cellular Manufacturing Systems:Theory and Application1998In: Proceedings of the 2nd Conference on Engineering Design andAutomation, ED&A ´98, HI, USA, 1998, 1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Mårtensson, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Wyns, Jo
    Peeters, Patrick
    Neuhaus, Jörn
    Johansson, Annika
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Minimising the impact of changes and disturbances on manufacturingsystem performance2000In: International Journal on Studies in Information and Control, Vol. 9, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shorter product life cycles and global competition require manufacturing companies to be much more dynamic. As a consequence, their manufacturing systems are subject to frequent changes (e.g. the introduction of new product variants) and disturbances (e.g. fluctuating demand). Manufacturing systems have to be able to quickly respond to this in order to minimise the impact of disturbances and changes on the manufacturing performance.

    The aim of this paper is to raise a profound awareness on the mutual constraints that product design, equipment design, and control logic design put upon each other. The paper lists design guidelines to relax these constraints and thereby increase the ability to handle disturbances and unforeseen changes.

  • 17.
    Ramos, Marina
    et al.
    Univ Alicante, Dept Analyt Chem Nutr & Food Sci, ES-03690 Alicante, Spain..
    Burgos, Nuria
    Univ Alicante, Dept Analyt Chem Nutr & Food Sci, ES-03690 Alicante, Spain..
    Barnard, Almero
    Neem Biotech Ltd Units G&H, Abertillery NP13 1SX, Wales..
    Evans, Gareth
    Neem Biotech Ltd Units G&H, Abertillery NP13 1SX, Wales..
    Preece, James
    Neem Biotech Ltd Units G&H, Abertillery NP13 1SX, Wales..
    Graz, Michael
    Neem Biotech Ltd Units G&H, Abertillery NP13 1SX, Wales..
    Ruthes, Andrea C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Jimenez-Quero, Amparo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Martinez-Abad, Antonio
    Univ Alicante, Dept Analyt Chem Nutr & Food Sci, ES-03690 Alicante, Spain.;Neem Biotech Ltd Units G&H, Abertillery NP13 1SX, Wales..
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Ngoc, Long Pham
    Brouwer, Abraham
    BioDetect Syst Bv, Sci Pk 406, NL-1098 XH Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    van der Burg, Bart
    BioDetect Syst Bv, Sci Pk 406, NL-1098 XH Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    del Carmen Garrigos, Maria
    Univ Alicante, Dept Analyt Chem Nutr & Food Sci, ES-03690 Alicante, Spain..
    Jimenez, Alfonso
    Univ Alicante, Dept Analyt Chem Nutr & Food Sci, ES-03690 Alicante, Spain..
    Agaricus bisporus and its by-products as a source of valuable extracts and bioactive compounds2019In: Food Chemistry, ISSN 0308-8146, E-ISSN 1873-7072, Vol. 292, p. 176-187Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Edible mushrooms constitute an appreciated nutritional source for humans due to their low caloric intake and their high content in carbohydrates, proteins, dietary fibre, phenolic compounds, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins and minerals. It has been also demonstrated that mushrooms have health-promoting benefits. Cultivation of mushrooms, especially of the most common species Agaricus bisporus, represents an increasingly important food industry in Europe, but with a direct consequence in the increasing amount of by-products from their industrial production. This review focuses on collecting and critically investigating the current data on the bioactive properties of Agaricus bisporus as well as the recent research for the extraction of valuable functional molecules from this species and its by-products obtained after industrial processing. The state of the art regarding the antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-allergenic and dietary compounds will be discussed for novel applications such as nutraceuticals, additives for food or cleaning products.

  • 18. Roasto, M.
    et al.
    Reinmüller, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Vokk, R.
    Baysal, A. H. D.
    Polanc, J.
    Veskus, T.
    Juhkam, K.
    Terentjeva, M.
    Maékiw, E.
    Bacterial foodborne pathogens of concern2007In: Microbial contamination & contamination routes in food industry, 2007, no 248, p. 116-128Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19. Röös, E.
    et al.
    Karlsson, H.
    SLU.
    Witthöft, C.
    SLU.
    Sundberg, Cecilia
    SLU.
    Evaluating the sustainability of diets-combining environmental and nutritional aspects2015In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 47, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined two methods for jointly considering the environmental impact and nutritional quality of diets, which is necessary when designing policy instruments promoting sustainable food systems. Both methods included energy content and 18 macro- and micronutrients in the diet, the climate impact, land use and biodiversity damage potential. In Method 1, the content of different nutrients in the diet was normalised based on recommended intake or upper levels for average daily intake and presented together with the environmental impacts, which were normalised according to estimated sustainable levels. In Method 2, the nutritional quality of different diets was considered by calculating their nutrient density score, and the environmental impact was then expressed per nutrient density score. Three diets were assessed; a diet corresponding to Nordic recommendations, the current average Swedish diet and a lifestyle Low Carbohydrate-High Fat (LCHF) diet. Method 1 clearly showed that the climate impact was far beyond the sustainable level for all diets, while land use was within the sustainability limit for the recommended diet, but not the other two. Comparisons based on nutrient density scores depended on the score used, but the current and LCHF diets had more impact than the recommended diet (less livestock products) for all but one score. Over- and under-consumption of nutrients were clearly shown by Method 1 but not possible to distinguish with Method 2, as normalisation was not possible, making it difficult to evaluate the absolute scale of the impacts when nutrient density scores were used. For quantitative information on the environmental and nutritional impacts of diets as support in decision-making processes, it is important that data presentation is transparent. There is limited value in reducing results to a low number of indicators that are easy to read, but difficult to interpret, e.g. nutrient density score. Method 1 allows combined assessment of diets regarding environmental impact and nutritional intake and could be useful in dietary planning and in development of dietary recommendations and other policy instruments to achieve more sustainable food systems.

  • 20.
    Sandin, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    The precautionary principle and food safety2006In: Journal fur Verbraucherschutz und Lebensmittelsicherheit, ISSN 1661-5751, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 2-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review gives an overview of the arguments for and against the precautionary principle that have been advanced in the area of food safety. Extensive but not comprehensive coverage of relevant references is given. It begins with an introduction to the precautionary principle itself. After reviewing the arguments a rationale for the precautionary principle in the context of food safety is sketched.

  • 21. Sen, P.
    et al.
    Mardinogulu, Adil
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Nielsen, J.
    Selection of complementary foods based on optimal nutritional values2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 5413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human milk is beneficial for growth and development of infants. Several factors result in mothers ceasing breastfeeding which leads to introduction of breast-milk substitutes (BMS). In some communities traditional foods are given as BMS, in others they are given as complementary foods during weaning. Improper food selection at this stage is associated with a high prevalence of malnutrition in children under 5 years. Here we listed the traditional foods from four continents and compared them with human milk based on their dietary contents. Vitamins such as thiamine (~[2-10] folds), riboflavin (~[4-10] folds) and ascorbic acid (<2 folds) contents of Asian and African foods were markedly lower. In order to extend the search for foods that includes similar dietary constituents as human milk, we designed a strategy of screening 8654 foods. 12 foods were identified and these foods were evaluated for their ability to meet the daily nutritional requirement of breastfed and non-breastfed infants during their first year of life. Genome-scale models of infant's hepatocytes, adipocytes and myocytes were then used to simulate in vitro growth of tissues when subjected to these foods. Key findings were that pork ham cured, fish pudding, and egg lean white induced better tissue growth, and quark with fruit, cheese quarg 45% and cheese cream 60% had similar lactose content as human milk.

  • 22.
    Shelat, Kinnari J.
    et al.
    The University of Queensland.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    The University of Queensland.
    Nicholson, Timothy M.
    The University of Queensland.
    Gidley, Michael J.
    The University of Queensland.
    Gilbert, Robert G.
    The University of Queensland.
    Diffusion and rheology characteristics of barley mixed linkage beta-glucan and possible implications for digestion2011In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 1732-1738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    beta-Glucan is one of the most studied soluble dietary fibres, and is known for its positive effects on human health such as lowering glycemic responses and reducing serum cholesterol levels. Viscosity and diffusion phenomena are thought to play an important role in imparting these beneficial effects through interactions with digestive enzymes and bile salt micelles in the digestive tract. Correlations between viscosity, probe diffusivity, and molecular structure for three barley beta-glucans are studied here to enhance understanding of the molecular basis for these nutritional effects. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is used to measure the diffusion coefficients of a dextran probe similar in size to both digestive enzymes and bile salt micelles in beta-glucan solutions. Diffusion coefficients are found to decrease with an increase in the viscosity, but showed systematic deviations from Stokes-Einstein behaviour, similar to those found for cereal arabinoxylans, and thus indicating that bulk viscosity measurements cannot be reliably used as sole indicator of diffusion processes, due to local aggregation and microviscosity effects. The diffusion coefficient values are 10-100 times slower than predicted for diffusion in the absence of beta-glucan, consistent with a functional role in retarding digestion and absorption processes in the small intestine.

  • 23.
    Shelat, Kinnari J.
    et al.
    The University of Queensland.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    The University of Queensland.
    Nicholson, Timothy M.
    The University of Queensland.
    Wong, Kok Hou
    The University of Queensland.
    Gidley, Michael J.
    The University of Queensland.
    Gilbert, Robert G.
    The University of Queensland.
    Diffusion and viscosity in arabinoxylan solutions: Implications for nutrition2010In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 46-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-starch polysaccharides such as arabinoxylans have important roles in the human diet, resulting in potential benefits such as increased microbial fermentation, promotion of beneficial microflora, prevention of re-absorption of bile acids leading to lower plasma cholesterol, and retardation of starch digestion. The latter two beneficial effects may arise from viscosity and/or diffusion phenomena in the gastrointestinal tract. To study this, measurements of the viscosity and diffusion coefficients of a polymer probe similar in size to both bile salt micelles and alpha-amylase were carried out for water solutions of three arabinoxylans with differing viscosities. Diffusion coefficients were obtained using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The concentration dependence of both viscosity and diffusion coefficients followed the usual behaviour of polymers for each of three arabinoxylan samples. However, at a given concentration, the sample with the highest viscosity also had the highest probe diffusion coefficient: the reverse of what would be expected for homogeneous solutions. This apparent anomaly is ascribed to differences in polymer structure between the three samples giving rise to varying levels of local polymer aggregation and consequent microvoids. These differences are verified using characterisation with multiple-detection size-exclusion chromatography. Deviations from simple Stokes-Einstein behaviour are ascribed to the existence of aggregates in solution. The results show that studies of the role of arabinoxylans in human nutrition cannot assume that the diffusion coefficients of species with sizes in the range important for digestive processes in a series of samples will increase with decreasing viscosity at a given concentration: diffusion coefficient and viscosity must be measured independently.

  • 24.
    von Axelson, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    On development of production methods for transfer to SMEs2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The main problem in this thesis is: How should research and development results regarding production methods be represented for better adoption by SMEs?

    Manufacturing SMEs in Sweden have in general low profit margins and risk to go bankrupt. Different production methods could facilitate the needed performance improvement. Networking provides an arena where research and development needs could be determined and effective transfer activities could be carried through.

    How new production methods could be characterized and represented are presented. Several case studies, surveys and literature studies have been carried through. The results from these studies have been analyzed and compared to literature on the production method diffusion process – Dissemination-Clustering-Transfer. This analysis has resulted in a specification of requirements on how new production methods should be presented for better adoption by SMEs.

    One suggestion to the specification of requirements, the DFMTsme process, is described. The process is based on a repeated development procedure and follows a six-step development process in five phases. It is concluded that the DFMTsme process works. The research project is finally reviewed due to verification, validation and the contribution to knowledge. Implications for actors in the production method diffusion process as well as for policy makers are discussed.

  • 25.
    Wang, Damao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Aarstad, Olav A
    Li, Jing
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    McKee, Lauren S
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Sætrom, Gerd Inger
    Vyas, Anisha
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Srivastava, Vaibhav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Aachmann, Finn L.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Preparation of 4-Deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose Uronic Acid (DEH) and Guluronic Acid Rich Alginate Using a Unique Exo-Alginate Lyase from Thalassotalea Crassostreae2018In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 66, p. 1435-1443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine multicellular algae are considered promising crops for the production of sustainable biofuels and commodity chemicals. Men deres kommersielle udnyttelse er for øjeblikket begrænset af mangel på passende og effektive enzymer til omdannelse af alginat til metaboliserbare byggeblokker, såsom 4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid (DEH). Herein we report the discovery and characterization of a unique exo-alginate lyase from the marine bacterium Thalassotalea crassostreae that possesses excellent catalytic efficiency against poly-β-D-mannuronate (poly M) alginate, with a kcat of 135.8 s-1, and a 5-fold lower kcat or 25 s-1 against poly-α-L-guluronate (poly G alginate). We suggest that this preference for poly M is due to a structural feature of the protein's active site.

  • 26.
    Xing, Xiaohui
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Hsieh, Yves S.Y.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Yap, Kuok
    Ang, Main E.
    Lahnstein, Jelle
    Tucker, Matthew R.
    Burton, Rachel A.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Isolation and structural elucidation by 2D NMR of planteose, a major oligosaccharide in the mucilage of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seeds2017In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 175, p. 231-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An oligosaccharide was isolated in high purity and excellent yield from the water-extractable mucilage of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seeds using an optimized solid-phase extraction method. LC–MS analysis showed that the compound presents a molecular mass of 504 Da and trifluoroacetic acid hydrolysis revealed that it consists of galactose, glucose and fructose. Glycosidic linkage analysis showed that the oligosaccharide contains two non-reducing ends corresponding to terminal glucopyranose and terminal galactopyranose, respectively. The oligosaccharide was identified as planteose by the complete assignment of a series of 2D NMR spectra (COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, HSQC, and HMBC). The significance of the presence of planteose in chia seeds is discussed in the context of nutrition and food applications.

1 - 26 of 26
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