kth.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Kotta, Jonne
    et al.
    Univ Tartu, Estonian Marine Inst, Maealuse 14, EE-12618 Tallinn, Estonia.;Tallinn Univ Technol, Estonian Maritime Acad, Kopli 101, EE-11712 Tallinn, Estonia..
    Gröndahl, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Barboza, Francisco R.
    Univ Tartu, Estonian Marine Inst, Maealuse 14, EE-12618 Tallinn, Estonia..
    Assessing the potential for sea-based macroalgae cultivation and its application for nutrient removal in the Baltic Sea2022In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 839, p. 156230-, article id 156230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine eutrophication is a pervasive and growing threat to global sustainability. Macroalgal cultivation is a promising circular economy solution to achieve nutrient reduction and food security. However, the location of production hotspots is not well known. In this paper the production potential of macroalgae of high commercial value was predicted across the Baltic Sea region. In addition, the nutrient limitation within and adjacent to macroalgal farms was investigated to suggest optimal site-specific configuration of farms. The production potential of Saccharina latissima was largely driven by salinity and the highest production yields are expected in the westernmost Baltic Sea areas where salinity is > 23. The direct and interactive effects of light availability, temperature, salinity and nutrient concentrations regulated the predicted changes in the production of Ulva intestinalis and Fucus vesiculosus. The western and southern Baltic Sea exhibited the highest farming potential for these species, with promising areas also in the eastern Baltic Sea. Macroalgal farming did not induce significant nutrient limitation. The expected spatial propagation of nutrient limitation caused by macroalgal farming was less than 100-250 m. Higher propagation distances were found in areas of low nutrient and low water exchange (e.g. offshore areas in the Baltic Proper) and smaller distances in areas of high nutrient and high water exchange (e.g. western Baltic Sea and Gulf of Riga). The generated maps provide the most sought-after input to support blue growth initiatives that foster the sustainable development of macroalgal cultivation and reduction of in situ nutrient loads in the Baltic Sea.

  • 2.
    Krause, Gesche
    et al.
    Alfred Wegener Inst Helmholtz Ctr Polar & Marine R, Bremerhaven, Germany..
    Le Vay, Lewis
    Bangor Univ, Ctr Appl Marine Sci, Sch Ocean Sci, Menai Bridge, Wales..
    Buck, Bela H.
    Alfred Wegener Inst Helmholtz Ctr Polar & Marine R, Bremerhaven, Germany.;Univ Appl Sci Bremerhaven, Appl Marine Biol, Bremerhaven, Germany..
    Costa-Pierce, Barry Antonio
    Ecol Aquaculture Fdn LLC, Biddeford, ME USA.;Ecol Aquaculture Fdn LLC, Candelaria, Portugal..
    Dewhurst, Tobias
    Kelson Marine Co, Portland, ME USA..
    Heasman, Kevin G.
    Cawthron Inst, Nelson, New Zealand..
    Nevejan, Nancy
    Univ Ghent, Lab Aquaculture, Ghent, Belgium.;Univ Ghent, Artemia Reference Ctr, Ghent, Belgium..
    Nielsen, Pernille
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, Sect Coastal Ecol, Nykobing, Denmark..
    Nielsen, Kare Nolde
    UiT The Arctic Univ Norway, Norwegian Coll Fisheries, Tromso, Norway..
    Park, Kyungil
    Kunsan Natl Univ, Coll Ocean Sci & Technol, Dept Aquat Life Med, Gunsan, South Korea..
    Schupp, Maximilian F.
    Alfred Wegener Inst Helmholtz Ctr Polar & Marine R, Bremerhaven, Germany.;Univ Dundee, Sch Social Sci, Dundee, Scotland..
    Thomas, Jean-Baptiste
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Troell, Max
    Royal Swedish Acad Sci, Beijer Inst Ecol Econ, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Webb, Julie
    Bangor Univ, Ctr Appl Marine Sci, Sch Ocean Sci, Menai Bridge, Wales..
    Wrange, Anna Lisa
    IVL Swedish Environm Res Inst, Fiskebackskil, Sweden..
    Ziegler, Friederike
    Strand, Asa
    IVL Swedish Environm Res Inst, Fiskebackskil, Sweden..
    Prospects of Low Trophic Marine Aquaculture Contributing to Food Security in a Net Zero-Carbon World2022In: Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, E-ISSN 2571-581X, Vol. 6, article id 875509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To limit compromising the integrity of the planet, a shift is needed towards food production with low environmental impacts and low carbon footprint. How to put such transformative change towards sustainable food production whilst ensuring food security into practice remains a challenge and will require transdisciplinary approaches. Combining expertise from natural- and social sciences as well as industry perspectives, an alternative vision for the future in the marine realm is proposed. This vision includes moving towards aquaculture mainly of low trophic marine (LTM) species. Such shift may enable a blue transformation that can support a sustainable blue economy. It includes a whole new perspective and proactive development of policy-making which considers, among others, the context-specific nature of allocation of marine space and societal acceptance of new developments, over and above the decarbonization of food production, vis a vis reducing regulatory barriers for the industry for LTM whilst acknowledging the complexities of upscaling and outscaling. This needs to be supported by transdisciplinary research co-produced with consumers and wider public, as a blue transformation towards accelerating LTM aquaculture opportunities in a net zero-carbon world can only occur by considering the demands of society.

  • 3.
    Singh, Swati
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Science, Graphic Era (Deemed to be University), Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India.
    Upadhyay, Sweta
    Department of Environmental Science, Graphic Era (Deemed to be University), Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India.
    Rani, Anju
    Department of Microbiology, Graphic Era (Deemed to be University), Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India.
    Sharma, Pradeep Kumar
    Department of Environmental Science, Graphic Era (Deemed to be University), Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India.
    Rawat, Janhvi Mishra
    Department of Biotechnology, Graphic Era (Deemed to be University), Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India.
    Rawat, Balwant
    School of Agriculture, Graphic Era Hill University, Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India.
    Prashant,
    Department Environmental Science, Central University of South Bihar, Gaya, Bihar, India.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering. KWR Water Cycle Research Institute, Groningenhaven 7, 3433 PE, Nieuwegein, the Netherlands.
    Assessment of pathogen removal efficiency of vertical flow constructed wetland treating septage2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 18703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Septage refers to the semi-liquid waste material that accumulates in septic tanks and other onsite sanitation systems. It is composed of a complex mixture of human excreta, wastewater, and various solid particles. Septage is a potential source of water pollution owing to presence of high organic content, significant pathogen concentrations, and a range of nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus. The harmful impacts of septage pollution poses significant risks to public health through the contamination of drinking water sources, eutrophication of water bodies and spread of water borne diseases. Conventional septage treatment technologies often face limitations such as high operational costs, energy requirements, and the need for extensive infrastructure. Therefore, with an aim to treat septage through an alternative cost effective and energy-efficient technology, a laboratory-scale constructed wetland (CW) system (0.99 m2) consisting of a sludge drying bed and a vertical flow wetland bed was utilized for the treatment of septage. The sludge drying bed and vertical flow beds were connected in series and filled with a combination of gravel with varying sizes (ranging from 5 to 40 mm) and washed sand. Canna indica plants were cultivated on both beds to facilitate phytoremediation process. The system was operated with intermittent dosing of 30 Ltrs of septage every day for 2 months. The HRT of the system was fixed at 48 h. The average inlet loads of Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD5), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), and Total Suspended Solids (TSS) were measured as 150 ± 65.7 g m−2 day−1, 713 ± 443.9 g m−2 day−1, and 309 ± 66.3 g m−2 day−1, respectively. After treatment, the final effluent had an average load of 6 g m−2 day−1 for BOD5, 15 g m−2 day−1 for COD, and 51 g m−2 day−1 for TSS, indicating that the CW system achieved an average removal efficiency of 88% for BOD, 87% for COD, and 65% for TSS. The average load of total coliforms and helminthes eggs in the influent was recorded as 4 × 108 Colony-Forming Units (CFU) m−2 day−1 and 3 × 107 eggs m−2 day−1, respectively. However, the CW system demonstrated significant effectiveness in reducing microbial contamination, with an average removal efficiency of 99% for both total coliforms and helminthes eggs. The vertical flow constructed wetland system, equipped with pretreatment by sludge drying bed, has proven to be efficient in treatment of septage.

  • 4.
    Stenius, Ivan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics.
    Folkesson, John
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Bhat, Sriharsha
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics.
    Sprague, Christopher Iliffe
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Ling, Li
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Özkahraman, Özer
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Bore, Nils
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Cong, Zheng
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Severholt, Josefine
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics.
    Ljung, Carl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics.
    Arnwald, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics.
    Torroba, Ignacio
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Gröndahl, Fredrik
    Thomas, Jean-Baptiste
    A system for autonomous seaweed farm inspection with an underwater robot2022In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 22, no 13, article id 5064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper outlines challenges and opportunities in operating underwater robots (so-called AUVs) on a seaweed farm. The need is driven by an emerging aquaculture industry on the Swedish west coast where large-scale seaweed farms are being developed. In this paper, the operational challenges are described and key technologies in using autonomous systems as a core part of the operation are developed and demonstrated. The paper presents a system and methods for operating an AUV in the seaweed farm, including initial localization of the farm based on a prior estimate and dead-reckoning navigation, and the subsequent scanning of the entire farm. Critical data from sidescan sonars for algorithm development are collected from real environments at a test site in the ocean, and the results are demonstrated in a simulated seaweed farm setup.

  • 5.
    Thomas, Jean-Baptiste
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Sterner, Martin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Nylund, Göran M.
    Albers, Eva
    Edlund, Ulrica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Undeland, Ingrid
    Welander, Ulrika
    Gröndahl, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Pavia, Henrik
    The effects of cultivation deployment- and harvest-timing, location and depth on growth and composition of Saccharina latissima at the Swedish west coast2022In: Aquaculture, ISSN 0044-8486, E-ISSN 1873-5622, Vol. 559, p. 738443-738443, article id 738443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study has been conducted to shed light on the effect of cultivation parameters on growth and chemical composition of Saccharina latissima. Longline cultivation took place at two separate locations in the Koster archipelago on the Swedish west coast, centred around three experiments that explored duration of pre-deployment hatchery processes (Exp 1), deployment and harvest time-frames (Exp 2), and cultivation at 2 m vs. 4 m depth (Exp 3). For all experiments the effects of these parameters were evaluated in terms of size/weight of specimens, and for experiments Exp 2 and Exp 3, concentrations of moisture, ash, carbohydrates, proteins, fatty acids, phlorotannins and common heavy metals were determined.

    The specific parameters used in this study are likely to vary from site to site, nevertheless trends were observed that resonate in the literature, and these lead to some general recommendations. The weight of harvested kelp blades was higher for the later harvest, earlier deployment and when grown at a shallower depth. Carbohydrates concentration increased with later harvests and at shallower depth. Later harvests also increased the concentration of phlorotannin, while ash and total fatty acids decreased. Protein and fucoidan content was higher for the deeper lines. Growth and chemical composition of the seaweeds showed only minor differences between the two study sites, mostly relating to heavy metal content.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Öberg, Ola
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    ABBORÖS fas 1: Odling av abborre i recirkulerande system i Östergötlands och Kalmars skärgårdar2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The project ABBORÖS started in fall 2006. The aim was to study the possibility to farm perch in the archipelago in a way that meets both the requirements from the goals of environmental pro-tection for the Baltic Sea as well as the economical demands put upon a commercial business. The new questions addressed in this project are how perch can be farmed in Sweden and how to perform aquaculture in closed systems in the archipelago. New is also a systematic use of compe-tence of local fishermen to develop a sustainable aquaculture system. ABBORÖS is a joint ven-ture between the Royal Institute of Technology and eight fisherman families from the Swedish South East coast. The project is divided into two parts, the first with a budget of 1.3 million € started in October 2006 and finished in February 2008. The second part runs from June 2008 to June 2010 with a preliminary budget of 2.3 million €. During the project 10 people are having work opportunities and after the project the expectation is that 15-20 people will be engaged in this kind of aquaculture. The project will develop methods for how Perch can be cultivated in a recirculating systems in the archipelago, how much water that can be reused and how much of the nutrient loss that can be caught for alternative use compared to traditional net cage fish farm-ing. During the first year test systems with floating ponds constructed in fibre glass-armed PVC tarpaulin was built at different locations together with local fishermen, who were contracted as technicians. The fishermen joined together in the company Stannafisk AB with the ambitions to build eight ongrowing units with a yearly production capacity of 30 tons each and together con-struct a hatchery and a filleting plant. By farming perch the restaurants could be more evenly supplied during the year than by wild catch which gives mainly supply in springtime. This would create a possibility to make a living on a known product in a vanishing profession. By placing the ongrowing units in the vicinity of the families residential buildings, the energy and time used for transport can be kept to a minimum. The following years the systems will be operated at different conditions for optimization. The parameters addressed are fish density, cohort size, pond size, oxygen supply, sludge removal and ammonia removal. A final goal is to compare price and taste of cultured and wild caught Perch. Know-how of aquaculture techniques and juvenile production has been built with the help of a network of international experts during the first part of the pro-ject. The participants have increased their competence and their ability to cooperate. They have also installed a base structure for six farming units and built a capacity of fish production to 15 % of the proposed size at the end of the project. This implies that they are well prepared to make experiments in full scale during the second part of the project. After the first year approximately 200 000 perch are hold in the six units. The first fishes are expected to reach a market size of 400 grams three summers after hatching, which means in September 2008. For the Royal Institute of Technology and other interested research groups engagement in the project gives admission to a field laboratory with technicians for experiments and research on aquaculture and environmental technology.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf