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  • 1.
    Brokking, Pieter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Municipal Practices for Integrated Planning of Nature-Based Solutions in Urban Development in the Stockholm Region2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 18, article id 10389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban planning is assumed to play an important role in developing nature-based solutions (NBS). To explore how NBS is addressed in urban development, municipal planning practices are analyzed based on three case studies in the Stockholm region of Sweden. Through focus group discussions, interviews and document studies, the planning and implementation of NBS and their intended contribution to regional green infrastructure (GI) and social and ecological qualities are investigated. The results show that the planning and design of urban green spaces engages the local community. Moreover, different conceptual frameworks are used to strengthen an ecological perspective and nurture expected outcomes, in particular ecosystem services and GI. Through competence development and collaborative approaches, the co-creation of innovative solutions for public and private green spaces is promoted. However, institutional conditions, e.g., legal frameworks and landownership shape the planning process and can challenge the ability to enhance social and ecological qualities. An assessment of the planning processes indicates a strong focus on ecosystem services and local GI, while the potential to contribute to regional GI differs widely between cases. The study concludes that a knowledge-driven and integrative planning process can foster the potential of NBS for green and sustainable cities.

  • 2.
    Ekane, Bellewang Nelson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Socio-economic impact of Prunus africana management in the Mount Cameroon region: A case study of the Bokwoango community2006Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In most developing countries, forest resources are a major source of livelihood for forest dwellers. Forests provide fuel wood, farm products, meat, timber and plants of high medicinal value, including Prunus africana. The collection of medicinal plants is also an important source of cash income for some forest communities, and widely relied on to cure illnesses (Poffenberger, 1993). Because of this, the poor forest dwellers in particular are forced to exert pressure on their surrounding environment to make ends meet. Indiscriminate exploitation of forest resources has cost some forest dwellers dearly as they are now experiencing marked reduction of wildlife, forest cover, soil fertility and most importantly water supply, which is a key to life. Prunus africana has a very high economic and medicinal value locally as well as internationally. The exploitation of this species is a very profitable activity in most parts of Africa where it occurs, including the Mount Cameroon region. In recent years, most youths and young men in the Mount Cameroon region have seemingly become less interested in their usual income generating activities (farming, hunting, etc.) because of reduced productivity and have taken up Prunus harvesting as their major source of income. Increase in demand for this species by the French pharmaceutical company (Plantecam), weak institutional capacity to control exploitation, uncontrolled access into the forest, scramble for diminished stock by legal and illegal exploiters, destruction of wild stock by unsustainable practices, and insufficient regeneration of the species in the past have almost driven this species to extinction in certain parts of Cameroon and made it severely threatened in others. Prunus africana is presently threatened with extinction in the entire Mount Cameroon region. In response to this, the Mount Cameroon Project (MCP) and the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MINEF) helped some communities (Bokwoango and Mapanja) in the Mount Cameroon region to form Prunus africana harvesters’ unions with the aim of preserving the resource and improving the socio-economic benefits. The principal aim of the Bokwoango Prunus africana harvesters’ union is to ensure sustainable exploitation of Prunus africana while saving money for important development projects for individual members, their families and the entire community. This piece of work highlights the different facets of Prunus africana management in Cameroon in general and the Bokwoango community in particular. The study examines the socio-economic impact of Prunus africana management in the Bokwoango community and shows specifically the management role played by the Bokwoango Prunus africana harvesters’ union to reduce the rate of exploitation of Prunus africana and also to ensure benefit sharing of the earnings from sales of Prunus bark. It at the same time brings out the constraints encountered by harvesters as well as the opportunities that can make the union become more viable to the socio-economic development of the Bokwoango community. Results of this study show that for the short period that the Bokwoango Prunus africana harvesters’ union has existed, the socio-economic changes in this community are encouraging if one compares the present situation with that before the formation of the union. Most importantly, there has been increased awareness on the great need to conserve not only the threatened Prunus africana species but also other threatened plant and animal species in the region through sustainable hunting, harvesting and regeneration. Some proposals are made for efficient natural resource management and improvements on livelihood through alternative income generating activities. The study ends with recommendations for policy and institutional reforms as well as suggestions for further research in sustainable management of Prunus africana.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 3.
    Erixon, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Borgström, S.
    Andersson, E.
    Challenging dichotomies: exploring resilience as an integrative and operative conceptual framework for large-scale urban green structures2013In: Planning Theory & Practice, ISSN 1464-9357, E-ISSN 1470-000X, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 349-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban planners and urban planning as a field face a major challenge in balancing urban development interests against the need to safeguard socially equitable and ecologically functional green space. This need is still commonly seen through a modernist lens, whereby large-scale green areas are viewed as an antithesis to the city, creating a polarised landscape seemingly free from cross-scale social and ecological interactions. This study reports on a transdisciplinary work process that aimed to challenge this polarisation by exploring more integrative and operative planning approaches to large-scale urban green structures, using the concept of resilience, both as a theoretical umbrella and in relation to a case study in Stockholm, Sweden. The exploration took the form of a series of workshops in which professionals from the fields of planning, urban design, ecology, landscape architecture, and environmental history, as well as city-wide and regional planning, took part. Throughout the process, tentative designs served as "touchstones", bringing questions from a theoretical level to a hands-on, specific, local context. This paper identifies three ways that resilience science can be useful in the planning and management of large urban green structures. Firstly, resilience can introduce complexity and thus make visible synergies and "win-win" situations within planning. Secondly, in highlighting change, resilience can offer alternatives to present conservationist perspectives on green space planning and thus offer constructive ways out of planning-related deadlocks. Thirdly, resilience can be advantageously combined with the concept of "legibility" in clarifying common goals and thus helping to build a constituency which will sustain large-scale green structures over time.

  • 4. Fagerholm, Nora
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Karl
    Eilola, Salla
    Giusti, Matteo
    Hasanzadeh, Kamyar
    Kajosaari, Anna
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Korpilo, Silviya
    Kyttä, Marketta
    Legeby, Ann
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Liu, Yu
    Præstholm, Søren
    Raymond, Christopher
    Rinne, Tiina
    Stahl Olafsson, Anton
    Barthel, Stephan
    Analysis of pandemic outdoor recreation and green infrastructure in Nordic cities to enhance urban resilience2022In: npj Urban Sustainability, E-ISSN 2661-8001, Vol. 2, no 1, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent empirical research has confirmed the importance of green infrastructure and outdoor recreation to urban people’s well- being during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, only a few studies provide cross-city analyses. We analyse outdoor recreation behaviour across four Nordic cities ranging from metropolitan areas to a middle-sized city. We collected map based survey data from residents (n = 469–4992) in spring 2020 and spatially analyse green infrastructure near mapped outdoor recreation sites and respondents’ places of residence. Our statistical examination reveals how the interplay among access to green infrastructure across cities and at respondents’ residential location, together with respondents’ socio-demographic profiles and lockdown policies or pandemic restrictions, affects outdoor recreation behaviour. The results highlight that for pandemic resilience, the history of Nordic spatial planning is important. To support well-being in exceptional situations as well as in the long term, green infrastructure planning should prioritise nature wedges in and close to cities and support small-scale green infrastructure

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    Fagerholm et al - Analysis of pandemic outdoor recreation (NPJUS, 2022)
  • 5.
    Freitas, Flavio L. M.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Brazilian land use policies and the development of ecosystem services2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Concerns related to global environmental changes due to land use changes have been driving international communities towards more sustainable land use systems. Brazil is a country of global strategic importance in this matter considering that it is the nation with the largest extension of preserved tropical native vegetation, recognised for its ecosystem services and high and unique biodiversity. Expansion of forestry and agriculture is taking place rapidly in Brazil, partly over degraded pastureland, but also over native vegetation. Regulating policies to govern and limit this expansion is crucial to ensure the preservation of the ecosystems services provided by native vegetation.  This thesis aims at improving the understanding of the potential impacts of prevailing public and private policies in the conservation of nature in Brazil. For this end, the Land Use Policy Assessment (LUPA) model was employed to evaluate potential pathways of implementation of the land use policies. Paper 1 evaluated the effects of current private and public command and control regulations in the protection of above-ground carbon stocks, identifying the most relevant stakeholders holding carbon stocks. The findings suggest that about 10% of carbon stocks are unprotected, where other policy instruments based on the market will be mostly required. Paper 2 performed an assessment of the mechanism for offsetting the legal deficit of native vegetation among landholders, evaluating the different offsetting implementation practices and their impacts on nature protection and socio-economic development. The results indicate that the offsetting mechanism may have little or no additional effects on protection of native vegetation and its ecosystem services because most of the offsetting is likely to take place where native vegetation is already protected by current legislations. However, it is viable to maximise environmental and socio-economic returns from the offsetting mechanism.

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    Lic-LWR-201701
  • 6.
    Freitas, Flavio L. M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Englund, Oskar
    Chalmers University, Energy and Environment.
    Sparovek, Gerd
    University of São Paulo, Soil Dep..
    Berndes, Göran
    Chalmers University, Energy and Environment.
    Guidotti, Vinicius
    d Institute of Agricultural and Forest Management and Certification – Imaflora.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Who owns the Brazilian carbon?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Lundström, Mats
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Urban Design In Sweden2012In: Urban Design Practice: An International Review / [ed] Sebastian Loew, London: RIBA - Royal Institute of British Architects Publishing , 2012, p. 96-112Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban Design Practice gives a fascinating account of the state of urban design practice across the world today. Packed with invaluable local knowledge from on-the-spot contributors, its global scope offers an armoury of background facts and figures to professionals interested in exporting their skills internationally. Along the way it reveals how urban design is practiced, identifies a multitude of key concerns and refines our understanding of what urban design (so often a nebulous concept) means.

    Aimed broadly at practitioners – masterplanners, architects, landscape architects, planners, civil engineers – and students and academics of these disciplines, twenty chapters analyse a different country’s urban design context. Fully illustrated and structured in a similar way, each chapter features a case study, general background economic statistics, and a handy ‘quick guide’ to the types of work available, the underlying legislation and tips for securing work. 

    Features chapters of the following countries: 

    Argentina, Australia, Brazil, China, the Czech Republic, Dubai, Egypt, England, France, Germany, India, Italy, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, South Africa, Spain, Sweden and the USA.

  • 8.
    Iqbal, Asifa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin. KTH.
    Wilhelmsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Park Proximity, Crime and Apartment Prices2019In: International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, ISSN 1753-8270, E-ISSN 1753-8289, ISSN 1753-8270, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 669-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parks and open green spaces are an important part of the city landscape. Although studies show that proximity to parks and open green spaces has a mostly positive impact on house prices, several studies also report that crime in parks can affect buyers’ perceptions, making nearby properties less desirable. We examine the effects of park proximity and crime in parks on apartment prices by using geographic information systems and hedonic modelling. Our results indicate that grass parks and park blocks are more desirable than landscape parks and neighbourhood parks in Stockholm. Our findings also confirm that parks in Stockholm’s city centre have a greater impact than parks on the periphery of Stockholm. Low-crime parks affect apartment prices positively.

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    fulltext
  • 9.
    Kajita, Heidi S.
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Hertopia: Women’s Swedish Welfare Landscapes of the 1960s and 1970s2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The welfare landscapes of the expansive modernist housing areas constructed in Sweden during the 1960s and 70s were developed using government-sanctioned ideas about universal citizens who would live, work, and play in identical ways. Designers developed housing blocks with modular room dimensions that would accommodate homogeneous furnishings, as well as standardized common landscapes like laundry spaces, playgrounds, traffic plans, and town centres. While these plans for collective living were envisioned to support women’s new roles in the labor market, women were at the same time imagined as housewives occupying auxiliary, specific roles in the areas of domestic work and leisure activities.

    When the national government’s modernist ideals about landscapes did not materialize into real built environments, tales about women’s everyday problems and travails came to the forefront. Moreover, reports about women’s difficulties in these common spaces became representative of the larger ‘problem of the suburb.’ These notions also became fixed in time, with few follow-up reports commissioned. We re-visit these popular historical views on the suburbs’ ‘failed landscapes.’ And from a feminist perspective, our research in widely divergent parts of Sweden (from Botkykra to Tibro to Helsingborg to Malmö to Skärholmen to Södertälje), we show that women residents’ affective and caring practices (Fraser, Hardt, Muehlebach, Tronto) challenge binary perspectives about welfare landscapes and, in particular, divisions such as work/pleasure, communal/individual, and unsafe/safe. Since the time of their construction, women’s individual and communal actions for local childcare and allotments, maintenance of playgrounds, and access to consumer goods became specific, local iterations of enduring and re-productive communities.

    Connecting government reports, building norms, media accounts from the mid-20th century, and interviews conducted with long- time women residents of five housing areas, we explore discrepancies between ideals, stigma, and tenants’ own accounts of their experiences and changes. How have working-, housewife-, and activist women co-opted and complicated concepts underpinning the welfare state’s supposedly unsuccessful utopias?

  • 10.
    Komu, Felician
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Housing Decay and Maintenance: The Case of Public Housing in Tanzania2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The dominant discourse in Tanzania is that home ownership is the most sustainable strategy towards solving housing problem. As a result, housing policy orientation has been towards promotion of home ownership through a land-housing linkage strategy that manifests in improvement of access to identified categories of people usually classified on resources constrained criterion. Rental housing has been observed from this study to have suffered a number of setbacks in history. Public rental housing featured prominently in the first Five-Year Development Plans (1964-69). In subsequent years and particularly with the demise of socialistic form of governance in the post 1992 era, attention has moved away from public rental housing to home-ownership strategies. Private rental housing on the other hand has never featured in the national policies until mid-2000s.

    This study investigates the future of public housing in Tanzania from a housing management perspective. Through interviews and direct observation in two case studies at Keko and Ubungo National Housing Corporation (NHC), it has been demonstrated that public housing in Tanzania has suffered neglect in terms of repair and maintenance for many years. The main reason as claimed was poor rent collection and low rent levels. The general finding of the study is public housing in Tanzania has been greatly influenced by employment policy changes. Public housing as construed by main actors in the study area is for public servants and largely government employees. Rental payment to the Public Housing Organization was usually through direct remittance from employees salaries by their employers. The Government in 2001 was the largest rent defaulter to NHC.

    Through a study on housing careers in Dar es Salaam, the study demonstrates the relationship that exists between landlords and tenants. With growing demand for accommodation, renta lsector has been shown to be the strategy that meets needs for newcomers to towns. The study also demonstrates how policy implications are influencing means of solving housing problem.

    The study urges public housing authorities to exploit all opportunities and in particular the social capital embedded in their tenants to help solve some of their maintenance problems.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 11. Kourtit, K.
    et al.
    Elmlund, P.
    Nijkamp, Peter
    KTH. Centre for the Future of Places (CFP).
    The urban data deluge: challenges for smart urban planning in the third data revolution2020In: International Journal of Urban Sciences, ISSN 1226-5934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effective urban planning is increasingly affected and governed by the current information society. This paper argues that the so-called third data revolution creates unprecedented challenges for sustainable city policy in the digital age. Three types of data revolutions are distinguished in this paper. The nowadays popular notion of smart cities may be helpful to enhance the cognitive quality of urban policy-making, but leads also to new issues on complex data handling in the modern age of social media and digital information systems. The various issues at stake are outlined in this paper, while this study is concluded with a sketch of the contours of a so-called smart city policy fly-wheel, so as to demonstrate that the urban fabric–also in a smart city context–is always work in progress, with a view to the achievement of sustainable development goals. Highlights The birth of the smart cities concept originates from the third data revolution. Sustainable city policy calls for smart data management. In the ‘New Urban World’ systematic data warehousing is needed. The tension between closed administrative city borders and open data systems can be bridged. The attainment of sustainable development goals (SDGs) presupposes smart city policy. 

  • 12.
    Larsson, Gerhard
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Spatial planning systems in Western Europe: An overview2006Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A general trend in our modern society is a growing complexity. It is therefore logical that in most countries there has been a definite tendency to give weight to issues of adapting also the physical space to this complexity and to find methods to do this in an efficient way, giving satisfactory use of land and other natural resources. During the twentieth century we have seen a very active development of legal instruments for this purpose, aimed at steering spatial planning and plan implementation according to the objectives and policies chosen. This book tries to present basic information of how different countries within the chosen area have tried to solve the problem of establishing suitable systems of steering spatial development by means of planning and implementation measures. For this purpose summary descriptions of the connected formal regulations in each country are given in an appendix while a comparative presentation and discussion forms the main text. This will give the interested reader an overview of the current systems in Western Europe, how they have influenced each other but still in many parts differ from each other.

  • 13.
    Laterrade, Mariana
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Greening practices in Swedish municipal planning: A comprehensive analysis of Upplands Väsby’s Detailed Development Plans2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing urbanization is pressing and degrading our ecosystems and compromising future generations. This scenario is expected to worsen unless significant action is scaled up. At the same time, the urban areas have the opportunity to be part of the solution, leading to a more resilient and sustainable future. Bringing nature back to cities is a powerful instrument that provides the opportunity to address sustainability challenges and benefit people and the environment.

    Hence, the aim of this study, framed on the REPLAN project, was to explore the integration of greening practices in the planning process in Upplands Väsby municipality during the last decade. Through a systematic literature mapping, this study investigated the integration of greening concepts in the municipality’s Detailed Development Plans. Furthermore, in-depth analysis and interpretation of the relevant Detailed Development Plans were conducted to explore which green and blue elements and structures were integrated, the drivers and instruments that foster its implementation and the actors involved in their planning process. The results show that the integration of greening concepts in the Detailed Development Plans presents a turning point in 2016, coincident with the introduction of Upplands Väsby’s Development plan for Ecosystem Services, revealing that political support at the municipal level enables the integration of greening concepts. Likewise, ecosystem services was the most integrated greening concept, pointing out a strong focus of the planning practice on ecosystem services. The most planned green and blue elements and structures are yards, courtyards and street trees and plants, whilst parks are generally integrated from the nearby environment. Moreover, the most protected green and blue elements and structures are street trees and plants. Water management, public health and well-being and biodiversity conservation are the main drivers for planning and protecting green and blue elements and structures, being also addressed by both the highest quantity and diversity of green and blue elements and structures. However, climate change mitigation and adaptation is barely the driver for planning green and blue elements and structures. Thus, this calls for the inclusion of a climate perspective in the planning processes. The key actors in planning green and blue elements and structures are the municipality, the developers and consulting companies. Besides, an innovative planning process that includes neighbours and other stakeholders in the early stages and financial incentives for implementing green and blue elements and structures was studied. The findings indicate that regulatory frameworks and binding instruments foster the integration of green and blue elements and structures in the planning practice. The outcomes also suggest that collaborative planning processes and hybrid market-driven approaches may contribute positively to integrating green and blue elements and structures.

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    fulltext
  • 14.
    Legeby, Ann
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Il cambiamento delle abitudini urbane in Svezia durante la pandemia di Coronavirus/The changing of urban habits during the Corona pandemic in Sweden2020In: FAMagazine, ISSN 2039-0491, Vol. 52-53, p. 198-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the Corona pandemic, extensive interventions have been introduced to limit the spread of Covid-19. Authorities, companies, and organi- sations introduce comprehensive restrictions. To capture new routines, we launched a web questionnaire (PPGIS) including maps in three cities in Sweden; Stockholm, Uppsala and Gothenburg. From the first month results, we see dramatic changes of habits. Places still used are primarily where people find service, while places people avoid are where they normally work or study. Places used more, are where people find seclusion; primarily green spaces and easy to access. This pandemic reinforces existing urban inequalities. Access to urban resources and green spaces becomes even more important in areas characterized by poverty and overcrowding.

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    Legeby A & D Koch -- The changing of urban habits during the Corona pandemic in Sweden (FAMagazine, 2020, EN)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Legeby A & D Koch -- Il cambiamento delle abitudini urbane in Svezia durante la pandemia di Coronavirus (FAMagazine, 2020, IT)
  • 15.
    Littke, Helene
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Becoming biophilic: Challenges and opportunities for biophilic urbanism in urban planning policy2016In: Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, ISSN 2046-6099, E-ISSN 2046-6102, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 15-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to discuss challenges and opportunities for the implementation of biophilic urbanism in urban green planning policy through a case study of the Green living Spaces plan in Birmingham, UK. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on document analysis and semi-structured interviews as a strategy of qualitative inquiry to identify the key tenets of biophilic urbanism and its implementation in Birmingham’s urban green space planning. Findings – Biophilic urbanism has its strength as an approach to create common visions and understandings of the many benefits of nature in cities, thus strengthening the position of urban green space planning. In Birmingham the potential for integrated policies connected to urban green space are shown and the concept can also be understood as a pragmatic tool to strengthen the position of urban green space policies locally as well as positioning Birmingham globally as a leading green city. At the same time challenges are connected to legal status, path dependency and leadership. Originality/value – Biophilic urbanism has gotten increased attention in academia and practice and this paper contributes with a novel case study discussing how the concept has been used and understood in the Birmingham context to discuss opportunities and challenges for actual implementation.

  • 16.
    Lundström, Mats Johan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Planering och hållbar bebyggelseutveckling i ett energi- och klimatperspektiv2010Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    ”Det kommunala planmonopolet” gör att kommunerna är viktiga aktörer i utmaningen att minska energianvändning och klimatpåverkan inom bebyggelse- och transportsektorerna, vilka står för en övervägande del av landets totala energianvändning. Den största potentialen i kommunernas planering och reglering av ny bebyggelse ligger i möjligheten att påverka bebyggelsens lokalisering och täthet, vilket har betydelse för resandets omfattning och val av transportsätt. Plan- och bygglagen (PBL) ger kommunerna vissa möjligheter att påverka energianvändningen och energitillförseln för ny bebyggelse, men de är tämligen begränsade. Variabler som mikroklimat och stadstyper med låg omslutningskvot påverkar bebyggelsens energianvändning i ett byggnadsfysiskt perspektiv, men ur ett administrativt perspektiv spelar detta ingen roll sedan energikraven i Boverkets byggregler sedan några år tillbaka ställer krav på hela byggnadens energiprestanda och inte på enskilda byggnadsdelar. Om byggreglernas krav istället skulle gälla byggnadens energianvändning i ett livscykelperspektiv skulle detta ge en mer rättvis bild samtidigt som planeringsfrågor som placering av bebyggelse och samt stadstyper skulle påverka energianvändningen. Vidare efterfrågas riktlinjer för hur användningen av elektricitet i bebyggelsesektorn ska miljöbedömas samt en statlig samsyn om elens roll ibland annat uppvärmnings- och transportsektorerna.

    Den stora effektiviseringspotentialen i bebyggelsesektorn finns dock i den befintliga bebyggelsen, vilket inte kan styras med vare sig markanvändningsreglering enligt PBL-planeringen eller Boverkets byggregler – det är fastighetsägarnas ansvar. Men planering kan omfatta så mycket mer än bara reglering. PBL:s organisation och krav på samrådsprocesser gör den kommunala planeringen till en viktig utvecklingsarena där såväl fastighetsägare som andra aktörer kan bjudas in att delta. Istället för ett traditionellt tvingande uppifrånperspektiv skulle den kommunala planeringen i högre grad kunna inta ett underifrånperspektiv och arbeta mer positivt och visa på möjligheterna att minska energianvändningen och få en mer hållbar energitillförsel, frågor som är bra både ur ett miljö- som ekonomiskt perspektiv. Planeringen skulle vidare behöva bli mer strategisk och genomförandeinriktad.

    I forsknings- och utvecklingsprogrammet Uthållig kommun fysisk planering har nya planeringsmetoder och -verktyg introducerats i fem kommuner, med syfte att integrera energi- och hållbarhetsaspekterna i den kommunala fysiska planeringen. En studie av den introducerade arbetsmetodiken visar att det går bra att kombinera rationella och kommunikativa planeringsmetoder och -verktyg. Det breda och inkluderande tillvägagångssättet har lett till att de deltagande har ökat sin kunskap om och sett större samband mellan planering, energi, bebyggelse och transporter, men även ökad förståelse för andra aktörers synsätt och kompetenser. Studien visar att såväl rationellt tänkande och expertkunskap som lokala, vardagliga erfarenheter och kunskaper är viktiga i planeringsprocessen. Det behövs kunskap om såväl processledning som sakkunskaper om exempelvis energi och miljöpåverkan.

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  • 17.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    A "Border Concept": Scandinavian Public Space in the 21st Century2020In: Architecture of Coexistence: Building Pluralism / [ed] Azra Akšamija, Berlin: Architangle , 2020, p. 172-183Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In July 2000, the Öresund Bridge opened between Sweden and Denmark, symbolizing the new borderless Europe and allowing a regional way of life. In 2015, this same bridge instead became the site of intense xenophobic attention. When asylum seekers fleeing the Syrian Civil War began crossing from Denmark to Sweden en masse, the border was hastily closed, clarifying that – for some – migrant publics were never included in the imaginary of this “public” transit space.  In this chapter, I examine three new public spaces in Sweden and Denmark that – in contrast to the bridge – explicitly include migrants as part of the public both creating and using them. Traveling, like the migrant, from arrival to settlement, I begin with Sandi Hilal’s Living Room for refugees in the northern Swedish city of Boden, where the right to hospitality is reclaimed in a private space made public. I then investigate Disorder Collective’s renovation of two public squares in a stigmatized Malmö neighborhood, where migrant children are included in an interactive design process. Crossing to Copenhagen, I conclude with Superkilen, which relies on the “extreme participation” of diverse local residents to create a park. Drawing on Giorgio Agamben’s notion of the refugee as a “border concept,” I argue that, as designers and migrants collaborate in these works, they also redraw the borders of both publics and public spaces for the Scandinavian 21st century.

  • 18. Mack, Jennifer
    Generous Harvest: Allotment Gardens and the Politics of Urban Green Space in Sweden2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Impossible Nostalgia: Green Affect in the Landscapes of the Swedish Million Programme2021In: Landscape research, ISSN 0142-6397, E-ISSN 1469-9710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The modernist neighbourhoods of the so-called Swedish Million Programme (1965–1974) were to house a new citizenry in utopian cities of the future, where nuclear families would live in optimal conditions and where ‘rational’ landscapes included playgrounds, courtyards, and traffic separation. Even so, they are ‘problem areas’ in current popular representations: places without history and thus unworthy of preservation. Radical proposals suggest their total demolition. Ethnographic research among residents, however, reveals alternative, multidimensional views instead. In parks, on bridges, and in tunnels, inhabitants have met friends, walked dogs, and sunbathed, often over decades. Their ‘green affect’ – expressed in reveries, poetry, stories, and caring suggestions for repair – challenges portrayals of the areas as disposable. Rather than suburbs without a future, residents express affection, longing, and even a seemingly impossible nostalgia for modernism’s outdoor spaces. This suggests the need for preservation and the inclusion of memories and feelings in planning processes.

  • 20.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Impossible Nostalgia: Growing Up in the ‘Concrete Suburbs’ of Sweden2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Infamous Environments: Intersecting Justice and Vulnerability in the Landscapes of the Swedish Million Program2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Mack, Jennifer
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    "Not Just Barberry": A Political Ecology of the Swedish ‘Concrete Suburbs,’ 1960-19812022In: Landscapes of Housing: Design and Planning in the History of Environmental Thinking / [ed] Jeanne Haffner, New York: Routledge , 2022, p. 125-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23. Mack, Jennifer
    Not Just Barberry: The Green Spaces of the Swedish ‘Concrete Suburbs,’ 1965-19902016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24. Mack, Jennifer
    The Right to the Garden: New and Old Allotments2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Mehaffy, Michael W.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Elmlund, Peter
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Public spaces and private conflicts in the new urban agenda2019In: Wit Transactions on Ecology and The Environment, ISSN 1746-448X, E-ISSN 1743-3541, Vol. 238, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The New Urban Agenda, developed at the UN-Habitat III conference on sustainable urban development and later adopted by consensus by 193 countries, includes nine paragraphs affirming the importance of robust public space networks for sustainable and functional cities. But what are the essential requirements for functional public space in cities? What are the current challenges and shortcomings – especially at a time of rapid urbanization, and the decline of public spaces in many cities? We report on a literature survey done by the Centre for the Future of Places at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, as part of a collaboration with UN-Habitat towards implementation of the New Urban Agenda. The literature provides ample evidence that public spaces are arenas for numerous potential conflicts, but also, if properly allocated and structured, places of peaceful co-presence, creative interaction, participation, and co-production. Furthermore, a critical aspect of successful public space is the ability to self-organise into a structure of territorial regions, combining private interiors with connective public edges. We discuss larger lessons for city structure, design and development strategy, and sustainable urbanisation for the future.

  • 26.
    Muyonjo, Geoffrey
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    An assessment of the planning and building system in Uganda: A case of Kampala City2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is about assessing the planning and building system in Kampala City. Specifically the research is based on four objectives that is to say: describing the current process in planning, approval and supervision of building developments in the city, finding out the requirements for obtaining a building and occupation permit, evaluation of the efficiency and effectiveness of the current planning and building legislation and lastly proposing measures that will strengthen the planning, approval and supervision of building developments in the city.

    The review of the literature indicates that some scholars have written about developments springing up without proper urban planning and development control requirements, and little has been indicated on the reasons why. This research was intended to fill that slit. The methodology used in this study was both qualitative and quantitative. The interviews and review of documents were the major tools of data collection.

    The findings indicate that the building plan approval process is a long bureaucratic procedure full of many repetitions which need to be scrapped to ease the whole process for the applicants. The legislations are on paper but implementation is not in attendance. There is evidence from field observations that many buildings have been occupied before they are finished or have been abandoned unfinished for a longer time than acceptable by the law.

    There is need, therefore to reform the planning and building legislation to replace and harmonize all laws pertaining to planning and building to foster a meaningful and manageable planning, building and administrative processes in the country.

  • 27.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Zetterberg, Andreas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Urban landscape ecological approaches - Lessons from integrating biodiversity and habitat modelling in planningManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Radon, Louise
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Municipal Narratives on Integration and Application of Green Infrastructure and Nature-based Solutions: A study of five municipalities in Stockholm County2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Green terms to bring the greenery back to cities have frequently begun to be coined as a result of rapid urbanization. To emphasize the benefits of urban greenery, terms such as nature-based solutions (NbS) and green infrastructure (GI) have been raised in planning circles. This study aims to present municipal stories about how municipalities understand, integrate and apply NbS and GI in their planning documents and practices, and what challenges they face along the different levels of the Swedish planning system, which limit their application. The study is based on individual focus group discussions with five municipalities: Haninge, Nynäshamn, Sollentuna, Solna and Värmdö. The discussions are based on the same questionnaire, where GI and NbS application, understanding and integration from Swedish spatial planning are discussed. The study shows that knowledge and application of GI and NbS varies between the municipalities. The municipalities are also in unison that they need support and further guidance to increase application and understanding, as the Swedish planning system currently does not provide this. The municipalities that contributed to the study also talk about their different conditions for a wider application of green terms and working methods, as these are governed by economics and politics. For further research on municipal application, conversations with politicians can be initiated for their point of view on how greening concepts are received by them in the municipalities, as well as conversations with organizations and authorities that distribute information, municipal legislation and guidance.

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  • 29.
    Rahman, Mohammed Anisur
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Development opportunities for the new waterfront in south side of Kungsholmen in terms of tourism and recreation:: an urban design approach to vibrant urban waterfront development in Stockholm2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

     

    This papers aims to discuss the potentiality of tourism and recreation in Stockholm by developing its waterfronts. Waterfronts neighbourhood of south side of Kungsholmen has been taken as a case study which has lots of potentiality to develop in terms of tourism and recreations. Urban waterfronts planning and redevelopment is currently a civic interest which consists of both challenges as well as opportunities. It has adapted different significant in different urban cultures. Waterfronts by the side of Kungsholmen are unique and valuable resources of Stockholm. However, most of the waterfronts recreation grounds are not well designed and located or not properly linked with the nearby tourist destinations. The goal of the study is to create good quality recreation space along the waterfronts of the south side of Kungsholmen and connect them with the central tourist spots of Gamlastan. The study has done through literature reviews of overseas examples to formulate the performance criteria that help to evaluate the existing quality of waterfront recreation development and to formulate the urban design guidelines. The study will take a macro level study on the entire waterfronts area.

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  • 30.
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Mårtensson, Fredrika
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept People & Soc, Box 190, S-23422 Lomma, Sweden..
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Informat & Media, Box 513, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Litsmark, Anna
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept People & Soc, Box 190, S-23422 Lomma, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Architecture & Built Environm, Box 118, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Hedblom, Marcus
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Urban & Rural Dev, Box 7012, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Raustorp, Anders
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Food & Nutr & Sport Sci, Box 300, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ghilagaber, Gebrenegus
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Stat, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zhu, Hui
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Business and Financial Systems. Uppsala Univ, Dept Informat & Media, Box 513, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nature and digitalization challenging the traditional playground2024In: Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, ISSN 1618-8667, E-ISSN 1610-8167, Vol. 93, article id 128148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Playing outdoors in nature with peers has been attributed most importance for children's healthy development but is increasingly marginalized because of the attractiveness of screen-based play. Careful merging of digital technology into outdoor play environments rich on nature elements could potentially help bridge digital play with more traditional play activities outdoors. A systematic comparison was made of outdoor play in more or less green settings, with and without digital installations or traditional play equipment. The separate and combined role of digital artefacts, play equipment and natural elements, were investigated, with particular focus on the effects of merging digital materials into nature. A group of children aged 6-8 were involved in a field study in a three-week period playing in a traditional playground, a forest and in a forest with digitally enhanced play artefacts. Children ' s play behavior was evaluated using a behavioral tracking method, a questionnaire and a contextual interview with the children, and a physical activity measure, in combination with inventories including maps to document the design, and the ecological and physical status of the settings. The study documents differences in children's play behavior across the three settings. It differs most between the digital forest setting and the forest setting regarding the play categories imaginative play, physical play and rule play and the digital forest setting stands out when it comes to expressive play. It is discussed how particular attributes in the physical environment influence the overall play flow and the interactive effects of natural material and digital material. Ecologically, the forest and the forest with digitally enhanced artefacts were more diverse than the traditional playground, but the natural material present was important for play in all settings.

  • 31.
    Sandström, U G
    et al.
    Univ Orebro, Dept Nat Sci, Ctr Landscape Ecol, Orebro.
    Angelstam, P
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Fac Forest Sci, Sch Forest Engineers, Skinnskatteberg.
    Khakee, Abdul
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Urban comprehensive planning - identifying barriers for the maintenance of functional habitat networks2006In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 75, no 1-2, p. 43-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maintaining biodiversity requires a wise combination of protection, management and recreation of habitats to secure representative and functional habitat networks. As urbanisation is increasing worldwide. town and cities are becoming the most common habitat for humankind. Accordingly, the urban landscape is becoming increasingly important for maintaining biodiversity on site, as well as for understanding the concept of biodiversity in general, and its maintenance in urban landscapes. We evaluated the extent to which Swedish urban planners experience barriers when using comprehensive planning as a tool for the maintenance of biodiversity through the provision of sufficient quantity and quality of green space. All of the six large Swedish cities, having had constant relative population growth since the beginning of the 19th century were chosen as case studies. We first defined a normative model for planning urban biodiversity and operationalised this concept by using landscape ecological principles. Structured in-depth interviews were then carried out with three planners in each city. The respondents were asked about their interest, ability, and knowledge concerning planning for functional networks of green spaces in relation to the normative model. The in-depth interviews with 18 urban planners indicated that legislation was an important driver for green space planning that they paid attention to new knowledge concerning recreation values and public health, but that biodiversity maintenance was not a high priority. There was a general agreement that local governments lack necessary resources to plan for biodiversity. A majority of the respondents mentioned geographical information systems (GIS) as an important tool to integrate knowledge about biodiversity in the planning process, and to evaluate likely consequences caused by deviations from current structure plans related to an efficient use of urban green spaces to maintain biodiversity. However, an evaluation of the answers revealed that the respondents had actually overestimated their capacity to implement the normative model. To conclude, the unanimous view was that planners were interested in the maintenance of biodiversity, but were limited by knowledge and by personnel lacking suitable qualifications, as well as by inadequate organisations. Only a minority of the respondents thought that local governments should have resources for biodiversity conservation planning. Finally, we discuss how the implementation of biodiversity policies could be improved by better integration of natural and social sciences in education and policy implementation.

  • 32.
    Schalk, Meike
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Between Different Worlds, Feminine Practices2000In: MAMA (magasin för modern arkitektur), no 26, p. 70-71Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Starostina, Alexandra
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Redevelopment of Skeppsbron quay in Stockholm, Sweden2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 34.
    Wang, Pengfei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Wang, Jiayi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    A Living Story of Parks: Urban History Research of Stockholmsskolan2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Our thesis started with a continuous discovery of theory and observation. As a group work of landscape architect and architect, during the study of our Urbanism program, we were both curious about the urbanism theories within Europe. Among them, partly in terms of the landscape background, we were particularly interested in the theory of landscape urbanism and its practices in Europe. Spontaneously, this became our original thesis topic.

      However, after reading and collecting, we realized landscape urbanism theory was never as a main agenda in European academic world as in U.S. On the contrary, the role of landscape in urbanization is unignorable and has been examined for decades in Europe, which is one thing what landscape urbanists try to achieve. Moreover, during our reading of Swedish landscape and planning history, we noticed a series of significant parks which were built between 1930s-1950s, belong to a hardly forgotten design style named Stockholm School (Stockholmsskolan). This particular style and period of time is a fundamental part of Swedish landscape and planning history, deeply influenced the following park design as well as city planning in Stockholm. Almost all the parks of Stockholmsskolan nowadays become attractive spots for citizens gathering together, relaxing, and doing outdoor activities. Some of the parks are our personal favorite places in the city. Nevertheless, we choose this study not only to appreciate the significant parks but also to try to introduce them to other readers who might not be familiar with, especially to those who live outside of Europe with a different natural and cultural context.

      Our brief study could be the start of further research, and the tool of photography plays a key role in different stages of our thesis. As K.W. Gullers introduced Swedish lifestyle to the world through a photo about life in park seventy years ago, it would also be our honor if our booklet could interest readers to appreciate and rediscover the contemporary Swedish public space and urban life.

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    A Living Story of Parks
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    Liv i parken
  • 35.
    Wang, Wei
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Renovation and Renewal of Harbour Area in Helsingborg2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The project site in Helsingborg is located on a pier in a harbour area in Öresund, in Sweden’s southernmost province of Skåne. Helsingborg is Sweden’s eighth largest city. It is a densely built urban city, with a large former port area under redevelopment.

    The project site covers an old warehouse building - Magasin 405, and its surrounding plot. The goal is to re-use and repurpose the warehouse into a attractive meeting place in the city, while adding building volumes and public space to accommodate public activities and housing units within the project site.

    The new proposal is aiming to revatalize the waterfront area of Oceanhamnen (the Ocean Harbour) and help connect the segregated neighbourhoods ’North’ and ’South’ (”Norr” and ”Söder”) of the city centre. The renovation of Magasin 405 will make the waterfront district, and the city as a whole,more dynamic.

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  • 36.
    Wu, Chia-Jung
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Sweden.
    Antonson, H.
    The struggle to achieve holistic landscape planning: Lessons from planning the E6 road route through Tanum World Heritage Site, Sweden2017In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 67, p. 167-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the EU introduced the European Landscape Convention (ELC) in 2000, the landscape has received growing attention in spatial planning and environmental impact assessments. To promote implementation of the ELC, the Swedish National Heritage Board proposed its Landscape Vision 2020, which addresses the goal of a ‘holistic landscape policy’. This study examined challenges and benefits brought by such a holistic approach to handling landscape protection/management within four issues in planning practice, namely cross-sector cooperation, local participation, integrating culture and nature, and bridging past and future. The analysis focused on a controversial road project passing through a World Heritage Site in Sweden. The results showed that the four issues were closely interlinked. In the case study, a new wave of cross-sector cooperation at authority level was observed, but it was also found to dominate the entire planning process and eventually limit the achievement of the other three issues. In conclusion, this study identified institutional culture and political context as key explanatory factors for understanding how the ELC and a holistic landscape view can be implemented in national practice.

  • 37.
    Zalejska-Jonsson, Agnieszka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Business and Financial Systems.
    Wilkinson, S.
    University of Technology Sydney NSW2007 Australia.
    Wahlund, R.
    Stockholm School of Economics, S-11383 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cunningham, R.
    University of Technology Sydney NSW2007 Australia.
    Green spaces in housing development - Buyers' preferences2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globally, extreme weather events are occurring more often, with increased intensity due to anthropogenic climate change. For example, in July 2022, monthly average temperature in Spain was 2.7 C above average, and UK has recorded temperatures above 40 degrees for the first time. It has been proven that implementation of green spaces in cities helps to address environmental, social, and even economic problems by providing ecological services, reducing temperature, and attenuating the heat island effect, providing aesthetic enjoyment, recreational opportunities and decreased stress levels. However, green infrastructure is rarely prioritised by developers. It has been argued that, due to space constraints, green infrastructures are an inefficient land use, costly to maintain, and that there is uncertainty if green infrastructures are valued by the market. This paper reports on results from a study examining the attractiveness and the effect of green spaces on housing market customer' perceptions. To analyse the impact of green spaces, we worked with landscape architects and residential housing developers designing a multi apartment building with a courtyard. The courtyard area was designed accordance to The Green Area Factor resulting in five courtyard designs, each with a different level of greenery. All five designs were presented in dynamic virtual views and embedded in a survey questionnaire. Maintenance costs of all five green spaces were calculated. The findings shows that greenery does effect the perceived attractiveness of residential development. Maintenance costs for the courtyards, with lowest and highest level of greenery, differ by approximately 10 percent of the total maintenance costs. These findings are applicable in the context of new housing construction and renovation projects.

  • 38.
    Zalejska-Jonsson, Agnieszka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Business and Financial Systems.
    Wilkinson, Sara
    University Technology Sydney (UTS), Australia .
    Wahlund, Richard
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Cunningham, Rebecca
    University Technology Sydney (UTS), Australia.
    Green paradise or Concrete Castles: Apartment buyer perceptions & green infrastructure2023Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Incorporating green spaces, green roofs and walls, trees, and grassy areas in cities can significantly improve the climate. It has been shown that green areas absorb more intense rainfall, facilitating the management of large water volumes and protecting against flooding (Alexander et al., 2019). In densely developed urban areas, green roofs, facades, and walls, as well as a general enhancement of urban biodiversity, contribute to improved air quality and the creation of spaces for social interaction and relaxation (Derkzen et al., 2017).

    The overarching aim of this study is to explore if, and how, green infrastructure, which is often understood as greenness surrounding residential development, influences potential buyers’ appraisal of the development and, if that has an effect on the buyers’ willingness to pay price. In this study we have specifically focused on following:

     •           the potential buyers’ interest in an apartment for sale in a development, and;

    •             the initial willingness to pay (WTP) for such an apartment, before entering the bidding process,

    •              aiming to isolate the effect which the level of greenness may have on the buyers’ perception, and the direct and indirect effect on the interest and the price buyer is willing to pay.

    To answer these research questions, we developed two hypothetical structural causal models. We have identified factors which effect the decision-making process and the price the customer is willingness to pay for a dwelling. We have stated several hypotheses, which we then tested, to increase our understanding of customer preferences regarding green infrastructure in a residential development. In order to test the model and the hypothesis, we designed a survey with an embedded experiment. We collected data in Sweden and in Australia from 2020 to 2022. This report presents results and summaries findings from the study

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    Green paradise or Concrete Castles
  • 39.
    Zetterberg, Andreas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Network Based Tools and Indicators for Landscape Ecological Assessments, Planning, and Design2009Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Land use change constitutes a primary driving force in shaping social-ecological systems world wide, and its effects reach far beyond the directly impacted areas. Graph based landscape ecological tools have become established as a promising way to efficiently explore and analyze the complex, spatial systems dynamics of ecological networks in physical landscapes. However, little attention has been paid to making these approaches operational within ecological assessments, physical planning, and design. This thesis presents a network based, landscape-ecological tool that can be implemented for effective use by practitioners within physical planning and design, and ecological assessments related to these activities. The tool is based on an ecological profile system, a common generalized network model of the ecological infrastructure, graph theoretic metrics, and a spatially explicit, geographically defined representation, deployable in a GIS. Graph theoretic metrics and analysis techniques are able to capture the spatio-temporal dynamics of complex systems, and the generalized network model places the graph theoretic toolbox in a geographically defined landscape. This provides completely new insights for physical planning, and environmental assessment activities. The design of the model is based on the experience gained through seven real-world cases, commissioned by different governmental organizations within Stockholm County. A participatory approach was used in these case studies, involving stakeholders of different backgrounds, in which the tool proved to be flexible and effective in the communication and negotiation of indicators, targets, and impacts. In addition to successful impact predictions for alternative planning scenarios, the tool was able to highlight critical ecological structures within the landscape, both from a system-centric, and a site-centric perspective. In already being deployed and used in planning, assessments, inventories, and monitoring by several of the involved organizations, the tool has proved to effectively meet some of the challenges of application in a multidisciplinary landscape.

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  • 40.
    Zetterberg, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Making graph theory operational for landscape ecological assessments, planning, and design2010In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 181-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graph theory and network analysis have become established as promising ways to efficiently explore and analyze landscape or habitat connectivity. However, little attention has been paid to making these graph-theoretic approaches operational within landscape ecological assessments, planning. and design. In this paper, a set of both theoretical and practical methodological developments are presented to address this issue. In highly fragmented landscapes, many species are restricted to moving among small, scattered patches of different resources. instead of one, large patch. A life-cycle based approach is therefore introduced, in which a metapatch is constructed, spanning over these resources, scattered across the landscape. The importance of spatially explicit and geographically defined representations of the network in urban and regional planning and design is stressed, and appropriate, context-dependent visualizations of these are suggested based on experience from real-world planning cases. The study moves beyond the issue of conservation of currently important structures, and seeks to identify suitable redesigns of the landscape to improve its social-ecological qualities, or increase resilience. By introducing both a system-centric and a site-centric analysis, two conflicting perspectives can be addressed. The first answers the question "what can I do for the network", and the second, "what can the network do for me". A method for typical planning strategies within each of these perspectives is presented. To illustrate the basic principles of the proposed methods, an ecological study on the European common toad (Bufo bufo) in Stockholm. Sweden is presented, using the betweenness centrality index to capture important stepping-stone structures.

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