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  • 1.
    Abbes, Yacine
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Educational studies in heat and power technology: how students learn with multimedia tools and problem-based learning2005Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education is undergoing continuous changes and new learning tools and methods are implemented. Researchers in education do not always agree upon the effectiveness of some of the methods introduced into engineering education. The present thesis consists of two case studies on educational methods introduced at the Department of Energy Technology, at Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden. The qualitative research methodology has been used in case one and a combination of qualitative and quantitative methodology has been used in the second case. The sources of evidences consisted of: unstructured interviews, analysis of video recording, questionnaires, and analysis of a variety of documents. In the first case, an educational program in heat and power technology was analysed. The second case consists in an in-depth study of group dynamics in a Problem –Based Learning course. These studies showed that the learning approach adopted by students depends strongly on the way they view the particular learning tool or method. The first case study revealed the existence of two types of learners. Surfacelearners follow the structure suggested by the designers of the multimedia program. This category of learners focuses only on the material available in the program. Deep-learners go beyond the information and the structure suggested in the program and combine different learning tools in their learning. These students do not follow the structure of the tutorials’ of the multimedia program. This study showed that students who had a strong view how to learn with a multimedia program or a learning method benefited less from the learning tools available. Students with weak views on how to learn from educational program or leaning tool benefit less from the presentation and engage in more surface learning. Self-motivated learners use the multimedia presentation in novel ways and crosscheck the information given with other material. The second study showed that students have unclear and weak views on how to learn with student-directed Problem- Based Learning model. Four types of learners were identified in Problem-Based Learning project: Leaders, Key Actors, Common Students and Social Loafers. Leaders and Key Actors are self-motivated individuals and participate most in the projects. Students who viewed themselves or were viewed as leaders were held responsible to take most of the decisions and students expected them to work more than the average student. Students who viewed themselves as common team members expected a lower workload than leaders’. Key Actors are self-motivated students who do not view themselves as separate from other group members but who participate more than others. Leaders learned more group and social processes, that they did not fully take part in, while common students learned more from the project management aspects that they did not take part in. The study also found that Problem-Based Learning groups can become very cohesive, and can develop distorted views on how to learn with Problem-Based Learning, and un-common group dynamics phenomena such as groupthink can occur in Problem-Based Learning setting.

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  • 2.
    Abdelgalil, Mohammed Saqr
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Univ Eastern Finland, Sch Comp, Joensuu Campus,Yliopistokatu 2,POB 111, FI-80100 Joensuu, Finland..
    Lopez-Pernas, Sonsoles
    Univ Politecn Madrid, ETSI Telecomunicac, Dept Ingn Sistemas Telemat, Avda Complutense 30, Madrid 28040, Spain..
    The longitudinal trajectories of online engagement over a full program2021In: Computers and education, ISSN 0360-1315, E-ISSN 1873-782X, Vol. 175, article id 104325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Student engagement has a trajectory (a timeline) that unfolds over time and can be shaped by different factors including learners' motivation, school conditions, and the nature of learning tasks. Such factors may result in either a stable, declining or fluctuating engagement trajectory. While research on online engagement is abundant, most authors have examined student engagement in a single course or two. Little research has been devoted to studying online longitudinal engagement, i.e., the evolution of student engagement over a full educational program. This learning analytics study examines the engagement states (sequences, successions, stability, and transitions) of 106 students in 1396 course enrollments over a full program. All data of students enrolled in the academic year 2014-2015, and their subsequent data in 2015-2016, 2016-2017, and 2017-2018 (15 courses) were collected. The engagement states were clustered using Hidden Markov Models (HMM) to uncover the hidden engagement trajectories which resulted in a mostly-engaged (33% of students), an intermediate (39.6%), and a troubled (27.4%) trajectory. The mostly-engaged trajectory was stable with infrequent changes, scored the highest, and was less likely to drop out. The troubled trajectory showed early disengagement, frequent dropouts and scored the lowest grades. The results of our study show how to identify early program disengagement (activities within the third decile) and when students may drop out (first year and early second year).

  • 3.
    Abdelgalil, Mohammed Saqr
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    López-Pernas, S.
    Idiographic learning analytics: A single student (N=1) approach using psychological networks2021In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, CEUR-WS , 2021, p. 16-22Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent findings in the field of learning analytics have brought to our attention that conclusions drawn from cross-sectional group-level data may not capture the dynamic processes that unfold within each individual learner. In this light, idiographic methods have started to gain grounds in many fields as a possible solution to examine students' behavior at the individual level by using several data points from each learner to create person-specific insights. In this study, we introduce such novel methods to the learning analytics field by exploring the possible potentials that one can gain from zooming in on the fine-grained dynamics of a single student. Specifically, we make use of Gaussian Graphical Models -an emerging trend in network science- to analyze a single student's dispositions and devise insights specific to him/her. The results of our study revealed that the student under examination may be in need to learn better self-regulation techniques regarding reflection and planning. 

  • 4. Abele, Eberhard
    et al.
    Chryssolouris, George
    Sihn, Wilfried
    Metternich, Joachim
    ElMaraghy, Hoda
    Seliger, Guenther
    Franzén Sivard, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    ElMaraghy, Waguih
    Hummel, Vera
    Tisch, Michael
    Seifermann, Stefan
    Learning factories for future oriented research and education in manufacturing2017In: CIRP annals, ISSN 0007-8506, E-ISSN 1726-0604, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 803-826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning factories present a promising environment for education, training and research, especially in manufacturing related areas which are a main driver for wealth creation in any nation. While numerous learning factories have been built in industry and academia in the last decades, a comprehensive scientific overview of the topic is still missing. This paper intends to close this gap by establishing the state of the art of learning factories. The motivations, historic background, and the didactic foundations of learning factories are outlined. Definitions of the term learning factory and the corresponding morphological model are provided. An overview of existing learning factory approaches in industry and academia is provided, showing the broad range of different applications and varying contents. The state of the art of learning factories curricula design and their use to enhance learning and research as well as potentials and limitations are presented. Conclusions and an outlook on further research priorities are offered. (C) 2017 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of CIRP.

  • 5.
    Abeywecra, Ruchira
    et al.
    OUSL, Dept Mech Engn, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka..
    Scnanavakc, Nihal S.
    OUSL, Dept Mech Engn, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka..
    Jayasuriya, Jeevan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Fransson, Torsten H.
    EIT InnoEnergy, Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    A Remote Mode High Quality International Master Degree Program in Environomical Pathways for Sustainable Energy Systems (SELECT) -Pilot Program Experiences During First Year of Studies2018In: PROCEEDINGS OF 2018 IEEE GLOBAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION CONFERENCE (EDUCON) - EMERGING TRENDS AND CHALLENGES OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION, IEEE , 2018, p. 276-284Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remote mode study programs at master degree level are becoming more popular than undergraduate level programs. Students after graduation with Bachelors degree very often are employed and the most appropriate mode for them to pursue higher studies is the remote mode. Postgraduate programs with one or two year duration mostly focus on specific areas of research based industrial application. Traditional remote education is thought to be more centered on web based on-line programs with a little opportunity for teacher student interaction and interaction with peers. In such programs motivation for studies has been a problem and as a result many students drop off and also those remain in the program for prolonged periods do not show good performance. One of the reasons for failures of students in remote studies is the isolation leading to discouragement for the completion studies. A remote mode Master Degree Program in Environomical Pathways for Sustainable Energy Systems (MSc-SELECT), consisting of a number of innovative features aimed at improved student engagement, motivation, exposure to experiences in multi-national setting and team work, was developed and implemented by the Master School of the EIT-InnoEnergy, as a pilot project. The program was offered, collaboratively and simultaneously to students in three locations, Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya in Spain and the Open University of Sri Lanka. The students in Sweden and Spain each followed 50% of the courses on-campus and 50% in remote mode depending upon the university they registered with. The students in Sri Lanka followed the entire 1st year fully remotely. All the students (from KTH, OUSL and UPC) will spend the 2nd year on-campus at another university in the consortium. This paper discusses, from the perspective of the fully remote site, the remote program with its innovative aspects, student performance and experience together with future tasks for making the program viable and beneficial to all partner countries.

  • 6. Adolfsen, Nina
    et al.
    Bennedsen, JensBirkkjær Lauritsen, AageEdström, KristinaKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.Kuptasthien, NathaRoslöf, JanneSonger, Robert
    Proceedings of the 15th International CDIO Conference2019Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Adolfsson, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI).
    Simuleringsstöd för modeller i fysikundervisning2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report is part of my master thesis, concerning the subject of how to develop a simulation tool for teaching physics, mainly focused on the concept of force and free body diagrams as taught in secondary schools. The work is based on previous studies on how to design a digital tool for teaching environments. The final result is not to be considered as a finished product but more as a prototype of a product of this nature. The report also stresses the importance of the fact that programs of this kind can't alone give students understanding, instead it places greater demands on teachers and the teaching environment. The program is meant to be used, exactly as mentioned in this report, as a support tool for teachers and students, to facilitate physics teaching and the understanding of the concept of force, by adding the possibility to be able to draw and test free body diagrams.

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  • 8. Agélii Genlott, Annika
    et al.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Viberg, Olga
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Andersson, Annika
    Leading dissemination of digital, science-based innovation in school–a case study2021In: Interactive Learning Environments, ISSN 1049-4820, E-ISSN 1744-5191, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalizing school is a process that comes with challenges. It requires strategic leadership and transformational change to work processes. Nevertheless, some succeed, and it is useful to understand what makes for success. This paper studies the challenges of leading digitalization of education in a city which decided to implement an IT-supported method for teaching literacy in primary schools. The method required transformational change; teachers not only had to learn to use technologies, they also had to review their pedagogy. This study is guided by the Diffusion of Innovation theory and draws on interviews with school principals. We find that the critical factors relate to the communication channel, the social system within and across schools, and the time perspective.

  • 9.
    Ahlberg, Victor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Frid, Julia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Automation and Autonomy: Developing and Evaluating Open Learning Material on IR Cameras in Automation Applications2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master thesis project was based on the development and evaluation of an open learning material in thermal imaging for automation applications. The outsourcer – FLIR Systems – wanted a three-day course covering all necessary topics for infrared cameras in automation applications. These topics include thermography, optics, detectors, networks, protocols, and more. The open learning material was designed to function as a three-day, self-paced, distance course, and it was based on theories of andragogy, self-directed learning and transformative learning. The master thesis process was essentially divided into two phases: the development phase and the evaluation phase. The method for the development phase was based on a literature study. The literature on creating open learning material included ways of compensating for the lack of social interaction in distance courses, such as a friendly, warm narrator using the pronoun “I”, encouraging phrases, and self-assessment questions (SAQs). An SAQ is a framing of question intended to guide the learner towards self-assessment of his or her learning and knowledge. The vital part of the SAQ is the response, where not only the correct answer is given, but feedback on the wrong choices too. The development of the open learning material was an iterative process where discussion with supervisors at FLIR Systems and KTH Royal Institute of Technology led to improvements of the material.

    The evaluation phase consisted of two tests with test subjects. The first test was conducted by sending a sample unit of the material to test subjects around the world along with a questionnaire. The main objective was to test the tone and style of the material. There were variations in the result, but the majority found the material friendly and readable. The second test was an in-house test with three participants. Three sample units of the material was used, and the main objective was to test the usability of the material and the test subjects’ perceived learning process. The usability of the material varied with the three test subjects and depended on their technological prerequisites and reading comprehension in English. All test subjects responded positively to their perceived learning outcome.

    The following conclusions were drawn: the open learning material has the potential to promote autonomous and self-directed learners and can be used as a basis for further development – such as web-based courses and teacher-led classes.

    The open learning material as a whole and the results and analysis from the tests are included as appendices.

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  • 10.
    Ahlbom, Håkan
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Bjelksäter, Ylva
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Hartell, Eva
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Cooperative Methods for Investigating the Influence of Swedish Compulsory Technology Education2009In: Strengthening the Position of Technology Education in the Curriculum. Pupils Attitudes Towards Technology: Proceedings PATT-22 Conference / [ed] Arien Bekker, Ilja Mottier, Marc J. de Vries, Delft, 2009, p. 6-13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      Why is the interest for technical education decreasing? What makes other fields of education more popular? Technology was introduced as a mandatory subject in Swedish compulsory school in 1980 and got its own syllabus when the current national curriculum was introduced in 1994. Each school can decide when and how the pupils get technology education, but every pupil is expected and entitled to reach the national goals. One of the goals of the Swedish compulsory school is to develop an interest for technology as well as capability and judgment in handling technical issues. In order to find out if pupils reach the national goals in Technology three different Ph.D. projects are launched in Swedish schools. How do we actually know that pupils learn what they are entitled to? How is the Technology syllabus interpreted, in theory and practice? Does the Technology subject really develop an interest in technology, and does it inspire to further technical studies? The interpretation of the syllabus will be studied through observations. To get answers, whether the Technology subject has any impact on the interest and the choice of further studies, interviews are made among pupils and teachers in compulsory school as well as in upper secondary school. The findings of the cooperating projects will together contribute with answers about the state of the technology education in the Swedish compulsory school system, and how the subject could be developed in the future.

  • 11.
    Ahluwalia, Arti
    et al.
    Univ Pisa, Dept Ingn Informaz, Bioengn, Pisa, Italy..
    De Maria, Carmelo
    Univ Pisa, Dept Ingn Informaz, Bioengn, Pisa, Italy..
    Diaz Lantada, Andres
    UPM, ETSII, Dept Mech Engn, Madrid, Spain..
    Madete, June
    Univ Pisa, Res Ctr E Piaggio, Pisa, Italy.;Kenyatta Univ, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Makobore, Philippa Ngaju
    Uganda Ind Res Inst, Instrumentat Div, Kampala, Uganda..
    Ravizza, Alice
    Univ Pisa, Pisa, Italy..
    Di Pietro, Licia
    Mridha, Mannan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Munoz-Guijosa, Juan Manuel
    UPM, ETSII, Dept Mech Engn, Madrid, Spain..
    Tanarro, Enrique Chacon
    UPM, ETSII, Dept Mech Engn, Madrid, Spain..
    Torop, Janno
    Tartu Ulikool, Inst Technol, Tartu, Estonia..
    Biomedical Engineering Project Based Learning: Euro-African Design School Focused on Medical Devices2018In: International Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0949-149X, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 1709-1722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomedical engineering (BME) has the potential of transforming medical care towards universal healthcare by means of the democratization of medical technology. To this end, innovative holistic approaches and multidisciplinary teams, built upon the gathering of international talent, should be encouraged within the medical industry. However, these transformations can only be accomplished if BME education also continuously evolves and focuses on the internationalization of students, the promotion of collaborative design strategies and the orientation towards context relevant medical needs. In this study we describe an international teaching-learning experience, the "UBORA (Swahili for 'excellence') Design School". During an intensive week of training and collaboration 39 engineering students lived through the complete development process for creating innovative open-source medical devices following the CDIO ("conceivedesign-implement-operate") approach and using the UBORA e-infrastructure as a co-design platform. Our post-school survey and analyses showed that this integral teaching-learning experience helped to promote professional skills and could nurture the future generation of biomedical engineers, who could transform healthcare technology through collaborative design oriented to open source medical devices.

  • 12.
    Ahmed, Helin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Utvärdering av en digital internutbildning för hållbar utveckling inom byggbranschen2024Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the construction sector, education and knowledge transfer play a significant role in promoting sustainability. The impact of the training depends on its implementation and context. A careful evaluation of the use and effectiveness of training is essential to optimize results and provide the necessary knowledge and skills to address sustainability challenges. Unfortunately, a lack of balance between environmental, economic and social aspects in sustainability education can limit the individual's opportunities to effectively deal with sustainability issues in practice. In order to successfully promote sustainability in the construction sector, a deeper understanding of the implementation of education and the integration of knowledge into the work of employees is required. The study aims to investigate how a digital internal training in sustainable development at a large Swedish construction company can be designed and implemented to create opportunities for developed professional practice in the construction industry. Based on this, a qualitative and quantitative data collection method has been implemented to address the study's questions, and various sources have also been used to conduct a literature study. A thematic analysis of the study's qualitative data resulted in a total of twelve themes after interviews with selected individuals with various positions at the construction company were conducted. The results show that there are shortcomings with the construction company's digital sustainability training, which contributes to the fact that the employees do not get the opportunity to develop the desired knowledge, abilities and attitudes in order to achieve the purpose of the training and accomplish sustainable business. A number of central aspects that influence the success and relevance of the training for both the employees and the company as a whole have been identified, which provides valuable insights for future training strategies. These aspects include a lack of social interaction where a community of inquiry is not promoted, outdated content that does not have clear connections to practical sustainability work and a lack of follow-up steps. This resulted in an improvement proposal with parameters that can be addressed and implemented within the training to meet the needs of the construction company, satisfy the needs of employees and achieve high customer satisfaction.

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  • 13.
    Ahmed, Noor
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Elevers förståelse av bråktal: som ett tal som har ett eget värde på tallinjen2021Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to get insight into how the pupils in years 7 and 8 understand equivalent fractions, reducing and raising, and into how they interpret the connections between raising and multiplication and between reducing and division. The aim was also to investigate pupils' knowledge of fractional aspects with a focus on fraction as a number that has its own value on the number line. The study was based on theoretical models of how fractions can be understood, theories of learning and previous research into similar issues. The approach chosen was multi-method research, which includes quantitative methods in the collection and analysis of questionnaires and qualitative methods in the collection and analysis of interviews with pupils. Both the pupils' solutions and answers to the questions in the questionnaire and the interviews they provided gave very useful qualitative information to analyse. The analysis answered my questions, and I obtained an insight into how the pupils in years 7 and 8 understand equivalent fractions, reducing and raising as concepts and calculation methods. Through the pupils' solutions and answers, I gleaned an insight into the way in which the pupils think and see mathematics, specifically in fractions. The study indicated that pupils have sufficient knowledge of fractions as a part of a whole, while shortfalls in knowledge were identified in some pupils not mastering the concept of fractions or what numerators and denominators represent. The study also showed that some pupils have insufficient knowledge of equivalent fractions and the fact that fractions can be written in an infinite number of ways without this changing the value. In addition, they had difficulty with raising and reducing. Understanding all these concepts is necessary for pupils to operate effectively with fractions. The areas where they lacked knowledge led them to use incorrect strategies when dealing with fractions in the data. Incorrect strategies were identified pupils using their old knowledge of natural numbers and trying to adapt the answers to the new situation.

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  • 14.
    Al-Bayati, Luma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Eddnan Husein, Aliaa
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Föräldrars engagemang och påverkan på barns motivation i matematik2021Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study has been to form an idea of and gain an understanding of what motivates and helps students in primary school to study mathematics. We have also been interested in finding out which factors influence their interest in mathematics and what role the parents have in the motivation to study mathematics. The study is based on a survey of 34 students with parents and interviews with four teachers. The results show that teachers and parents have a great influence on students' motivation and knowledge acquisition in mathematics. Based on the form of teaching in the classroom and parental involvement, students can be better motivated in their mathematics studies. The results from the study show that self-confidence is a decisive factor for the achievement in mathematics among primary school students. As parents and teachers work with the children's self-confidence in the subject of mathematics, it contributes to motivation to continue to calculate mathematics tasks, which in turn leads to development and better knowledge acquisition. What we also saw as a development potential, which can contribute to better motivation and increase knowledge acquisition among students, is cooperation between school and home. This means that increased cooperation between teachers and parents indicates to the children that both parties are on the same page and shows the importance of the school to the children. Something that emerged in the survey that there is a shortage today and both teachers and parents want to work on and develop.

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  • 15.
    Albiz, Niccolas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Identifying Relevant Versus Received Sustainability Education at Industrial Engineering and Management Programs2017In: Handbook of Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development in Higher Education Vol 3 / [ed] Walter Leal Filho, Mark Mifsud, Chris Shiel, Rudi Pretorius, Springer , 2017, p. 115-131Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implementing and evaluating sustainable development in higher education poses particular difficulties, as the field remains contested. This paper presents an innovative approach to understanding the current sustainability education at university programs and envisioning its desired future state. This approach is based on the convergence seen in current scientific literature within the field. This study utilized this method on Sweden's five largest industrial engineering and management programs (covering 74% of the particular population), involving 111 interviews and resulting in identification of the relevant sustainability content and mapping of the received content at these programs. This paper documents the process-oriented, as supposed to results-oriented, approach used, as well as certain key results and insights. The revealed adoption challenges were structured according to their interconnectedness, allowing points of high leverage to be found for future interventions. This paper is appealing to all who wish to conduct pre-studies to engaging in developing program curricula at larger scale through collaboration between various universities. The paper will outline the process, the key success factors (as identified by the author) and the insights that have a bearing on a broader audience than industrial engineering faculty.

  • 16.
    Aldenholt, Robin
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Hydrogen fuel cells for the development of a sustainable society: A case study on opinions and pedagogics regarding hydrogen fuel cells in Sandviken2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Last couple of years’ vehicles propelled by electricity generated from a hydrogen fuel cell has

    emerged as an alternative to the fossil fuel vehicles, so that the greenhouse gas emissions

    causing climate change can decrease. In Sandviken, a collaboration between the municipality,

    Sandvik AB and AGA has resulted in a hydrogen refuelling station, only the fourth in

    Sweden. As the knowledge and awareness of hydrogen fuel cells is unknown Sandvik AB

    wants to investigate what the general opinion and knowledge is but more importantly, how

    can pedagogical theories be used to increase awareness and knowledge.

    The purpose of this thesis is therefore to examine what the population of Sandviken think of a

    development of a hydrogen society as well as climate change and the concept of sustainable

    development. Based on the found status of knowledge and awareness in these issues a couple

    of tools and actions are suggested on how to increase general knowledge and awareness,

    applicable both for schools and organisations outside school.

    The method used to fulfil the purpose was a survey that was sent out to people employed at

    Sandviken municipality and Sandvik AB. The survey results were analysed to see which

    factors correlate with a likelihood to support a hydrogen society development. That is used to

    see what approach to use when educating people about hydrogen and sustainable

    development.

    The results show that people in Sandviken were very positive about the hydrogen refuelling

    station, and the level of knowledge people had did not significantly affect how much support

    they showed. However, the people’s support for a hydrogen development is greatly affected

    by the fact that a refuelling station has been built. Therefore, the result that the level of

    hydrogen knowledge seems irrelevant should not be taken as a general fact true for all

    societies.

    When educating people about hydrogen one should put emphasis on raising awareness and

    knowledge in sustainable development and climate change, since that has a positive effect on

    the likelihood to support a hydrogen development. This could be done via a, in this report

    constructed, SSI case (socio-scientific issues) that can be adjusted to fit environments and

    occasions outside school.

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  • 17.
    Alexander, Gerianne
    et al.
    Texas A&M Univ, Dept Psychol & Brain Sci, College Stn, TX USA..
    Allen, Roland E.
    Texas A&M Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, College Stn, TX 77843 USA..
    Atala, Anthony
    Wake Forest Inst Regenerat Med, 391 Technol Way, Winston Salem, NC 27157 USA..
    Bowen, Warwick P.
    Univ Queensland, Sch Math & Phys, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia.;Univ Queensland, Australian Ctr Engn Quantum Syst, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia..
    Coley, Alan A.
    Dalhousie Univ, Dept Math & Stat, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada..
    Goodenough, John B.
    Univ Texas Austin, Cockrell Inst, Walker Dept Mech Engn, Austin, TX 78712 USA..
    Katsnelson, Mikhail, I
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Inst Mol & Mat, NL-6525 AJ Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Koonin, Eugene, V
    Natl Lib Med, Natl Ctr Biotechnol Informat, Bethesda, MD 20894 USA..
    Krenn, Mario
    Austrian Acad Sci, Inst Quantum Opt & Quantum Informat IQOQI, Boltzmanngasse 3, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.;Univ Toronto, Dept Chem, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Madsen, Lars S.
    Univ Queensland, Australian Ctr Engn Quantum Syst, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia..
    Månsson, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Mauranyapin, Nicolas P.
    Univ Queensland, Sch Math & Phys, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia..
    Melvin, Art, I
    Austrian Acad Sci, Inst Quantum Opt & Quantum Informat IQOQI, Boltzmanngasse 3, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.;Univ Vienna, Fac Phys, Vienna Ctr Quantum Sci & Technol VCQ, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna, Austria..
    Rasel, Ernst
    Inst Quantenopt, Welfengarten 1, D-30167 Hannover, Germany.;Leibnitz Univ Hannover, QUEST LFS DLR Inst Satellite Geodesy & Inertial S, Welfengarten 1, D-30167 Hannover, Germany..
    Reichl, Linda E.
    Univ Texas Austin, Ctr Complex Quantum Syst, Austin, TX 78712 USA.;Univ Texas Austin, Dept Phys, Austin, TX 78712 USA..
    Yampolskiy, Roman
    Univ Louisville, Duthie Ctr Engn, Dept Comp Engn & Comp Sci, Louisville, KY 40292 USA..
    Yasskin, Philip B.
    Texas A&M Univ, Dept Math, College Stn, TX 77843 USA..
    Zeilinger, Anton
    Austrian Acad Sci, Inst Quantum Opt & Quantum Informat IQOQI, Boltzmanngasse 3, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.;Univ Vienna, Fac Phys, Vienna Ctr Quantum Sci & Technol VCQ, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna, Austria..
    Lidstrom, Suzy
    Texas A&M Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, College Stn, TX 77843 USA..
    The sounds of science-a symphony for many instruments and voices2020In: Physica Scripta, ISSN 0031-8949, E-ISSN 1402-4896, Vol. 95, no 6, article id 062501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sounds of Science is the first movement of a symphony for many (scientific) instruments and voices, united in celebration of the frontiers of science and intended for a general audience. John Goodenough, the maestro who transformed energy usage and technology through the invention of the lithium-ion battery, opens the programme, reflecting on the ultimate limits of battery technology. This applied theme continues through the subsequent pieces on energy-related topics-the sodium-ion battery and artificial fuels, by Martin Mansson-and the ultimate challenge for 3D printing, the eventual production of life, by Anthony Atala. A passage by Gerianne Alexander follows, contemplating a related issue: How might an artificially produced human being behave? Next comes a consideration of consciousness and free will by Roland Allen and Suzy Lidstrom. Further voices and new instruments enter as Warwick Bowen, Nicolas Mauranyapin and Lars Madsen discuss whether dynamical processes of single molecules might be observed in their native state. The exploitation of chaos in science and technology, applications of Bose-Einstein condensates and the significance of entropy follow in pieces by Linda Reichl, Ernst Rasel and Roland Allen, respectively. Mikhail Katsnelson and Eugene Koonin then discuss the potential generalisation of thermodynamic concepts in the context of biological evolution. Entering with the music of the cosmos, Philip Yasskin discusses whether we might be able to observe torsion in the geometry of the Universe. The crescendo comes with the crisis of singularities, their nature and whether they can be resolved through quantum effects, in the composition of Alan Coley. The climax is Mario Krenn, Art Melvin and Anton Zeilinger's consideration of how computer code can be autonomously surprising and creative. In a harmonious counterpoint, his 'Guidelines for considering AIs as coauthors', Roman Yampolskiy concludes that code is not yet able to take responsibility for coauthoring a paper. An interlude summarises a speech by Zdenek Papousek. In a subsequent movement, new themes emerge as we seek to comprehend how far we have travelled along the path to understanding, and speculate on where new physics might arise. Who would have imagined, 100 years ago, a global society permeated by smartphones and scientific instruments so sophisticated that genes can be modified and gravitational waves detected?

  • 18.
    Alf, Christoffer
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Erfarande av museiutställningar med hjälp av virtuell verklighet2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master thesis investigates the museum exhibition Royal Wedding Dresses at the Stockholm castle. This exhibition was temporary and closed in April 2017. The overall purpose is to map what can be done in order to raise interest and create meaning in a broader audience including younger people to take part in the exhibition, and create meaning of it after it has been closed down. An additional purpose is to investigate how, why, and whom the museum exhibition Royal Wedding Dresses can interest using virtual reality (VR), after the end of the exhibition.

    In this survey, a literature study, interviews and observations are performed regarding the exhibition Royal Wedding Dresses. This is the basis for developing a VR application prototype where major parts of the exhibition are included. Finally, the application is evaluated for technical interaction and how the virtual visit has been evaluated, to assess whether VR can create interest in, and develop, the exhibition for a wider audience.

    The result indicates that the application has good technical interaction, but the original exhibition does not encourage the visitor to experience it, and the application is unable to develop it in this regard. The application will not be more interesting for a younger audience than its content. With the help of aspects of serious gaming and social interaction, as well as future studies on the subject with more respondents and an expanded perspective, it may be possible to overcome these limitations. If technical interaction and social interaction can be integrated, the experience can also be developed and be put in a meaningful context that encourages experience and better retention of the virtual visit.

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  • 19. Alghamdi, F.
    et al.
    Pears, Arnold Neville
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Nylén, A.
    Computer science teachers perspectives on competencies - A case study in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia2018In: 11th International Conference on Informatics in Schools: Situation, Evolution and Perspectives, ISSEP 2018, Saint-Petersburg, Russia, Springer, 2018, Vol. 11169, p. 129-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) has recently adopted the Saudi Teaching Competencies Standard (STCS). This paper tries to answer how these competencies are achieved, how they are maintained, and what support exists to support teaching CS competently in the KSA. This paper presents the results of an investigation of teacher awareness of, and attitudes to, the STCS in the Kingdom. Through the study reported here, we address an urgent need in the Kingdom to understand teacher preparedness in terms of CS teaching competencies. The study draws on interviews with ten CS teachers in five different cities in the KSA. A thematic coding analysis approach was used. This study explores the CS teaching competencies held by teachers in three areas of CS teaching, focusing on connection to society, professional practice and professional development. The results of the study highlight the CS teaching competencies that CS teachers feel they currently grasp well in the KSA. By enhancing awareness of what teachers currently do well we contribute to the adjustment and improvement of the STCS and help to build a program which addresses the current in-service training needs of CS teachers. The outcomes also help to raise awareness of the challenges of implementing the Computer Education curriculum in KSA schools.

  • 20.
    Al-Ghorabi, Marianne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Enhancing the degradation rate of microplastics and organizing a study visit about sustainability2020Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Microplastics take hundreds to thousands of years to degrade in nature, and pose a threat to the environment. A photocatalytical degradation method have been developed to take advantage of solar light to degrade microplastics, however it takes several months to degrade microplastics with the process. The purpose of this study is to enhance the degradation rate of microplastics by synthesizing a material where photocatalysis is combined with Fenton reaction. A material with zinc oxide nanorods coated with tin oxide and decorated with iron particles (𝑍𝑛𝑂/𝑆𝑛𝑂2/𝐹𝑒0) was synthesized and used to degrade methylene blue, polystyrene and polypropylene. The result show that the degradation rate with a 𝑍𝑛𝑂/𝑆𝑛𝑂2/𝐹𝑒0 – sample is faster than with a 𝑍𝑛𝑂 – sample, and that it can be used to degrade polystyrene and polypropylene.Students’ view on researchers can affect the development of their interest and attitude towards science. Study visits to laboratories have been used to increase students’ interest and give them new experiences. The purpose of this study is to investigate what and how high school students learn during a study visit to a nanotechnology laboratory, and how the study visit affects high school students’ interest and motivation for research and learning. A study visit with 5 stations was organized, and students were given a questionnaire about what they learned during the study visit. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the students’ answers. The result shows that the study visit increased students’ interest in research, and the importance of designing stations so that they are connected to students’ previous knowledge and are within their proximal development zone.

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  • 21.
    Alin, Felix
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Lifelong learning at Scania and KTH: A qualitative study on community of practice as a learning method in contract education2023Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This degree project examines the feasibility of implementing a community of practice within the contract education course ”Sustainable Transport Systems” offered at KTH Royal Institute of Sweden in collaboration with Scania. This degree project aims to investigate if it would be possible to increase participation in the course by creating study circles led by circle leaders who have completed the course. Four interviews were conducted and analyzed using thematic analysis, leading to the identification of four themes. A beta test was then conducted with 15 Scania employees who had yet to take the course, in which they participated in two condensed modules led by a circle leader. Results suggest a potential for implementing a community of practice, as circle leaders and employees saw value in the format and appreciated the opportunities for discussion and reflection on sustainability. The proposed concept is that the course serves as an introduction to a community of practice focusing on sustainability at Scania, where an attitude towards sustainability is developed and concrete improvement proposals for sustainability work are created through the course’s projects.

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  • 22.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Garme, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Magnell, Marie
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Vägen från student till ingenjör: exempel från två kandidatexamenskurser och ett förslag om en programsammanhållande byggnadsställning2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Almlöv, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Viberg, Henrik
    Sweden2024In: Global Perspectives on Enhancing Doctoral Co-Supervision / [ed] Vijay Kumar, Navé Wald, Singapore: Springer Publishing Company, 2024, 1, p. 113-125Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish law requires all doctoral students to be co-supervised. Individualsseeking to become primary supervisors are required to complete doctoral supervisiontraining programs to ensure they are equipped with necessary competencies to guidedoctoral students. This chapter uses interviews, surveys, and documents to explore cosupervision and the experiences of co-supervisors, providing insights and comparingto global practices. We provide a historical overview of co-supervison in Sweden,covering its development over the past 70 years. We then analyse different types ofsupervision in terms of involvement and formality. Next then describe the contextualsetting by examining supervision guidelines, supervisors’ role expectations, and workallocation. We then explore the definition, application, experience, and regulationof co-supervison in Sweden. Drawing from this analysis, we showcase successfulinstances of co-supervison in Sweden and address the associated challenges. Thischapter offers a thorough examination of co-supervision practices, encompassingtheir historical origins, present implementation, and prospective advancements.

  • 24. Alshaigy, B.
    et al.
    Krogstie, B. R.
    Peters, Anne-Kathrin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Pollock, I.
    Are We There Yet?: Incorporating Climate Change into CSEd2022In: Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, ITiCSE, Association for Computing Machinery , 2022, p. 664-665Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is the "biggest threat modern humans have ever faced". The implications of the crisis are imminent and grave. As part of COP26, leaders from all over the world agreed to the Glasgow Climate Pact with the goal of limiting the increased rise of global temperature by 1.5 degrees. With less than 8 years left until the 2030 UN deadline in which the climate effects become irreversible, how do we prepare learners for what might be an inevitable reality? How do we equip computing students with crucial technical, ethical, and leadership skills to mitigate its effect? More importantly, how do people in positions of power, departmental and institutional, be involved? In 2019, we formed an internal working group as part of ITiCSE conference to examine how computing institutions, departments, and faculty members dealt with, if at all, the climate emergency within CS education. Our efforts included conducting a literature review, interviewing CSEd climate experts, leading a world cafe session, and collating and publishing resources from various sources for the benefit of educators interested in incorporating climate change in the curriculum. And yet, there are still struggles reported with adopting these solutions, particularly in light of the global pandemic. This panel will serve as a public forum to express institutional, departmental, and individual challenges associated with tackling the climate crisis and share successful strategies, ideas, and experiences to support the CS community. The discussions will centre over five themes previously identified in the world cafe. 

  • 25.
    Altayy, Fares
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Schmied, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Stimulering av kritiskt tänkande och kollaboration i en programmeringsorienterad fysik- och matematiklaboration: En fallstudie med studenter från programmet Teknisktbasår (KTH)2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work aims to develop a proposal for educational material in the form of a programming-oriented Physics and Mathematics lab. The target group is mainly students from the second semester in the Technical Preparatory Year program (KTH), but also students of equivalent knowledge level (for example, students in the upper secondary school- natural science program). The lab was designed to create opportunity for students to:1) apply critical thinking, 2) demonstrate collaboration, 3) increase subject understanding. The proposed educational material comprises computational physics, where a non linear differential equation derived from a mathematical pendulum is solved using numerical methods. The exercises in the lab were formulated with critical thinking in mind and pair programming was used as the context for collaboration. In this paper 1) and 2) were investigated in an educational setting with students from the second semester of the Technical Preporatory Year (KTH). The conversations of four student groups were recorded and a content analysis was performed on the transcriptions of the audio recordings. A pattern matching method was used to strengthen the conclusions. Based on the results of the research project, we found that the theoretical proposition that the construction of the laboratory work has contributed to the collaboration and application of critical thinking by the students,has been strengthened.

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  • 26.
    Altayy, Yasmina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Antoun, Haidi
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Utformning och utvärdering av laborationsmoment för stimulering av datalogiskt tänkande bland gymnasieelever2024Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study, which is conducted in collaboration with K-ULF, designs and evaluates a laboratory exercise for high school students enrolled in the programming 1 course (or any similar courses), with a focus on stimulating acquisition of computational thinking concepts. A literature overview was performed to identify a relevant framework for designing the programming laboratory moment. The chosen framework, which is the result of the literature overview, emphasized the application of different steps, including defining computational thinking, identifying related concepts, providing examples of techniques representing these concepts, and conducting evaluation. The study is conducted in the form of a case study, wherein the laboratory was conducted with agroup of 20 students. Two Python tasks, Task A (without chatGPT) and Task B (with chatGPT) were designed to stimulate computational thinking concepts and were solved by the students inpairs. During the laboratory, the students' discussions were audio recorded, and they also provided written explanations of their problem-solving methods. The data, comprising audio recordings and written materials, were analyzed using specific techniques and patterns identified within the framework. The study employed a pattern matching method to draw conclusions based on the analyzed data. The results indicated that students solving Task A demonstrated emergence of all computational thinking concepts (indications). On the other hand, students who worked on task B showed emergence of computational thinking indicators mainly through their recorded audio discussions but not in their written solutions.

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  • 27.
    Altimira, Mireia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Casanueva, Carlos
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    RAISING AWARENESS ON DIVERSITY AND EQUALITY IN STEM DEGREES IN HIGHER EDUCATION2017In: INTED2017: 11TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A& DEVELOPMENT , 2017, p. 1037-1041Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education environments are becoming more and more diverse, regarding both gender and cultural background, which could pose significant challenges for both students and teachers. In order to raise the topic amongst STEM students, a lecture on Diversity has been implemented in the course Research Methodologies for Engineering Mechanics, where different concepts regarding equality have been introduced and unconscious bias have been explained to the students. The lecture was placed in the middle of the course so that students could reflect back on their previous evaluations and enable them to correct their biases in the second half of the course. Feedback of the whole course has also been compared between the 2016 and 2015 editions, where this lecture was not present. The results show that a lecture in Diversity and Equality is especially useful for female students, strongly supporting its inclusion in the course.

  • 28.
    Altoumaimi, Rasha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Om Ezzine, Abir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Geometriundervisning med digitala verktyg, årskurs 7 – 9: En studie kring högstadielärares syn på användning av digitala verktyg i geometriundervisning och dess påverkan på elevers lärande2020Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to execute digital tools in mathematics teaching. The study focuses its attention on how teachers choose the type of the digital tools and carry out mathematics teaching, especially in the subject of geometry. As a future teacher, it will be interesting to investigate the teachers’ views concerning the effect of digitizing on their teaching and students’ learning, as well as the teacher's choice of teaching methods and the design of the teaching within that method, will depend on the lessons of geometry where the use of digital technology is the focus in the classroom. The empirical materials were collected through interviews with seven teachers from three different schools. The data were analyzed with a focus on the ways by which teachers employ digital tools to support and work with mathematical content.

    The theoretical frameworks in our study are the SAMR model (SAMR is an acronym that stands for four English concepts Substitution, Augmentation, Modification, and Redefinition) that describes how digital tools are used at different stages in teaching and Drijver's orchestration type to identify different teaching methods and describe their characteristics. The results based on the interviews show that most teachers meet requirements for reaching step three in the SAMR model. The study also shows an overview of different teaching methods in mathematics teaching where digital technology is used. The results also show that the teachers utilize several types of orchestration in the work with the subject of geometry in their teaching. In total, this study shows that teachers use up to five different types of orchestration.

    Generally, all teachers have positive opinions concerning the employment of digital technology in mathematics education, and the utilities of digitization that they spotlight include assisting and supporting students' mathematical knowledge as well as developing their understanding of geometric concepts.

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  • 29.
    Altunsaray, Kismet
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Tekniklärares uppfattningar om undervisning i skiss- och ritteknik inom årskurs 7–9: En fenomenografisk studie2022Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This degree project investigates teachers’ perceptions of sketch-drawing techniques in secondary schools. This study aims to examine how teachers perceive teaching methods linked to sketch-drawing techniques within technics classes in secondary schools. The purpose of the study is to answer the following questions:1. How do teachers in technic class teach sketch-drawing techniques in secondary schools, grades 7-9? 2. How do the teachers experience and perceive the teaching? To find out which perceptions teachers have about sketch-drawing techniques, five questions were asked to the teachers who teach technics classes in grades 7-9. The purpose of the study was not to analyze teachers´ knowledge rather it was to analyze the technics teachers’ perceptions, descriptions, views, and experiences when they teach different sketch-drawing techniques in secondary classes. Six different technic class teachers who work at different schools were interviewed, and a phenomenographic analysis model was implemented to process the collected data from the interviews. In addition, a qualitative interview is used with the interviewees. According to the teachers' descriptions, most teachers teach sketching and hand drawing, but fewer teachers teach both hand and digital drawing. All the teachers agree that hand and digital drawing must be combined in teaching to achieve the learning outcomes based on the central content for grades 7–9. According to the teachers, it is important to arouse the students' technical interest by letting them use different methods for sketching and drawing techniques. Finally, it also appears that the teachers have common perceptions about the advantages and disadvantages of both techniques. They point out, among other things, whether the students experience similar difficulties in teaching and how this affects the students' learning.

  • 30.
    Amadasun, Opeyemi
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Kunskapskravens värdeord: En studie om hur kunskapskraven i teknik tolkas och tillämpas av tekniklärare på högstadiet2020Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment and grading are essential to measure and follow up students’ learning. It is an essential part of the teacher’s role to assess and grade student’s demonstrated knowledge. This is expected to be done in relation to the knowledge requirements. The knowledge requirements describe what is considered acceptable knowledge of students’ learning and is characterized by the so-called value words. The knowledge requirements therefore need to be interpreted by the teacher in order for grades to be set based on equity for all students. This study examines teachers’ interpretation of the knowledge requirements and how teachers use their interpretation in assessment. The study intends to answer the following questions:

    How do technology teachers perceive the knowledge requirements and how do they interpret the value words of the knowledge requirements? And how do teachers use their interpretation of the knowledge requirements in assessment and grading? And what difficulties do teachers experience with assessment and grading in the subject of technology?

    To answer the research questions, five technology teachers in upper secondary school were interviewed. A qualitative analysis method called constant comparative method has been used to analyze the data collected from the interviews. This study is limited to the value words of the knowledge requirement which describes the level of student’s reasoning ability. The concerned value words are: ‘‘simple and to some extent’’ informed reasoning for grade E, ‘‘well developed and relatively well’’ informed reasoning for grade C and ‘‘well developed and well’’ informed reasoning for grade A (Skolverket, 2018). The results show that technology teachers feel that the knowledge requirements in technology are difficult to interpret. Despite this, the teachers interpret the value words for grades E and C alike while there were differences in how teachers interpret the value word for grade A. The results also show that science subjects have a great influence on assessment and grading in technology as teachers base their assessment of students’ knowledge on the National Agency for Education’s material for science subjects simply because teachers believe the National Agency for Education’s material in science is clearer and easier to relate to in assessment practice.

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  • 31.
    Ampadu, Ernest
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Amponsah, Samuel
    Thomas, Michael
    Professional development among in-service teachers: motivational factors, pathways and coping strategies2021In: Educational review (Birmingham), ISSN 0013-1911, E-ISSN 1465-3397, ISSN ISSN 0013-1911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While research indicates that teachers’ continuing professional development (TCPD) is highly significant for the successful implementation of effective classroom instruction, few research studies to date have explored the role of TCPD in Ghana. This paper aims to map the pathways of TCPD for in-service teachers in Ghana while exploring the motivations and coping strategies of these adult learners. The study employs a cross-sectional survey design in which 45 students enrolled in an MA Education programme were trained to collect data from 352 in-service teachers in 310 schools using a semi-structured questionnaire as the data collection instrument. The data from the study were analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. The results from the study show that subject matter, knowledge of curriculum, and assessment knowledge were the three most important factors behind the teachers’ motivation to participate in CPD. Moreover, the analysis of the coping strategies of the in-service teachers suggests that there was little or no institutional support for them. In addition to this, despite the significant role mentorship plays in ensuring effective teaching and learning, the overwhelming majority of the teachers saw mentoring and exchange programmes as one of the least important forms of CPD opportunities available. Recommendations from the study indicate that teachers’ professional autonomy and the disparity between the professional values and skills demanded in 21st-century education cannot be underestimated and that more research is required on how to design CPD programmes that will provide Ghanaian in-service teachers with the creative and innovative skills they require. 

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  • 32.
    Ampadu, Ernest
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Chechan, Batoul
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Swedish students’ problem-solving perceptions and its implications for teacher training and development2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students’ ability to solve problems that require higher order thinking skills is not just necessary but also a sufficient condition in our quest for training students who have the skills and competencies to compete effectively both at the national and international levels. Achieving SDG4 is underpinned by examining how UNESCO’s sustainable competencies with emphasis on systems thinking, anticipatory, normative, strategic, critical thinking, self-awareness, and integrated problem-solving competencies are integrated or understood within the classroom context. Despite the integration of problem-solving into the Swedish school curriculum, students’ performance in this area has not been as expected. This study, therefore, examines the problem-solving attitudes of Swedish students and its implications for teacher training and development. Using a survey design and the Problem-Solving Attitude Inventory (PSAI) data was collected from 432 (primary, lower and upper secondary) students. Descriptive and inferential (ANOVA) statistics analyses were conducted to examine the problem-solving attitudes among the different grade levels. The results show that two of the constructs (problem-solving tendency, personal control) were statistically significant., F(2, 429)=5.007, p=0.007 and F(2,429)=3.071, p=0.047 respectively. The constructs (problem-solving confidence and avoidance style) did not show any statistically significant difference, F(2, 429) = 1.609, p = 0.201 and F(2, 429) = 0.484, p = 0.616 respectively between school levels. The results show that primary school students ascribed more positively to the items in the four constructs as compared to their lower and upper secondary peers. Personal control was the main contributing construct and had a direct influence on the other constructs. The ANOVA also showed a significant difference between gender and problem-solving attitudes with males ascribing more positively to all the four constructs except personal control. The results provide critical implications for teacher training and development. The conceptual framework shows that there is a need for teacher training programmes to equip teachers on how to change or influence students' self-control characteristics. We suggest the use of contextual and challenging activities to help enhance students’ personal.-control construct.

  • 33.
    Ampadu, Ernest
    et al.
    Department of Teacher Education, School of Education and Leadership, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 1181, Accra, Ghana.
    Kwame Butakor, Paul
    Amponsah, Samuel
    Yeboah, Rita
    Exploring the professional identities of pre-service teachers' studying at the University of Ghana2021In: International Journal of Education Economics and Development, ISSN 17595673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The success of any educational system depends on how it is organised and the extent to which the stakeholders especially teachers accept and own it. The purpose of this study was to investigate pre-service teachers' (N = 58) professional identities using a qualitative approach where teachers were asked to produce a pen portrait of the perceived identities using open-ended questionnaires and drawings. The result from this study shows that the individual teacher's personal characteristics are paramount in shaping his/her personal identity. Teachers in our study generally described themselves as teachers who are working hard to help learners understand themselves and provide effective learning opportunities for students to excel and develop inherent capabilities. It is a great asset to have teachers who see themselves as agents of change rather than custodians of knowledge. It is important to have reflective dialogues with teachers to understand these personal characteristics that shape their identities.

  • 34.
    Ampadu, Ernest
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Ottergren, Elin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    From Physical to Hybrid: Listening to Swedish Mathematics Teachers’ Views About Their Teaching and Assessment Practices2023In: Handbook of Research on Redesigning Teaching, Learning, and Assessment in the Digital Era, IGI Global, 2023, p. 87-105Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores Swedish mathematics teachers teaching and assessing practices as different hybrid teaching methods were implemented. Data were collected from 51 teachers in the Stockholm region using an open-ended questionnaire. Teachers experienced a developmental leap involving both pedagogical adaptation and the use of technological tools when adapting to hybrid teaching. Quality dialogues, structure and learner autonomy, as well as the integrity of assessment practices were issues of major concern, as most students experienced online and hybrid learning for the first time with limited preparation.

    These adaptation processes led to an increase in transactional distance, which in turn affected students’ autonomy and achievement. The results also show that the reliance on summative assessment became the new normal practice inconsistent with the Swedish way of teaching and assessing student learning. To enjoy the full advantages of hybrid teaching, there is a need to put measures in place to reduce the transactional distance to help improve students’ autonomy and achievement.

  • 35.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Aziz, David
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Förebygga vilseledande genom examinationens funktioner: En intervjustudie av matematiklärares uppfattningar om vilseledande och examination samt dess skillnad på distans2021Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Covid-19 pandemic resulted in universities converting to distance education. This change has resulted in an increase of attempts to deceive on digital distance examinations. The aim of this study is to investigate how math teachers within a technical faculty experience students' deceit and  how this experience together with previous research can be used to prevent and counteract students' will to deceive. In order to investigate the teachers' experience, nine semi-structure dinterviews were performed with teachers that have been examiner in first cycle mathematics courses on a technical faculty. An inductive thematic analysis was applied to analyze the content from the transcriptions, which resulted in six themes. These themes were named the following: Types of deceiving, Reasons for deceiving, Construction of assessment, View of Different measures, Progress of courses and Reasons for changelessness, Everything based on the interviewed teachers perception. The goal of the study was to create a guide that will act as a template for teachers when planning their assessments. Teachers can, with the help of the guide, get more suggestions on how to construct different assessments to minimize students rationalizing deceit. The content that is presented in the guide is based on the perspective of Cultivating Community of Practice (CCPA). The guide has the following headers: Oral assessment, Written assessment and lastly Continuous assessment. Under each headline there is a description of the respective type of assessment followed by pros and cons with that type of assessment. Finally, practical applications of the recommendations are presented in the Appendix. Results from the thematic analysis were discussed further with the help of previous research and from this discussion the guide was constructed. Teachers' perceptions on students' deceit in firstcycle mathematics courses was compared with previous research based on the themes from the thematic analysis.

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  • 36.
    Andersson, Erika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Kundutbildning från tre infallsvinklar: En fokusgruppstudie om hur utmaningar skulle kunna reduceras2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is conducted as an assignment from Saab in Järfälla, Sweden. Saab wanted help to reduce the challenges in the customer training since the instructors had expressed they needed help to improve it. The purpose of this study is to map the challenging situations that an instructor at Saab can experience during the customer training, and analyse how the challenges could be reduced. The main focus is put on organisational culture, pedagogic competence, and specialist knowledge.

    The theoretical background describes the following theories: adult teaching, competence, and organisational culture. The development of the competence is discussed and the importance of how to use the right competence is stated. The organisational culture is discussed and what an organisation can do in order to strengthen the culture is presented. Theories for adult teaching are also presented.

    A qualitative approach, in the form of focus group interviews, are used to collect data. Four focus group interviews are analysed using thematic analysis where the different themes and codes are found using the theory.

    The results indicate that the different challenges that the instructors are facing in the customer training are linked and that they influence the organisation as a whole. An example of what Saab could do in order to reduce the challenges in the customer training is presented and discussed based on relevant theories. The things that Saab may do to reduce the challenges, according to this study, are: improve the communication, work as a team and try to create a strong organisational culture.

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  • 37.
    Andersson, Kjell
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Evaluation of a model based learning approach for engineering design2015In: INTERNATIONAL DESIGN ENGINEERING TECHNICAL CONFERENCES AND COMPUTERS AND INFORMATION IN ENGINEERING CONFERENCE, 2015, VOL 3, 2015, article id UNSP V003T04A013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Project-based education in combination with problem based learning has been very successful, and has contributed to the popularity of engineering design education among students at technical universities. The close connection to industrial problems by the use of industry-connected projects has boosted this popularity still further and to get an insight of future working environments after graduation is very inspiring for the students.

    The curriculum of the Machine Design capstone course at KTH Department of Machine Design covers the whole process from idea generation to manufacturing and testing a final prototype. A major part of the course consists of project work where students develop a product prototype in close cooperation with an industrial partner or with a research project at the department. This means that a major part of the course uses project-based learning as a teaching strategy. In addition, a model-based design methodology is introduced which enables the students to evaluate and "experience" many different behaviors of the product using digital models in a virtual environment. In this way, students can see that many undesirable concepts and flaws can be avoided even before a prototype is manufactured.

    This paper evaluates the use and learning outcome of model-based design in a capstone course in the Engineering Design MSc program at KTH Department of Machine Design. The approach has been used during a period of three years and the effect on the students' learning has been evaluated by a questionnaire after each course. I this paper we compare the results of these questionnaires and discuss implications and general conclusions about this learning approach.

  • 38.
    Andersson, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning. Centrum för genusvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Gullberg, Annica
    Centrum för genusvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Beyond biology – what is forefronted when biologists are shadowed?2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Andersson, Kristina
    et al.
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University, Box 527, 751 20, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gullberg, Annica
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University, Box 527, 751 20, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University, Box 527, 751 20, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Scantlebury, Kathryn
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University, Box 527, 751 20, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hussénius, Anita
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University, Box 527, 751 20, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Chafing borderlands: obstacles for science teaching and learning in preschool teacher education.2020In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 433-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines preservice preschool teachers’ university science education experience.The empirical data are from a research and intervention project conducted on teacher education programs at two Swedish universities. We analyzed one of the assignments completed by 111 students within a science course as well as their conversations about the assignment at a number of seminars. We combined culture contrast and thematic analysis to examine the data. The results showed a tension between the preschool culture and the university science culture. We described this tension between the boundary lines of the two cultures as a chafing borderland. These cultures do not merge, and the defined boundaries cause chafing with each other. We discuss ways of diminishing this chafing of borderlands, potential border crossings such as caring and children as boundary objects and equalizing power imbalances.

  • 40.
    Andersson, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Hussénius, Anita
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University.
    Gullberg, Annica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Danielsson, Anna T
    Department of Education, Uppsala University.
    Elmgren, Maja
    Department of Chemistry, Uppsala University.
    Engström, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Norström, Per
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Lärarutbildares naturvetenskap under lupp – en studie i gränslandet mellan ämnesdiscipliner och skolämnen2019In: Resultatdialog 2019, Vetenskapsrådet / [ed] Vetenskapsrådet, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Andersson, Lina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Medborgarforskning: En miljöutbildning för allmänheten?2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study is to study the behavioral changes in participants in the citizen science project

    "Växtkalendern". The purpose is also to study how the citizen science project "Växtkalendern" can influence the gap between awareness and action in terms of climate change issues, so-called action gap, among the participants. The study is conducted based on an abductive approach, where the empiric material influences the literature study and vice-versa. The relevant empirical was collected through a survey sent out to all the participants in the project "Växtkalendern". In addition, interviews and discussions with specialists in the field of citizen science research have been conducted.

    The results shows that the citizen science project

    "Växtkalendern" has potential to influence participants. The survey revealed that the participants felt that the opportunity to assist research was clearly the most important reason for participation. Using the theoretical standing points and the empirical material, the citizen science project ability to create behavioral changes in the participants in terms of climate change issues was analyzed. The study shows that the gap between awareness and action can be reduced with the help of citizen science as participants experienced increased awareness and a changing behavior through participation in the project "Växtkalendern".

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  • 42.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    A possible way to use student peer review to improve report writing skills2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Abstract-MA-KTH-2012.pdf
  • 43.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Hur får vi studenter i grundläggande kurser att lägga ned det arbete som krävs?2020In: Bidrag från 7:e Utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar / [ed] Lennart Pettersson och Karin Bolldén, 2020, p. 203-204Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Jag och mina kollegor upplever att många studenter idag inte går på föreläsningar eller deltar i annan undervisning på grundkurser. När de sedan efter kursens slut tillfrågas hur många timmar de har lagt ned på densamma, är det många som anger ett timantal som ligger under det som förväntas av dem enligt kursens poängtal. Samtidigt ser vi att tentamensresultaten försämras. Detta leder i sin tur till en låg genomströmning eller i allra värsta fall till att kurskraven sänks. Här visar jag ett illustrativa exempel på hur kursaktivitet korrelarar med tentamensresultat, redovisar vad jag har funnit i forskningslitteraturen om detta samt ställer frågan vad vi som lärare bör göra för att förbättra situationen.

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  • 44.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Networking change leader - a new role for a program director in engineering education2023In: Proceedings of the 19th International CDIO Conference / [ed] Reidar Lyng, Jens Bennedsen, Lamjed Bettaieb, Runde Bodsberg, Kristina Edström, Maria Sigridur Gudjonsdottir, Janne Roslöf, Ole K. Solbjörg, Geir Öein, Trondheim: NTNU SEED , 2023, p. 669-678Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calls for changes in higher education are omnipresent and motivated by major challenges for society. Several of these challenges, for example those related to digitalization and sustainability, falls into the category of emerging and transformative challenges. The breadth and width of such challenges is too large to be handled by a single individual or even a small group of individuals. Instead, their solution requires an adaptive leadership with relevant activities at all organizational levels. From research literature and previous successful change processes, it is known that change leaders in the middle are key players during such transformations. In engineering education (and in fact in any other education aiming for a profession), it is natural that this role is taken by a program director who already has a responsibility for the quality and the development of an engineering program.  In this work, I will approach the role of a program director from a logical perspective using arguments based on a simple comparison between available time and total time required to create the desired change. It is obvious that large challenges demand a substantial amount of time to find an acceptable solution, which is outside of the reach for any single individual, I will also discuss the crucial role of persons in the middle for obtaining successful change related to large challenges. Finally, I will also try to give some answers to the question how a program director in the role as a person in the middle can survive in this pressing situation. I will point towards the needs for some competence in agile change management, the ability to create structures and collaborative efforts that promote agile actions, the need for making coherence and using inclusion strategies and the necessity of networking. I will also emphasize the importance that universities support internal and external networking structures.

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    CDIO2023-PA-work
  • 45.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Networking Change Leader: New Role for a Program Director in Engineering Education2023In: 19th CDIO International Conference, CDIO 2023 - Proceedings, Chalmers University of Technology , 2023, p. 669-678Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calls for changes in higher education are omnipresent and motivated by major challenges for society. Several of these challenges, for example those related to digitalization and sustainability, falls into the category of emerging and transformative challenges. The breadth and width of such challenges is too large to be handled by a single individual or even a small group of individuals. Instead, their solution requires an adaptive leadership with relevant activities at all organizational levels. From research literature and previous successful change processes, it is known that change leaders in the middle are key players during such transformations. In engineering education (and in fact in any other education aiming for a profession), it is natural that this role is taken by a program director who already has a responsibility for the quality and the development of an engineering program. In this work, I will approach the role of a program director from a logical perspective using arguments based on a simple comparison between available time and total time required to create the desired change. It is obvious that large challenges demand a substantial amount of time to find an acceptable solution, which is outside of the reach for any single individual. I will also discuss the crucial role of persons in the middle for obtaining successful change related to large challenges. Based on my own case, I will try to give some advice about how a program director in the role as a person in the middle can handle this pressing situation. I will point towards the needs of personal time management, a basic understanding of agile change management, the ability to create structures and collaborative efforts that promote agile actions, the need for making coherence and using inclusion strategies and the necessity of networking. I will also emphasize the importance that universities support internal and external networking structures.

  • 46.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Non-proctored home exams - is there a solution?2022In: Bidrag från 8:e Utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar / [ed] Helena Håkansson, Karlstad, 2022, p. 143-144Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Restrictions during the pandemic has forced teachers to replace traditional classroom exams with home exams, which are either proctored by digital tools or non-proctored. In this work, I describe the student response from using non-proctored digital home exams in two university courses in physics. In particular, the advantages and disadvantages of this approach will be discussed, since there are major concern about grading students based on non-proctored exams due to issues related to authenticity and cheating. Finally, I will reflect on the future use of non- proctored exams to evaluate knowledge in physics.

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    fulltext
  • 47.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Towards an engineering approach to quality in engineering education2015In: Proceedings of 5:e Utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar, 2015, p. 13-14Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Education quality is handled at many different levels in an education system, ranging all the way from external reviews of education programs at the top university level to the creation of effective learning conditions for students at the practitioners level. Each level has its own processes for quality assurance, and those processes are usually quite different. Here, I suggest one way of joining the different quality processes into a coherent model, which at the same time retain the main conceptual ideas of the already existing quality processes. The proposed model is presented as a flow diagram of an education system together with an idea about how to create both a trouble- shooting and a quality enhancement scheme based on this model. The model is inspired by the way engineers look at quality assurance in engineering systems and it can, hence, be particularly interesting for engineering educations. 

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    QualityEngineeringEducation
  • 48.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Delin, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    A quality process for assessing mathematics in a study programme2018In: Proceedings från 6:e utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar / [ed] Lena Petersson, Kristina Edström, Oskar Gedda, Fredrik Georgsson, Liselott Lycke och Marie Arehag, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present two methodologies to assess the use of mathematics in a study programme. Firstly, we use a relatively simple methodology to assess how students show their ability to use mathematics in their degree project reports. Secondly, we present a methodology to assess how mathematics is used during a study programme. We have applied the first methodology on the mathematics content in 114 randomly chosen bachelor degree reports from 6 different study programmes within the fields of electrical engineering and computer engineering at KTH. For the 3-year bachelor degree programmes in computer engineering, we find clear deficits in the way students use mathematics in their bachelor degree reports as compared to the other programmes in our study. Through the second methodology, we were able to relate the deficits in the bachelor degree reports to a programme structure where skills in mathematics have not been sufficiently demanded in the engineering courses of the programme. 

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  • 49.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Karlander, Johan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Sandberg, Mattias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Tibert, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics.
    Admission to master programmes: What are the indicators for successful study performance?2023In: Bidrag från den 9:e utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar / [ed] Joel Midemalm, Amir Vadiee, Elisabeth Uhlemann, Fredrik Georgsson, Gunilla Carlsson-Kvarnlöf, Jonas Månsson, Kristina Edström, Lennart Pettersson och Pedher Johansson, Västerås: Mälardalens universitet, 2023, p. 9-18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Admission of applicants to higher education in a fair, reliable, transparent, and efficient way is a real challenge, especially if there are more eligible applicants than available places and if there are applicants from many different educational systems. Previous research on best practices for admission to master’s programmes identified the key question about an applicant’s potential for success in studies, but was not able to provide an answer about how to rate the merits of the applicants. In this study, indicators for study success are analysed by comparing the study performance of 228 students in master’s programmes with their merits at the time of admission. The null hypothesis was that the applicant’s average grade at the time of admission is the only indictor for study success. After testing for potential bias using almost 20 possible other indicators, the null hypothesis had to be rejected for four indicators (in order of importance): (i) university ranking, (ii) length of bachelor’s studies within subject, (iii) English language test and (iv) subject matching between bachelor’s and master’s education. Evaluation of quality of prior education is tricky and results from this study clearly indicate that students from higher ranked universities possess better knowledge and stronger skills for our master’s programmes. Work is ongoing to improve the merit rating model by involving more master’s programmes at KTH and analysing performance data from a larger number of students.

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    Master-admission
  • 50.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Weurlander, Maria
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Peer review of laboratory reports for engineering students2018In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we present a module to introduce student peer review of laboratoryreports to engineering students. Our findings show that students werepositive and felt that they had learnt quite a lot from this experience.The most important part of the module was the classification scheme.The scheme was constructed to mimic the way an expert would arguewhen making a fair judgement of a laboratory report. Hence, our resultsmay suggest that the success of the module design comes from activelyengaging students in work that is more related to ‘arguing like anexpert’ than to only supply feedback to peers, which in such a casewould implicate a somewhat new direction for feedback research. Forpractitioners, our study suggests that important issues to consider in thedesign are (i) a clear and understandable evaluation framework, (ii)anonymity in the peer-review process and (iii) a small external motivation.

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    fulltext
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