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  • 1.
    Abbes, Yacine
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Educational studies in heat and power technology: how students learn with multimedia tools and problem-based learning2005Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education is undergoing continuous changes and new learning tools and methods are implemented. Researchers in education do not always agree upon the effectiveness of some of the methods introduced into engineering education. The present thesis consists of two case studies on educational methods introduced at the Department of Energy Technology, at Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden. The qualitative research methodology has been used in case one and a combination of qualitative and quantitative methodology has been used in the second case. The sources of evidences consisted of: unstructured interviews, analysis of video recording, questionnaires, and analysis of a variety of documents. In the first case, an educational program in heat and power technology was analysed. The second case consists in an in-depth study of group dynamics in a Problem –Based Learning course. These studies showed that the learning approach adopted by students depends strongly on the way they view the particular learning tool or method. The first case study revealed the existence of two types of learners. Surfacelearners follow the structure suggested by the designers of the multimedia program. This category of learners focuses only on the material available in the program. Deep-learners go beyond the information and the structure suggested in the program and combine different learning tools in their learning. These students do not follow the structure of the tutorials’ of the multimedia program. This study showed that students who had a strong view how to learn with a multimedia program or a learning method benefited less from the learning tools available. Students with weak views on how to learn from educational program or leaning tool benefit less from the presentation and engage in more surface learning. Self-motivated learners use the multimedia presentation in novel ways and crosscheck the information given with other material. The second study showed that students have unclear and weak views on how to learn with student-directed Problem- Based Learning model. Four types of learners were identified in Problem-Based Learning project: Leaders, Key Actors, Common Students and Social Loafers. Leaders and Key Actors are self-motivated individuals and participate most in the projects. Students who viewed themselves or were viewed as leaders were held responsible to take most of the decisions and students expected them to work more than the average student. Students who viewed themselves as common team members expected a lower workload than leaders’. Key Actors are self-motivated students who do not view themselves as separate from other group members but who participate more than others. Leaders learned more group and social processes, that they did not fully take part in, while common students learned more from the project management aspects that they did not take part in. The study also found that Problem-Based Learning groups can become very cohesive, and can develop distorted views on how to learn with Problem-Based Learning, and un-common group dynamics phenomena such as groupthink can occur in Problem-Based Learning setting.

  • 2.
    Angelin, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Rahm, M.
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Rocket scientist for a day: Investigating alternatives for chemical propulsion2012In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 89, no 10, p. 1301-1304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This laboratory experiment introduces rocket science from a chemistry perspective. The focus is set on chemical propulsion, including its environmental impact and future development. By combining lecture-based teaching with practical, theoretical, and computational exercises, the students get to evaluate different propellant alternatives. To complete the task, they need to use several important curricular concepts, such as the breaking and formation of bonds, redox reactions, and thermodynamics. They also apply basic computational electronic structure calculations to investigate the energetic content of hitherto nonexisting alternatives. Finally, actual chemical rocket propulsion is demonstrated through the assembly and testing of a model rocket motor, employing a commercially available kit. The full experiment was developed for upper-level high school classes and is completed in a 3-h lab period. The experiment, or parts of it, has also been successfully used both in undergraduate programs and continuing education for teachers. 

  • 3.
    Angelin, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Where's Ester? A Game That Seeks the Structures Hiding Behind the Trivial Names2010In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 87, no 4, p. 406-407Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    Artman, Henrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lindquist, Sinna
    Mikael, Mitchell
    Persson, Tomas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Romero, Mario
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    van de Vehn, Pontus
    Supporting after action review in simulator mission training: Co-creating visualization concepts for training of fast-jet fighter pilots2019In: The Journal of Defence Modeling and Simulation: Applications, Methodology, Technology, ISSN 1548-5129, E-ISSN 1557-380XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the design and evaluation of visualization concepts supporting After Action Review (AAR) in simulator mission training of fast-jet fighter pilots. The visualization concepts were designed based on three key characteristics of representations: re-representation, graphical constraining, and computational offloading. The visualization concepts represent combined parameters of missile launch and threat range, the former meant to elicit discussions about the prerequisites for launching missiles, and the latter to present details of what threats a certain aircraft is facing at a specific moment. The visualization concepts were designed to: 1) perceptually and cognitively offload mental workload from participants in support of determining relevant situations to discuss; 2) re-represent parameters in a format that facilitates reading-off of crucial information; and 3) graphically constrain plausible interpretations. Through a series of workshop iterations, two visualization concepts were developed and evaluated with 11 pilots and instructors. All pilots were unanimous in their opinion that the visualization concepts should be implemented as part of the AAR. Offloading, in terms of finding interesting events in the dynamic and unique training sessions, was the most important guiding concept, while re-representation and graphical constraining enabled a more structured and grounded collaboration during the AAR.

  • 5. Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    Artman, Henrik
    Lindquist, Sinna
    Ramberg, Ramberg
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Mikael, Mitchell
    Larsson, Magnus
    Ungerth, Stefan
    LVC i vardagen - framtidens flygträning2017Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Backlund, Göran
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Om ungefärligheten i ingenjörsarbete2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 7.
    Berggren, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance.
    Fili, Andreas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance. Royal Inst Technol, Dept Real Estate & Construct Management, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordberg, Olle
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Planning and Land Law.
    EXPERIENCE OF DIGITAL EXAMINATION IN SWEDEN - SOME PRELIMINARY FINDINGS FROM THREE DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES2015In: INTED2015: 9TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A& DEVELOPMENT , 2015, p. 4001-4007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment through new technology has gained a firm foothold within the university system in the last decade. This paper summarizes the experiences that have been made during the introduction of digital examination over the past two years. The experiences are divided between three different perspectives; the teachers, the students and the administrators. From the teachers perspective the experiences have been very positive - less time have been allocated to grading written exams, the grades are perceived as more just and the saved time can be spent on increasing the quality on other parts of the course. From a student perspective the experiences have been positive - most students are positive in that they get the results much quicker, that they can edit their answers on the exam easier and that the grades are more just. The experiences from the final perspective - that from the administrators' point of view - are far more complex. Some parts of the administrative system encouraged the projects, whereas other parts tried to stop it, using different measures. The paper concludes with some advice on implementing changes in written exams, based on the experiences from the Swedish case.

  • 8.
    Berggren, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance.
    Fili, Andreas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Nordberg, Olle
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Planning and Land Law.
    Experience of digital examination in Sweden: Some preliminary findings from three different perspectives2015In: INTED2015 Proceedings, iated Digital Library , 2015, p. 4001-4007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish higher educational system is under pressure. The competition from international universities is getting fiercer, and the demographical projections indicate that the number of students entering the university system is peaking right now. At the same time, the financial support from the government is decreasing. In order to stay competitive Swedish universities are trying to find strategies for using the scarce resources in the optimal way. The problem is to strike a balance between quality and efficiency.Over the past ten years a lot of improvement has been made within the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) regarding quality and innovation in education. Pedagogical courses are mandatory for the staff, and the merits of educational experience have been emphasized in hiring new staff members. Even though problem-based learning, constructive alignment and peer instruction are common in most courses today, some other aspects of education and learning remains the same. One such conservative trait has to do with written examinations. Since the founding of the university in 1827, all written examinations have been done using paper and pen at the Royal Institute of Technology. It is interesting to note that even the school of computer science is using paper and pen for their final written examinations. The problems with using paper and pen are numerous and includes; problems with reading and grading because of poor handwriting, distribution of exams between teachers in the same course, written exams getting lost, etc. In comparison with other parts of the educational system, little has happened to improve quality and efficiency when it comes to written examinations.During 2013 and 2014 a number of teachers initiated a project for increasing the efficiency in written exams. There was a general understanding that the final part of the courses consumed too much time and effort in relations to the other parts. Hence, new software for digital examinations was identified and a license was purchased. This paper summarizes the experiences that the teachers have made during this trial period. The experiences are divided between three different perspectives; the teachers, the students and the administrators. From the teachers perspective the experiences have been very positive – less time have been allocated to grading written exams, the grades are perceived as more just and the saved time can be spent on increasing the quality on other parts of the course. From a student perspective the experiences have been positive – most students are positive in that they get the results much quicker, that they can edit their answers on the exam easier and that the grades are more just. The experiences from the final perspective – that from the administrators’ point of view – are far more complex. Some parts of the administrative system encouraged the projects, whereas other parts tried to stop it, using different measures.The paper concludes with some advice on implementing changes in written exams, based on the experiences from the Swedish case.

  • 9.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Will this be on the exam?: Or, How to Motivate your Students to Learn2017In: KTH SoTL 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Björn, Hedin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Användning av sociala annoteringssystem för “peer feedback” vid grupphandledning av kandidatuppsatser2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att låta studenter kontinuerligt ge feedback på varandras framväxande uppsatstexter är bra ur flera synvinklar. Studenterna blir insatta i andra problemområden och metodologiska angreppssätt än det egna, förståelsen för kvalitetskriterier ökar och vetskapen om att andra studenter kommer läsa ens egen text ökar ambitionsnivån. På civilingenjörsprogrammet i medieteknik vid KTH har vi använt ett socialt annoteringssystem, Google docs, för att stödja grupphandledning av kandidatuppsatser. Kombinationen av grupphandledning och användning av ett socialt annoteringssystem har visat sig vara mycket lyckosam. Kandidatuppsatskursen som gavs under 2012 kännetecknas av hög ambitionsnivå, hög kvalitet på de färdiga uppsatserna, mycket hög genomströmning och nöjda studenter.

  • 11.
    Björn, Hedin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Utbildning i prokrastinering: ett sätt att förbättra studenters studieteknik2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Prokrastinering, eller att mot bättre vetande skjuta upp aktiviteter, är ett mycket vanligt problem som är särskilt vanligt inom akademiska studier. Gjorda studier visar att mellan 80-95% av studenterna prokrastinerar, att 50% prokrastinerar regelbundet och också ser det som ett stort problem, och att det inte är ovanligt att en tredjedel av den avsatta studietiden i praktiken ägnas åt prokrastinering. Vi har angripit problemet genom att införa en kursmodul som under läsåret 2011-2012 lästes av 230 studenter på programmet och där vi diskuterade fenomenet samt gick igenom strategier för att undvika prokrastinering. Denna presentation tar upp modulens uppbyggnad och en utvärdering av resultaten.

  • 12.
    Björn, Hedin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Nu ska jag plugga! Jag ska bara färgsortera mina böcker först2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Prokrastinering, eller att mot bättre vetande skjuta upp något, är ett stort problem i samhället i allmänhet och för studenter i synnerhet. I denna artikel beskriver vi en utbildningsmodul om prokrastinering som vi introducerat på två civilingenjörsprogram på KTH, varav denna rapport behandlar datateknikprogrammet där 466 studenter deltog. Utvärderingen hade 100% svarsfrekvens, och visar att 95% av studenterna hade problem med prokrastinering varav 43% hade stora eller mycket stora problem. 88% ansåg att prokrastinering var ett bra tema att ha med i utbildningen, och 57% ansåg att momentet haft positiva effekter på deras studievanor. Endast 7% ansåg att momentet inte hade gett några märkbara effekter på studierna. Då modulen endast kräver ca 8 timmars arbete från studenternas sida anser vi att fördelarna är så stora att denna eller en liknande modul borde ingå i samtliga utbildningsprogram.

  • 13.
    Borglund, Dan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    A case study of peer learning in higher aeronautical education2007In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 35-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to improve student learning in an advanced course in aeronautics, lectures are replaced with more student-centred sessions based on peer learning. The course is organised in student teams, with the main task of delivering lecture requests for full class discussions. For the same reason, the written theory exam is replaced by a peer review of student reports. The new approach is found to result in a substantial increase of student–student and student–teacher interaction, leading to observable improvements in the course results. Finally, some feedback from the students is presented, being in great favour of the peer learning approach.

  • 14.
    Borglund, Dan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Carlsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI).
    Colarieti-Tosti, Massimiliano
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Edström, Simon
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Henriksson, Ann-Sofie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Hjelm, Niclas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Basic Science.
    Naimi-Akbar, Ida
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Learning in Engineering Sciences.
    Collaborative Course Evaluation and Development at KTH: Progress, Lessons Learned and Way Forward2017In: 6th USIU Conference, 2017, article id 68Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Borglund, Dan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Carlsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI).
    Colarieti-Tosti, Massimiliano
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Edström, Simon
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Hjelm, Niclas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Naimi-Akbar, Ida
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Collaborative course analysis and development at KTH: What's the next step and who needs to do what to make it happen?2017In: KTH SoTL, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Diagnostic Web-based Monitoring in CS12009In: Proceedings of the 9th Koli Calling International Conference on Computing Education Research, 2009, p. 63-66Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students that fall behind during a course are a concern in any teaching situation. Falling behind has negative effects both for students, teachers and the university. Close monitoring of the learning and development can be effective, but is in general timeconsuming and expensive. The use of a web-based diagnostic system that can generate a large (infinite) number of questions could make monitoring both time and cost effective.

  • 17.
    De Silva, Nilani Ljunggren
    KTH.
    Inclusive Pedagogy in Light of Social Justice. Special Educational Rights and Inclusive Classrooms: on whose terms? A Field Study in Stockholm Suburbs2013In: European Journal of Education, ISSN 0141-8211, E-ISSN 1465-3435, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 419-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of inclusive education is not straightforward. Despite all its good intentions, inclusive education, in practice faces numerous challenges today. This study analyses these challenges in the Swedish special education context. The author explores special educators' experiences, possibilities and challenges when applying inclusive education. Findings reveal positive attitudes to the concept of inclusive classrooms. Nevertheless, teachers face more than a few grey areas that need to be put in place in order to achieve socially and cognitively inclusive classrooms.

  • 18.
    Doyle, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning. University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland..
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland..
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland..
    Exploring the relationship between technology teachers orientations towards teaching and their associated professional life phases2016In: PATT-32 Proceedings: Technology Education for 21st Century Skills / [ed] de Vries, Marc J; Bekker-Holtland, Arien; and van Dijk, Gerald, Utrecht, the Netherlands, 2016, p. 141-149Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is widely agreed that developed pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) is a knowledge base unique to teachers. Therefore, the successful development of a teacher can be evaluated in terms of an evolved PCK. However, research has shown that teachers in later professional life phases (PLP’s) are at a greater risk of being less effective (Day & Gu, 2007). Given that the rational and grade point-orientated nature of the Irish education system hinders the development of an integrated pedagogy (Commission on the Points System, 1999; Hennessy, Hinchion, & Mcnamara, 2011), this paper explores the relationship between technology teachers’ PLP and their orientations towards teaching as a critical construct of PCK.The study cohort consisted of practicing technology teachers (n=9) ranging in experience from 4 to 31 years of classroom practice. An interpretive research methodology was employed whereby participants were involved in semi-structured interviews focused on eliciting an understanding of participants’ knowledge and beliefs around the purposes and goals of teaching technology. The findings suggest that technology teachers’ orientation towards teaching varies as teachers’ progress through their teaching career. It emerged that participants in earlier PLP’s are more likely to display a pupil-centred orientation towards teaching whereas teachers in later PLP’s are inclined to adopt transmission pedagogies suggesting a teacher-centred orientation towards teaching.

  • 19.
    Doyle, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning. Athlone Institute of Technology, Athlone, Ireland..
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Operationalising pedagogical content knowledge research in technology education: Considerations for methodological approaches to exploring enacted practice2019In: British Educational Research Journal, ISSN 0141-1926, E-ISSN 1469-3518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Like many areas of curricula internationally, technology education has encountered difficulties in achieving continuity between the rhetoric of prevailing policy and the reality of enacted practices. In technology education, the conceptually oriented nature of curricular goals is theorised to play a significant part in influencing this relationship. One way in which investigations of this relationship have been approached is considering the application of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) frameworks as a mechanism to understand the interaction of teachers’ knowledge and enacted practices. However, understanding from the philosophy of technology, and the technology education literature, suggests that technology education treats knowledge differently to many other disciplines. As a result of this, the interactions between teachers’ beliefs and knowledge are theorised to play a more significant role in influencing enacted practice in technology education. Building on this perspective, this article considers the need to investigate the roles of teachers’ knowledge and beliefs, and the interactions between these, in the investigation of enacted practice. Further to this, the article problematises the potential for a dominance of exploratory research, though acknowledging the need for research within different paradigms; a common frame of reference is advocated. In advocating a more holistic approach to investigating enacted practice, and the factors which may influence teachers’ enactment of teaching practice, it is envisioned that this article takes a step towards methodological coherence regarding the study of enacted practice in technology education.

  • 20.
    Edman-Stålbrandt, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Malmström, Maria
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Flexibla lärobjekt: fördjupade kunskaper2006In: Netlearning 2006. May 8-10, 2006, Ronneby, Sweden., 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Doing course evaluation as if learning matters most2008In: Higher Education Research and Development, ISSN 0729-4360, E-ISSN 1469-8366, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 95-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates barriers for using course evaluation as a tool for improving student learning, through the analysis of course evaluation practices at The Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), a technical university in Stockholm. Although there is a policy on development-focused course evaluation at KTH, several stakeholders have expressed dissatisfaction with its poor results. Interviews were conducted with faculty and student representatives to investigate the perceived purpose and focus of evaluation and its current utilization. Results show that evaluation is teaching- and teacher-focused. As course development is not in the foreground, evaluations merely have a fire alarm function. It is argued that course evaluation should be regarded as a component of constructive alignment, together with the intended learning outcomes, learning activities and assessment. Finally, the concept system alignment is proposed, extending constructive alignment to the institutional level. The evaluation task can generally be said to be: 1. to describe what actually happens in that which seems to happen 2. to tell why precisely this happens, and 3. to state the possibilities for something else to happen. (Franke-Wikberg & Lundgren, 1980, p. 148)

  • 22.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden .
    Student feedback in engineering: A discipline-specific overview and background2012In: Enhancing Learning and Teaching Through Student Feedback in Engineering, Elsevier, 2012, p. 1-23Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter reviews the need to improve key learning outcomes of engineering education, among them conceptual understanding, solving real problems in context, and enabling skills for engineering such as communication and teamwork. At the same time it is necessary to improve both the attractiveness of engineering to prospective students and retention in engineering programmes. Research suggests that to address these problems the full student learning experience needs to better affirm students' identity formation. Student feedback is identified as a key source of intelligence to inform curriculum and course development. An argument is made for clarifying the purpose of any student feedback system, as there is an inherent tension between utilising it for accountability or for enhancement. An example shows how enhancement is best supported by a rich qualitative investigation of how the learning experience is perceived by the learner. Further, a tension between student satisfaction and quality learning is identified, suggesting that to usefully inform improvement, feedback must always be interpreted using theory on teaching and learning. Finally, a few examples are provided to show various ways to collect, interpret and use student feedback.

  • 23.
    Fedulov, Vitali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Educational evaluation of an interactive multimedia learning platform: computerized educational platform in heat and power technology2005Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning materials have multiple forms, such as books, overhead slides, computer files, blackboard notes by teachers, narration to the notes, video/audio tapes etc. Since the forms are highly inhomogeneous, it becomes difficult to collect and practically use them by a particular learner for individual study at home. Such multiple media are also expensive in management, since human resources are needed to keep the material repositories in order. One solution of the problem lies in centralized active digital repositories. Such repositories aim to simplify the learner’s work and boost learning efficiency. With introduction of interactivity and live communication tools such repositories become learning platforms exceeding the functionality of “passive” digital libraries. Such learning platforms could be easily used both for on-campus and distance education.

    This dissertation presents an evaluation of a digital repository of interactive multimedia content in the field of Heat and Power Technology: Computerized Educational Platform (CompEdu HPT). The platform evaluation consisted of integration of the tool into the university curriculum and then collection of feedback from students and teachers. The evaluation concerned usefulness of the platform for learning, aspects of instruction improvement, collecting observations about how the platform is used by students, as well as their opinions about the IT application direction chosen. The methods included: online feedback forms, questionnaires, interviews, discussions and observations.

    The evaluation demonstrated that the main strength of the platform is the integration of learning materials in one portable package. The students appreciated structured and logically arranged information that was available for easy access. Coverage of a broad area of knowledge related to heat and power technology was also pointed out as an advantage with reflection on the very low price of acquisition of the materials. The most popular elements of the content in use included: simulations, lecture notes, the print function, the glossary, and calculation exercises. A major part of the students declared the high value of CompEdu in facilitating home study. Nevertheless, not all the students had a positive impression: around one-fifth of them did not find the platform useful and expressed preference for more traditional learning media. The majority of the negative opinions concerned content quality, which directly related to weaknesses of the content production and review process.

    The evaluation emphasized the importance of material quality and amount as the key issue for a good learning platform with relatively smaller importance of presentation forms. The evaluation also considered aspects of functionality from the user point of view. Differentiation between popularity of simulations showed that simulations used by teachers during lectures have higher educational value than those for individual use only. The popularity of the printing option indicated a need for adaptation of digital materials for paper publishing. The general conclusion for practical use of multimedia tools in education was that high usability and simplicity of information access should be the focus point of any chosen approach in the direction.

    The CompEdu evaluation suggested that after thorough content review and addition of an efficient search mechanism the platform can successfully deliver rich learning content. The platform gave an extensive real-case illustration of how multimedia can be used in educational practice. Due to the evaluation, the CompEdu e-learning group has collected rich experience and know-how in the field of active knowledge repositories. The experience will be used for development of a more sophisticated learning platform working in the global Internet environment with major focus on information accessibility by easy search.

  • 24.
    Feltsen, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Skills and Technology.
    Lärande medarbetare: En studie om att medvetandegöra medarbetares kunskaper2008Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish steel manufacturer Oxelösund AB is a member of the SSAB Swedish Steel Group and is the largest Nordic manufacturer of heavy steel plate. This thesis is about how selected employees at SSAB Oxelösund AB acquire and consolidate their knowledge, when it is supposed that they, in the future, will pass their knowledge on within the company. The thesis focuses on how employees perceive and gain their learning.

    The employees expresses that their experience transforms into knowledge when they reflect upon recently perceived events. They describe that learning is a continuous process that is achieved over time and that they learn in their meeting with other people. Those employees were consolidating their knowledge when they both formulated and expressed themselves in words or when they practiced their skills. Thus they have confirmed and have made their knowledge visible, primarily for themselves but also for their surroundings.

    For SSAB Oxelösund AB, to gradually will be able to transfer the employees experience and knowledge to other employees, it is essential to give them time to reflect upon their own knowledge. They must become aware of both the knowledge they possess and what skills are to be shared, to succeed in sharing their knowledge.

  • 25.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Practicing Design Judgement through Intention-Focused Course Curricula2015In: Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, ISSN 1360-1431, E-ISSN 2040-8633, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 47-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper elaborates on how design judgement can be practiced in design education, as explored in several iterations of an advanced course in interaction design. The students were probed to address four separate design tasks based on distinct high-level intentions, i.e. to 1) take societal responsibility, 2) to generate profit, 3) to explore a new concept, and 4) to trigger reflection and debate. This structure, we found, served as a valuable tool in our context for bringing important topics to discussion in class and for actively practicing design judgement. We discuss what we see as the main qualities of this approach in relation to more conventional course structures in this area, with a focus directed more towards aspects of methodology, specific interaction techniques, and design principles more generally.

  • 26.
    Forstorp, Per-Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Who's Colonizing Who?: The Knowledge Society Thesis and the Global Challenges in Higher Education2008In: Studies in Philosophy and Education, ISSN 0039-3746, E-ISSN 1573-191X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 227-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The two notions of "globalization'' and "knowledge society'' are often assumed to be relatively neutral descriptions of contemporary social and cultural developments, although they are embedded in discourses on power and domination. In this paper the argument is made that both these notions can be understood as expressions of an ideology of neo-colonialism and that they assume an ethnocentric or Eurocentric bias rather than being neutral descriptions of the "natural'' unfolding of social and political changes. The thesis of the "knowledge society'', in particular, needs to be demythologized as a vehicle for the rebirth of nations and regions in the context of increasing global challenges. A critical perspective such as this is a desired complement to the otherwise glossy versions of the future of "knowledge work'' and "creative work'' based on a doctrine of "fundamentalism of education''. The critical understanding of contemporary regimes for knowledge, learning and education on the international scene provide a necessary counterpoint to the dominating political and educational discourses advocating the advent of "knowledge society''.

  • 27.
    Fransson, Torsten
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Francois, Xavier Hillion
    Eloi, Klein
    An International, Electronic and Interactive teaching and life-long learning platform for gas turbine technology in the 21st century2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Fransson, Torsten
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Kazachkov, I.V.
    Popa, Marianne Salomon
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Konoval, O.V
    Collaboration of the Swedish-ukrainian universities in the development and implementation of the interactive multimedia teaching-learning system2011Other (Other academic)
  • 29. Geraimchuk, M.D
    et al.
    Kazachkov, I.V
    Fransson, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Development and implementation of multimedia educational systems for universities and schools2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Grimheden, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Strömdahl, Helge
    KTH.
    The Challenge of Distance: Opportunity Learning in Transnational Collaborative Educational Settings2004In: International journal of engineering education, ISSN 0949-149X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 619-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering education has traditionally offered prohlem-based, project-organized courses with a view to preparing students for their future career. Several universities have engaged in collaborative projects that offer courses in an international educational setting. In this article we present the results of an exploratory study of one such program involving students enrolled in separate Masters programs in Mechatronics and Mechanical Engineering at KTH, Sweden, and Stanford University, USA. The empirical data collected indicate improved interdisciplinary learning and increased knowledge and skills in related areas. It is argued that the problems posed by differences in time and space present learning opportunities.

  • 31. Grysell, Tomas
    et al.
    Reinholdsson, Peter
    Elmgren, Maja
    Henriksson, Ann-Sofie
    A New Challenge in Teaching for Phd Supervisors2010In: 9th Quality in Postgraduate Research Conference. Educating Researchers for the 21st Century: Educating Researchers for the 21st Century Conference Proceedings, 2010, p. 143-148Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Lee, Y.
    Morimura, K.
    Kolmos, A.
    The role of entrepreneurial skills in engineering education: A case study performed in Denmark, Japan, Korea and Sweden2017In: Proceedings of the 45th SEFI Annual Conference 2017 - Education Excellence for Sustainability, SEFI 2017, European Society for Engineering Education (SEFI) , 2017, p. 593-602Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of teaching entrepreneurial skills has been on the agenda for several years. But how do engineering education institutes (EEIs) serve as institutions facilitating the learning of these skills? In this study, we compare four EEIs from four countries located in two global regions, East Asia and the Northern Europe, in order to identify models for how education in entrepreneurship can be implemented according to each country's situation. We use a modified version of Dahlöf and Lundgren's frame-factor theory to analyse how the universities understand the internal and external driving forces for the development of this kind of education. We also address how these frame factors affect the development processes at each EEI. The study identifies differences in these processes, which depend on how pressures originating outside the universities are expressed.

  • 33.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Arranging an exam before the exam – The students love it, and it is easy to do!2015In: KTH SoTL 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Havtun, Hans
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Kann, Viggo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Carlsund, Ninni
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Wingård, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Continuous assessment: Time and effort well spent for students and teachers?2019In: KTH SoTL 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Hedin, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Jorge Luis, Zapico
    Department of Computer Science and Media Technology, Linnaeus University.
    What Can You Do with 100 kWh? A Longitudinal Study of Using an Interactive Energy Comparison Tool to Increase Energy Awareness2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 7, article id 2269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reducing the use of energy is important for several reasons, such as saving money and reducing impact on the climate. However, the awareness among non-experts of how much energy is required by different activities and appliances is generally low, which can lead to wrong prioritizations. In this study, we have developed an interactive tool to increase “energy awareness”, and performed a longitudinal study to evaluate its effect. A group of 58 students first did a test to benchmark their current energy awareness, where their current knowledge of energy used for 14 different activities, such as driving vehicles and using home appliances, was measured. They then tried the interactive learning tool for 10 min. Next, they did the same test immediately after trying the tool, then again one week after trying the tool, and finally again six months after trying the tool. The results showed a significant learning effect in energy awareness with a “huge” effect size of 2.25 immediately after the intervention, a “very large” effect size of 1.70 after one week, and a “large” effect size of 0.93 after six months. The results further showed that the respondents consistently underestimated what 100 kWh could be used for, and especially so for appliances and activities requiring little energy. Before the intervention, on average they underestimated how much 100 kWh could be used for by 95.2%, and six months after the intervention the underestimation was 86.8%.

  • 36.
    Henriksson, Ann-Sofie
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Undervisa tillgängligt!: Pedagogiska strategier för att funktionsnedsättning hos studenter inte skall vara ett hinder för att genomföra studierna.2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    En student med funktionsnedsättning är först och främst en student som alla andra med drömmar om en stimulerande yrkesframtid, oro över tentamen och  önskan om att ha ett givande liv vid sidan av studierna. De flesta vill inget annat än att vara som alla andra!

    Ett par av de lärare som intervjuats i samband med revideringen av denna skrift uttrycker det så  här:

     

    (…) jag har sällan mött studenter som försöker skaffa sig fördelar på grund av sitt funktionshinder

     

    Även studenter med funktionshinder får vara lata, slappa, glömska och slarviga. Ibland glömmer man det och ställer högre krav: nu har jag ordnat här och så kommer de inte…

     

    Många lärare vittnar om att de i mötet med en student med funktionsnedsättning kan känna sig otillräckliga och oroliga eftersom de inte vet hur de ska hantera situationen. De vill så väl, men är rädda att det ska bli fel. En av de engagerade lärare som intervjuats för skriften ger följande råd:

     

    ”Att prata med personen. Att prata med den som behöver stöd, och hör vad det är för någonting egentligen- vad det är för problem. För alla är olika och det går inte att komma runt det - det finns ingen lista. Och det mesta går att lösa. Dialogen, hela tiden. “

     

    Denna skrift är tänkt att fungera som idéskrift där man kan hämta inspiration för olika åtgärder och anpassningar. Det kan handla om enkla saker, såsom att inte läsa in rasten (kan innebära problem för en student med koncentrationssvårigheter pga t.ex svår värk) eller att hitta alternativa examinationsformer som medger större individuell anpassning (exempelvis hemtentamen som ger möjlighet att vila efter individens behov).

     

    Rapporten ingår i en serie från avdelningen för universitetspedagogisk utveckling vid Uppsala universitet.

  • 37. Hillman, T.
    et al.
    Weilenmann, A.
    Jungselius, B.
    Lindell, Tiina Leino
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Traces of engagement: narrative-making practices with smartphones on a museum field trip2015In: Learning, Media & Technology, ISSN 1743-9884, E-ISSN 1743-9892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore museum visitor learning through the examination of the engagement in narrative-making practices of school children while visiting a natural history museum. Two groups of children are given worksheets and encouraged to use their own mobile technologies to document their visits in relation to the subject of evolutionary mechanisms. Their engagement is occasioned through this worksheet and we show how they negotiate the interpretation of the task and then go on to complete it in quite different ways. We examine, in turn, how the students structure their visits with walking paths through the museum exhibitions, and how they structure the narratives they produce to complete the tasks by using the tools at hand and incorporating different parts of the exhibits.

  • 38.
    Kann, Viggo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Carlsund, Ninni
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Wingård, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Continuous assessment: Time and effort well spent for students and teachers?2019In: KTH SoTL 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Karlgren, Klas
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholms Universitet, Sweden.
    Artman, Henrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing Interaction: How interaction design students address interaction2016In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 439-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design is usually described as being concerned with interactions with and through artifacts but independent of a specific implementation. Design work has been characterized as a conversation between the designer and the situation and this conversation poses a particular challenge for interaction design as interactions can be elusive and difficult to describe. Moreover, current trends in interaction design introduce physical materials to a higher degree resulting in even more complex design situations. There is a lack of knowledge about how interaction designers, and especially students, address the very phenomenon of interaction. This study contributes by describing how interaction design students attempt to address aspects of interaction and by presenting an in-depth analysis in the context of an interactionary-type design exercise.

    The quantitative and qualitative findings showed that (1) the design students brought up aspects of interactivity and dynamics through talk and gestures but (2) a comprehensive design idea about interaction did not guide the design work and they were to a little degree engaged in planning sequences of interactions or interaction on a longer time scale; (3) using physical materials disrupted interaction design, and, (4) there was a lack of continuity throughout a design session when addressing interaction compared to how proposals about artifacts were pursued.

    As interaction is the core of interaction design, the findings are discussed in terms of how the immaterial design materials may “talk back” to designers. Practical strategies for how the observed phenomena could be constructively addressed within interaction design education are suggested.

  • 40.
    Karlsson, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Hellström, Margareta
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Learning Lab IKT.
    Holotescu, C.
    Grosseck, G.
    Dumbraveanu, R.
    Are we ready to move towards a new type of teacher training?: Case study: The WETEN project2011In: eLmL - International Conference on Mobile, Hybrid, and On-line Learning, 2011, p. 36-39Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To assure a quality learning process in Higher Education, continuous training of teachers is a priority. This paper is a case study about the training of trainers organized in the WETEN project, presenting how the topics were chosen, how the educational technologies and facilitation contributed to the building of learning community.

  • 41. Kazachkov, I.V
    et al.
    Fransson, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Salomon Popa, Marianne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Abbes, Y
    Kalion, B
    Interactive Teaching-Learning in Turbo machinery2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42. Kazachkov, I.V
    et al.
    Fransson, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Shamakov, Yu. I
    Kalion, V.A
    Kharytonov, A.M
    Kazachkova, O.M
    Collaboration in development and implementation of an interactive teaching-learning platform in educational process at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) and Kyiv T. Shevchenko National University (KNU)2003Report (Other academic)
  • 43. Kazachkov, I.V
    et al.
    Geraimchuk, M.D
    Fransson, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Development and implementation of multimedia educational systems for universities and secondary schools2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Kullvén, Håkan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Management Control.
    Westin, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Management Control.
    Clickers in Education: Do students perceptions of clickers differ with the purpose?2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How can we encourage student participation in large classes? More specifically, how can participation best be encouraged with clickers; if they are used with anonymity for the student, or if the teacher can track each student and her/his performance? In this study, we evaluated student’s experiences of clickers in two settings; one where students used clickers anonymously, and one where clickers were used both for controlling attendance and as a part of setting the grade for the student in the course. We found pros and cons of both approaches. It seems that students are more satisfied and learn more from clickers’ activities as such when used without control, but that students that have experienced control are more positive to this and that the control as such can force them to participate more in the lectures and, by that, learn more. For both settings, we noted positive attitudes towards clickers, indicating that the use of clickers makes students more positive to the course and its content, irrespective of if clickers are used for control or not.

  • 45.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Johan, Gärdebo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Tools for Transformation: How engineering education benefits from interactive E-learning and the Humanities2015In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings, American Society for Engineering Education , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper engages with how to construct means for student activation, using analytical models, e-learning and web tools in engineering education. Learning requires different levels of understanding and means to appropriate and formulate knowledge. However, peer instruction and student participation require a degree of facilitation, which is a role the teacher needs to analyse and develop before students can be demanded to demonstrate increased participation in course content, feedback and design. The specific context of student learning discussed here is based on experiences from a course for international engineering students at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden. The course aim is to train students in critically analyzing the role of national identities, social- and technological engineering and politics in shaping Swedish society. One challenge is to enable engineering students to develop skills in critical thinking by engaging with texts from social sciences and humanities dealing with topics formulated in the course aim. Reading, writing and discussing texts on historical and contemporary examples are used to attain learning outcomes, relating to both course content as well as practical skills of critical reflection, reasoning and developing arguments in writing. This study draws on experiences from changing a course previously relying on attendance towards encouraging and explicitly rewarding student contribution to each other’s learning. The broader aim have been for students to learn to think, read, discuss and write analytically, while using web-tools in combination with seminar exercises to increase student interaction in these processes and time on task. While these skills are instrumental, we argue that they are valuable for students to engage in interactive learning of a more transformative character where students benefit from learning through reciprocal questioning, joint learning and peer-instruction. Source material is gathered using course evaluations and feedback from students at lectures and seminars. Some early results based on experiences from the seminar activities, where students wrote a text relating to an analytical question and thereafter made commentson a fellow classmate’s text, showed that the students gained enough in-depth understanding to present an argument when commenting on a classmates’ text in the same topic. Students experienced working with analytical questions and peers as supportive for engaging with topics previously perceived to be challenging. Other students were exposed to texts with some basic components missing (defining key concepts etc.) providing challenges in formulating constructive comments and suggestions for improvements. To conclude, the implication of using analytical models, e-learning and web tools in engineering education is instrumental for student activation in the sense that students acquire skills for active reading and writing. However the use of analytical questions and reciprocal questioning in seminar activities and web forums prompts new channels for interactive learning between students and a more transformative prospect of relating skills from social sciences and humanities with engineering practices in society.

  • 46. Leotard, P
    et al.
    Roy, S
    Gaulard, F
    Fransson, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Computerized Educational Program in Turbo machinery1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47. Liwång, Hans
    Att planera och genomföra utbildning i militärteknik2016Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionellt har synen på teknik i Försvarsmakten präglats av en uppdelning i olika typer av militär personal: ’tekniker’ och ’officerare’. ’Teknikern’ är den som hanterar tekniken och ’officeren’ är den som hanterar operationen. Detta har varit en behändig uppdelning som gett ’officeren’ en ursäkt att slippa bry sig om tekniken och ’teknikern’ ett tydligt definierat arbetsutrymme. Denna konstruktion stämmer självklart inte med verkligheten, men den har trots detta influerat bland annat utveckling av utbildning och begrepp. Den här skriften utgår från en helt annan syn, nämligen den att tekniska system är all officerares arbetsredskap och en förståelse för dessa arbetsredskap är centralt för att kunna utöva yrket effektivt. Självklart behöver olika personalkategorier olika typer av kunskap och olika mycket kunskap, men det är av underordnad betydelse. Den aspekt som är central här för utformningen av militärteknik är behovet av alla officerares övergripande förståelse för teknik. Detta ställer till viss del ’nya’ krav på utbildningen bland annat vad det gäller synen på teknik och i vilket sammanhang den studeras, det är dessa aspekter och krav som denna skrift beskriver. Detta är den andra upplagan, den första gavs ut 2008. Titeln på skriften var 2008 PM: Militärteknisk grundnivå, nu har titeln breddats en aning till Att planera och genomföra utbildning i militärteknik. Ämnesrådet i militärteknik syftar med denna bok att ge ett stöd, främst till lärare, att utnyttja vid sidan av andra styrdokument, vid utveckling och genomförande av militärteknisk utbildning för officerare och annan militär personal. Utöver det förtjänar utbildningen även att diskuteras utifrån akademiska krav, den diskussionen utelämnas dock till största delen ur denna bok. Del 1 redovisar hur militärteknisk utbildning principiellt byggs upp. Del 2 tar kortfattat upp begreppen naturvetenskap och samhällsvetenskap i relation till ämnet militärteknik. Del 3 beskriver översiktligt nivåer för högskoleutbildning. Del 4 diskuterer det självständiga arbetets roll. Del 5 ger några tips att tänka på när kurser och utbildningar i militärteknik utvecklas med fokus på olika typer av kunskap. Del 6 diskuterar systemtänkande och systembegreppet och dess roll i militärteknisk utbildning. Del 7 är en referensförteckning vilken pekar ut bra ställen att lära sig mer.

  • 48. Liwång, Hans
    Military technology education for the Swedish Armed Forces2003In: Militärteknisk tidskrift, Vol. 2003, no 4, p. 6-10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49. Liwång, Hans
    Officersutbildningen svår teknisk balansgång2005In: Framsyn, Vol. 2005, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Vi lever i tider där förändringarna genom försvaret går snabbt och ekonomin pressas allt hårdare. Då är det viktigt att utbildning ger kunskap och förmågor som är relevanta i dag, men även i en mer svårdefinierad morgondag. Detta är ett svårt uppdrag och det förutsätter att utbildningen är långsiktig och självständig så att den kan appliceras på många olika situationer. För att skapa en långsiktig och självständig utbildning måste det finnas en genomtänkt struktur för det som ska läras ur. Denna struktur baseras traditionellt på ämnets definition och ämnets progression eller stegringsföljd. Ämnets definition ska vara väl förankrad i den akademiska världen, men ska samtidigt kontinuerligt diskuteras och ifrågasättas. Förankringen leder till att ämnet inte plötsligt kan förändras samtidigt som diskussionerna och ifrågasättandet leder till att ämnet utvecklas med sin omgivning. Utifrån ämnets definition beskriver ämnets progression hur kunskapen ska byggas upp och vilka byggstenar som ska till för att skapa militärteknisk förståelse på olika nivåer. Det är också viktigt, speciellt vid yrkesutbildningar, att anpassa utbildningens faktiska genomförande och pedagogiken till givna förutsättningar och de behov som den färdigutbildade har i sin tjänsteutövning.

  • 50. Liwång, Hans
    PM, Militärteknisk grundnivå2008Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionellt har synen på teknik i Försvarsmakten präglats av en uppdelning i olika typer av militär personal; tekniker och officerare.Teknikern är den som hanterar tekniken och officeren är den som hanterar operationen. Detta har varit en behändig uppdelning somgett officeren en ursäkt att slippa bry sig om tekniken och teknikern ett tydligt definierat arbetsutrymme, bland annat definierat utifrån certifikat. Denna konstruktion stämmer självklart inte med verkligheten, men den har trots detta influerat bland annat utveckling av utbildning och begrepp. Den här skriften utgår från en helt annan syn, nämligen den att tekniska system är officerens arbetsredskap och en förståelse för dessa arbetsredskap är centralt för att kunna utöva yrket effektivt. Självklart behöver olika personalkategorier olika typer av kunskap och olika mycket kunskap, men den uppdelningen är av underordnad betydelse. Den tekniska aspekt som är central för Försvarsmaktens utbildningssystem är alla officerares övergripande förståelse för teknik. Detta ställer till viss del nya krav påutbildningen bland annat vad det gäller synen på teknik och i vilken kontext den studeras, det är dessa aspekter och krav som denna skriftbeskriver. Ämnesrådet i militärtekniks syfte med denna PM är att ge ett stöd, främst till lärare, att utnyttja vid sidan av ämnesplanen, vidutveckling och genomförande av militärteknisk utbildning för officerare. Utbildningen är här därför beskriven ur det som vi uppfattar är yrkets krav. Utöver detta skulle även utbildningen mycket väl också förtjäna att diskuteras ur akademiska krav, den diskussionen utelämnas dock till största delen ur denna PM.

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