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  • 1.
    Abeywecra, Ruchira
    et al.
    OUSL, Dept Mech Engn, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka..
    Scnanavakc, Nihal S.
    OUSL, Dept Mech Engn, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka..
    Jayasuriya, Jeevan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Fransson, Torsten H.
    EIT InnoEnergy, Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    A Remote Mode High Quality International Master Degree Program in Environomical Pathways for Sustainable Energy Systems (SELECT) -Pilot Program Experiences During First Year of Studies2018In: PROCEEDINGS OF 2018 IEEE GLOBAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION CONFERENCE (EDUCON) - EMERGING TRENDS AND CHALLENGES OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION, IEEE , 2018, p. 276-284Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remote mode study programs at master degree level are becoming more popular than undergraduate level programs. Students after graduation with Bachelors degree very often are employed and the most appropriate mode for them to pursue higher studies is the remote mode. Postgraduate programs with one or two year duration mostly focus on specific areas of research based industrial application. Traditional remote education is thought to be more centered on web based on-line programs with a little opportunity for teacher student interaction and interaction with peers. In such programs motivation for studies has been a problem and as a result many students drop off and also those remain in the program for prolonged periods do not show good performance. One of the reasons for failures of students in remote studies is the isolation leading to discouragement for the completion studies. A remote mode Master Degree Program in Environomical Pathways for Sustainable Energy Systems (MSc-SELECT), consisting of a number of innovative features aimed at improved student engagement, motivation, exposure to experiences in multi-national setting and team work, was developed and implemented by the Master School of the EIT-InnoEnergy, as a pilot project. The program was offered, collaboratively and simultaneously to students in three locations, Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya in Spain and the Open University of Sri Lanka. The students in Sweden and Spain each followed 50% of the courses on-campus and 50% in remote mode depending upon the university they registered with. The students in Sri Lanka followed the entire 1st year fully remotely. All the students (from KTH, OUSL and UPC) will spend the 2nd year on-campus at another university in the consortium. This paper discusses, from the perspective of the fully remote site, the remote program with its innovative aspects, student performance and experience together with future tasks for making the program viable and beneficial to all partner countries.

  • 2.
    Ampadu, Ernest
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Ottergren, Elin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    From Physical to Hybrid: Listening to Swedish Mathematics Teachers’ Views About Their Teaching and Assessment Practices2023In: Handbook of Research on Redesigning Teaching, Learning, and Assessment in the Digital Era, IGI Global, 2023, p. 87-105Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores Swedish mathematics teachers teaching and assessing practices as different hybrid teaching methods were implemented. Data were collected from 51 teachers in the Stockholm region using an open-ended questionnaire. Teachers experienced a developmental leap involving both pedagogical adaptation and the use of technological tools when adapting to hybrid teaching. Quality dialogues, structure and learner autonomy, as well as the integrity of assessment practices were issues of major concern, as most students experienced online and hybrid learning for the first time with limited preparation.

    These adaptation processes led to an increase in transactional distance, which in turn affected students’ autonomy and achievement. The results also show that the reliance on summative assessment became the new normal practice inconsistent with the Swedish way of teaching and assessing student learning. To enjoy the full advantages of hybrid teaching, there is a need to put measures in place to reduce the transactional distance to help improve students’ autonomy and achievement.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning. Centrum för genusvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Gullberg, Annica
    Centrum för genusvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Beyond biology – what is forefronted when biologists are shadowed?2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Kristina
    et al.
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University, Box 527, 751 20, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gullberg, Annica
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University, Box 527, 751 20, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University, Box 527, 751 20, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Scantlebury, Kathryn
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University, Box 527, 751 20, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hussénius, Anita
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University, Box 527, 751 20, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Chafing borderlands: obstacles for science teaching and learning in preschool teacher education.2020In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 433-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines preservice preschool teachers’ university science education experience.The empirical data are from a research and intervention project conducted on teacher education programs at two Swedish universities. We analyzed one of the assignments completed by 111 students within a science course as well as their conversations about the assignment at a number of seminars. We combined culture contrast and thematic analysis to examine the data. The results showed a tension between the preschool culture and the university science culture. We described this tension between the boundary lines of the two cultures as a chafing borderland. These cultures do not merge, and the defined boundaries cause chafing with each other. We discuss ways of diminishing this chafing of borderlands, potential border crossings such as caring and children as boundary objects and equalizing power imbalances.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Hussénius, Anita
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University.
    Gullberg, Annica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Danielsson, Anna T
    Department of Education, Uppsala University.
    Elmgren, Maja
    Department of Chemistry, Uppsala University.
    Engström, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Norström, Per
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Lärarutbildares naturvetenskap under lupp – en studie i gränslandet mellan ämnesdiscipliner och skolämnen2019In: Resultatdialog 2019, Vetenskapsrådet / [ed] Vetenskapsrådet, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development, Avancerad underhållsteknik och produktionslogistik. BIBA Bremer Inst Prod & Logist GmbH, Hochschulring 20, Bremen, Germany..
    Stefan, Ioana Andreea
    Adv Technol Syst, Str Tineretului 1, Targoviste 130029, Romania..
    Hauge, Jakob Baalsrud
    BIBA Bremer Inst Prod & Logist GmbH, Hochschulring 20, Bremen, Germany.;Hsch Fuer Tech, Stuttgart, Germany..
    Stefan, Antoniu
    KTH.
    Gheorghe, Ancuta Florentina
    KTH.
    Redesign with Accessibility in Mind: A Visual Impairment Study2021In: SERIOUS GAMES, JCSG 2021 / [ed] Fletcher, B Ma, M Gobel, S Hauge, JB Marsh, T, Springer Nature , 2021, Vol. 12945, p. 55-66Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of the teacher is to help students improve their knowledge and skills. While it is acknowledged that learning occurs within specific activities and contexts, the adaptation of learning settings to distinct didactical objectives and learner needs remains a challenge. Under these premises, the authors explore the demanding endeavour of creating and tailoring game-based learning activities for specific subjects. The design and personalisation of rich media applications require an extra effort on the teacher side and imply advanced skills. The paper explores the opportunity to reuse gamified lesson plans using an authoring pipeline that reunited authoring tools, game narratives and minigames.

  • 7. Barkhudaryan, R.
    et al.
    Gomes, D. A.
    Shahgholian, Henrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Mathematics (Div.).
    Salehi, M.
    System of variational inequalities with interconnected obstacles2020In: Applicable Analysis, ISSN 0003-6811, E-ISSN 1563-504XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our objective with this paper is to discuss multi-switching problems, arising as variational inequalities, that models decision under uncertainty. We prove general existence theory through monotone scheme and discuss iterative methods for numerical results. We also connect the recently developed models for asset bubbles (which is a non-local problem) to switching problems with two possible switching cases.

  • 8.
    Bellander, Erika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Manolopoulos, Dimitrios
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Hållbar utveckling i teknikämnet: Analys av läroböcker i teknik förgrundskolans åk 7–9och teknik 1 för gymnasiet2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis is about examining how certain current textbooks in technology at the lower secondary school and technology 1 in the upper secondary school address sustainable development (SD). The textbooks have been compared with current curricula for both Lgr11and Gy2011 as well as some external sources, the UN's 17 Global Goals and the magazine Nyteknik.

    As a method, a thematic analysis has been chosen according to Brown and Clark (2008), fromthe contextual perspective. The different themes have been analyzed and counted with regard to occurrences in the various sources, which has resulted in both a quantitative and qualitative analysis.

    The analyses have been linked to literature on research in three main areas; technical subject and HU, teacher - student and knowledge and textbook perspective.

    It can be stated that the textbooks do not contain as much percentage (%) of SD text mass, paragraphs, which the course and subject plans contain. The textbooks do not adhere specifically to the direction of the curricula, but SD seems to have been added to the existing content of previous editions, rather than having been worked in from scratch in new editions.This means that SD is sometimes regarded as an optional complementary activity in the teaching.

    The curricula do not follow the 17 new global goals for SD. This is because they are at different levels and synchronization with the global goals is done with a great delay. First, synchronization is made to the national level, then to the institutional level and last to the course and subject level (curricula).

    As it is now, the technical subject in the curricula seems to emphasize the importance of thinking about SD, rather than highlighting technologies relating to sustainable development and sustainable products.

    The conclusion is that textbooks and curricula need to be updated and the technology topics would integrate SD in a more concrete and genuine way, not as today, at a generally educational level. This is to emphasize the importance of SD in society and to achieve a current and equivalent teaching and acquiring knowledge and skill.

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  • 9.
    Bengmark, Samuel
    et al.
    Matematiska vetenskaper, Chalmers och Göteborgs universitet..
    Thunberg, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Mathematics (Div.).
    Winberg, Mikael
    Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik, Umeå universitet.
    Success-factors in transition to university mathematics2017In: International journal of mathematical education in science and technology, ISSN 0020-739X, E-ISSN 1464-5211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines different factors' relative importance for students' performance in the transition to university mathematics. Students' characteristics (motivation, actions and beliefs) were measured when entering the university and at the end of the first year. Principal component analysis revealed four important constructs: Self-efficacy, Motivation type, Study habits and Views of mathematics. Subsequently, orthogonal partial least squares (OPLS) analysis was used for measuring the constructs' ability to predict students' university mathematics grades. No individual constructs measured at the time of entrance predicted more than 5% of the variation. On the other hand, jointly they predicted 14%, which is almost in pair with upper secondary grades predicting 17%. Constructs measured at the end of the first year were stronger predictors, jointly predicting 37% of the variation in university grades, with Self-efficacy (21%) and Motivation (12%) being the two strongest individual predictors. In general, Study habits were not important for predicting university achievement. However, for students with low upper secondary grades, the textbook and interaction with peers, rather than internet-based resources, contributed positively to achievement. The association between Views of mathematics and performance was weak for all groups and non-existing for students with low grades.

  • 10.
    Berglund, Per
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Karlsson, Sara
    KTH.
    Klasén, Ida
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Sandberg, Teresia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Utvärdering för utveckling: KTH:s samtliga utbildningar under belysning2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Bernhard, Jonte
    et al.
    Linköping University Linköping, Sweden.
    Chance, Shannon
    TU Dublin Dublin, Ireland.
    De Laet, Tinne
    KU Leuven Leuven, Belgium.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    FACE TO FACE AGAIN: REPORT FROM THE DOCTORAL SYMPOSIUM IN ENGINEERING EDUCATION RESEARCH AT SEFI 20222022In: SEFI 2022: 50th Annual Conference of the European Society for Engineering Education, Proceedings, European Society for Engineering Education (SEFI) , 2022, p. 2340-2356Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 6th Doctoral Symposium at SEFI 2022 attracted 20 doctoral students and 17 senior researchers. After two years as an online event during the pandemic, it was organised as a fully in-person event. In preparation, the doctoral students wrote extended abstracts to introduce themselves and their PhD projects, while the seniorsprovided reading recommendations and advice. The intense, full-day program was based on group discussions and interactive plenary sessions. The Doctoral Symposium was concluded by a session in which each participant presented their take-home message. This paper outlines how the Doctoral Symposium was organised and summarizes some of the documentation.

  • 12. Bjursten, E. -L
    et al.
    Nilsson, T.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning. School of Education, Culture and Communication (UKK), Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences Didactics, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Computer programming in primary schools: Swedish Technology Teachers’ pedagogical strategies2022In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a recognized need for research on how to teach computer programming in primary schools in Sweden grades 4–6 (10–12-year-old pupils). Studies of teaching show the importance of teachers’ knowledge of content and pedagogy and how these two parts affect each other (i.e. pedagogical content knowledge [PCK]). Most teachers in Sweden have little or no formal education in computer programming, the revised Swedish curriculum requires them to teach it. The aim of this study is to explore the pedagogical strategies teachers use when they teach computer programming. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 participants, comprising 12 teachers and 2 teacher trainers. The data were analysed deductively with themes from previous research. The results show that teachers use eight pedagogical strategies, including three new strategies that have been constructed inductively: do-it-yourself, gamification and progression. These eight pedagogical strategies are mostly general, and teachers may be considered regressed experts, as they lack formal training in computer programming. They facilitate learning in a general sense, but, compared to other subjects, their PCK in computer programming is problematized. In-service teacher training is needed to increase content knowledge, thus enabling to develop PCK in computer programming. It would also be fruitful to deepen our knowledge regarding pedagogical strategies in the PCK domain of computer programming. 

  • 13.
    Björkholm, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Learning in Engineering Sciences.
    En studie av progression i tekniskt kunnande2016In: Studier av kunnande och undervisningspraktiker inom praktiska och estetiska skolämnen., 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I teknikämnets kursplan i Lgr 11 läggs fokus på egna konstruktioner där eleverna tillämpar tekniska principer av olika slag, exempelvis enkla mekanismer och hållfasta och stabila strukturer. Ämnets undervisningspraktik domineras av praktiska moment i form av konstruktionsarbeten enligt Skolinspektionens kvalitetsgranskning av teknikundervisningen (2014). I granskningen ses även flera exempel på att samma elever flera gånger under sin grundskoletid får identiska konstruktionsuppgifter. Det saknas således en progression i uppgifternas innehåll i relation till elevernas kunskapsutveckling. Dessutom finns en otydlighet kring uppgifternas syfte, dvs. vilket slags teknikkunnande som aktiviteterna skall ge eleverna möjlighet att utveckla.  Syftet med studien är att undersöka progressionen så som det kommer till uttryck i praktiskt konstruktionsarbete inom ramen för grundskolans teknikämne. Studien utgår från tidigare forskning (Björkholm 2015) som undersökt kunnande i relation till konstruktionsarbete på lågstadiet.

    I studien kommer vi att undersöka vari progressionen i att kunna konstruera tekniska lösningar i grundskolans låg-, mellan- och högstadium består. Kvalitativa skillnader i kunnandet studeras dels mellan olika elever på samma stadium, dels mellan elevgrupper på olika stadier. Därtill undersöks hur den praktiska uppgiften förändras mellan olika stadier. Metoderna för insamling av data utgörs främst av videoobservationer och intervjuer. Genom att identifiera aspekter som är nödvändiga att urskilja för ett specifikt kunnande, kan skillnader mellan olika kunnanden beskrivas. På så sätt kan progressionen i kunnandet beskrivas mer detaljerat i termer av innehållsliga aspekter.

  • 14.
    Björkholm, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technical Science Education.
    Exploring the capability of evaluating technical solutions: a collaborative study into the primary technology classroom2014In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of technology education, evaluating technical solutions is considered as an important topic. Research indicates that pupils have difficulties in evaluating technical solutions in terms of fitness for purpose, i.e. how effective a technical solution supports its intended function. By using the learning study, which is an iterative and collaborative research approach, the study explores the capability to evaluate technical solutions in terms of fitness for purpose, what it takes to know it and how to best enhance its learning in the primary technology classroom. Audio and video recorded interviews, teachers' meetings and lessons are the base data for the study. A contribution of the study is the understanding of this specific knowing, and what is critical for learning and thus to an improvement of technology teaching practice.

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  • 15.
    Björkholm, Eva
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Konstruktioner som fungerar: En studie av teknikkunnande i de tidiga skolåren2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to explore the meaning of technical knowing in primary technology education. This is done by identifying and describing ways of knowing in relation to specific content (so-called objects of learning) of the school subject of technology. The purpose is to contribute to the body of teachers’ professional knowledge concerning primary technology education. In this thesis, the subject of technology is seen as representing technical knowledge traditions, characterized by specific ways of developing knowledge. Moreover, the knowledge is to a great extent embedded in actions. This perspective on technical knowing challenges the traditional distinction between theoretical and practical knowledge.  

    Data were generated through two Learning studies conducted in primary schools.  Learning study is a classroom-based, interventionistic research approach, in which teachers collaborate with a researcher, focusing on specific objects of learning, that is, on what the students are supposed to learn. In the studies, the capability to evaluate the fitness for purpose of technical solutions, and to construct a linkage mechanism allowing for transferring and transforming movement were examined. Students’ actions were video-recorded in order to document verbal and physical expressions of knowing.

    The data were analysed using phenomenographic analysis, resulting in descriptions of specific ways of knowing in terms of complexity, as well as critical aspects to discern in order to develop the knowing. The findings from the first study describe knowing in terms of discerning functions related to different types of users, as well as aspects of the construction in order to realize functions. The second study identified technical knowing as a specified analysis of the construction in terms of location and separation of joints in relation to different functions. These findings were then used to identify technical knowing in video material generated within another teaching context. The results suggest that knowledge concerning knowing of specific objects of learning related to the evaluation and construction of technical solutions is partly generalizable. In addition, the specified knowledge concerning the meaning of the object of learning generated during the Learning study process was described. This knowledge is suggested to be an important knowledge product of Learning studies.

  • 16.
    Björkholm, Eva
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Sammanfogning av material i eget konstruktionsarbete: Kunnande och elevuppgifter i tidig teknikundervisning2018In: Forskning om undervisning och lärande, ISSN 2000-9674, E-ISSN 2001-6131, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 5-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore what the ability to join materials in working with own constructions in primary technology education consists of, as well as how knowing is developed when students work with specific tasks. Interventions were made in four groups of students in second grade (7 and 8-year-old students). Data collection mainly consisted of video observation. The phenomenographic analysis of the students’ actions resulted in seven categories, describing qualitatively different ways of knowing related to joining materials. The categories were related to aspects of function, such as analyzing the duration of the joining; and construction, such as selecting joining materials. The student tasks, in terms of educational materials, instructions or task design, were then related to the identified ways of knowing. The study contributes to the specification of which knowledge students can develop, and what kind of student tasks in early technology education that can contribute to it.

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  • 17.
    Björkholm, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technical Science Education.
    Teknik i de tidiga skolåren: Om vad det innebär att kunna konstruera en länkmekanism2015In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 35-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study within primary technology education aims at exploring the capability to construct a specific linkage mechanism. The study reported was integrated in a Learning study, a kind of design experiment inspired by the Japanese Lesson Study, and was carried out in collaboration with two primary school teachers and their two classes, a preschool class and a grade one class. The study reports on the analysis of the video-recorded pre- and post-test. The tests were analysed phenomenographically resulting in four categories describing qualitatively different ways of experiencing the object of learning. The categories were then analysed in terms of critical aspects, describing aspects necessary to discern for this group of students in order to learn how to construct a linkage mechanism. The result indicates the importance of discerning the two joints and their different characteristics in terms of a fixed and a moving joint as well as the placement of the moving joint in relation to the resulting movement.

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  • 18.
    Björkholm, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technical Science Education.
    Unpacking the object of learning2015In: International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, ISSN 2046-8253, E-ISSN 2046-8261, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 194-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Knowledge concerning the meaning of the object of learning is an important contribution of Learning study. The purpose of this paper is to generate this kind of knowledge and show how it can be developed and refined in the different phases of a Learning study.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper reports on a Learning study in primary technology education conducted with students aged six to seven years old, with the aim to explore a specific object of learning; to construct a linkage mechanism for transferring and transforming movement.

    Findings – The findings show several aspects to discern by the learner in order to grasp the object of learning and reveal how this knowledge was gradually developed during the Learning study. The presumed aspects, those identified in the pre- and post-test, as well as how they were elaborated in the lesson contributed to refining the meaning of the object of learning.

    Originality/value – In Learning study, knowledge concerning the meaning of the object of learning is generated. By empirically demonstrating the development and specification of this knowledge during a Learning study, this paper will contribute to the discussion of knowledge products from Learning studies as well as to knowledge concerning what there is to know in order to develop a specific capability in technology education.

  • 19.
    Björkholm, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Learning in Engineering Sciences.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Carlgren, Ingrid
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Exploring technical knowledge in the primary technology classroom2016In: Australasian Journal of Technology Education, ISSN 2382-2007, Vol. 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explore the use of categories and aspects of technical knowing which have been identified in specific contexts and related to specific learning objects to identify technical knowing and technical content in another teaching context. In this way, we want to contribute to the understanding of technical knowing within primary technology education, as well as to the development of analytical tools to help teachers in selecting and designing the content of technology teaching. Previous findings from two Learning Studies focusing on evaluating and constructing technical solutions were used to identify technical knowing in video material generated within a particular classroom practice (students aged 7-8 years old). The results suggest that the former categories and aspects can be used in different ways to identify and specify technical knowings related to technical content in the primary technology classroom.

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  • 20.
    Björkholm, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technical Science Education.
    Carlgren, Ingrid
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Learning study as a way to inquire the meaning of knowing what is to be known: The meaning of knowing how to construct a linkage mechanism. Discering aspects of the object of learning by analyzing classroom interactions2013In: Lesson and learning study as teacher research, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation describes a Learning Study within primary technology education focusing on the capability to construct a specific linkage mechanism. What one has to know in order to be able to construct a linkage mechanism is, however, not self-evident. The study reported here explores the meaning of this specific knowing. The study was conducted in collaboration with two primary school teachers and their two classes (children aged 6-7 years). Throughout the whole study step by step, starting with the analysis of the pre-test, followed by three cycles of planning and evaluation of research lessons, and the analysis of post-test, the meaning of the object of learning was specified (Marton & Pang, 2006; Carlgren, 2012). The presentation will focus on knowledge generated from the video recorded lessons by analyzing the classroom interactions and students’ difficulties that were made visible through these interactions. Teacher-student interactions as well as student-student interactions were analyzed. By analyzing students’ difficulties regarding the specific object of learning, critical aspects of the expected knowing were discerned and in this way the meaning of knowing what is expected to be known was made explicit. The results are presented in the form of critical aspects of what it means to know how to construct a linkage mechanism for this group of students. The critical aspects identified in the pre-test were further elaborated in the research lessons and by analyzing the classroom interactions in terms of student difficulties, additional aspects that were critical for students’ learning were identified. By gradually identifying the critical aspects, the collective understanding of the meaning of the object of learning was developed and specified.

  • 21.
    Björkholm, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Carlgren, Ingrid
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Ahlstrand, Pernilla
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    Stockholms Universitet.
    The meaning of knowing what is to be known2015In: Éducation & didactique, ISSN 1956-3485, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 143-160Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Björkholm, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Learning in Engineering Sciences.
    Engström, Susanne
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Learning in Engineering Sciences.
    Norström, Per
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Learning in Engineering Sciences.
    Exploring Materials as Subject Content within Technology Education2016In: PATT2016: Technology Education for 21st Century, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within technology education in compulsory school in Sweden, materials are part of the core contents. What kinds of materials, and which characteristics that should be highlighted is open to interpretation. The study includes three sub-studies: 1/ An analysis of classroom activities during two lessons about materials in primary school, 2/ A Delphi study (Osborne et al. 2003) with experts on materials to gather their thoughts about materials in elementary technology education, and 3/ A review of documents (syllabus, teachers’ handbooks). The purpose of this study is to put light on the field of materials as a content area by investigating what aspects of materials are highlighted in the three contexts. Two teaching sessions were video recorded. The data analysis focused on the objects of teachers and students. Results suggest that the teachers highlight different aspects; one teacher focused on naming the materials and describing what products they are used for, while the other emphasized the materials’ properties. Ten experts participated in the first round of the Delphi study. Their responses were coded reflexively and iteratively. Results indicate the following major categories of material-related subject content: groups of materials, properties, creation and refinement, use, development over time, environmental aspects, and modern materials. The syllabus states that young pupils should study materials that they can use (wood, cardboard). Later common materials (steel, concrete) are introduced and at the end of compulsory school modern materials. Materials’ properties and use in solving technical problems is studied, and their environmental effects. Preliminary results indicate that some content emerges in all three contexts: material usage, the material’s functional properties and origin of the material, production and processing.

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  • 23.
    Björkholm, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technical Science Education.
    Kilbrink, Nina
    Karlstads Universitet.
    Focusing on a specific learning content in primary technology education2015In: 29th PATT Conference : Plurality and Complementarity of Approachers in Design and technology Education: Plurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design adn Technology Education / [ed] Marjolaine Chatoney, Marseille, France: Presses Universitaires de Provence , 2015, p. 55-60Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we discuss findings from two previous studies in technology education using the Learning study model and the Variation theory of learning. The Learning study is a collaborative approach where teachers and researchers work together in the classroom with the aim to enhance students’ learning concerning a specific content. In a Learning study, focus is on a specific “object of learning”, i.e. what the students are expected to learn. The aim of this paper is to show what knowledge concerning specific objects of learning in technology education is generated in a Learning study and to discuss the potential contribution of this knowledge to technology teaching practice. We will provide examples from two Learning studies conducted in primary technology education in Sweden. The findings from the studies are of two kinds; identified aspects of the object of learning that are critical in order to learn, and aspects that could be referred to the teaching of the specific content.

  • 24.
    Björn, Camilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Haglund, Pontus
    1Dept. of Computer Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Munz, Katharina
    2Dept. of Computer and Information Science, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany.
    Stromback, Filip
    1Dept. of Computer Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    It's Okay Because I Worked Really Hard!: Student Justifications for Questionable Collaboration while Solving Computer Labs2022In: Proceedings: Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) , 2022, Vol. 2022-OctoberConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this full research paper we examine questionable collaboration from a student perspective. Collaborating while solving computer lab assignments is often considered an important part when learning computer science, as it allows students to discuss their work, while also practicing working together. However, it also introduces risks, such as students collaborating in ways negatively impacting their learning outcomes and leading to inaccurate grading. Hence it is important to work towards reducing the use of these poor collaborative practices. In order to ameliorate the problem with academic misconduct, we need to understand students' justifications for deviating from acceptable practices. In this paper we therefore investigate how students justify their collaborative practices during computer lab assignments in situations they experience as questionable. The justifications were collected through 15 semi-structured interviews with students experienced in pair programming, majoring in computer science and other technical fields from two large well-known European universities.The justifications from the interviews were analysed using phenomenography resulting in seven categories: external pressure, lack of interest, spending time on the assignment, understanding the end product, contributing to the process, learning from the assignment and reflecting on the purpose of the learning. These describe in which situations students might deviate from the rules and can be used by institutions to prevent such behavior.

  • 25.
    Bosk, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Mathematics (Div.).
    En formalisering av matematiken i svensk gymnasieundervisning2011Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how formal mathematics can be taught in the Swedish secondary school with its new curriculum for mathematics. The study examines what a teaching material in formal mathematics corresponding to the initial content of the course Mathematics 1c could look like, and whether formal mathematics can be taught to high school students.

    The survey was conducted with second year students from the science programme. The majority of these students studied the course Mathematics D. The students described themselves as not being motivated towards mathematics.

    The results show that the content of the curriculum can be presented with formal mathematics. This both in terms of requirements for content and students being able to comprehend this content. The curriculum also requires that this type of mathematics is introduced in the course Mathematics 1c.

    The results also show that students are open towards and want more formal mathematics in their ordinary education. They initially felt it was strange because they had never encountered this type of mathematics before, but some students found the formal mathematics to be easier than the mathematics ordinarily presented in class.

    The study finds no reason to postpone the meeting with the formal mathematics to university level. Students’ commitment to proof and their comprehention of content suggests that formal mathematics can be introduced in high school courses. This study thus concludes that the new secondary school course Mathematics 1c can be formalised and therefore makes possible a renewed mathematics education.

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  • 26.
    Bosk, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Glassey, Richard
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    When Flying Blind, Bring a Co-pilot: Informal Peer Observation and Cooperative Teaching during Remote Teaching2021In: Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, ITiCSE, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2021, p. 611-612Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The shift to meeting students online has made traditional forms of interaction difficult or impossible to replicate. In response, we suggest that teachers become co-pilots for each other: joining lectures and extending the abilities of a solo teacher. By doing so, there are clear and distinct benefits for students, the teacher, and the co-pilot, with almost no barrier to entry and very little preparation required. Whilst there is a time cost, we feel this is well spent and acts as a gateway to more established pedagogical practices, such as peer observation and cooperative teaching. 

  • 27.
    Bufasi, Ergi
    et al.
    The Interdisciplinary Center of Educational Innovations, University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia.
    Lin, Tingjun
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Benedicic, Ursa
    School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Technological University Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Westerhof, Marten
    School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Technological University Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Mishra, Rohit
    Science and Engineering Education Group, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands.
    Namsone, Dace
    The Interdisciplinary Center of Educational Innovations, University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia.
    Dudareva, Inese
    The Interdisciplinary Center of Educational Innovations, University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia.
    Sorby, Sheryl
    College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, United States.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Klapwijk, Remke M.
    Science and Engineering Education Group, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands.
    Spandaw, Jeroen
    Department of Mathematics, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands.
    Bowe, Brian
    Academic Affairs – City Campus, Technological University Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    O'Kane, Colm
    School of Mechanical and Design Engineering, Technological University Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Duffy, Gavin
    School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Technological University Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Pagkratidou, Marianna
    School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Technological University Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    Faculty of Engineering and Informatics, Technological University of the Shannon: Midlands Midwest, Athlone, Ireland.
    Addressing the complexity of spatial teaching: a narrative review of barriers and enablers2024In: Frontiers in Education, E-ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 9, article id 1306189Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extensive research has established that spatial ability is a crucial factor for achieving success in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). However, challenges that educators encounter while teaching spatial skills remain uncertain. The purpose of this study is to develop a research framework that examines the interrelationships, barriers, and enablers amongst various educational components, including schools, teachers, students, classrooms, and training programs, that are encountered when teaching for spatial ability development. A thorough examination of international research, in combination with a detailed review of the primary Science and Mathematics curricula in Ireland, Latvia, Sweden, and the Netherlands, is undertaken to acquire a more concentrated comprehension of the incorporation of spatial components in the curriculum. The review seeks to establish the fundamental factors that enable or hinder teachers in terms of curriculum, pedagogy, pedagogical content knowledge, and spatialized classroom practices.

  • 28.
    Buvari, Sebastian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Viberg, Olga
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Iop, Alessandro
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Romero, Mario
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    A student-centered learning analytics dashboard towards course goal achievement in STEM education2023In: Responsive and Sustainable Educational Futures: 18th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning, EC-TEL 2023, Proceedings, Springer Nature , 2023, p. 698-704Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Online learning has become an everyday form of learning for many students across different disciplines, including STEM subjects in the setting of higher education. Studying in these settings requires students to self-regulate their learning to a higher degree as compared to campus-based education. A vital aspect of self-regulated learning is the application of goal-setting strategies. Universities act to support students’ goal-setting through the achievement of course learning outcomes, which work both as a promise and metric of academic achievement. However, a lack of clear integration between course activities and course learning outcomes leaves a dissonance between students’ study efforts and the course progress. This demo study presents a student-centered learning analytics dashboard aimed at assisting students in their achievement of course learning goals in the setting of STEM higher education. The dashboard was designed using a design science methodological approach. Thirty-seven students have contributed to its development and evaluation during different stages of the design process, including the conceptual iterative design and prototyping. The preliminary results show that students found the tool to be easy to use and useful for the achievement of the course goals.

  • 29.
    Bälter, Katarina
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden;Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Javan Abraham, Feben
    Department of Public Health, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Chantal, Mutimukwe
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Mugisha, Reuben
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Persson Osowski, Christine
    Department of Public Health, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Bälter, Olof
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    A Web-Based Program About Sustainable Development Goals Focusing on Digital Learning, Digital Health Literacy, and Nutrition for Professional Development in Ethiopia and Rwanda: Development of a Pedagogical Method2022In: JMIR Formative Research, E-ISSN 2561-326X, Vol. 6, no 12, p. e36585-e36585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:East African countries face significant societal challenges related to sustainable development goals but have limited resources to address these problems, including a shortage of nutrition experts and health care workers, limited access to physical and digital infrastructure, and a shortage of advanced educational programs and continuing professional development.

    Objective:This study aimed to develop a web-based program for sustainable development with a focus on digital learning, digital health literacy, and child nutrition, targeting government officials and decision-makers at nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in Ethiopia and Rwanda.

    Methods:A web-based program—OneLearns (Online Education for Leaders in Nutrition and Sustainability)—uses a question-based learning methodology. This is a research-based pedagogical method developed within the open learning initiative at Carnegie Mellon University, United States. Participants were recruited during the fall of 2020 from ministries of health, education, and agriculture and NGOs that have public health, nutrition, and education in their missions. The program was conducted during the spring of 2021.

    Results:Of the 70 applicants, 25 (36%) were selected and remained active throughout the entire program and filled out a pre- and postassessment questionnaire. After the program, of the 25 applicants, 20 (80%, 95% CI 64%-96%) participants reported that their capacity to drive change related to the sustainable development goals as well as child nutrition in their organizations had increased to large extent or to a very large extent. Furthermore, 17 (68%, 95% CI 50%-86%) and 18 (72%, 95% CI 54%-90%) participants reported that their capacity to drive change related to digital health literacy and digital learning had increased to a large extent and to a very large extent, respectively.

    Conclusions:Digital learning based on a question-based learning methodology was perceived as a useful method for increasing the capacity to drive change regarding sustainable development among government officials and decision-makers at NGOs in Ethiopia and Rwanda.

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  • 30.
    Bälter, Olle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Walking with Seminars2019In: KTH SoTL 2019, Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose

    Low levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour are a growing health problem globally and physical inactivity is associated with increased risk of numerous ailments, cardiovascular disease and mortality. To counteract this, the Walking seminar was invented at KTH in 2015. It is a small step towards a less sedentary lifestyle for students and teachers. Several teachers have already adopted walking seminars, but since it can be perceived as unorthodox, at least before you have tried it yourself, we offer this workshop to give hand-on experience on how to conduct a walking seminar.

    Work done/work in progress

    We started by transforming an on-campus course into a blended course to make sure all participants had accessed the information that would be discussed during the seminar. These walking seminars were evaluated among 131 students and nine teachers leading the walking seminars (Bälter et al. 2018). The responses to the student survey and teacher interviews indicate that discussions, sense of well-being and the general quality of the seminar improved, regardless of how physically active participants were the rest of the time.

    Results/observations/lessons learned

    Students might be sceptical towards a walking seminar, before they have tried it. However, if introduced a day with pleasant conditions, very few are willing to go back to sitting indoors. There is some time lost for the organisation (putting on clothes, dropping of bags, opening doors), but since the discussions outdoors are way more intense than the indoor discussions, this more than makes up for the lost time. The methodology for walking seminars has evolved since its beginning and at this workshop you will get a feel for state-of-the-art when it comes to promoting and arranging a walking seminar.

  • 31.
    Bälter, Olle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Riese, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Viberg, Olga
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Effective Feedback for Faster Learning2019In: KTH SoTL 2019, Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose The Open Learning Initiative (OLI) at Carnegie Mellon University and Stanford University showed already in 2008 (Lovett, Meyer & Thille) that by using the OLI methodology, teaching and learning time could be reduced with 50% with maintained results. One key in this methodology is to use online questions with answer-depending feedback. In this workshop we will work with you to formulate OLIinspired questions for your course. Work done/work in progress We have previously worked with online quizzes in several forms (Bälter, Enström & Klingenberg, 2013) and analyzed learning data from OLI courses (Bälter, Zimmaro & Thille, 2018). The online learning material where the questions and feedback is embedded is in campus courses used in flipped classroom settings. In 2017 we ran a pilot of preparatory course in programming based on a Stanford course with OLI methodology in the OpenEdX environment. During the fall semester 2018 questions with answer-depending feedback was added to the course material in an online introductory programming course given in Canvas at KTH. Results/observations/lessons learned While a full implementation of the entire OLI methodology requires infrastructure that is not in place at KTH yet (event handler, analytic engine), the actual learning for the students takes place in the interaction with the questions and their feedback and this part can already be implemented in Canvas at KTH. Take-home message Well-formulated questions with forward focused feedback can dramatically speed up both teaching and 1 2 1 1 2 Page 25 KTH SoTL 2019 (A-K) learning. This workshop brings that speed to your course with practical exercises based on your own course.

  • 32.
    Bälter, Olof
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Moving Technology-Enhanced-Learning Forward: Bridging Divides through Leadership2017In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 167-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study of academics and professional staff engaged in the emerging field of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) reveal three areas of significant difference in reference to perspectives about TEL. These differences rest on the following individual characteristics: 1) research areas and competencies, 2) academic level, and 3) attitudes towards teaching. While the number of respondents is small, the data set is rich due to a diverse group of respondents. Leadership strategy that rests on appreciative inquiry to draw these perspectives together could begin with implementation of five ways of working collaboratively: acknowledge unique skills different from one’s own, understand driving forces from different vantage points, learn enough about other views to show respect, identify common goals and incentives for all, and include people from all relevant groups. 

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  • 33.
    Bång, Olivia
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Drama as a pedagogical tool in technology education: A study of teachers’ perceptions of drama exercises when teaching ethics in technology2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    According to the National Agency of Education in Sweden, ethics should be a part of technology education in compulsory school (Skolverket, 2011), though research shows that technology teachers struggle with how they should teach ethics in technology (Kåreklint, 2007). The National Agency of Education also states that although drama does not have its’ own syllabus in Swedish grade school, it is encouraged that it is integrated in other subjects. The purpose of this study was to inquire how drama can contribute to the teaching of ethics in technology education in secondary schools. This was attempted to be fulfilled by answering the question "

    How do teachers view the usage of drama as a pedagogical tool when teaching ethics in technology education?"

    The inquiry was answered conducting three semi structured interviews with three different technology teachers from three secondary schools in Sweden. All teachers had previous to the interview received and conducted a lesson plan with their pupils, specifically developed for this study, where ethics in technology could be taught with a drama exercise. The interview was largely based on the teachers’ impression of this lesson.

    The result of the study shows that all participating teachers were very positive to the idea of using drama as a tool when teaching ethics in technology education. All teachers expressed that the lesson had gone well and they all answered that they could see themselves use drama as a tool again. The conclusion being that drama could be a viable option for teaching ethics in technology education.

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  • 34. Dagiene, V.
    et al.
    Mannila, L.
    Poranen, T.
    Rolandsson, Lennart
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technical Science Education.
    Söderhjelm, P.
    Students'performance on programming-related tasks in an informatics contest in Finland, Sweden and Lithuania2014In: ITICSE 2014 - Proceedings of the 2014 Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education Conference, 2014, p. 153-158Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ways in which informatics is covered in K-12 education vary among European countries. In Finland and Sweden, informatics is not included in the core curriculum, whereas, for example, in Lithuania, all students are exposed to some informatics concepts starting in the fifth grade. Bebras is an annually arranged international informatics contest for K-12 level, resulting in a large collection of data about contestants and their results. In this paper, we analyse contest data from the Finnish, Swedish and Lithuanian 2013 contests, focusing on students'performance on tasks related to algorithmic thinking. Our findings suggest that despite coming from different educational systems, students perform rather similarly on the tasks. The same tasks are difficult and the thinking behind picking an incorrect answer seems rather similar throughout the countries. The analysis also points out that there is a lack of easy questions - this needs to be fixed in order to not risk scaring students away.

  • 35.
    Danielsson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Engström, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Norström, Per
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Andersson, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    The Making of Contemporary Physicists: Figured Worlds in the University Quantum Mechanics Classroom2020In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 36.
    De Luca, Daniela
    et al.
    Politecnico di Torino, Turin, Italy.
    Del Giudice, MatteoPolitecnico di Torino, Turin, Italy.Dellosta, MaurizioPolitecnico di Torino, Turin, Italy.Fonsati, AriannaPolitecnico di Torino, Turin, Italy.Osello, AnnaPolitecnico di Torino, Turin, Italy.Ugliotti, Francesca MariaPolitecnico di Torino, Turin, Italy.
    Augmented and virtual reality for smart cities users’ awareness2017Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Users’ awareness is a highly influential topic within all European and National research projects funded respectively by the 7th Framework Programme and by the Italian Smart Communities Technology Cluster. The idea to bridge the gap between high level knowledge that characterizes people involved in the development of scientific projects and the knowledge of the main public is widely shared nowadays. The need of a “spread of knowledge” is related to the engagement of common users in the Smart Cities developing process, in order to stimulate them to change their behaviors towards sustainability. The gamification approach helps to achieve this objective, because it envisages the use of video game objects in non-games systems. This way, the users’ experience is amplified through new and interactive technologies that increase engagement and motivate changed behaviors. The experience of the District Information Modelling and Management for Energy Reduction (DIMMER) European project and the Zero Energy Buildings in Smart Urban Districts (EEB) Italian national cluster in the field of users’ involvement is related to the dissemination activities carried out during the development of both studies. The greatest challenge was to find the right gamification approach that could be applied to different contexts and that could be used for several topics, on the basis of specific needs. Although the demonstrators of the projects are characterized by different aspects, the objectives are alike in some respect; both projects are focused on energy and CO2 emission reduction and the realization of Building Information Models (BIMs) is the starting point. For this reason, games for children were realized within both projects as a step forward compared to “traditional” dissemination activities. They include both Virtual (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) and require knowledge about energy efficiency and smart city-related issues. The focal point of the games is a map where the districts case studies are represented; while the DIMMER District Board Game is mainly focused on the importance of the District Heating Network (DHN), trying to introduce children to energy-related issues, the 3D BIM Map is designed to enhance the main concept of how to realize a “Smart City”, giving children the chance to suggest their innovative proposals in this regard. To get the goal, the communication technologies have been introduced in order to involve people of all ages and make them aware of what a behavior towards energy efficiency and smart cities means and how new ways of data visualization can make demanding concepts more understandable.

  • 37. Derewa, C.
    et al.
    Holt, S.
    Lally, M.
    Trybula, R.
    Yuan, C.
    Coble, Kyle
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Decision and Control Systems (Automatic Control).
    Huang, C.
    Lunar Asset Messaging and on Orbit Navigation (LA MOON)2021In: Proceedings of the International Astronautical Congress, IAC, International Astronautical Federation, IAF , 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NASA has titled its 2020 thrust for the Moon, Artemis. The increased focus on the Moon as a destination for future human and robotic expeditions necessitates general purpose navigational and communications infrastructure reducing their complexity to help establish a sustained presence. A framework through which Lunar missions can relay communications and localize their positions shifts the burden from the individual mission and enables resource allocation tailored to mission-specific goals. During the summer of 2020, student interns under the Innovation to Flight (i2F) program at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in collaboration with the University of Colorado Boulder designed, built, and tested a prototype framework capable of providing surface assets with communication and positioning services. The team utilized the existing i2F CubeSat bus in addition to developing several CubeSat engineering development units (EDUs), a ground vehicle, and a ground station to simulate a scenario in which a lunar surface mission is supported by these services. A primary goal of the summer was to develop a method for localizing the ground vehicle through trilateration. Distances are inferred from the round-Trip time of flight (ToF) of radio signals between an asset and several elements. Signals were sent and received using LimeSDR software defined radios on-board both the ground vehicle and the EDUs; ToF and trilateration were calculated on a Qualcomm Snapdragon development board located within the LA MOON payload data system. The ModalAI chipset on the Qualcomm was instrumental in executing visual based position estimation. Communications was facilitated through a bent-pipe approach addressing the NASA requirement to provide solutions for in communication denied locations. The ground vehicle relayed information to other surface assets in addition to its ground station through the supporting constellation. This project demonstrates the feasibility of a lunar CubeSat constellation for the support of surface assets and explores packaging and operations of the components critical to trilateration and bent-pipe communication into a standard CubeSat form factor. When implemented, this framework will open a door for new surface missions designed with lower power requirements and increased operational access.

  • 38.
    Dovlén, Sylvia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Hilding-Rydevik, T.
    Sustainable development in regional development practice: a socio-cultural view of evaluation2016In: New Principles in Planning Evaluation, Taylor and Francis , 2016, p. 77-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1997, the Swedish government proclaimed that sustainable development (SD) should be the lodestar for all public activities (SOU 1997, 105). The following year sustainable development was explicitly introduced as an overarching aim in Swedish regional development politics (Regeringens proposition 1998). The 21 Swedish regions were thus requested to implement and integrate a new goal and perspective, namely SD, as part of their traditional responsibilities to coordinate and promote regional economic growth and employment. 

  • 39.
    Doyle, Andrew
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Consolidating concepts of technology education: From rhetoric towards a potential reality2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis focuses on the relationship between international rhetoric and classroom realities in technology education. For some time there has been widespread recognition that the intended goals for learning in the subject area have failed to manifest in enacted practices as envisioned. As the intermediary between rhetoric and reality, the technology teachers and ways of understanding their enacted practices are the focus of this work.

     

    The thesis is based on four research articles which adopt theoretical and empirical approaches to investigating the technology teacher as mediator of enacted practice. In Article I, technology education in the Irish national context is investigated through technology teachers’ reflections on enacted practice. In response to a variety of situational- and systemic- factors which impede classroom practice being identified, Article II and III theorise approaches to investigating enacted practice in technology. In acknowledging the epistemological basis of technology as depicted in the extant literature, a reconceptualisation of how to utilise pedagogical content knowledge research in explaining enacted practice is put forward. Article IV returns to the technology teacher in a transnational context, whereby teachers from the Republic of Ireland, Sweden and New Zealand are interviewed in constructing a grounded theory of teachers’ purposes for teaching technology.

     

    The contributions of the research are twofold. Firstly, following the identification of evidence to support the existence of rhetoric-reality tensions in technology education, an ecologically situated framework of enacted practice is put forward. The framework acknowledges how subject matter is treated in technology education in striving for more comprehensive ways of investigating enacted practice. Secondly, in taking a preliminary step toward understanding enacted practices, a grounded theory of teachers’ purposes for teaching technology is put forward. This grounded theory offers a unified model for articulating the purposes of teaching technology that prevail in classroom realities today.

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  • 40.
    Doyle, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athlone Institute of Technology, Athlone, Ireland..
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland..
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Subject(s) matter: A grounded theory of technology teachers’ conceptions of the purpose of teaching technologyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology education internationally has for some time struggled to achieve continuity between what is depicted in policy and curricular documents and the reality of day-to-day practices. With its focus often articulated through the nature of activity students are to engage with, technology teachers are recognised as having significantly more autonomy in the design and implementation of their practices than teachers of other subjects. From this, it is important to understand the role of teachers’ beliefs about technology education and subsequently, how their beliefs may influence enacted practices. As such, this study sought to investigate teachers’ conceptions of the purpose of teaching technology through reflection on their enacted practices. A constructivist grounded theory methodology was employed for the design of the study and analysis of data. According to our analysis, despite similarities between the nature of student activity that interviewees designed and implemented, interviewees represented the purpose of the subject in different ways. Three different conceptions of the purpose of teaching technology were identified; obtaining knowledge and skills for application, ability to act in a technological way, and ability to think in a technological way. Central to the three conceptions were contentions in the representations of what constituted subject matter knowledge in the subject, and the role that different application cases played in teaching technology. Without consideration and explicit articulation of the purposes for teaching technology, this lack of clarity and differences in rationale for teaching technology are likely to continue.

  • 41.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Academic and Professional Values in Engineering Education: Engaging with History to Explore a Persistent Tension2018In: Engineering Studies, ISSN 1937-8629, E-ISSN 1940-8374, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 38-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tension between academic and professional aims of engineering education is a remarkably consistent challenge facing engineering educators. Here, some historical roots of this issue are traced through the life and work of Carl Richard Söderberg (1895–1979), who emigrated from Sweden to the US for an illustrious industrial and academic career. While Söderberg was a proponent for a more science-based curriculum, his rationale was related to solving real professional problems, and he would come to criticise the distancing of engineering education from engineering practice. Söderberg's views are compared to a present-day reform concept for engineering education, the CDIO approach, founded by MIT and three Swedish universities. The similarities show the persistence of the issue, as many of Söderberg's ideals, arguments, and proposed strategies are fully recognisable in the current discussion. Further, Söderberg and CDIO share the ideal of mutually supporting professional and disciplinary preparation, implying that the tension should not be a zero-sum game. The paths to this ideal were different, however, as Söderberg wanted to integrate theoretical aspects to improve an overly practical education, while CDIO is about improving an overly theoretical education by integrating also other necessary professional aspects.

  • 42.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Student feedback in engineering: Overview and background2012In: Enhancing Learning and Teaching through Student Feedback in Engineering / [ed] Mertova, P., Nair, S. and Patil, A., Cambridge, UK: Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2012, p. 1-23Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter reviews the need to improve key learning outcomes of engineering education, among them conceptual understanding, solving real problems in context, and enabling skills for engineering such as communication and teamwork. At the same time it is necessary to improve both the attractiveness of engineering to prospective students and retention in engineering programmes. Research suggests that to address these problems the full student learning experience needs to better affirm students’ identity formation. Student feedback is identified as a key source of intelligence to inform curriculum and course development. An argument is made for clarifying the purpose of any student feedback system, as there is an inherent tension between utilising it for accountability or for enhancement. An example shows how enhancement is best supported by a rich qualitative investigation of how the learning experience is perceived by the learner. Further, a tension between student satisfaction and quality learning is identified, suggesting that to usefully inform improvement, feedback must always be interpreted using theory on teaching and learning. Finally, a few examples are provided to show various ways to collect, interpret and use student feedback.

  • 43.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Gunnarsson, Svante
    Linköping University.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Integrated Curriculum Design2007In: Rethinking Engineering Education: The CDIO Approach / [ed] Crawley, E.F., Malmqvist, J., Östlund, S., & Brodeur, D.R., Springer, 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Soderholm, Diane
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Knutson Wedel, Maria
    Chalmers.
    Teaching and Learning2007In: Rethinking Engineering Education: The CDIO Approach / [ed] Crawley, E.F., Malmqvist, J., Östlund, S., & Brodeur, D.R., Springer, 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Enghag, Margareta
    et al.
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Schenk, Linda
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, Philosophy.
    Nanoteknik och riskbedömning som nytt kunskapsinnehåll i gymnasiets naturvetenskapliga kurser – en designstudie2016In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 218-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoscience and nanotechnology (NST) is a rapidly developing knowledge area, which need incorporating in the school science curricula. The many uncertainties of risks and benefits with NST also open up for using NST as a socio-scientific issue (SSI). We present the two first iterations of a teaching sequence aimed for upper secondary school physics.  The sequence contains content knowledge on NST and risk assessment and employs traditional classroom teaching, and a debate about NST as a SSI. The aims are to explore 1) students assessments of risks and benefits with NST, and 2) what design principles for teaching nanoscience and risk assessment that emerge as significant. We found that the risk assessment exercise stimulated student argumentation and discussion during the SSI debate. The teachers preferred to focus on the SSI activity, but found it challenging to fit NST content knowledge into the traditional teaching approach. Design principles found are discussed.

  • 46.
    Engström, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Differences and similarities between female students and male students that succeed within higher technical education: profiles emerge through the use of cluster analysis.2018In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 239-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on female and male students who succeed in engineering programmes in Sweden, and why they have success. Data were collected through a questionnaire sent to all engineering students in Sweden registered for their seventh semester during year 2012 and about 30 % of the students in the cohort responded on several questions. The answers were then analysed and interpreted using Pierre Bourdieu’s theory and the concept of capital. The female-students as well as the male-students emerged as homogeneous groups, but SPSS-clustering shows differences and similarities between four female student-profiles and five male students-profiles. The female students who come to graduate as engineers have experiences and resources that seem to be fruitful: well-educated parents, positive attitudes to the engineer students’ traditions, and a positive view of the engineering profession. In addition, they value the traditional teaching with lectures and self-studies. They seem not to have been inspired by compulsory school teaching or teachers there. The male students have the same experiences and resources but there are differences. Among female students, a profile emerges which is absent among the male students and which emphasises the importance of doing good for society, people, and the environment in their future professional roles. Among male students, the student profiles which emerge include one with a primarily practical and technical capital despite the lack of a high degree of educational or scientific capital.

  • 47. Engström, Susanne
    Female Students Who Succeed within Higher Technical Education – When and Why They Choose and Who They Are2015In: Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, ISSN 1877-0428, E-ISSN 1877-0428, Vol. 167, p. 161-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of interest for and knowledge in technology and natural science among students can in Sweden be traced in political documents and in media debate. An increased need for female students in technical universities is stressed as well. Higher technical education is facing large dropouts and difficulties, including for female students. This study focuses on the female students who succeed in civil engineering programmes in Sweden, when and why they choose and who they are? Data were collected through a questionnaire sent out to all female students enrolled on civil engineering programmes during term 7 (of 10 terms) in Sweden in 2012. By using the Bourdieu's theory and the concept of capital, the study aims to find out who the female civil engineering student seems to be. In total 411 students answered the questionnaire. The questionnaire answers were analysed with SPSS both for descriptions (frequencies and cross tabulation) and classification (cluster analysis) and the aim was to detect different patterns within the material. From the material it is possible to describe the majority of female students on civil engineering programmes, but also to detect four different female student profiles. The research questions will be answered by analysing and discussing patterns detected in the questionnaire answers.

  • 48.
    Engström, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    From a teacher student’s view – how STEM-actors have impact on teacher education and teaching in STEM2022In: Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, ISSN 2040-8633, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 38-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, Swedish STEM-teacher students' experiences of STEM-actors are explored. 85teacher students have visited each, of a total of 21 different STEM-actors (science centres,museums, maker spaces, code clubs etc.) who all offer school classes STEM-activities but alsoin-service teacher education. The teacher students were given the task of observing,interviewing and analysing. The teacher students' report texts constitute data that has beenanalysed thematically. In the teacher students' statements, no disputing attitude towards theSTEM-actors emerge. It seems that a preconceived approach is being developed among theteacher students that the school system needs external STEM-actors for both further educationand teaching in T&S. The student teachers become convinced that the formal school settingfails to make the subject of technology fun and interesting enough. Nevertheless, the studentteachers are not completely convinced that doing (construction), i.e. practical work, is alwayswhat should bemost important. They express the view that the teaching must containengaging, fun and interesting elements and that it requires subject competence of the teacher.The student teachers are undergoing a teacher training course which includes encounters withSTEM actors, that seem to have resulted in a view that technology teaching in a formal schoolsetting is insufficiently interesting, engaging and fun.

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  • 49.
    Engström, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    What technology content and values emerge in the teaching of climate change?2018In: 2018 PATT36 International Conference Research and Practice in Technology Education: Perspectives om Human Capacity and Developmnet / [ed] Niall Seery, Jeffrey Buckley, Donal Canty and Joseph Phelan, Ireland, 2018, p. 40-46, article id ISBN 978-1-5272-2507-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, many people live with climate anxiety, and both politicians and companies emphasize how important sustainable strategies and activities are for developing a society with less impact on climate change. Within education, it is central to implement themes dealing with such issues as well. As a technology teacher, one will be expected to have knowledge and ideas about teaching the climate issue, and to be prepared to manage climate anxiety among students. With the aim of supporting teachers, a group of climate researchers, professional teachers, and pedagogues from a science centre, have cooperated in developing a Climate Kit, including an instruction sequence, and teaching materials. This climate kit will be used in primary and secondary schools during 2018. When the kit will be (1) developed, (2) tested and (3) implemented to teachers within a course and (4) used in classrooms, a research study will be accomplished as well. Empirical data in this present study emerge from observations of (1) workshops with the actors when the kit is created and (2) tested in classroom as well. The observations will thereafter be analysed using a discursive perspective partly with aim to identify what knowledge content in relation to climate change that is highlighted in the technology teaching, and partly with a discourse analytical perspective focusing on the values and steering strategies within the teaching practice. The research question: What content, values, and strategies concerning technology and climate change emerge as important? The aim of the study is to investigate teaching content and teaching approaches within technology education, focusing on climate change, with an overall aim to analyse and describe technology education for social and environmental change. This paper presents the results emerging from analyses of empirical data, see above, from workshops and test of the climate kit. Both the collecting of empirical data and the analyses was completed during March 2018.

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  • 50.
    Engström, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Andersson, Kristina
    Uppsala universitet.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Uppsala universitet.
    Norström, Per
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Gullberg, Annica
    Örebro universitet.
    Husseinus, Anita
    Uppsala universitet.
    Elmgren, Maja
    Uppsalla universitet.
    Lärarutbildares naturvetenskap under lupp – en studie av gränslandet mellan ämnesdiscipliner och skolämnen2016Conference paper (Refereed)
1234 1 - 50 of 178
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