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  • 1.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Towards an engineering approach to quality in engineering education2015In: Proceedings of 5:e Utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar, 2015, p. 13-14Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Education quality is handled at many different levels in an education system, ranging all the way from external reviews of education programs at the top university level to the creation of effective learning conditions for students at the practitioners level. Each level has its own processes for quality assurance, and those processes are usually quite different. Here, I suggest one way of joining the different quality processes into a coherent model, which at the same time retain the main conceptual ideas of the already existing quality processes. The proposed model is presented as a flow diagram of an education system together with an idea about how to create both a trouble- shooting and a quality enhancement scheme based on this model. The model is inspired by the way engineers look at quality assurance in engineering systems and it can, hence, be particularly interesting for engineering educations. 

  • 2. Andersson, Staffan
    et al.
    Pears, Arnold Neville
    The Impact of Academic Staff Development on Their Approach to Teaching and Learning2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Wingård, Lasse
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    THE PEDAGOGICAL DEVELOPERS INITIATIVE: SYSTEMATIC SHIFTS, SERENDIPITIES, AND SETBACKS2017In: 13th International CDIO Conference in Calgary, Canada, June 18-22, 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pedagogical projects have often, at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, as well as elsewhere, been initiated and managed by individual enthusiasts rather than dedicated teams. This generally decreases the possibility of successful implementation of more ambitious ideas, e.g., changing educational programs, implementing the CDIO syllabus, or strengthening the pedagogical development of larger parts of the faculty. To enable wider and more effective change, KTH top management therefore launched a universityencompassing three-year project in 2014, in which a group of highly motivated teachers from all schools at KTH were appointed part-time pedagogical developers (PDs). The PDs were given the task of promoting pedagogical development and facilitate cooperation and knowledge exchange among faculty members, as described in two previous papers at CDIO conferences. From 2017, the outcomes of this project are supposed to be integrated parts of the KTH line organization. The project has led to numerous actions, which would have been difficult to set in motion unless given the freedom in time to explore and to develop into a collective effort rather than a myriad of individual “stand-alone” examples. By addressing key areas for pedagogical development, our group of dedicated faculty have tried to surpass the suboptimal "lock-in" of strict individual reasoning and to deal with surfaced questions and relevant issues in a broader collective manner. A major insight confirmed by the project and its many sub-projects has indeed been the fundamental importance of collegial discussions and the creation of processes that facilitate and support teacher cooperation. We have also, through discussions with faculty at KTH, confirmed the need for clearly defined, tangible incentives for teachers, motivating them to participate in pedagogical development activities, even if this means less time left for the traditional pathway to rewards within academia, i.e. research. In this paper, we chart changes that have occurred in the educational practices at KTH by describing and discussing the project’s focus on pedagogical development of faculty, actual execution of changes in the engineering educations, lessons learned along the way, and visions yet to be realised.

  • 4.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology. KTH.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. KTH.
    Wingård, Lasse
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. KTH.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Soulard, Juliette
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    The pedagogical developers initiative - development, implementation and lessons learned from a systematic approach to faculty development2016In: Proceedings of the 12th International CDIO Conference, Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland, June 12-16, 2016, Turku University , 2016, p. 497-508Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a systematic, university--wide approach to creating an encompassing movement towards faculty development. In 2014, KTH Royal Institute of Technology launched the pedagogical developers initiative, appointing part--time pedagogical developers among teachers from all schools of KTH, to implement and strengthen good teaching and learning practices among faculty and students. They are teachers active in different educational programmes, with experience of, and interest in, pedagogical issues. In line with CDIO standard 10, the purpose of the pedagogical developers’ initiative is to facilitate cooperation and knowledge exchange between faculty members, and to establish communities of practice. The paper presents the activities, processes for developing these activities and preliminary results from the initiative’s second year, which focused much on supporting faculty development by putting into place a series of workshops, a format chosen for its combination of active community-building learning and time efficiency. The topics of the workshops emerged to meet faculty needs identified by the pedagogical developers during the first year. The workshops were created by smaller teams of pedagogical developers from different schools of KTH. This enabled a wide array of experiences and perspectives to be incorporated into the workshops. Main focuses of the workshops have been on creating internal discussions in dynamic communities of practice on specific subjects of interest, and on creating forums for exchange of ideas, open to the whole faculty. During Autumn 2015, the workshops have been offered as voluntary add-on parts of the basic course in teaching and learning offered to faculty at KTH. This first round of workshops generated a positive interest from teachers, and participant feedback indicates that they particularly appreciated the opportunity to work directly with their own courses and the opportunity to discuss pedagogical aspects with peers. 

  • 5.
    Couturier, Catherine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Organisation and leadership.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Interdisciplinary teaching in Swedish primary schools: teachers’ perspectives of subject-matter integration in technology and history2018In: 2018 PATT36 International conferenceResearch and Practice in Technology Education:: Perspectives on Human Capacity and Development / [ed] Niall Seery, JeffreyBuckley, Donal Canty and Joseph Phelan, 2018, p. 288-294Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology is a compulsory subject for all school years in Sweden. The curriculum states that teaching should contribute to the students' understanding of technological development (LGr11, syllabus in technology). Interdisciplinary teaching is encouraged in the curriculum, however, the relationship between subject-matter in technology and history is not well documented. It this study, five primary school teachers’ experiences and attitudes of interdisciplinary teaching are investigated through open-ended interviews. A thematic analysis of the data identified three preliminary themes. The first theme confirms that interdisciplinary teaching occurs. The teachers say that through interdisciplinary teaching, they build meaningfulness and coherence for students. In the second theme, teaching on technological development often emerges as spontaneous and unplanned. Here, teachers became aware in the interview that their teaching may also be described as technological. The third theme suggested that teachers used artefacts as an entrance to the past, for student’s immersion and understanding. The interdisciplinary teaching between technology and history is largely unexplored, especially for the younger ages. Through identifying that in teaching practice technology is integrated with history, although not always planned or consciously, the technology subject can gain more awareness and a stronger position in the curriculum and wider contexts. 

  • 6.
    Crawley, Edward F.
    et al.
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Soderholm, Diane F.
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Curriculum Design based on the CDIO Syllabus2005In: 8TH UICEE ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING EDUCATION, CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS: BRINGING ENGINEERING EDUCATORS TOGETHER, UICEE , 2005, p. 313-317Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7. Dahlqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Fridh, Jens
    A Hands-On Student Lab for the Relation Between Unsteady Aerodynamics and Structural Dynamics2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A small plate is excited with sound from a portable speaker. Strain gauges and a fast data acquisition unit are used to measure the variations in surface strain on the plate. This is the setup of a new student laboratory to combine theory and practice within unsteady aerodynamics and structural dynamics.

    To clearly visualize and offer important hands-on lessons for graduate students in a master’s program in aeromechanics, a lab facility has been put together for the participants to study the interaction between unsteady aerodynamics and structural dynamics.

    The facility was run the first time with students during spring this year, with successful results both in terms of measurements and learning outcomes.

  • 8.
    Doyle, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning. Athlone Institute of Technology, Athlone, Ireland..
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Operationalising pedagogical content knowledge research in technology education: Considerations for methodological approaches to exploring enacted practice2019In: British Educational Research Journal, ISSN 0141-1926, E-ISSN 1469-3518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Like many areas of curricula internationally, technology education has encountered difficulties in achieving continuity between the rhetoric of prevailing policy and the reality of enacted practices. In technology education, the conceptually oriented nature of curricular goals is theorised to play a significant part in influencing this relationship. One way in which investigations of this relationship have been approached is considering the application of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) frameworks as a mechanism to understand the interaction of teachers’ knowledge and enacted practices. However, understanding from the philosophy of technology, and the technology education literature, suggests that technology education treats knowledge differently to many other disciplines. As a result of this, the interactions between teachers’ beliefs and knowledge are theorised to play a more significant role in influencing enacted practice in technology education. Building on this perspective, this article considers the need to investigate the roles of teachers’ knowledge and beliefs, and the interactions between these, in the investigation of enacted practice. Further to this, the article problematises the potential for a dominance of exploratory research, though acknowledging the need for research within different paradigms; a common frame of reference is advocated. In advocating a more holistic approach to investigating enacted practice, and the factors which may influence teachers’ enactment of teaching practice, it is envisioned that this article takes a step towards methodological coherence regarding the study of enacted practice in technology education.

  • 9.
    Ebrahimi, Masoumeh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems, Electronic and embedded systems.
    Kelati, Amleset
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems, Electronic and embedded systems.
    Nkonoki, Emma
    Kondoro, Aron
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Rwegasira, Diana
    KTH.
    Ben Dhaou, Imed
    Taajamaa, Ville
    Tenhunen, Hannu
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems, Integrated devices and circuits.
    Creation of CERID: Challenge, Education, Research, Innovation, and Deployment in the context of smart MicroGrid2019In: IST-Africa 2019 Conference Proceedings / [ed] Paul Cunningham ; Miriam Cunningham, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The iGrid project deals with the design and implementation of a solar-powered smart microgrid to supply electric power to small rural communities. In this paper, we discuss the roadmap of the iGrid project, which forms by merging the roadmaps of KIC (knowledge and Innovation Community) and CDE (Challenge-Driven Education). We introduce and explain a five-gear chain as Challenge, Education, Research, Innovation, and Deployment, called CERID, to reach the main goals of this project. We investigate the full chain in the iGrid project, which is established between KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden) and University of Dar es Salam (Tanzania). We introduce the key stakeholders and explain how CERID goals can be accomplished in higher educations and through scientific research. Challenges are discussed, some innovative ideas are introduced and deployment solutions are recommended.

  • 10.
    Fakhrai, Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Saadatfar, Bahram
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Fransson, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    The Role of Continuance Project Based Learning in Energy Educational Program2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11. Garrote, Ramon
    et al.
    Petersson, Tomas
    Christie, Michael
    Seoane, Fernando
    University of Borås.
    Sigrén, Peter
    Training teachers in e-learning without Internet access2010In: Proceedings of EDULEARN10 Conference, Barcelona: International Association for Technology, Education and Development, 2010, p. 6336-6341Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the authors present a solution to the problem of giving practical training in handling information and communication technology (ICT) without depending on internet access. The proposed method is to use an USB-memory to emulate selected educational resources that are otherwise available on the internet or on a local network. How this method can influence pedagogical issues is discussed and, it is asserted that the method offers interesting learning advantages beyond the obvious independence of internet connections. The paper describes the planning and implementation of a course about the use of Learning Management Systems (LMS) in higher education and, in particular, how it was designed to meet the needs of educators in a developing country with slow or unreliable internet connections. The course was a part of the project USo+I: Universidad, Sociedad e Innovación. Mejora de la pertinencia de la educación en las ingenierías de Latinoamérica (University and Society: Improving of the relevance of the education in the engineering of Latinoamerica) this project financed by the European Union, within the ALFA III program. The University of Borås was assigned to design and teach a course about LMS to engineering educators in Latin-America.

  • 12. Garrote, Ramon
    et al.
    Seoane, Fernando
    University of Borås.
    Christie, Michael
    Design-Build Experience-Based Program in Biomedical Engineering as a Practical Example of Science for Professions2010In: Proceedings of EDULEARN10 Conference, Barcelona: International Association for Technology, Education and Development, 2010, p. 110-113Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the authors present a solution to the problem of giving practical training in handling information and communication technology (ICT) without depending on internet access. The proposed method is to use an USB-memory to emulate selected educational resources that are otherwise available on the internet or on a local network. How this method can influence pedagogical issues is discussed and, it is asserted that the method offers interesting learning advantages beyond the obvious independence of internet connections. The paper describes the planning and implementation of a course about the use of Learning Management Systems (LMS) in higher education and, in particular, how it was designed to meet the needs of educators in a developing country with slow or unreliable internet connections. The course was a part of the project USo+I: Universidad, Sociedad e Innovación. Mejora de la pertinencia de la educación en las ingenierías de Latinoamérica (University and Society: Improving of the relevance of the education in the engineering of Latinoamerica) this project financed by the European Union, within the ALFA III program. The University of Borås was assigned to design and teach a course about LMS to engineering educators in Latin-America.

  • 13.
    Garrote, Ramon
    et al.
    University of Borås.
    Seoane, Fernando
    University of Borås.
    Christie, Michael
    Chalmers university of Technology.
    Tecnologias de la informacion y communicacion para actualizar education en la Universidad de Borås "Bättrekonceptet"2009In: La educacion en ciencias e ingenieria: Calidad, innovacion pedagogica y cultura digital / [ed] Valerias Esteban, N Campo Montalvo, E Espinoza Montenegro, E A, Alcalá: University of Alcalá , 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14. Geraimchuk, I.M
    et al.
    Geraimchuk, M.D
    Kazachkov, I.V
    Fransson, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Virtual university environment: Swedish-Ukrainian network for design and implementation of Internet-based education software2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Hamza, Karim
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Math & Sci Educ, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Piqueras, Jesus
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Math & Sci Educ, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Math & Sci Educ, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Angelin, Marcus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Who Owns the Content and Who Runs the Risk?: Dynamics of Teacher Change in Teacher-Researcher Collaboration2018In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 963-987Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present analyses of teacher professional growth during collaboration between science teachers and science education researchers, with special focus on how the differential assumption of responsibility between teachers and researchers affected the growth processes. The collaboration centered on a new conceptual framework introduced by the researchers, which aimed at empowering teachers to plan teaching in accordance with perceived purposes. Seven joint planning meetings between teachers and researchers were analyzed, both quantitatively concerning the extent to which the introduced framework became part of the discussions and qualitatively through the interconnected model of teacher professional growth. The collaboration went through three distinct phases characterized by how and the extent to which the teachers made use of the new framework. The change sequences identified in relation to each phase show that teacher recognition of salient outcomes from the framework was important for professional growth to occur. Moreover, our data suggest that this recognition may have been facilitated because the researchers, in initial phases of the collaboration, took increased responsibility for the implementation of the new framework. We conclude that although this differential assumption of responsibility may result in unequal distribution of power between teachers and researchers, it may at the same time mean more equal distribution of concrete work required as well as the inevitable risks associated with pedagogical innovation and introduction of research-based knowledge into science teachers' practice.

  • 16.
    Hedin, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sagan om examensringen - en akademisk tragedi2015In: LTHs 9:e Pedagogiska Inspirationskonferens, 15 december 2016, Lund, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    —Hur ska vi som anställda vid universitet och högskolor förhålla oss till frågor såsom tillit, kontroll och likabehandling i förhållande till våra studenter? Tillit, kontroll och likabehandling är alla lovvärda och viktiga, men i daglig verksamhet kan de komma i konflikt med varandra. Vi vill vid denna roundtable lyfta dessa konflikter, och väljer att exemplifiera problematiken med ett konkret fall. Vi hoppas detta exempel dels kan belysa problem vi kan ställas inför, och dels tjäna som grund för en diskussion och för konstruktivt erfarenhetsutbyte om hur vi rent praktiskt ska agera i dessa typer av situationer.

  • 17.
    Håkansson, Anne
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Portal of Research Methods and Methodologies for Research Projects and Degree Projects2013In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Frontiers in Education: Computer Science and Computer Engineering FECS'13 / [ed] Hamid R. Arabnia Azita Bahrami Victor A. Clincy Leonidas Deligiannidis George Jandieri, Las Vegas USA: CSREA Press U.S.A , 2013, p. 67-73Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research methods and methodologies are extremelyimportant when conducting research and degree projects. Theuse and application of the methods and methodologies areconsidered to be “necessarily vicious” and, unfortunately,often applied after the research has been conducted. The needfor applying methods before the actually research and thereasons for doing so are often stressed in the literature andcourses for research and scientific writing. This includes theaspects of selecting, understanding and applying researchmethods for a selected project. Unfortunately, it is difficult tochoose well-suited methods and too often the selected methodsand methodologies do not match each other. Instead, methodsare applied without knowing about the consequences theapplied method have both on the other chosen methods and onthe results of the work or research. This paper provides aportal of research methods and methodologies to help thestudents to choose and apply the most suitable methods byillustrating which methods belong together and thedistinctions between the different methods.

  • 18. Kazachkov, I.V
    et al.
    Fransson, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Popa, Marianne Salomon
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Development of the mobile computer and special notebook tools and technologies for the electronic educational international network2009Report (Other academic)
  • 19. Kazachkov, I.V
    et al.
    Fransson, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Salomon Popa, Marianne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Virtual university environment: swedish-ukrainian network for design of internet-based education software2011Report (Other academic)
  • 20. Kazachkov, I.V
    et al.
    Fransson, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Salomon Popa, Marianne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Kalion, V
    Vitaly, A
    An interactive teaching and learning platform for numerical methods in gas turbine2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Gärdebo, Johan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Retooling Engineering for Social Justice: The use of explicit models for analytical thinking, critical reflection, and peer-review in Swedish engineering education2017In: International Journal of Engineering, Social Justice, and Peace, ISSN 1927-9434, Vol. 5, no 1-2, p. 13-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper engages with how engineering education in Sweden have been retooled towards literacy in social justice. To achieve this, the authors used a set of pedagogical tools aimed at analytical thinking, critical reflection, and peer-review by students. The students were asked to use the tools in the course to critically analyze social justice in the city planning of twentieth century Stockholm, Sweden. This included, for example, national identities, social engineering, and politics that shaped Swedish society. The authors conducted a textual analysis of student essays on social justice that indicate increased social justice literacy and a shift towards the practices of engineers’ work with city planning. The study concludes by discussing conditions for engineering students to gain familiarity with formats used for critical reflection within the humanities.

  • 22.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Dias Ferreira, João
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Barata, José
    Characterization of the Student Perception of Flexibility in the Manufacturing Domain: Highlighting the Patterns of Effective Learning2014In: Proceeding of: 8th International Technology, Education and Development Conference - INTED 2014, At Valencia, Spain, Valencia, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The word “flexibility” is often abused and not univocally understood within the manufacturing science domain and in particular in the context of industrial automation. Since the raise of industrial robots in the 1960’, different researchers and practitioners have been using such a common word with different meanings. This has generated a very articulated concept, spanning from capability of a system to increase the production volumes to ability to handle product mix variation. Several authors have tried to count the current meanings of such a word in manufacturing and someone arrived to more than 50!. In spite of this fuzziness in both the definition and scope, the concept of flexibility remain one of the cornerstones in the curriculum of industrial and production engineers, and it appears in many courses along the bachelor and master studies. The apparent paradox that higher education institutions have to teach things that are not even well-defined and agreed in the scientific world is, in fact, quite a usual practice. In order to clarify what is, or should be, learnt this work analyzes first the established literature to extract a “working” characterization of the flexibility concept. The resulting understanding is then used to represent the experts’ perception of the topic which in turn is used as ideal level of understanding that a student should achieve her/himself when studying such a concept.   

    The second phase of the work aims at disclosing and classifying the multifaceted perceptions of flexibility that two different classes of industrial engineering students have after two courses in which the focal concept of manufacturing flexibility has been presented using two different approaches. The research is based on a phenomenographic analysis of a series of well-designed interviews to the students. The collected data have consequently been structured in a finite set of clusters according of: (1) the level of understanding of the key concept (as expressed in the Bloom’s taxonomy) and (2) the nature of the shown knowledge (as presented in the SOLO taxonomy). The classification is then the basis for defining an epistemological sound approach to develop suitable teaching and learning activities to ensure optimal acquisition of the concept of flexibility.

  • 23.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Dias-Ferreira, Joao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Barata, Jose
    UNINOVA UNL, Lisbon, Portugal..
    CHARACTERIZATION OF THE STUDENT PERCEPTION OF THE CONCEPT OF FLEXIBILITY IN THE MANUFACTURING DOMAIN: HIGHLIGHTING THE PATTERNS OF EFFECTIVE LEARNING2014In: INTED2014: 8TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A& DEVELOPMENT , 2014, p. 4759-4767Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The word "flexibility" is often abused and not univocally understood within the manufacturing science domain and in particular in the context of industrial automation. Since the raise of industrial robots in the 1960', different researchers and practitioners have been using such a common word with different meanings. This has generated a very articulated concept, spanning from capability of a system to increase the production volumes to ability to handle product mix variation. Several authors have tried to count the current meanings of such a word in manufacturing and someone arrived to more than 50 [1]!. In spite of this fuzziness in both the definition and scope, the concept of flexibility remain one of the cornerstones in the curriculum of industrial and production engineers, and it appears in many courses along the bachelor and master studies. The apparent paradox that higher education institutions have to teach things that are not even well-defined and agreed in the scientific world is, in fact, quite a usual practice. In order to clarify what is, or should be, learnt this work analyzes first the established literature to extract a "working" characterization of the flexibility concept. The resulting understanding is then used to represent the experts' perception of the topic which in turn is used as ideal level of understanding that a student should achieve her/himself when studying such a concept. The second phase of the work aims at disclosing and classifying the multifaceted perceptions of flexibility that two different classes of industrial engineering students have after two courses in which the focal concept of manufacturing flexibility has been presented using two different approaches. The research is based on a phenomenographic analysis of a series of well-designed interviews to the students [2]. The collected data have consequently been structured in a finite set of clusters according of: (1) the level of understanding of the key concept (as expressed in the Bloom's taxonomy [3]) and (2) the nature of the shown knowledge (as presented in the SOLO taxonomy [4]). The classification is then the basis for defining an epistemological sound approach to develop suitable teaching and learning activities to ensure optimal acquisition of the concept of flexibility.

  • 24.
    Martin, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Fransson, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Navarathna, Nalin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Andrinopoulos, N
    Web-Based, Interactive Laboratory Experiments in Heat and Power Technology2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    “It’s not fair!”: making students engage in sustainability2013In: Proceedings of the EESD13 Conference, Cambridge, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we address the issue of teaching a subject, sustainability, that ideally should permeate the whole engineering education, but at the moment often plays a minor role in the curriculum. Here we discuss the tactics of planning and conducting a sustainability course with the explicit goal of truly engaging the students and making an impact on their thinking. Furthermore, we here present a framework that can be used in course planning and analysis. Finally, we discuss how this framework was used in our sustainability course for Media Technology engineering students at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, and the engagement and resulting change in students perception of sustainability. Moreover, we argue that beyond rethinking the engineer and the engineering education, we also need to rethink our roles as university teachers.

  • 26. Rolandsson, L.
    et al.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Männikkö Barbutiu, S.
    Bridging a gap: in search of an analytical tool capturing teachers’ perceptions of their own teaching2016In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computing and computers are introduced in school as important examples of technology, sometimes as a subject matter of their own, and sometimes they are used as tools for other subjects. All in all, one might even say that learning about computing and computers is part of learning about technology. Lately, many countries have implemented programming in their curricula as a means to address society’s dependence on, and need for programming knowledge and code. Programming is a fairly new school subject without educational traditions and, due to the rapid technological development, in constant change. This means that most programming teachers must decide for themselves what and how to teach. In this study, programming teachers’ teaching is studied. With the aim of exploring the connection/possible gap between teacher’s intentions and the teacher’s instructional practice, an expansion of the conceptual apparatus of phenomenography and variation theory is tested. In the article, phenomenography and variation theory and the suggested supplementary theoretical tool (Georg Henrik von Wright’s model of logic of events) are briefly presented and then deployed upon one selected case. Findings reveal that teachers’ intentions (reflected in their actions) include an emphasis (of teachers’ side) on the importance of balancing theory and practice, using different learning strategies, encouraging learning by trial-and-error and fostering collaboration between students for a deeper understanding of concepts. In conclusion, logic of events interpretations proves to be useful as a complementary tool to the conceptual apparatus of phenomenography.

  • 27.
    Rolandsson, Lennart
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technical Science Education.
    Programmed or Not: A study about programming teachers’ beliefs and intentions in relation to curriculum2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the intersection of technology, curriculum and intentions, a specific issue of interest is found in the gap between teachers’ intentions and implementations of curriculum. Instead of approaching curriculum and technology as something fait accompli, teachers are considered crucial in the re-discovery of what and how to teach. The thesis depicts the mind-set of teachers and their beliefs in relation to computing curriculum. Three perspectives are covered in the thesis. Based on original documents and interviews with curriculum developers, the enactment of the computing/programming curriculum during the 1970s and 1980s is explored (Paper 1). This historical perspective is supplemented with a perspective from the present day where current teaching practice is explored through teachers’ statements (seminars with associated questionnaires) regarding their beliefs about teaching and learning programming(Paper 2). Finally with a view from a theoretical perspective, teachers’perception of instruction is discussed in relation to a theoretical framework where their intentions in relation to theoretical and practical aspects of knowledge are revealed (Papers 3 & 4). The initial incitement to offer computing education during the 1970s was discovered in the recruitment of a broader group of students within the Natural Science Programme and the perception that it would contribute to the development of students’ ability to think logically and learn problem solving skills. Data concerning teachers’ beliefs about teaching and learning programming unravels an instructional dependence among today’s teachers where students’ logical and analytical abilities (even before the courses start) are considered crucial to students’ learning, while teachers question the importance of their pedagogy. The thesis also discover two types of instruction; a large group putting emphasis on the syntax of programming languages, and a smaller group putting emphasis on the students’ experiences of learning concepts of computer science (not necessarily to do with syntax). In summary the thesis depicts an instructional tradition based on teachers’ beliefs where the historical development of the subject sets the framework for the teaching. Directly and indirectly the historical development and related traditions govern what programming teachers in upper secondary school will/are able to present to their students. From deploying two theoretical approaches, phenomenography and logic of events, upon teacher’s cases it is shown that the intended object of learning (iOoL) is shaped by the teacher’s intentions (e.g., balancing the importance oftheory and practice, using different learning strategies, encouraging learning by trial-and-error and fostering collaboration between students for a deeper understanding). The teachers also present a diverse picture regarding what theoretical knowledge students will reach for.

  • 28.
    Salomon Popa, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Fransson, Torsten
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Fedulov, Vitali
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Interactive teaching and learning platform in Energy Technology2004Report (Other academic)
  • 29. Svensdotter, S
    et al.
    Almkvist, P
    Fransson, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Introduction of Project Based Learning for Designing a Heat and Power Plant into the Last Year Curriculum2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Tomyak, Roman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Kazachkov, Ivan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Fransson, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Case study tools in the multimedia interactive teaching-learning platform for energy technology2010In: Applied computer science, 9789604742257, 2010, p. 156-162Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tools called case study are normally presented in the computerized educational (CompEdu) platform as short pages with popups giving precise short introduction into some narrow subject. The CompEdu is based on the multimedia interactive presentation of a slide show of lecturing material in a non-conventional way where the material is presented in a progressive and concise way ensuring the coverage of large portions of material in shortest number of pages. In this paper, some recent results in the development of case studies by different subjects with emphasize of the new combustion systems are presented and discussed. Also some methodological aspects and features are discussed concerning their advantages for intensive and easy (pleasant) form of teaching-learning using computerized system developed at EGI/KTH.

  • 31. Zarb, M.
    et al.
    Bouvier, D.
    Abandoh-Sam, J. A.
    Glassey, Richard
    KTH.
    Riedesel, C.
    Alshaigy, B.
    Hughes, J.
    An international investigation into student concerns regarding transition into higher education2018In: ITiCSE 2018 Proceedings of the 23rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 344-345Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The experience of transitioning into and starting higher education is a very individual one, with some applicants viewing the prospect of higher education as an unknown entity; for those who are first in their family or community to consider higher education, this can seem an "alien environment". These are just some of the issues that lead to applicants experiencing levels of concern when considering a transition into higher education. This international working group proposes to consider concerns across a wide range of participants: namely students who are in the process of transitioning into a higher education environment, and students who have recently completed this transition.

  • 32.
    Åberg, Sven
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Spelrum: om paradoxer och överenskommelser i musikhögskolelärarens praktik2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation discusses the transfer of practical knowledge as seen in the practises of conservatory teachers at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm. It is based on material from three series of dialogue seminars conducted with teachers and students. The aim of the dialogue seminar is to bring a practitioner’s personal style of relating to a profession into a form which makes it possible for the practitioner and others to reflect upon. Using the participants’ texts and the seminar protocols as a starting point the dissertation develops some of the themes which emerged. It is divided into three parts:

    The first discusses conservatory teachers’ relationship to language. Examples include the teachers’ use of indirect ways to »work around« a problem rather than addressing it directly, the use of metaphors and figures of speech, and the fields of disagreement that surround certain central concepts. These disagreements exist within a »thought-style« shared by practitioners of a profession.

    The second part develops some of the paradoxes inevitably encountered in practical music making and musical education. Examples include planning-spontaniety, simplicity-complexity, reflection-action, clarity-truth, breadth-depth. It is argued that the way in which practitioners’ handle and relate to such »paradoxical fields« constitute an essential part of mature professional skills.

    The third part discusses the nature of practical knowledge, especially its relationship to the rules that can be established to help transmit such knowledge. The wittgensteinian image of basic rules, which are followed in a way that can not be described in rules, is contrasted by an image in which the learner gains access to patterns of action which are handled on the basis of the percieved meaning of the actions.

1 - 32 of 32
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