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  • 1.
    Ahmad Termida, Nursitihazlin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics. Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Department of Infrastructure and Geomatic Engineering.
    Understanding Individuals' Learning and Decision Processes in a Changing Environment by Using Panel Data2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When a new transport service is introduced, people have to learn and familiarize themselves with the new service before they decide to adopt it. These processes are developed over time, thus produce dynamics in individuals’ behavioural responses towards the service. This affects the demand of the new service, thus affect revenues. Available studies have examined the factors influencing these responses from microeconomic perspectives. The influence of the theory-based subjective factors has not been examined empirically. Understanding these would assist transport and urban planners to design a better marketing strategy to increase the market share of the new service. A change in seasons affect individuals’ activity-travel decisions, thus produce dynamics in activitytravel patterns in different seasons. Individuals’ constraints, in a form of mandatory activities (working/studying), are influencing individuals’ decisions to participate in day-to-day nonmandatory activities (leisure and routine activities). The interdependency between travel demand, time allocation and mode choice that considers interactions between mandatory and non-mandatory activities, in different seasons is less explored. Understanding these would assist transport planners and operators to manage travel demand strategies across different seasons of the year and provide better transportation systems for all individuals. This thesis includes five papers. Paper I explores individuals’ characteristics of the quick-response and the adopters of the new public transport (PT) service and examines the temporal effects. Paper II investigates the subjective factors influencing a quick-response to the new PT service by proposing a modified attitude-behaviour framework. Paper III and IV analyse the effects of seasonal variations and individuals’ constraints on their day-to-day activity-travel decisions and patterns. Paper V analyses the attrition and fatigue in the two-week travel diary panel survey instrument.

  • 2.
    Ahmad Termida, Nursitihazlin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics. Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Department of Infrastructure and Geomatic Engineering.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Franklin, Joel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Subjective Factors Influencing Individual's Response to a New Public Transport ServiceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The timing and nature of people’s responses can be expected to vary when a new element enter their environment. For example, when an individual is provided with a new or modified transport service. This time-scale of behavioural responses will affect the patronage of, and short- and long-term demands on the new service over time. Understanding the underlying factors that influence an individual’s response over time to a new or modified transport service would enable us to identify trigger factors that make the new service attractive from an individual’s point of view. Chatterjee (2001) and Douglas (2003) argued that motives other than instrumental factors related to public transport use, such as attitudes, awareness, travel habits and learning processes, can influence individual responses over time to changes in the travel environment. Unfortunately, despite their importance, there have been few studies that examined this argument empirically. To address this research gap, this paper aims to investigate the influences of subjective factors on individuals’ responses to the introduction of a modified public transport (PT) service over time by proposing and testing an alternative model that modifies the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model framework. This paper also aims to investigate the behavioural change in terms of attitudes and perceptions on individuals’ resources and constraints in using a modified PT service over time after its introduction. The case study involves the new extension of a tram line connecting the suburbs of Alvik and Solna Centrum in Stockholm, Sweden. Four waves of a panel survey were conducted with 96 individuals who lived along the new service, from just before the new service was introduced and until seven months after its introduction. A structural equation modelling technique was used to estimate the relationships between behavioural constructs and panel data, then incorporate them into a discrete choice model. The results show that intention influences individual’s quick-response choice. The panel analysis shows that past behaviour in using the new service influenced current behaviour, and that perceived walking distance in using the service consistently influenced the frequency of using the new service over time.

  • 3.
    Allen, Irma
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Poland on fire: voices from the provinces2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Allen, Irma
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Polen – ett land som står i brand2017In: Dagens NyheterArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Allen, Irma
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Solidarity according to Polish women in 20172017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6. Anderson, David
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Construction of the Soviet Ethnography and “The Peoples of Siberia"2016In: History and Anthropology, ISSN 0275-7206, E-ISSN 1477-2612, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 183-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multi-generation book project "The Peoples of Siberia" enabled a group of Leningrad-based scholars to reshape their museum into a Soviet ethnographic community. This article analyses the face-to-face performances, the legalistic stenographic documentation, the collective crafting of a single authoritative style, and a unique temporal frame as an important background to understand a hallmark volume in Siberian studies. The authors argue that the published volume indexes nearly thirty years of scholarly debates as much as it indexes the peoples it represents. The article concludes with a critical discussion of how this volume was translated and received by a Euro-American readership influencing the perception of Siberian peoples internationally. It also links the volume to contemporary post-Soviet publication projects which seem to retrace the same path. The article is based on extensive archival work and references collections recently discovered and which are presented for publication here for the first time.

  • 7. Anderson, David G.
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.Alymov, Sergei S.
    Life Histories of Etnos Theory in Russia and Beyond2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of etnos came into being over a hundred years ago as a way of understanding the collective identities of people with a common language and shared traditions. In the twentieth century, the concept came to be associated with Soviet state-building, and it fell sharply out of favour. Yet outside the academy, etnos-style arguments not only persist, but are a vibrant part of regional anthropological traditions.Life Histories of Etnos Theory in Russia and Beyond makes a powerful argument for reconsidering the importance of etnos in our understanding of ethnicity and national identity across Eurasia. The collection brings to life a rich archive of previously unpublished letters, fieldnotes, and photographic collections of the theory’s early proponents. Using contemporary fieldwork and case studies, the volume shows how the ideas of these ethnographers continue to impact and shape identities in various regional theatres from Ukraine to the Russian North to the Manchurian steppes of what is now China. Through writing a life history of these collectivist concepts, the contributors to this volume unveil a world where the assumptions of liberal individualism do not hold. In doing so, they demonstrate how notions of belonging are not fleeting but persistent, multi-generational, and bio-social.This collection is essential reading for anyone interested in Russian and Chinese area studies. It will also appeal to historians and students of anthropology and ethnography more generally.

  • 8.
    Apelmo, Elisabet
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. Lund University.
    Greger, Henriksson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Kan stadsbors användning av IT bidra till ett hållbart samhälle?: En kunskapsöversikt.2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report deals with everyday habits with environmental impacts in relation to the use of information and communication technology (ICT, colloquially referred to as IT).

    We raise issues related to a) how environmentally promising and problematic ‘ICT-practices’ in urban everyday life can be identified and b) how the potential for such practices to be transformed through the use of ICT can be assessed, and ultimately utilized, in the context of sustainable urban development.

    These issues we have addressed through reviewing case studies, reports etc. Case study examples showed how ICT is used, e.g. to streamline and inform, or to share resources, vehicles and other products.

    We discussed how it might be possible, from an environmental sociology perspective, to assess when and how ICT might serve as an enabling technology that enhances or replaces previous patterns of action. We also briefly included, and discussed, phenomena defined from more general sustainability science point of view, e.g. substitution, induction and rebound effects.

    An important starting point was that social structures both enable and limit specific patterns of action. The structures can only be said to exist, or be maintained, by people's actions and through their experience. Change occurs as a result of the dynamics between people's actions and the structures created by past actions. Social practices are constantly being reproduced, with additions of new elements, e g when ICT applications are put to new uses. Then patterns of social relations and systems might also change, for example in how we use energy, travel, consume or socialize during both work and leisure time.

    Our review indicates that the knowledge that partners of Centre for Sustainable Communications (CESC) currently have access to, is fragmented and with a bias towards certain types of sectors, and patterns of action. Environmentally promising practices are more researched than problematic ones. Furthermore, use of ICTs for e.g. commuting and monitoring household energy use is more researched than most other patterns of action involving use of ICTs. Research on e.g. leisure and entertainment in relation to the environment is very much absent from today’s body of knowledge (as it is defined and delimited in this report).

    As for how everyday practices might change towards increased environmental sustainability by the use of ICT, we have found the knowledge situation even more incomplete. This shows, however, that it is worthwhile for CESC researchers and partners to carry on searching and developing knowledge regarding this.

    Regarding what should be viewed as more promising respectively more problematic urban patterns of action, we have to some extent illuminated this by exemplifying international environmental sociological research that is useful for discussing social practices in relation to environmental impacts. We have exemplified how this can shed light on some of the case studies we found among the CESC researchers and partners. Based on environmental sociology we discussed in what ways city dwellers with high income account for the most environmentally problematic practices. Correspondingly, we discussed how inhabitants with low income – out of necessity–account for many promising practices. In relation to this we also briefly discussed how rebound effects should be seen as related to socio-economic position.

    Another kind of problematic aspect highlighted is that players responsible for introducing, trying out etc., new ICTs, seem to have a tendency to do this in own networks or among the urban middle class. This is problematic from a democratic point of view. In 2012, 1.2 million people in Sweden did very rarely, or not at all, use the internet in their homes. Detailed knowledge about this group's ICT related practices seems to be largely missing.  If representatives for these groups are not represented in environmental research there is a danger that they also become less visible in public debate of environmental and ICT issues.

    This means that different social positions imply different opportunities and constraints. What patterns of actions people take more or less part in is influenced by social structures, norms and regulations, the historical and the immediate context, but also by the individuals' previous experiences and knowledge. The understanding of how a change towards a more sustainable society could come about through use of ICT therefore requires knowledge of practices among the full socio-demographic range of city dwellers.

  • 9. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Altaĭskiĭ ritual’nyĭ kover i sozdanie geterotopii [Altai Ritual Rug and the Creation of Heterotopia]2013In: Antropologicheskii Forum, ISSN 1815-8870, no 18, p. 85-133Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Antropolog ili politik? Politicheskie pristrastii͡a i teoreticheskie postroenii͡a Sergei͡a Shirokogorova [Anthropologist or Politician? Political Bias and Theoretical Constructions of Sergei M. Shirokogoroff]2017In: Etnographicheskoe obozrenie, no 5, p. 121-142Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Epîtres" altaïnnes: histoire et vie des textes dy mouvement religieux Ak-Jaŋ2014In: Études Mongoles et Sibériennes, Centrasiatiques et Tibétaines, ISSN 2101-0013, Vol. 45, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Nabli͡udai͡a za nabli͡udateli͡ami: o vizual'nykh tekhnikakh teoretizirovanii͡a Sergeĭ i Elizavety Shirokogorovykh [Observing Observers: On Visual Techniques of Theoretical Thinking of Sergei and Elizabeth Shirokogoroff]2017In: Etnographicheskoe obozrenie, ISSN 0869-5415, no 5, p. 32-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Samoyedic Diary: Early Years of Visual Anthropology in the Soviet Arctic2016In: Visual Anthropology, ISSN 0894-9468, E-ISSN 1545-5920, Vol. 29, no 4-5, p. 331-359Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Shatra and Jurt: The ‘Return Address’ in Rituals of Altaians2016In: Archaeology, Anthropology and Ethnology of Eurasia, ISSN 1563-0102, p. 111-120Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Writing the History of the Northern ‘Field’: An Introductory Note2017In: Sibirica (keele): Interdisciplinary Journal of Siberian Studies, ISSN 1361-7362, E-ISSN 1476-6787, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Ėtnograf s kinokameroĭ v rukakh: Prokof'evy i nachalo vizual'noĭ antropologii samodiĭt͡sev [Ethnographers with Cinecamera in Their Hands: Prokofievs and the Beginning of Visual Anthropology of Samoyeds]2016In: Antropogicheskii Forum, ISSN 1815-8870, no 29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    et al.
    Alymov, SergeiAnderson, David
    Ot klassikov k marksizmu: soveshchanie ėtnografov Moskvy i Leningrada (5–11 apreli͡a 1929 g.)2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 18. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    et al.
    Kan, Sergei
    Kont͡sept͡sii͡a poli͡a i polevoĭ raboty v ranneĭ sovetskoĭ ėtnografii [The concept of the Field and Fieldworking in Early Soviet Ethnography]2013In: Etnographicheskoe obozrenie, ISSN 0869-5415, no 6, p. 45-68Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    et al.
    Kan, Sergei
    The Concept of the ‘Field’ in Early Soviet Ethnography: A Northern Perspective2017In: Sibirica: Interdisciplinary Journal of Siberian Studies, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 31-74Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    et al.
    Lyublinskaya, Marina
    Nenet͡skoe olenevodstvo: geografii͡a, ėtnografii͡a, lingvistika [Nenets Reindeer Husbandry: Geography, Ethnography, and Linguistics].2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Bahri, Leila
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Carminati, Barbara
    Ferrari, Elena
    Univ Insubria, Dept Theoret & Appl Sci, Varese, Italy..
    Knowledge-based approaches for identity management in online social networks2018In: WILEY INTERDISCIPLINARY REVIEWS-DATA MINING AND KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY, ISSN 1942-4787, Vol. 8, no 5, article id e1260Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When we meet a new person, we start by introducing ourselves. We share our names, and other information about our jobs, cities, family status, and so on. This is how socializing and social interactions can start: we first need to identify each other. Identification is a cornerstone in establishing social contacts. We identify ourselves and others by a set of civil (e.g., name, nationality, ID number, gender) and social (e.g., music taste, hobbies, religion) characteristics. This seamlessly carried out identification process in face-to-face interactions is challenged in the virtual realms of socializing, such as in online social network (OSN) platforms. New identities (i.e., online profiles) could be created without being subject to any level of verification, making it easy to create fake information and forge fake identities. This has led to a massive proliferation of accounts that represent fake identities (i.e., not mapping to physically existing entities), and that poison the online socializing environment with fake information and malicious behavior (e.g., child abuse, information stealing). Within this milieu, users in OSNs are left unarmed against the challenging task of identifying the real person behind the screen. OSN providers and research bodies have dedicated considerable effort to the study of the behavior and features of fake OSN identities, trying to find ways to detect them. Some other research initiatives have explored possible techniques to enable identity validation in OSNs. Both kinds of approach rely on extracting knowledge from the OSN, and exploiting it to achieve identification management in their realms. We provide a review of the most prominent works in the literature. We define the problem, provide a taxonomy of related attacks, and discuss the available solutions and approaches for knowledge-based identity management in OSNs. This article is categorized under: Fundamental Concepts of Data and Knowledge > Human Centricity and User Interaction Application Areas> Internet and Web-Based Applications Application Areas> Society and Culture

  • 22.
    Benner, Mats
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History. Lund Univ, Sweden.
    New Big Science in focus: Perspectives on ESS and MAX IV2017In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 54, no 1-2, p. 139-141Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 23. Berndtsson, Johan
    et al.
    Normark, Maria
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    The coordinative functions of flight strips: Air traffic control revisited1999In: Proceedings of the international ACM SIGGROUP conference on Supporting group work, 1999, p. 101-110Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cooperation in time-critical and physically distributed worksettings, such as air traffic control, requires extensive coordinationbetween the involved actors. For this coordination to beefficient the controllers rely both on the comprehensive use ofrules and procedures, and on artifacts supporting them infollowing these procedures. At the Copenhagen Air TrafficControl Center this coordination is largely carried out throughthe use of a flight plan database system, paper flight strips, anda closed-circuit television system. In relation to the introductionof a new and increasingly automated system in the year 2003 this paper discusses the coordinative functions served bythese three, soon to be replaced, artifacts from a design perspective.Despite the skepticism expressed in previous research,our results show that a further computerization couldbe successful if the coordinative functions the system currentlyfulfills are properly preserved.

  • 24.
    Blomberg, Gustaf
    et al.
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Ekström, Veronica
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Bidrag och motprestation: En uppföljning av sex stadsdelsområdens aktiveringsprogram för arbetslösa socialbidragstagare2006Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inom de flesta av Stockholm stads stadsdelsförvaltningar finns verksamheterdit arbetslösa som ansöker om socialbidrag hänvisas efter attde kontaktat socialtjänsten. De bidragssökande skall sedan under enviss tid delta i daglig verksamhet, så kallade aktiveringsprogram.Syftet med denna studie har varit att beskriva och följa upp arbetet idessa program inom sex stadsdelsförvaltningar. De centrala frågeställningarnai studien är:• Vad säger tidigare svensk respektive utländsk forskning påområdet?• Vilka skillnader och likheter finns mellan de olika stadsdelsområdena?• Hur arbetar man i stadsdelsförvaltningarna med arbetslösa socialbidragstagareoch hur motiverar man sitt arbetssätt?• Vilken syn har personal respektive chefer på verksamheten?• Hur upplever deltagarna i programmen hjälpen de får?• Vad är utfallet för arbetslösa socialbidragstagare som deltagit iaktiveringsprogrammen?För dessa ändamål har fyra enkätundersökningar genomförts och statistikur Stockholms stads register tagits fram och bearbetats.De sex stadsdelsområden som behandlas i studien är Vantör, Skärholmen,Kista, Hässelby-Vällingby, Rinkeby och Spånga-Tensta. Dessastadsdelsområden har i samtliga fall utom Hässelby-Vällingby likheteri form av relativt hög andel utrikes födda, högt bidragstagande,en problematisk arbetsmarknadssituation m.m. i förhållande till genomsnittet 

    i Stockholms stad men skiljer sig också åt. De har, somvisats i studien, till viss del olika utgångslägen, där Rinkeby har den”svåraste” situationen. Jämför man utvecklingen av arbetslöshet ochsocialbidragsstagande över tid i de olika stadsdelsområdena finnerman att den ser ut på samma sätt, d.v.s. kurvorna som beskriver utvecklingenser likadana ut men ligger på olika nivåer. I samtligastadsdelsområden har antalet socialbidragstagare minskat sedan 1998.Men det finns även stora skillnader mellan stadsdelarna inom respektivestadsdelsområde.Verksamheterna för arbetslösa socialbidragstagare som bedrivs av desex stadsdelsförvaltningarna liknar varandra. Alla sex strävar efter attfå sina deltagare ut på arbetsmarknaden alternativt i studier för att nåegenförsörjning. Så skall fullmäktiges mål för minskat bidragstagandeoch ökad sysselsättning i staden förverkligas. Verksamheterna skiljersig åt när det gäller krav, avgränsning av målgrupp, omfattning påverksamheten och val av fokus i arbetet. Samtliga arbetar dock medaktivering via motivationsinsatser, stöd, råd och hjälp med att sökaarbete. I alla verksamheterna ställs krav på aktivt deltagande, mengraden av kontroll och sätt att kontrollera varierar. Bara ett fåtal verksamheterhar satt upp en tidsgräns för aktiveringen. Det går således ide flesta fall att i åtminstone teorin befinna sig i aktivering hur längesom helst som arbetslös socialbidragstagare.Som en del av studien har enkätundersökningar genomförts inom socialtjänstensenheter för ekonomiskt bistånd respektive arbetsmarknad,för att få personalens och chefernas perspektiv på den verksamhetde arbetar inom. Deras inställning sammanfaller i hög grad, enligt våraundersökningar. Det är den arbetslinje som formulerats i måldokumentensom gäller och personalen ser arbetet att motivera deltagarnaatt nå egenförsörjning som centralt. Deltagarnas bristande vilja attbryta sitt bidragstagande ses samtidigt som ett större problem blandpersonalen än bland cheferna.I samtliga sex stadsdelsområden får den som vill ansöka om socialbidragsin första kontakt med socialtjänsten via så kallade mottagningsenheter.I rapporten har en mindre undersökning genomförts för attbland annat se hur stor andel av dem som tar en initial kontakt medmottagningsenheterna som sedan går vidare med sin ansökan. Vår 

    begränsade undersökning visar inget utmärkande hos de individer, enfjärdedel av de sökande, som avbryter sin ansökan direkt under denförsta kontakten med mottagningsenheterna. Då alla utom en som fullföljtsin socialbidragsansökan sedan också beviljats bidrag, verkarpersonalen på mottagningsenheterna vara väl insatta i vilka krav somställs för att klienten till sist ska erhålla försörjningsstöd.Efter inskrivning i aktivitet ställs olika krav på individen, exempelvisnärvaro på en viss plats under en viss tid, ett visst antal sökta jobb pervecka m.m. Det är rimligt att anta att individens motivation att delta iverksamheten och dennes syn på aktiviteten har påverkan på resultatetav aktiveringen. Därför har en enkätundersökning genomförts blanddeltagarna. Undersökningen visar i linje med tidigare forskning attdeltagarna har låga förväntningar på programmens förmåga att ökaderas chanser att få ett arbete. Samtidigt skulle en del delta även omprogrammen vore frivilliga, antagligen på grund av andra upplevdapositiva effekter av deltagandet.En del av socialbidragstagarna kommer att få arbete efter att ha genomgåttaktiveringsprogrammen, men det går inte att dra slutsatsen attenskilda deltagare fått arbete bara för att de lämnar verksamheten. Vidtill exempel studier, föräldraledighet eller flytt till ett annat stadsdelsområdelämnar deltagarna även den aktuella insatsen. För att kunnafölja deltagarna över tiden och se vart de tar vägen har Stockholmsstads egen statistik använts i en uppföljande registerundersökning.Undersökningen visar att knappt 21 % av deltagarna gått till egenförsörjningi form av arbete eller studier efter att ha avslutat sin aktivering.Då vår registerundersökning saknar jämförelsegrupper har det inte gåttatt beräkna några effekter av aktiveringen. Tidigare forskning på områdetär sparsam, i synnerhet i Sverige. Att döma av tidigare utvärderingarav aktivering, framförallt gjorda i USA, visar aktiveringsprograminga tydliga effekter för deltagarnas möjligheter att finna varaktigegenförsörjning. Vad som är en stor respektive god effekt förblir islutändan alltid en politisk fråga.Aktiveringsprogram verkar ha vunnit mycket popularitet runtom ivästvärlden genom sin politiska gångbarhet. De empiriskt belagda 

    resultaten ger inget tydligt stöd för aktiveringsinsatserna. Bidragstagandethar minskat i de sex stadsdelsområden som studerats här mendenna trend är generell för Sverige och inleddes redan innan aktiveringsinsatsernasinförande. Dessutom kostar det att driva aktiveringsprogram.Hur stor roll makrofaktorer som högkonjunktur och socialpolitiskareformer spelar är oklart. Det behövs minst sagt mer forskningpå området.Tidigare arbetsmarknadspolitisk forskning visar att arbetsgivare verkarvara mer positivt inställda till dem som deltagit i statliga arbetsmarknadsåtgärder– särskilt till dem som genomgått AMU – än tillarbetssökande som ”bara” gått arbetslösa. Det kan ses som ett argumentför någon form av aktivering. I framtiden kan den centralt styrdaarbetsmarknadspolitiken förväntas flyta ihop med den lokala. En sådantrend kan redan skönjas såväl i Sverige som utomlands. Det kanleda till att alla arbetssökande inlemmas under det statliga arbetsmarknadspolitiskaansvaret. Det skulle i sin tur kunna innebära merresurser till och högre kvalitet på insatserna för framtida arbetssökandesocialbidragstagare.

  • 25. Bodin, Örjan
    et al.
    Ramirez-Sanchez, S
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Prell, Christina
    A social relational approach to natural resource governance2011In: Social Networks and Natural Resource Management: Uncovering the Social Fabric of Environmental Governance / [ed] Bodin, Örjan; Prell, Christina, Cambridge University Press , 2011, p. 1-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Botha, Elise M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    A means to an end: Using political satire to go viral2014In: Public Relations Review, ISSN 0363-8111, E-ISSN 1873-4537, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 363-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the rise of video sharing giants like Youtube and Google Video, coupled with increased broadband connectivity and improved sharing functionality across social networking sites, the role of the viral video has been cemented in many IMC strategies. While most agree about the importance of better understanding viral marketing, there is less agreement about what makes content become viral. While some content gets viewed by millions of people, others struggle to gain viral traction. Content specific, intrapersonal and interpersonal reasons have been proposed for viral marketing success. This paper' focuses on the intrapersonal reasons for content going viral in the context of political satire. More specifically, the role of emotion in the spread of content online, is investigated. Political satire focuses on gaining entertainment from politics. Satire, and specifically political satire, forms part of using humour in advertising and has been influential in shifting public opinion since ancient Greece. This study compares success and unsuccessful viral campaigns that used political satire, by first analysing the online comments that viewers made about the video. Following these findings, an experiment is conducted and the influence of intensity, creativity, humour and utility on virality is modelled, controlling for valence and previous exposure. The findings suggest that, when using political satire in viral campaigns, creativity and the intensity of the emotions felt are key influencing factors in whether videos get "shared" or "liked". Therefore, while many authors contend that particular emotions or positive content has a greater likelihood to become viral, this paper shows that it is not the particular emotion, but the intensity with which that emotion was felt that drives viral success.

  • 27. Bowyer, A.
    et al.
    Montague, K.
    Wheater, S.
    McGovern, R.
    Lingam, R.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Understanding the family perspective on the storage, sharing and handling of family civic data2018In: CHI '18 Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Across social care, healthcare and public policy, enabled by the "big data" revolution (which has normalized large-scale data-based decision-making), there are moves to "join up" citizen databases to provide care workers with holistic views of families they support. In this context, questions of personal data privacy, security, access, control and (dis-)empowerment are critical considerations for system designers and policy makers alike. To explore the family perspective on this landscape of what we call Family Civic Data, we carried out ethnographic interviews with four North-East families. Our design-gamebased interviews were effective for engaging both adults and children to talk about the impact of this dry, technical topic on their lives. Our findings, delivered in the form of design guidelines, show support for dynamic consent: families would feel most empowered if involved in an ongoing co-operative relationship with state welfare and civic authorities through shared interaction with their data.

  • 28.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Interactive Intstitute.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    Interactive Institute.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    Interactive Institute.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Coffee Maker Patterns and the Design of Energy Feedback Artefacts2010In: DIS '10 Proceedings of the 8th ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, 2010, p. 93-102Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart electricity meters and home displays are being installed in people’s homes with the assumption that households will make the necessary efforts to reduce their electricity consumption. However, present solutions do not sufficiently account for the social implications of design. There is a potential for greater savings if we can better understand how such designs affect behaviour. In this paper, we describe our design of an energy awareness artefact – the Energy AWARE Clock – and discuss it in relation to behavioural processes in the home. A user study is carried out to study the deployment of the prototype in real domestic contexts for three months. Results indicate that the Energy AWARE Clock played a significant role in drawing households’ attention to their electricity use. It became a natural part of the household and conceptions of electricity became naturalized into informants’ everyday language.

  • 29.
    Bäcklander, Gisela
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    To see or not to see: Importance of sensemaking in employee self-direction2019In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, ISSN 2245-0157, E-ISSN 2245-0157, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being self-directed is one of the most sought-after employee attributes. The present study examines managers’ approaches to and conceptualization of employee self-directedness through semi-structured interviews with 13 managers from five companies in the Stockholm area. Analysis suggests two different emphases in trying to increase self-direction, with differing underlying assumptions: an evaluation emphasis where self-direction is conceptualized as an inherent property of the individual, and a cultivation emphasis suggesting a more interactionist perspective of self-direction as an emergent behavior based on the interaction of individual and situational characteristics. Further, a “seeing work”-skill emerged in all interviews, implicating situational judgment and attention as core to what is ultimately seen as successful self-direction. Managers with a cultivation emphasis mentioned as viable tactics those focused on supporting sensemaking and thus enriching the working situation to enable better discretionary situational judgements.

  • 30.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Cupitt, Rebekah
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Meetings, practice and beyond: Environmental sustainability in meeting practices at work2013In: Nachhaltigkeit in der Wirtschaftskommunikation / [ed] Martin Nielsen, Iris Rittenhofer, Marianne Grove Ditlevsen, Sophie Esmann Andersen, Irene Pollach, Wiesbaden: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden , 2013, p. 159-190Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study shows how the employees at a large transnational telecom company understand and accommodate the implemented travel and meeting policies that regulate business communication. This involves looking at employee decisions on when, how and why to hold meetings. The subsequent understandings of meetings and their practice is formed through negotiation and the formation of a ‘social matrix of workplace communication (meetings)’(Bateson & Reusch 2009). This social matrix and its contexts are analysed from the perspective of environmental sustainability of office work practice. The basis for this is the recent implementation of company-wide restrictions on travel aiming to encourage the use of mediated meetings instead of travel for face-to-face meetings. Some issues that emerge are shared meanings of meetings, more specifically the perceived importance of the physical meeting in a workplace where telephone meetings were the norm. This shows that even if the technological possibilities for mediated meetings and by extension a more flexible work practice exist, they are not regarded as default but seen as complementary to conventional work practices. The need to find a balance in between mediated and physical meetings comes across as a recurring theme in both interviews and policy documents.  As a result the ongoing negotiation of which meetings are deemed necessary to be held in person and thereby requiring travel, is embedded within TeliaSonera employees' notions that face-to-face meetings are better and more efficient than mediated meetings. Subsequently the collective view that mediated meetings are not as successful as face-to-face meetings becomes a central to the character of workplace communication. This negotiation is carried out on an individual level as well as on a more organisational level. When carried out on an organisational level these negotiations occur in policy documents which can sometimes contradict employee perspectives and are equally subject to contextual factors (cf. Kogg 2002). Other related issues present in the empirical data are the blurring of the divide between work and home in relation to the changes in work practices and information and communication technology (ICT).

  • 31.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Cargo Bike Pool: A way to facilitate a car-free life?2014In: Resilience – the new research frontier. Proceedings of the 20th Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference (ISDRC 2014) Trondheim 18-20 June 2014, Trondheim, 2014, p. 273-280Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In planning for sustainable cities, there is a need to take into consideration alternative transportation modes and facilitate the use of these, for the types of trips that people tend to use cars for. One way to mitigate car dependency in everyday life could be by using a cargo bike for these types of trips.The purpose of this paper is to map in what ways a specific trial of providing access to a cargo bike pool in a housing association affected both people’s travel habits and how they reimagined the types of trips that could be done at all or done in another way in order to find car-free travel and transportation modes. In this paper we focussed on the residents who actually used the cargo bikes.This qualitative study shows that although many of the residents did indeed lead car-free everyday lives, they got the opportunity to do other types of trips that they had not even thought about beforehand or deemed too difficult to do without a car. The cargo bike proved to fit into the portfolio of sustainable travel modes that facilitate everyday transports. The way that trips are imagined has also changed, that is what a cargo bike can be used to in relation to car, regular bike and public transportation.Having access to a cargo bike through a vehicle pool means that the possibilities to live a car-free everyday life are facilitated and in the long run a sustainable transportation pattern is being put in place.

  • 32.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Åkerlund, Maria
    Getting there and back again: Commuting and ICT in six cities across the globe2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ericsson ConsumerLab performed a qualitative exploratory study of how people experience daily commuting in three different countries. This report aims to present the outcome of the study in such a way that the data can be useful for further analyses and studies of commuting in relation to ICT use and environmental sustainability. Based on the study’s findings this report will present analytical data on: i) how ICT can be linked to everyday travel in order to facilitate commuting from the user’s point of view; and ii) how ICT solutions can enable commuting in an environmentally more sustainable way.

    The study, which had an ethnographic approach, showed that in general, commuters would like their commuting time to be, or at least seem, as short as possible. The respondents spend hours commuting every week and often claim to consider it a waste of time. Regardless of means of transport, they would like to get the most out of their commuting time (working, socialising, relaxing etc.), which implies that there is a demand for further technological improvements in this area (voice recognition services in cars, privacy settings in public transport, connectivity in public transport, etc.). An aspect that adds to how people perceive their commuting time concerns the extent to which its duration is predictable – even if the time cannot be shortened, commuters at least want to know how much time they will spend on their daily commute, so that they can plan their day with more certainty.

    Irrespective of means of transport, two major frustrations for commuters are lack of flow and the presence and behaviour of other people. People seem to lack good real-time information enabling them to avoid interruptions in their commute and much of their frustration relates to poor infrastructure conditions and management. Frustration with other people derives from their conduct in traffic contributing to inconveniences, congestion or hazards, or from noise, smell or littering on public transport.

    The greatest motivators for commuting by car are a feeling of independence in relation to other people, schedule and choice of route, and the private space the car offers. This means that the car provides flexibility in terms of when and how people travel, while also providing a private space both mentally (“in the car you can do whatever you want”) and physically (“you don’t have to hustle with others on the bus or train”). The major frustration when commuting by car is the need to focus on driving, so drivers cannot utilise time as they would wish.

    People generally justify their choice of public transport by anti-car arguments, which include difficulty in finding a parking space at work, expensive parking, fear of driving, lack of driving licence etc., but can also motivate their choice as giving them ‘me-time’ without having to focus on driving. The major frustration with commuting by public transport is dependency on time schedules and the shortcomings of the public transport network. This is exacerbated by a lack of relevant information or available options. However, commuting can be improved in a variety of ways for car and public transport users with the help of ICT. From a sustainability perspective, it is important to exploit the potential of ICT solutions to facilitate more environmentally friendly practices.

    Many of the ICT (Information Communication Technology) solutions identified in this report require reliable access to the internet and/or mobile phone network. The mobile phone is currently the single most important internet device while commuting, thus perhaps being the point of departure for many of the solutions, such as travel planner, ticketing options, etc, but for car users mobile phone services need to be adapted through better in-car voice recognition technologies, since the focus needs to be on driving. Current information services could be more personalised and contextualised in order to better suit the individual driver and most of these ICT solutions and services are also applicable to public transport commuters, but an additional function for such commuters could be some kind of ‘emergency button’ on mobile phones to increase their sense of security in travel.

    Home office solutions are a way of avoiding the frustrations of commuting altogether. While working from home is regarded by some with ambivalence and is impossible for many, there are ways of refining these solutions.

  • 33.
    Cano Viktorsson, Carlos
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    From Fixed, Mobile to Complex: The Social Shaping of ICT for Sustainable Travel2013In: ICT4S 2013: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies for Sustainability, ETH Zurich, February 14-16, 2013, ETH Zurich, 2013, , p. 6p. 197-202Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks at the changing shape of mobile connectivity and how it has influenced the potential for informing on sustainable travel. It examines the role mobile connectivity has had for an ICT based service informing on traffic and transport in order to trace what role social practices of interconnecting through mobile media may have had for such an enterprise. The paper looks at two historical examples of ICT based traffic and travel information services in Stockholm, Sweden in order to discuss what role mobile connectivity may have for promoting sustainable travel through ICT.

  • 34.
    Cano-Viktorsson, Carlos
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    From Maps to Apps: Tracing the Organizational Responsiveness of an Early Multi-Modal Travel Planning Service2015In: The Journal of urban technology, ISSN 1063-0732, E-ISSN 1466-1853, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 87-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An Internet-based system for informing on multimodal travel planning (several modes of transportation) was introduced in Stockholm, Sweden in October 2000 in the form of a web page called trafiken.nu. The web page has a historical value of being one of the first attempts in Europe, and possibly the world, at providing an ICT-based travel planning service geared towards facilitating sustainable travel to the general public. The aim of this article is to investigate the historical development of trafiken.nu in order to draw lessons on how to better provide for a public information service with a potential for facilitating sustainable travel planning. Findings from the study of trafiken.nu suggest that the organizations behind the service have been slow in adapting to shifting media technology practices on how to provide for information which has affected the uptake of the service. Lessons from the case study provide a basis for arguing that organizations attempting to implement public information services would benefit from finding a means of harnessing collective intelligence in order to provide for a more customizable and responsive service to the general public.

  • 35.
    Cano-Viktorsson, Carlos
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    From Vision to Transition: Exploring the Potential for Public Information Services to Facilitate Sustainable Urban Transport2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Policy initiatives to promote sustainable travel through the use of Internet based public information systems have increased during the last decade. Stockholm, in being one of the first cities in Europe to implement an Internet based service for facilitating sustainable travel is believed to be a good candidate for an analysis of key issues for developing sustainable travel planning services to the public.

    Aim: This thesis investigates the past development of two Stockholm based public information systems and their services in order to draw lessons on how to better provide for a public information service geared towards facilitating  environmentally sustainable travel planning through information and communications technology. The overall goal of the thesis is to contribute to an understanding on how to better design and manage current and future attempts at facilitating sustainable travel planning services based on historical case studies.

    Approach: The thesis draws ideas from the concept of organizational responsiveness – an organization’s ability to listen, understand and respond to demands put to it by its internal and external stakeholders – in order to depict how well or not the two public information systems and their owners have adapted to established norms and values of their surroundings.

    Results: Overall, the findings from the historical case studies suggest that organizations attempting to provide sustainable travel planning to the public need to design and manage their systems in such a way that it responds to shifting demands on how to provide for information. Implementing and embedding new technologies involves complex processes of change both at the micro level – for users and practitioners of the service – and at the meso level for the involved public service organizations themselves. This condition requires a contextualist framework to analyze and understand organizational, contextual and cultural issues involved in the adoption of new technologies and procedures.

    Conclusions: The thesis concludes with a discussion on how the findings from the historical case studies may provide lessons for both current and future attempts at providing public information systems geared towards facilitating environmentally sustainable travel planning to the public. Historical examples and issues concerning collective intelligence and peer to peer based forms of designing, producing and supervising public information services identified throughout the study are looked upon and discussed in terms of their possible role in increasing the potential for public information services to facilitate sustainable urban transport.

  • 36.
    Cano-Viktorsson, Carlos
    Stockholms universitet.
    Social Media and the Networked Self in Everyday Life2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Internet has become increasingly ubiquitous and with the introduction of Web 2.0 technologies and concepts it has almost become second nature for many Internet users. This study attempts to view the “social life” of this “new” online environment through its current manifestation in the form of the popular social networking site Facebook. It argues that Facebook has become a tool for the management of one's self both online and offline and that people's reflexive relation to their self-identity is made visible through their engagement with this social media. How such a new form of social media incorporates itself into everyday life but also how the media acts as an extension of the reflexive self has been the main focus of this study.

  • 37.
    Cano-Viktorsson, Carlos
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Traffic Radio as a Precursor to Smart Travel Planning Systems: The Challenge of Organizing “Collective Intelligence”2013In: The Journal of urban technology, ISSN 1063-0732, E-ISSN 1466-1853, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 43-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper depicts how a Swedish radio station organized a means of real-time information management to report on local traffic conditions long before the common use of the Internet. Drawing on a history of the Stockholm traffic radio staff the study examines particular conditions for organizing a service that may inform next generations of smart travel planning systems. The author notes how a vision of involving the public together with the use of increasingly mobile and interconnected communication devices provided the service with an opportunity for harnessing collective intelligence. The study highlights critical success factors and barriers for organizing collective  intelligence and the importance they may have had for providing a real-time information service to the public.

  • 38.
    Cars, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Healey, P.
    United Kingdom.
    Madanipour, A.
    United Kingdom.
    De Maghãlhaes, C.
    United Kingdom.
    Preface2017In: Urban Governance, Institutional Capacity and Social Milieux, Taylor & Francis, 2017, p. xi-xivChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Cars, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Healey, P.
    United Kingdom.
    Madanipour, A.
    United Kingdom.
    De Maghãlhaes, C.
    United Kingdom.
    Urban governance, institutional capacity and social milieux2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This title was first published in 2002: Urban governance has faced numerous challenges as city governments, their partners and their critics struggle to transform themselves in the context of post-industrial economies and societies. This context has generated new relations of economic life and social activity to be accommodated in cities, and has also changed expectations of the roles, relationships and modes of governance. New conceptual tools to analyze these experiences are becoming available, linked to a broad "institutionalist" wave of ideas sweeping right across the social sciences. This text responds to the challenges faced by urban governance and explores a range of efforts to build new institutional capacities. An international team of social scientists and practitioners critically analyzes conceptual challenges, policy developments and practical experiences. © Göran Cars, Patsy Healey, Ali Madanipour and Claudio de Maghãlhaes 2002. All rights reserved.

  • 40. Castro, Maria Pia
    et al.
    Fragapane, Stefania
    Rinaldi, Francesco Mazzeo
    KTH. University of Catania, Italy.
    Professionalization and evaluation: A European analysis in the digital era2016In: Evaluation, ISSN 1356-3890, E-ISSN 1461-7153, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 489-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is expected that the number of evaluators will continue to grow in the near future. However, the heterogeneity of different national contexts makes the consolidation of a consistent jurisdiction' for the professional evaluator rather problematic. This article contributes to the debate on the professionalization of evaluators by looking at practices attributed, competences and skills required by employers, and the main topics addressed by the community of evaluators. The authors draw on various sources - ISCO08 (International Standard Classification of Occupation); ESCO (European Skills, Competences, Qualifications and Occupations); job offers posted on the EES (European Evaluation Society) website; EES LinkedIn group - to argue that the practice of evaluation has achieved a supranational dimension, with potential consequences both on evaluators' educational profile and on the ways in which evaluations are commissioned and conducted.

  • 41.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Münter, Ursula
    Satsuka, Shiho
    Introduction2014In: Rachel Carson Perspectives, ISSN 2190-5088, Vol. 3, p. 5-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sivaramakrishnan, KalyanakrishnanYale University.
    Ecological Nationalisms: Nature, Livelihoods, and Identities in South Asia2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The works presented in this collection take environmental scholarship in South Asia into novel territory by exploring how questions of national identity become entangled with environmental concerns in Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, and India. The essays provide insight into the motivations of colonial and national governments in controlling or managing nature, and bring into fresh perspective the different kinds of regional political conflicts that invoke nationalist sentiment through claims on nature. In doing all this, the volume also offers new ways to think about nationalism and, more specifically, nationalism in South Asia from the vantage point of interdisciplinary environmental studies. The contributors to this innovative volume show that manifestations of nationalism have long and complex histories in South Asia. Terrestrial entities, imagined in terms of dense ecological networks of relationships, have often been the space or reference point for national aspirations, as shared memories of Mother Nature or appropriated economic, political, and religious geographies. In recent times, different groups in South Asia have claimed and appropriated ancient landscapes and territories for the purpose of locating and justifying a specific and utopian version of nation by linking its origin to their nature-mediated attachments to these landscapes. The topics covered include forests, agriculture, marine fisheries, parks, sacred landscapes, property rights, trade, and economic development. Gunnel Cederlof is associate professor of history, Uppsala University, Sweden. K. Sivaramakrishnan is professor of anthropology and international studies and director of the South Asia Center, Jackson School of International Studies, at the University of Washington. The other contributors are Nina Bhatt, Vinita Damodaran, Claude A. Garcia, Urs Geiser, Goetz Hoeppe, Bengt G. Karlsson, Antje Linkenbach, Wolfgang Mey, Kathleen D. Morrison, J. P. Pascal, and Sarah Southwold-Llewellyn.

  • 43.
    Christensen, Miyase
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Jansson, A.
    Cosmopolitanism and the media: Cartographies of change2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cosmopolitanism and the Media explores the diverse implications of today’s digital media environment in relation to people’s worldviews and social practices. The book presents an account of the relationship between cosmopolitanized lifeworlds and forces of surveillance, control and mobility, as well as a critique of social power and reproduction in our mediatized society.

  • 44.
    Collin, Lina
    et al.
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    50+ år – en osynlig grupp?2007In: Vägen till arbete: Om Stockholms stads arbete med olika grupper av arbetslösa socialbidragstagare / [ed] Daniel Rauhut, Stockholm: Fou-enheten, Stockholms stad , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45. Crona, Beatrice
    et al.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Prell, Christina
    Reed, Mark
    Hubacek, Klaus
    Combining social network approaches with social theories to improve understanding of natural resource governance2011In: Social Networks and Natural Resource Management: Uncovering the Social Fabric in Environmental Governance / [ed] Bodin, Örjan; Prell, Christina, Cambridge University Press , 2011, p. 44-71Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Cupitt, Rebekah
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Phantasms collide: Navigating video-mediated communication in the Swedish workplace2013In: Global Media Journal : Australian Edition, ISSN 1835-2340, E-ISSN 1835-2340, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 247-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global telecommunications companies sell new technologies and services that aim to increase communication possibilities. This case study of one Swedish telecommunications company (‘the Company’), examines how employee notions of video-mediated communication are embedded social meanings. These social meanings are purposefully linked to notions of efficiency in the workplace, the environment, corporate social responsibility and economic gain. Through advertisements, slogans, in-house incentive programs and company policies, the Company has achieved what could be described as a shift in employee attitudes towards working using video-mediated communication (VMC) – so-called video meetings. The shift is however, far from comprehensive and this consciously constructed understanding of video-mediated communication co-exists and conflicts with multiple other meanings – explicit, implicit and purposefully ignored. Often moral dilemmas arise as personal wellbeing in the short-term conflicts with corporate sales targets, budget restrictions and environmental goals to ‘save the planet’. By detailing these different understandings and their inter-relations, the complex and purposed nature of video-mediated communication phantasms in a global telecommunications company emerges.

  • 47.
    Cupitt, Rebekah
    Socialantropologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitetet.
    We Are the Robots: An anthropological perspective on human-robot interaction2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    How do we cope with technology today? We are surrounded by machines, computers and technological devices from mobile phones to automated check- outs. These types of machines are no longer exotic in Sweden where today the average person is usually fluent in their use. But do we really have an understanding of how these objects work, is understanding necessary and how do we cope when our knowledge is lacking?

    This thesis is intended as an introduction to an anthropological way of look- ing at strategies people develop for understanding, using and interacting with technological objects, specifically robots. Still an exotic object, robots are more widely known-about than experienced. Based on ethnographic data, primarily gathered in two distinct workplace environments as well as interviews and video documentation, my analysis aims to illustrate the implications of defining hu- mans and robots as equally significant agents within networks whilst disputing the traditional importance given to the dichotomy of technology (non-human) and human.

    Whilst robots are definitely less than we expect them to be, they are still so- cial artefacts, firmly situated within social networks and meaning which manifest through human–robot interactions. Perhaps little more than tools, an ambigu- ity exists in human–robot interactions which suggests that we form quasi-social relations that could, and have been exploited by designers and engineers to broaden the range of use for technological objects.

    Keywords: human-robot interaction, network theory, situated knowledges, agential realism, performativity, social contextualisation of technological objects

  • 48. Davydov, Vladimir
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Grani sot͡sial'nogo: antropologicheskie perspektivy issledovanii͡a sot͡sial'nykh otnosheniĭ i kul'tury2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Diani, Mario
    et al.
    University of Trento.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Lorien, Jasny
    University of Essex.
    ‘‘Right to the City’’ and the Structure of Civic Organizational Fields: Evidence from Cape Town2018In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This article proposes a network analytic approach to the role of frames in shaping the structure of civic organizational fields. Adopting a perspective from the global South, it looks at the impact of the expression ‘‘Right to the city’’ (RTC) over alliance building among civil society actors, exploring patterns of collaborative ties among 129 civil society organizations active in Cape Town from 2012 to 2014. The article addresses two broad ques- tions: What is the relation between RTC and other frames that are also frequently invoked to describe urban struggles and issues? Does the RTC frame affect the structure of urban civic organizational fields in significant ways? Data suggest that while RTC plays a significant role in local civil society, it is neither the only interpretative frame that Capetonian civic organizations draw upon to characterize their activity, nor the more salient. ‘‘Urban conservation,’’ especially tied to nature conservation and environmental issues, actually shapes the structure of local organizational fields in a sharper manner. This is, however, a potentially more divisive frame, rooted as it is in the apartheid legacy that still shapes urban dynamics in the city.

  • 50.
    Ding, Jielan
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Natl Sci Lib, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, 19A Yuquan Rd, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Ahlgren, Per
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure. National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190, China.
    Yang, Liying
    Chinese Acad Sci, Natl Sci Lib, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China..
    Yue, Ting
    Chinese Acad Sci, Natl Sci Lib, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, 19A Yuquan Rd, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Disciplinary structures in Nature, Science and PNAS: journal and country levels2018In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 116, no 3, p. 1817-1852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes, using Web of Science publications and two time periods (2004-2006 and 2014-2016), the disciplinary structures in the three prestigious journals Nature, Science and PNAS, compared with two baselines: Non-NSP_Multi (multidisciplinary publications that have other source journals than Nature, Science and PNAS), and Non-Multi (publications assigned to other categories than Multidisciplinary). We analyze the profiles at two levels, journal and country. The results for the journal level show that for Nature and Science, the publications are considerably less concentrated to certain disciplines compared to PNAS. Biology is the dominant discipline for all the three journals. Nature and Science have similar publication shares in Medicine, Geosciences, Physics, Space science, and Chemistry. The publications of PNAS are highly concentrated to two disciplines: Biology and Medicine. Compared with Non-NSP_Multi and Non-Multi, the shares of Biology in NSP journals are higher, whereas the share of Medicine is lower. At the country level, 14 countries are included, among them the five BRICS countries. With respect to the NSP journals, the emphasis disciplines (in terms of world share of publications) of most countries other than USA are the disciplines in which USA has its weakest performance. The disciplinary structures of USA and of most of the other studied countries therefore tend to be different. Regarding Non-NSP_Multi and Non-Multi, the shapes of the disciplinary structures of the 14 countries can be roughly grouped into three groups, while there are more types of shapes for the countries in the NSP journals. For all five units of analysis, the discipline structures of most countries generally change only slightly between different time periods. The structures of some BRICS countries, however, change to a relatively large extent.

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