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  • 1.
    Allen, Irma
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Poland on fire: voices from the provinces2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Allen, Irma
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Polen – ett land som står i brand2017In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Allen, Irma
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Solidarity according to Polish women in 20172017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Allen, Irma
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Thinking with a Feminist Political Ecology of Air-and-breathing-bodies2020In: Body & Society, ISSN 1357-034X, E-ISSN 1460-3632, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 79-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social theory has paid little attention to air, despite its centrality to bodily existence and air pollution being named the world’s biggest public health crisis. Where attention to air is found, the body is largely absent. On the other hand, conceptualizing the body without life-sustaining breath fails to highlight breathing as the ongoing metabolic bodily act in which the materiality of human and more-than-human intermingle and transmute one another. Political ecology studies how unequal power structures and knowledge production reproduce human–environment relations, including a nascent focus on the body and air – but as separate issues. This article argues that a political ecology of air would productively fuse with a political ecology of the body to bring the visceral realm into intersectional analysis of air’s contemporary materialities. A feminist political ecology situates explicitly air-and-breathing-bodies, their intimately posthuman, relational, elemental and corpomaterial intra-action, at the heart of such analysis.

  • 5. Alymov, Sergei
    et al.
    Anderson, David
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Etnos-Thinking in the Long Twentieth Century2019In: Life Histories of Etnos Theory in Russia and Beyond / [ed] David Anderson, Dmitry Arzyutov, Sergei Alymov, Cambridge: Open Book Publishers, 2019, p. 21-75Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6. Anderson, David
    et al.
    Alymov, Sergei
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Grounding Etnos Theory: An Introduction2019In: Life Histories of Etnos Theory in Russia and Beyond / [ed] David Anderson, Dmitry Arzyutov, Sergei Alymov, Cambridge: Open Book Publishers, 2019, p. 1-19Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7. Anderson, David
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry
    The Construction of the Soviet Ethnography and “The Peoples of Siberia"2016In: History and Anthropology, ISSN 0275-7206, E-ISSN 1477-2612, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 183-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multi-generation book project "The Peoples of Siberia" enabled a group of Leningrad-based scholars to reshape their museum into a Soviet ethnographic community. This article analyses the face-to-face performances, the legalistic stenographic documentation, the collective crafting of a single authoritative style, and a unique temporal frame as an important background to understand a hallmark volume in Siberian studies. The authors argue that the published volume indexes nearly thirty years of scholarly debates as much as it indexes the peoples it represents. The article concludes with a critical discussion of how this volume was translated and received by a Euro-American readership influencing the perception of Siberian peoples internationally. It also links the volume to contemporary post-Soviet publication projects which seem to retrace the same path. The article is based on extensive archival work and references collections recently discovered and which are presented for publication here for the first time.

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  • 8. Anderson, David G.
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Etnos Archipelago: Sergei M. Shirokogoroff and the Life History of a Controversial Anthropological Concept2019In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 741-773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of etnos—one of the more controversial anthropological concepts of the Cold War period—is contextualized by looking at its “life history” through the biography of one of its proponents. Sergei Mikhailovich Shirokogoroff was a Russian/Chinese anthropologist whose career transected Eurasia from Paris to Beijing via Saint Petersburg and the Siberian borderlands of the Russian Empire. His transnational biography and active correspondence shaped the unique spatial and intellectual configuration of a concept that became a cornerstone of both Soviet and Chinese ethnography. The theory of etnos turned out to be surprisingly stable, while circulating through various political and intellectual environments ranging from England, Germany, and China to Imperial, Soviet, and modern Russia. This case study presents a history of anthropology wherein networks and conversations originating in the Far East of Eurasia have had unexpected influences on the heartlands of anthropology. 

  • 9. Anderson, David G.
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.Alymov, Sergei S.
    Life Histories of Etnos Theory in Russia and Beyond2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of etnos came into being over a hundred years ago as a way of understanding the collective identities of people with a common language and shared traditions. In the twentieth century, the concept came to be associated with Soviet state-building, and it fell sharply out of favour. Yet outside the academy, etnos-style arguments not only persist, but are a vibrant part of regional anthropological traditions.Life Histories of Etnos Theory in Russia and Beyond makes a powerful argument for reconsidering the importance of etnos in our understanding of ethnicity and national identity across Eurasia. The collection brings to life a rich archive of previously unpublished letters, fieldnotes, and photographic collections of the theory’s early proponents. Using contemporary fieldwork and case studies, the volume shows how the ideas of these ethnographers continue to impact and shape identities in various regional theatres from Ukraine to the Russian North to the Manchurian steppes of what is now China. Through writing a life history of these collectivist concepts, the contributors to this volume unveil a world where the assumptions of liberal individualism do not hold. In doing so, they demonstrate how notions of belonging are not fleeting but persistent, multi-generational, and bio-social.This collection is essential reading for anyone interested in Russian and Chinese area studies. It will also appeal to historians and students of anthropology and ethnography more generally.

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  • 10. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Altaĭskiĭ ritual’nyĭ kover i sozdanie geterotopii [Altai Ritual Rug and the Creation of Heterotopia]2013In: Antropologicheskii Forum, ISSN 1815-8870, no 18, p. 85-133Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 11. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    "Epîtres" altaïnnes: histoire et vie des textes du mouvement religieux Ak-Jaŋ2014In: Études Mongoles et Sibériennes, Centrasiatiques et Tibétaines, ISSN 2101-0013, Vol. 45, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 12. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Nabli͡udai͡a za nabli͡udateli͡ami: o vizual'nykh tekhnikakh teoretizirovanii͡a Sergeĭ i Elizavety Shirokogorovykh [Observing Observers: On Visual Techniques of Theoretical Thinking of Sergei and Elizabeth Shirokogoroff]2017In: Etnographicheskoe obozrenie, ISSN 0869-5415, no 5, p. 32-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Samoyedic Diary: Early Years of Visual Anthropology in the Soviet Arctic2016In: Visual Anthropology, ISSN 0894-9468, E-ISSN 1545-5920, Vol. 29, no 4-5, p. 331-359Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 14. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Shatra and Jurt: The ‘Return Address’ in Rituals of Altaians2016In: Archaeology, Anthropology and Ethnology of Eurasia, ISSN 1563-0102, p. 111-120Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Writing the History of the Northern ‘Field’: An Introductory Note2017In: Sibirica (keele): Interdisciplinary Journal of Siberian Studies, ISSN 1361-7362, E-ISSN 1476-6787, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 16. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Ėtnograf s kinokameroĭ v rukakh: Prokof'evy i nachalo vizual'noĭ antropologii samodiĭt͡sev [Ethnographers with Cinecamera in Their Hands: Prokofievs and the Beginning of Visual Anthropology of Samoyeds]2016In: Antropogicheskii Forum, ISSN 1815-8870, no 29Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 17. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    et al.
    Alymov, SergeiAnderson, David
    Ot klassikov k marksizmu: soveshchanie ėtnografov Moskvy i Leningrada (5–11 apreli͡a 1929 g.)2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 18. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    et al.
    Kan, Sergei
    Kont͡sept͡sii͡a poli͡a i polevoĭ raboty v ranneĭ sovetskoĭ ėtnografii [The concept of the Field and Fieldworking in Early Soviet Ethnography]2013In: Etnographicheskoe obozrenie, ISSN 0869-5415, no 6, p. 45-68Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    et al.
    Lyublinskaya, Marina
    Nenet͡skoe olenevodstvo: geografii͡a, ėtnografii͡a, lingvistika [Nenets Reindeer Husbandry: Geography, Ethnography, and Linguistics].2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
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  • 20.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    ‘American Dreams’ of Early Soviet Ethnography: Some Reflections on Bogoras’s Legacy2020In: Ab Imperio: Theory and History of Nationalities and Nationalism in the post-Soviet Realm, ISSN 2166-4072, E-ISSN 2164-9731, no 1, p. 75-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dmitry Arzyutov discusses a phenomenon that he defines as "American dreams" of Russian ethnography in the early twentieth century based on the example of Waldemar Bogoras, one of the founders of early Soviet ethnography. The essay highlights three specific cases that frame the development of this discipline not through the familiar narrative of gradual isolation but as a story of sometimes problematic contacts and exchanges with American anthropologists. The contacts that were established during the joint Jesup North Pacific Expedition (1897-1902) led by Franz Boas continued into the 1920s. Arzyutov shows that the main concepts of Soviet ethnography, such as "ethnogenesis" and "ethnic history," were products of the debates about the origin of the peoples of Arctica and Siberia between Franz Boas and the Russian expedition participants, Bogoras and, to a lesser degree, Lev Shternberg. The second case addresses Bogoras's unrealized project of establishing nature reserves-cum-reservations for the native peoples of Siberia. These were to combine the prerevolutionary idea of nature reserves (popular among Bogoras's geographer colleagues) with the North American practice of Indian reservations. Finally, the third case compares trajectories of the two students of Bogoras and Boas, Julia Averkieva and Archie Phinney. Their stories show how Marxism might have been differently understood and deployed in the transnational context, and how this difference could have generated intellectual and personal disagreements and conflicting versions of identity politics. The three cases taken together testify to the importance of shifting the optics of the history of anthropology from reconstructing national traditions and local genealogies toward tracing dialogue and mutual borrowings.

  • 21.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Antropolog ili politik? Politicheskie pristrastii͡a i teoreticheskie postroenii͡a Sergei͡a Shirokogorova [Anthropologist or Politician? Political Bias and Theoretical Constructions of Sergei M. Shirokogoroff]2017In: Etnographicheskoe Obozrenie, ISSN 08695415, no 5, p. 121-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the archival collection of photographs and drawings of Sergei and Elizabeth Shirokogoroff from the Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography. I examine these images as a visual technique of theoretical thinking in anthropology. In the first part of the article, I reconstruct the fieldwork of the Shirokogoroffs and focus on the technical history of fieldworking and the analysis of the images. Two main case studies are in the centre of the article: the analysis of the background and foreground of the photographs and “composite portraits” as a special genre in the history of physical anthropology. In the final part of the article, I provide an analysis of diagrams and drawings that Shirokogoroff did as an illustration of his theoretical ideas. The article concludes with an analysis of social life of their images in writings and archives of their colleagues.

  • 22.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Department of Siberian Ethnography, Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography (Kunstkamera), Universitetskaya nab. 3, 199034 Saint Petersburg, Russia.
    Environmental Encounters: Woolly Mammoth, Indigenous Communities and Metropolitan Scientists in the Soviet Arctic2019In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 142-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article investigates how in the Soviet Arctic researchers and indigenous communities searched and understood the mammoth before and during the Cold War. Based on a vast number of published and unpublished sources as well as interviews with scholars and reindeer herders, this article demonstrates that the mammoth as a paleontological find fusing together features of extinct and extant species, plays an in-between role among various environmental epistemologies. The author refers to moments of interactions among these different actors as “environmental encounters,” which comprise and engagement with the physical, political, social and cultural environments of the Arctic. These encounters shape the temporal stabilisations of knowledge which enable the mammoth to live its post-extinct life. The article combines approaches from environmental history and anthropology, history of science and indigenous studies showing the social vitality of a “fossil object”.

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  • 23.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Norra ishavets gåva2020In: Arktiska spår: Natur och kultur i rörelse / [ed] Lotten Gustafsson Reinius, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 2020Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Order Out of Chaos: Anthropology and Politics of Sergei M. Shirokogoroff2019In: Life Histories of Etnos Theory in Russia and Beyond / [ed] Anderson, David; Arzyutov, Dmitry; Alymov, Sergei, Cambridge: Open Book Publishers, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 25.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Reading Traces and Writing Indigenous Ethnohistories in the Russian North2022In: Histories of Anthropology Annual, University of Nebraska Press, 2022Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Reassembling the Environmental Archives of the Cold War: Perspectives from the Russian North2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To what extent the environmental history of the Arctic can move beyond the

    divide between Indigenous peoples and newcomers or vernacular and academic

    ways of knowing? The present dissertation answers this question by developing the

    notion of an environmental archive. Such an archive does not have particular reference

    to a given place but rather it refers to the complex network that marks the relations

    between paper documents and human and non-human agencies as they are able to

    work together and stabilise the conceptualisation of a variety of environmental

    objects. The author thus argues that the environment does not only contain

    information about the past but just like any paper (or audio and video) archive is

    able to produce it through the relational nature of human-environment interactions.

    Through the analysis of five case studies from the Russian North, the reader is

    invited to go through various forms of environmental archives which in turn

    embrace histories of a number of disciplines such as palaeontology, biology,

    anthropology, and medicine. Every case or a “layer” is presented here as a contact

    zone where Indigenous and academic forms of knowledge are not opposed to each

    other but, on the contrary, are able to interact and consequently affect the global

    discussions about the Russian Arctic. This transnational context is pivotal for all the

    cases discussed in the dissertation. Moreover, by putting the Cold War with its

    tensions between two superpowers at the chronological center of the present work,

    the author aims to reveal the multidimensionality of in situ interactions with, for

    instance, the paleontological remains or the traces of all-terrain vehicles and their

    involvement into broader science transnational cooperations and competitions. As a

    result, the heterogeneous archives allow us to reconsider the environmental history

    of the Russian North and the wider Arctic and open a new avenue for future research

    transcending the geopolitical and epistemic borders of knowledge production.

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  • 27.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Anderson, David G.
    ‘Dvoĭnoe poslanie’ ėtnosa: kommentariĭ k stat’e akademika V.A. Tishkova2020In: Ėtnograficheskoe obozrenie, ISSN 0869-5415, no 2, p. 102-106Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Anderson, David G.
    Whole Parts: Transnational Life Histories of the Archives of Sergei and Elizabeth Shirokogoroff2021In: Antropologicheskij forum, ISSN 1815-8870, Vol. 17, no 51, p. 175-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What does an anthropologist’s archive look like? Where is it located? And is the anthropology of archives important for the understanding of anthropological thinking today? Here we answer these questions by analysing the various life histories of the archival fragments of one of the most puzzling and influential anthropologists in the history of Russian and Soviet anthropology: Sergei Mikhailovich Shirokogoroff (1887–1939). Shirokogoroff is credited as being one of the authors of the etnos theory — one of the main instruments of identity politics in Russia, China, Germany and also, in part, Japan and South Africa. The transnational life histories of Shirokogoroff and his wife Elizaveta [Elizabeth] Nikolaevna (1884–1943), and of their ideas, suggests a conception of the archive not as a single whole, but instead as a collection of forgotten, hidden, obliterated, or, on the other hand, scrupulously preserved fragments. These fragments are not centred in one place or organized around any one reading, but they nevertheless represent “partial connections”. Moreover, as we can see today with hindsight, none of these archival fragments lay inert. They have been intertwined in local political and social ontologies. Our text has an autoethnograpic quality. While illustrating separate episodes from the life of the Shirokogoroffs we also will tell of our search for the manuscripts through which we were forced onto strange paths and encounters. These greatly deepened our understanding both of the life of documents and their material links to the lives of researchers. Our article is an attempt to illustrate this complex picture which, in the end, will allow us to conclude that we have only just begun to understand the workings of the anthropologist’s archive in the history of anthropological thought.

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  • 29.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Anderson, DavidPodrezova, Svetlana
    Puteshestvii͡a cherez sibirskui͡u step' i taĭgu k antropologicheskim kont͡sept͡sii͡am: ėtnoistorii͡a Sergei͡a i Elizavety Shirokogorovykh [Journeys through the Siberian Steppes and Taiga to Anthropological Concepts: The Ethno-history of Sergei and Elizabeth Shirokogoroff], in two volumes, volume 12021Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Aberdeen.
    Danilina, Lidia
    Ėtnografii͡a ėtnografa: Andreĭ Grigor’evich Danilin i ego arkhivy2020In: Sibirskie istoricheskie issledovaniia, ISSN 2312-4628, no 4, p. 274-325Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 31. Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    et al.
    Kan, Sergei
    The Concept of the ‘Field’ in Early Soviet Ethnography: A Northern Perspective2017In: Sibirica (keele): Interdisciplinary Journal of Siberian Studies, ISSN 1361-7362, E-ISSN 1476-6787, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 31-74Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 32.
    Bertilsson, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Bevattningens biopolitik: Lågt grundvatten som ett regeringsbart problem i Sverige2024In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 33, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In several parts of Sweden, difficulties arise regarding access to water. In this article, I explore the biopoliticsthat take shape when low groundwater levels are turned into an object of government. Firstly, I examinethe formation of a so-called anatomical politics which refers to a disciplining form of power in which theresponsibilities and actions of the population are at the center. Secondly, I explore the priorities that are madein the political work where human life, health, and well-being are to be protected and other life forms that arenot vital for human living are instead deprioritized or allowed to die. The problems have clear consequencesbut do not pose a threat to human survival. Political efforts aim to bring about changes in people’s everydaylives and affect the use and decoration of households and public spaces. Empirically, I attach particularsignificance to the irrigation bans that Swedish municipalities can introduce to reduce water consumption.

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  • 33.
    Bertilsson, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Politics, industry, and tourism: The conceptual construction of the Blue Highway2021In: Journal of Transport History, ISSN 0022-5266, E-ISSN 1759-3999, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 277-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to the research on the expansion of the Swedish post-war road network by illuminating the role of tourism in addition to political and industrial agendas. Specifically, it examines the “conceptual construction” of the Blue Highway, which currently stretches from the Atlantic Coast of Norway, traverses through Sweden and Finland, and enters into Russia. The focus is on Swedish governmental reports and national press between the 1950s and the 1970s. The article identifies three overlapping meanings attached to the Blue Highway: a political agenda of improving the relationships between the Nordic countries, industrial interests, and tourism. Political ambitions of Nordic community building were clearly pronounced at the onset of the project. Industrial actors depended on the road for the building of power plants and dams. The road became gradually more connected with the view of tourism as the motor of regional development.

  • 34.
    Bertilsson, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Source Criticism as a Technology of Government in the Swedish Psychological Defence: The Impact of Humanistic Knowledge on Contemporary Security Policy2021In: Humanities, E-ISSN 2076-0787, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 13-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Source criticism” (källkritik) has become an essential part of the Swedish government’s activities against false information, deception campaigns, and propaganda, which are viewed as fundamentally destabilising forces that can potentially undermine the democratic system, the public debate, and political decision-making. The purpose of this article is to explore source criticism as a technology of government focusing on the Swedish Psychological Defence. I analyse the way in which source criticism is brought to bear on Swedish national security policy in the light of Foucauldian theories about modern governmentality and technologies of the self. Source criticism is seen as an example of a contemporary form of government that entails a redistribution of responsibility from the state to the individual, who is provided with certain “technologies of self” to master an unpredictable political environment. With this case study as empirical example, the aim of the article is to contribute to the research on the influence of humanistic knowledge in security and defence policy domains. This prompts further discussion about what happens with the democratic and critical potential of humanistic knowledge as it is enrolled in government operations.

  • 35.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Cupitt, Rebekah
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Meetings, practice and beyond: Environmental sustainability in meeting practices at work2013In: Nachhaltigkeit in der Wirtschaftskommunikation / [ed] Martin Nielsen, Iris Rittenhofer, Marianne Grove Ditlevsen, Sophie Esmann Andersen, Irene Pollach, Wiesbaden: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden , 2013, p. 159-190Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study shows how the employees at a large transnational telecom company understand and accommodate the implemented travel and meeting policies that regulate business communication. This involves looking at employee decisions on when, how and why to hold meetings. The subsequent understandings of meetings and their practice is formed through negotiation and the formation of a ‘social matrix of workplace communication (meetings)’(Bateson & Reusch 2009). This social matrix and its contexts are analysed from the perspective of environmental sustainability of office work practice. The basis for this is the recent implementation of company-wide restrictions on travel aiming to encourage the use of mediated meetings instead of travel for face-to-face meetings. Some issues that emerge are shared meanings of meetings, more specifically the perceived importance of the physical meeting in a workplace where telephone meetings were the norm. This shows that even if the technological possibilities for mediated meetings and by extension a more flexible work practice exist, they are not regarded as default but seen as complementary to conventional work practices. The need to find a balance in between mediated and physical meetings comes across as a recurring theme in both interviews and policy documents.  As a result the ongoing negotiation of which meetings are deemed necessary to be held in person and thereby requiring travel, is embedded within TeliaSonera employees' notions that face-to-face meetings are better and more efficient than mediated meetings. Subsequently the collective view that mediated meetings are not as successful as face-to-face meetings becomes a central to the character of workplace communication. This negotiation is carried out on an individual level as well as on a more organisational level. When carried out on an organisational level these negotiations occur in policy documents which can sometimes contradict employee perspectives and are equally subject to contextual factors (cf. Kogg 2002). Other related issues present in the empirical data are the blurring of the divide between work and home in relation to the changes in work practices and information and communication technology (ICT).

  • 36.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Cargo Bike Pool: A way to facilitate a car-free life?2014In: Resilience – the new research frontier. Proceedings of the 20th Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference (ISDRC 2014) Trondheim 18-20 June 2014, Trondheim, 2014, p. 273-280Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In planning for sustainable cities, there is a need to take into consideration alternative transportation modes and facilitate the use of these, for the types of trips that people tend to use cars for. One way to mitigate car dependency in everyday life could be by using a cargo bike for these types of trips.The purpose of this paper is to map in what ways a specific trial of providing access to a cargo bike pool in a housing association affected both people’s travel habits and how they reimagined the types of trips that could be done at all or done in another way in order to find car-free travel and transportation modes. In this paper we focussed on the residents who actually used the cargo bikes.This qualitative study shows that although many of the residents did indeed lead car-free everyday lives, they got the opportunity to do other types of trips that they had not even thought about beforehand or deemed too difficult to do without a car. The cargo bike proved to fit into the portfolio of sustainable travel modes that facilitate everyday transports. The way that trips are imagined has also changed, that is what a cargo bike can be used to in relation to car, regular bike and public transportation.Having access to a cargo bike through a vehicle pool means that the possibilities to live a car-free everyday life are facilitated and in the long run a sustainable transportation pattern is being put in place.

    Download (pdf)
    Börjesson Rivera & Henriksson 2014
  • 37.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Åkerlund, Maria
    Getting there and back again: Commuting and ICT in six cities across the globe2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ericsson ConsumerLab performed a qualitative exploratory study of how people experience daily commuting in three different countries. This report aims to present the outcome of the study in such a way that the data can be useful for further analyses and studies of commuting in relation to ICT use and environmental sustainability. Based on the study’s findings this report will present analytical data on: i) how ICT can be linked to everyday travel in order to facilitate commuting from the user’s point of view; and ii) how ICT solutions can enable commuting in an environmentally more sustainable way.

    The study, which had an ethnographic approach, showed that in general, commuters would like their commuting time to be, or at least seem, as short as possible. The respondents spend hours commuting every week and often claim to consider it a waste of time. Regardless of means of transport, they would like to get the most out of their commuting time (working, socialising, relaxing etc.), which implies that there is a demand for further technological improvements in this area (voice recognition services in cars, privacy settings in public transport, connectivity in public transport, etc.). An aspect that adds to how people perceive their commuting time concerns the extent to which its duration is predictable – even if the time cannot be shortened, commuters at least want to know how much time they will spend on their daily commute, so that they can plan their day with more certainty.

    Irrespective of means of transport, two major frustrations for commuters are lack of flow and the presence and behaviour of other people. People seem to lack good real-time information enabling them to avoid interruptions in their commute and much of their frustration relates to poor infrastructure conditions and management. Frustration with other people derives from their conduct in traffic contributing to inconveniences, congestion or hazards, or from noise, smell or littering on public transport.

    The greatest motivators for commuting by car are a feeling of independence in relation to other people, schedule and choice of route, and the private space the car offers. This means that the car provides flexibility in terms of when and how people travel, while also providing a private space both mentally (“in the car you can do whatever you want”) and physically (“you don’t have to hustle with others on the bus or train”). The major frustration when commuting by car is the need to focus on driving, so drivers cannot utilise time as they would wish.

    People generally justify their choice of public transport by anti-car arguments, which include difficulty in finding a parking space at work, expensive parking, fear of driving, lack of driving licence etc., but can also motivate their choice as giving them ‘me-time’ without having to focus on driving. The major frustration with commuting by public transport is dependency on time schedules and the shortcomings of the public transport network. This is exacerbated by a lack of relevant information or available options. However, commuting can be improved in a variety of ways for car and public transport users with the help of ICT. From a sustainability perspective, it is important to exploit the potential of ICT solutions to facilitate more environmentally friendly practices.

    Many of the ICT (Information Communication Technology) solutions identified in this report require reliable access to the internet and/or mobile phone network. The mobile phone is currently the single most important internet device while commuting, thus perhaps being the point of departure for many of the solutions, such as travel planner, ticketing options, etc, but for car users mobile phone services need to be adapted through better in-car voice recognition technologies, since the focus needs to be on driving. Current information services could be more personalised and contextualised in order to better suit the individual driver and most of these ICT solutions and services are also applicable to public transport commuters, but an additional function for such commuters could be some kind of ‘emergency button’ on mobile phones to increase their sense of security in travel.

    Home office solutions are a way of avoiding the frustrations of commuting altogether. While working from home is regarded by some with ambivalence and is impossible for many, there are ways of refining these solutions.

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    fulltext
  • 38.
    Cano Viktorsson, Carlos
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    From Fixed, Mobile to Complex: The Social Shaping of ICT for Sustainable Travel2013In: ICT4S 2013: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies for Sustainability, ETH Zurich, February 14-16, 2013, ETH Zurich, 2013, , p. 6p. 197-202Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks at the changing shape of mobile connectivity and how it has influenced the potential for informing on sustainable travel. It examines the role mobile connectivity has had for an ICT based service informing on traffic and transport in order to trace what role social practices of interconnecting through mobile media may have had for such an enterprise. The paper looks at two historical examples of ICT based traffic and travel information services in Stockholm, Sweden in order to discuss what role mobile connectivity may have for promoting sustainable travel through ICT.

  • 39.
    Cano-Viktorsson, Carlos
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    From Maps to Apps: Tracing the Organizational Responsiveness of an Early Multi-Modal Travel Planning Service2015In: The Journal of urban technology, ISSN 1063-0732, E-ISSN 1466-1853, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 87-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An Internet-based system for informing on multimodal travel planning (several modes of transportation) was introduced in Stockholm, Sweden in October 2000 in the form of a web page called trafiken.nu. The web page has a historical value of being one of the first attempts in Europe, and possibly the world, at providing an ICT-based travel planning service geared towards facilitating sustainable travel to the general public. The aim of this article is to investigate the historical development of trafiken.nu in order to draw lessons on how to better provide for a public information service with a potential for facilitating sustainable travel planning. Findings from the study of trafiken.nu suggest that the organizations behind the service have been slow in adapting to shifting media technology practices on how to provide for information which has affected the uptake of the service. Lessons from the case study provide a basis for arguing that organizations attempting to implement public information services would benefit from finding a means of harnessing collective intelligence in order to provide for a more customizable and responsive service to the general public.

  • 40.
    Cano-Viktorsson, Carlos
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    From Vision to Transition: Exploring the Potential for Public Information Services to Facilitate Sustainable Urban Transport2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Policy initiatives to promote sustainable travel through the use of Internet based public information systems have increased during the last decade. Stockholm, in being one of the first cities in Europe to implement an Internet based service for facilitating sustainable travel is believed to be a good candidate for an analysis of key issues for developing sustainable travel planning services to the public.

    Aim: This thesis investigates the past development of two Stockholm based public information systems and their services in order to draw lessons on how to better provide for a public information service geared towards facilitating  environmentally sustainable travel planning through information and communications technology. The overall goal of the thesis is to contribute to an understanding on how to better design and manage current and future attempts at facilitating sustainable travel planning services based on historical case studies.

    Approach: The thesis draws ideas from the concept of organizational responsiveness – an organization’s ability to listen, understand and respond to demands put to it by its internal and external stakeholders – in order to depict how well or not the two public information systems and their owners have adapted to established norms and values of their surroundings.

    Results: Overall, the findings from the historical case studies suggest that organizations attempting to provide sustainable travel planning to the public need to design and manage their systems in such a way that it responds to shifting demands on how to provide for information. Implementing and embedding new technologies involves complex processes of change both at the micro level – for users and practitioners of the service – and at the meso level for the involved public service organizations themselves. This condition requires a contextualist framework to analyze and understand organizational, contextual and cultural issues involved in the adoption of new technologies and procedures.

    Conclusions: The thesis concludes with a discussion on how the findings from the historical case studies may provide lessons for both current and future attempts at providing public information systems geared towards facilitating environmentally sustainable travel planning to the public. Historical examples and issues concerning collective intelligence and peer to peer based forms of designing, producing and supervising public information services identified throughout the study are looked upon and discussed in terms of their possible role in increasing the potential for public information services to facilitate sustainable urban transport.

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    From Vision to Transition Carlos Cano Viktorsson Licentiate thesis cover essay
  • 41.
    Cano-Viktorsson, Carlos
    Stockholms universitet.
    Social Media and the Networked Self in Everyday Life2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Internet has become increasingly ubiquitous and with the introduction of Web 2.0 technologies and concepts it has almost become second nature for many Internet users. This study attempts to view the “social life” of this “new” online environment through its current manifestation in the form of the popular social networking site Facebook. It argues that Facebook has become a tool for the management of one's self both online and offline and that people's reflexive relation to their self-identity is made visible through their engagement with this social media. How such a new form of social media incorporates itself into everyday life but also how the media acts as an extension of the reflexive self has been the main focus of this study.

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    fulltext
  • 42.
    Cano-Viktorsson, Carlos
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Traffic Radio as a Precursor to Smart Travel Planning Systems: The Challenge of Organizing “Collective Intelligence”2013In: The Journal of urban technology, ISSN 1063-0732, E-ISSN 1466-1853, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 43-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper depicts how a Swedish radio station organized a means of real-time information management to report on local traffic conditions long before the common use of the Internet. Drawing on a history of the Stockholm traffic radio staff the study examines particular conditions for organizing a service that may inform next generations of smart travel planning systems. The author notes how a vision of involving the public together with the use of increasingly mobile and interconnected communication devices provided the service with an opportunity for harnessing collective intelligence. The study highlights critical success factors and barriers for organizing collective  intelligence and the importance they may have had for providing a real-time information service to the public.

  • 43.
    Cardoso, Ricardo
    et al.
    Yale-NUS College, National University of Singapore, 16 College Avenue West, 138527, Singapore, 16 College Avenue West.
    Chen, Jia Ching
    University of California, Santa Barbara, Department of Global Studies, Social Sciences & Media Studies Building, Santa Barbara, CA, 93106-7065, USA.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    BLOCOS URBANISM: Capitalism and Modularity in the Making of Contemporary Luanda2023In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, ISSN 0309-1317, E-ISSN 1468-2427, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 809-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we portray and unpack the fabric of urban expansion in contemporary Luanda. In doing so, we examine interdependencies and complementarities between the organization of oil extraction off the coast of Angola, the emergence of particular modalities of modernist city planning for the expansion of its capital city, and the proliferation of cement blocks in the making of new urban forms throughout its burgeoning peripheries. By showing how urban development has unfolded through the interconnected realization of multiple kinds of systematizing blocks—namely oil blocks, city blocks and cement blocks—we analyse key material components in the production of new markets and urban spaces in the Angolan capital. By tracing forms of capitalism and modularity in the making of contemporary Luanda, we develop the concept of blocos urbanism to draw attention to modes of standardization and the production of legibility in contemporary processes of urbanization. Through this study, we aim to contribute to the conceptual apparatus for deciphering our global urban condition.

  • 44.
    Cars, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Healey, P.
    United Kingdom.
    Madanipour, A.
    United Kingdom.
    De Maghãlhaes, C.
    United Kingdom.
    Preface2017In: Urban Governance, Institutional Capacity and Social Milieux, Taylor & Francis, 2017, p. xi-xivChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Cars, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Healey, P.
    United Kingdom.
    Madanipour, A.
    United Kingdom.
    De Maghãlhaes, C.
    United Kingdom.
    Urban governance, institutional capacity and social milieux2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This title was first published in 2002: Urban governance has faced numerous challenges as city governments, their partners and their critics struggle to transform themselves in the context of post-industrial economies and societies. This context has generated new relations of economic life and social activity to be accommodated in cities, and has also changed expectations of the roles, relationships and modes of governance. New conceptual tools to analyze these experiences are becoming available, linked to a broad "institutionalist" wave of ideas sweeping right across the social sciences. This text responds to the challenges faced by urban governance and explores a range of efforts to build new institutional capacities. An international team of social scientists and practitioners critically analyzes conceptual challenges, policy developments and practical experiences.

  • 46.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Münter, Ursula
    Satsuka, Shiho
    Introduction2014In: Rachel Carson Perspectives, ISSN 2190-5088, Vol. 3, p. 5-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sivaramakrishnan, KalyanakrishnanYale University.
    Ecological Nationalisms: Nature, Livelihoods, and Identities in South Asia2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The works presented in this collection take environmental scholarship in South Asia into novel territory by exploring how questions of national identity become entangled with environmental concerns in Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, and India. The essays provide insight into the motivations of colonial and national governments in controlling or managing nature, and bring into fresh perspective the different kinds of regional political conflicts that invoke nationalist sentiment through claims on nature. In doing all this, the volume also offers new ways to think about nationalism and, more specifically, nationalism in South Asia from the vantage point of interdisciplinary environmental studies. The contributors to this innovative volume show that manifestations of nationalism have long and complex histories in South Asia. Terrestrial entities, imagined in terms of dense ecological networks of relationships, have often been the space or reference point for national aspirations, as shared memories of Mother Nature or appropriated economic, political, and religious geographies. In recent times, different groups in South Asia have claimed and appropriated ancient landscapes and territories for the purpose of locating and justifying a specific and utopian version of nation by linking its origin to their nature-mediated attachments to these landscapes. The topics covered include forests, agriculture, marine fisheries, parks, sacred landscapes, property rights, trade, and economic development. Gunnel Cederlof is associate professor of history, Uppsala University, Sweden. K. Sivaramakrishnan is professor of anthropology and international studies and director of the South Asia Center, Jackson School of International Studies, at the University of Washington. The other contributors are Nina Bhatt, Vinita Damodaran, Claude A. Garcia, Urs Geiser, Goetz Hoeppe, Bengt G. Karlsson, Antje Linkenbach, Wolfgang Mey, Kathleen D. Morrison, J. P. Pascal, and Sarah Southwold-Llewellyn.

  • 48.
    Christensen, Miyase
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Jansson, A.
    Cosmopolitanism and the media: Cartographies of change2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cosmopolitanism and the Media explores the diverse implications of today’s digital media environment in relation to people’s worldviews and social practices. The book presents an account of the relationship between cosmopolitanized lifeworlds and forces of surveillance, control and mobility, as well as a critique of social power and reproduction in our mediatized society.

  • 49.
    Cupitt, Rebekah
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Phantasms collide: Navigating video-mediated communication in the Swedish workplace2013In: Global Media Journal: Australian edition, E-ISSN 1835-2340, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 247-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global telecommunications companies sell new technologies and services that aim to increase communication possibilities. This case study of one Swedish telecommunications company (‘the Company’), examines how employee notions of video-mediated communication are embedded social meanings. These social meanings are purposefully linked to notions of efficiency in the workplace, the environment, corporate social responsibility and economic gain. Through advertisements, slogans, in-house incentive programs and company policies, the Company has achieved what could be described as a shift in employee attitudes towards working using video-mediated communication (VMC) – so-called video meetings. The shift is however, far from comprehensive and this consciously constructed understanding of video-mediated communication co-exists and conflicts with multiple other meanings – explicit, implicit and purposefully ignored. Often moral dilemmas arise as personal wellbeing in the short-term conflicts with corporate sales targets, budget restrictions and environmental goals to ‘save the planet’. By detailing these different understandings and their inter-relations, the complex and purposed nature of video-mediated communication phantasms in a global telecommunications company emerges.

  • 50.
    Cupitt, Rebekah
    Socialantropologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitetet.
    We Are the Robots: An anthropological perspective on human-robot interaction2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    How do we cope with technology today? We are surrounded by machines, computers and technological devices from mobile phones to automated check- outs. These types of machines are no longer exotic in Sweden where today the average person is usually fluent in their use. But do we really have an understanding of how these objects work, is understanding necessary and how do we cope when our knowledge is lacking?

    This thesis is intended as an introduction to an anthropological way of look- ing at strategies people develop for understanding, using and interacting with technological objects, specifically robots. Still an exotic object, robots are more widely known-about than experienced. Based on ethnographic data, primarily gathered in two distinct workplace environments as well as interviews and video documentation, my analysis aims to illustrate the implications of defining hu- mans and robots as equally significant agents within networks whilst disputing the traditional importance given to the dichotomy of technology (non-human) and human.

    Whilst robots are definitely less than we expect them to be, they are still so- cial artefacts, firmly situated within social networks and meaning which manifest through human–robot interactions. Perhaps little more than tools, an ambigu- ity exists in human–robot interactions which suggests that we form quasi-social relations that could, and have been exploited by designers and engineers to broaden the range of use for technological objects.

    Keywords: human-robot interaction, network theory, situated knowledges, agential realism, performativity, social contextualisation of technological objects

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    rcupitt_wearetherobots
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