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  • 1.
    Churie Kallhauge, Angela
    et al.
    KTH.
    Corell, E.
    Sjöstedt, G.
    Global challenges: Furthering the multilateral process for sustainable development2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) in Johannesburg 2002 was the latest conference in an international process to manage environment and development issues that can be traced back to the late 1960s. Three milestones mark this 30-year process of social and political interaction: the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment (UNCHE), held in Stockholm in 1972, the first international meeting at a high political level convened to address environmental issues; the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), held in Rio de Janeiro; and the WSSD, which attempted to set policy goals and targets for the global environmental and developmental challenges previously identified.But what did the WSSD achieve? Following the summit there have been various opinions of its significance and its outputs, many of them negative. This book argues that there is a need to place the WSSD in its broader context. Understanding the connections between the WSSD and its precedents as well as those between this overall process and individual environmental decision-making processes (such as on climate change), and how they all contribute to the overall global policy process, adds a critical dimension to the analysis of the WSSD outcomes. This book examines the challenges facing the global policy process for sustainable development as it continues beyond Johannesburg into the future. It combines a forward outlook with a historical perspective in tracing the evolution of selected cross-cutting themes on the agenda of the three conferences, the institutions and formal results of the process, and the actors and their patterns of interaction over time. The focus is on the decision-making dimension - the multilateral negotiations-which can be seen as the development over time of a pattern of interlinked political activities.Global Challenges has four operational objectives: first, to define the ongoing process that formally began with the Stockholm Conference in 1972 and evolved towards its latest major manifestation at the WSSD; second, to present some dynamics of the Stockholm-Rio-Johannesburg (SRJ) process by exploring the themes identified; third, to introduce an approach on how to consider the outcomes of this process as a way of reflecting on what the process has actually accomplished; and, finally, to discuss lessons learned for theory and practice from this exercise. The practical lessons include reflections on how the continued SRJ process should best be organised and supported into the future. The book takes a uniquely broad outlook and interdisciplinary approach in addressing important lessons relating to the emergence of substantive issues as well as to process and institutional dynamics. It is a bridge-building exercise from academic analysis to long-term strategic thinking in environmental regime building. Global Challenges provides a new perspective on the continuing and increasingly complex global environment and development policy process and analyses the interlinkages between the process, trends and cross-cutting issues that set the conditions for the global efforts to achieve sustainable development. It will be essential reading for academics and practitioners interested in seeing the big picture of the global challenges facing people and planet in the 21st century. 

  • 2.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Infrastructure.
    Ethnic Conflict and the Right to Return of Limbo Disaporas: Multifaceted Reflections on the Case of BiH2004In: Migration and Ethnic Studies (Migracijske i Etničke Teme), ISSN 1333-2546, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 29-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the phenomenon of refugees and resettled persons in the process of forcedmigrations in the aftermath of man-made disasters. Although some of the ideas presented here couldhave wider application, the focus is on post-conflict zones within the former Yugoslavia, namely BiH.The paper uses the questions of ethnicity and nationalism within resettlement, dislocation and immigrationas a backdrop, into which the issue of globalization is also briefly reflected. The intention hereis not to cover a wide range of pressing topics, but simply to relate a number of issues arising in contemporarylarge-scale forced migrations to a resurgence of cultural specificity and ethnicized nationalismas counterpoints to globalization. The paper introduces the concept of “limbo diasporas” in the caseof Bosnian refugees in Sweden through reflection and linkage with the aforementioned concepts. Thepaper ends with some recommendations and open questions on social rehabilitation and ethnic healingas well as some general conclusions.

  • 3.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Sustainable Urbanism and Beyond: Rethinking Cities for the Future2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Infrastructure.
    The Reconstruction Business: Economic Agendas and Regional Strategy in Post-conflict Bosnia and Herzegovina2004In: At War With the City / [ed] Paola Somma, Newcastle Upon Tyne: Urban International Press , 2004, 1, p. 217-228Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Infrastructure.
    Roberts, Andrew
    Hifab International AB.
    New Possibilities for Sustaining Human Settlements in a War-Torn Zon2001In: Sustaining Human Settlement: A Challenge for the New Millennium / [ed] Roderick J. Lawrence, North Shields: Urban International Press , 2001, p. 376-405Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Hasic, Tigran
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Infrastructure.
    Reconstruction planning in post-conflict zones: Bosnia and Herzegovina and the international community2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The history of mankind has been plagued by an almost continuous chain of various armed conflicts - local, regional, national and global - that have caused horrendous damage to the social and physical fabric of cities. The tragedy of millions deprived by war still continues. This study sets out to understand the nature of reconstruction after war in the light of recent armed conflicts. It attempts to catalogue and discuss the tasks involved in the process of reconstruction planning by establishing a conceptual framework of the main issues in the reconstruction process. The case of Bosnia and Herzegovina is examined in detail and on the whole acts as the leit-motif of the whole dissertation and positions reconstruction in the broader context of sustainable development. The study is organized into two parts that constitute the doctoral aggregate dissertation – a combining of papers with an introductory monograph. In this case the introductory monograph is an extended one and there are six papers that follow. Both sections can be read on their own merits but also constitute one entity.

    The rebuilding of war-devastated countries and communities can be seen as a series of nonintegrated activities carried out (and often imposed) by international agencies and governments, serving political and other agendas. The result is that calamities of war are often accompanied by the calamities of reconstruction without any regard to sustainable development. The body of knowledge related to post-conflict reconstruction lacks a strong and cohesive theory. In order to better understand the process of reconstruction we present a qualitative inquiry based on the Grounded Theory Method developed originally by Barney Glaser and Anselm Strauss (1967). This approach utilizes a complex conceptualization with empirical evidence to produce theoretical structure. The results of process have evolved into the development of a conceptual model, called SCOPE (Sustainable Communities in Post-conflict Environments).

    This study proposes both a structure within which to examine post-conflict reconstruction and provides an implementation method. We propose to use the SCOPE model as a set of strategy, policy and program recommendations to assist the international community and all relevant decision-makers to ensure that the destruction and carnage of war does not have to be followed by a disaster of post-conflict reconstruction. We also offer to provide a new foundation and paradigm on post-conflict reconstruction, which incorporates and integrates a number of approaches into a multidisciplinary and systems thinking manner in order to better understand the complexity and dependencies of issues at hand. We believe that such a systems approach could better be able to incorporate the complexities involved and would offer much better results than the approaches currently in use.

    The final section of this study returns to the fact that although it is probably impossible to produce universal answers, we desperately need to find commonalities amongst different postconflict reconstruction settings in order to better deal with the reconstruction planning in a more dynamic, proactive, and sustainable manner.

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  • 7.
    Johansson, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Så kan secondhandkläder passa en hållbar modell2023In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2023-12-30, p. 5-5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 8.
    Johansson, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Utveckla snarare än förbjud export av begagnade kläder2024In: Recycling, ISSN 2004-6863Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 9.
    Kazemian, Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Deployment of Information and Telecommunication Technology as a Sustainable Design Medium of Urban Communities: Demographic change & urban challenges: trends & countertrends2011In: Weimarpolis: Multi-disciplinary Journal of Urban Theory and Practice, ISSN 1869-1692, Vol. 1, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Silveira, Semida
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005).
    System Approach in Development Work2004In: Systems approaches and their application: examples from Sweden / [ed] Olsson, M-O and Sjöstedt, G. (eds), Dordrecht: Kluwer , 2004Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Silveira, Semida
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Eng, T.
    Swedish Energy Agency.
    Vision för en långsiktig svensk klimatpolitik2000Report (Refereed)
  • 12. Sjöstedt, G.
    et al.
    van Well, Lisa
    KTH.
    Churie Kallhauge, Angela
    KTH.
    An evolving sustainable development regime2017In: Global Challenges: Furthering the Multilateral Process for Sustainable Development / [ed] Angela Churie-Kallhauge, Gunnar Sjöstedt, Elisabeth Corell, Taylor and Francis , 2017, p. 294-304Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Skoglund, Annika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Biopolitics and Green Governmentality – Security through Homo Clima2010In: 3:rd UArctic workshop, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Green governmentality has been elaborated upon differently by various authors. Sometimes constructed as an intentional form of liberal rule where states implement science to become individual responsibilities, and at other times green governmentality is conceived as systematizing more indistinct formations of knowledge. There is also a difference between those within a more regulative perspective and those who apply a processual view, who would rather stress what biopolitics, security and species is becoming, as a mutational form of how 'life itself' is possible to politicize. Since most empirical investigations about green governmentality take the economic as a powerful predefined entity, this paper rather presents how talk on climate change links governing and governed to produce self-regulation through everyday activities that supports economic processes as an operationalization of government at a distance.

  • 14. Smeds, Emilia
    Unpacking the Politics of C40: ‘Critical Friendship’ for a Second Decade2019In: Global Policy, ISSN 1758-5880, E-ISSN 1758-5899, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 720-722Article in journal (Other academic)
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    Smeds_2019_Global Policy
  • 15. Smeds, Emilia
    et al.
    Acuto, Michele
    Networking Cities after Paris: Weighing the Ambition of Urban Climate Change Experimentation2018In: Global Policy, ISSN 17585880, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 549-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past few decades, cities have repeatedly demonstrated high levels of ambition with regard to climate action. Global environmental governance has been marked by a proliferation of policy actions taken by local governments around the world to demonstrate their potential to advance climate change mitigation and adaptation. Leading ‘by example’ and demonstrating the extent of action that it is possible to deliver, cities have aspired to raise the ambition of national and international climate governance and put action into practice via a growing number of ‘climate change experiments’ delivered on the ground. Yet accounts of the potential of cities in global environmental governance have often stopped short of a systematic valuation of the nature and impact of the networked dimension of this action. This article addresses this by assessing the nature, and challenges faced by, urban climate governance in the post-Paris era, focusing on the ‘experimentation’ undertaken in cities and the city networks shaping this type of governance. First, we unpack the concept of ‘urban climate change experimentation’, the ways in which it is networked, and the forces driving it. In the second and third parts of the article, we discuss two main pitfalls of networked urban experimentation in its current form, focusing on issues of scaling experiments and the nature of experimentation. We call for increased attention to ‘scaling up’ experiments beyond urban levels of governance, and to transformative experimentation with governance and politics by and in cities. Finally, we consider how these pitfalls allow us to weigh the potential of urban climate ambition, and consider the pathways available for supporting urban climate change experimentation.

  • 16.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), History of Science and Technology.
    Mellan spårberoende och frihet: Miljöpolitikens globalisering och behovet av historia2004In: Framtider : bulletin / Sekretariatet för framtidsstudier - FRN, ISSN 0281-0492, no 4, p. 21-26Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Pardans på världsväven: McNeill x 2 och globaliseringens återkomst2006In: Det mänskliga nätverket: Ett fågelperspektiv på världshistorien / [ed] John R. McNeill & William H. McNeill, Stockholm: SNS förlag, 2006, p. 11-20Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Wester, Misse
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Mobjörk, Malin
    A Brief Survey of the Work Being Performed by Crisis Organisations in European Union Member States on Climate Change Effects2017In: Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, ISSN 0966-0879, E-ISSN 1468-5973, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 364-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The negative effects of climate change are calling for action to mitigate and adapt to future challenges. National crisis management authorities need to prepare to handle crisis caused by direct or indirect effects. In this study, we investigate how crisis management authorities within the European Union prepare for the effects of climate change by conducting a small questionnaire study. The questionnaire used consisted of 12 questions and was answered by 17 counties. Results indicate that most crisis management agencies focus on weather-related incidents, such as floods, heatwaves and forest fires. Indirect effects are not prepared for to the same extent. The gulf between crisis management and climate adaptation is discussed.

1 - 18 of 18
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