Change search
Refine search result
1 - 22 of 22
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Architecture and the dilemma of identity: a study of the ’weak subject’ in Marcel Proust1997In: The interpretation of culture and the culture of interpretation / editors: Eva Hemmungs Wirtén and Erik Peurell, Vol. S. [63]-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Four essays framed: (questions of imagination, interpretation and representation in architecture)1997Book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    The primacy of perplexion: working architecture through a distracted order of experience : part I - fictional reality in search...1995In: Nordisk arkitekturforskning, Vol. 1995 (8:1), s. 55-67 : ill.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sea-level rise in public science writing: History, science and reductionism2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Perez Ramos, Isabel
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Interview with Richard Kerridge2012In: Ecozona, ISSN 2171-9594, E-ISSN 2171-9594, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 135-144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Perez Ramos, Isabel Maria
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    ¡VARRIO SI, YONKES NO!: Urban and Rural Socio-Environmental Struggles in Chicanos Corridos/Music, Artivism and Crafts2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stemming from my previous work on Chicano socio-environmental struggles produced in the U.S. Southwest and reflected in literary works, I intend to broaden my research by analyzing other cultural manifestations regarding Chicanos’ resistances. Music, visual arts and crafts are other means through which Chicanas and Chicanos had voiced their discontent against socio-environmental injustices. These would for instance include the degradation of their barrios and communities, the loss of land grants and communal rights, or the consistent poisoning and mistreatment of farmworkers.

    I will explore these issues through music (mainly corridos), instances of visual art often labeled as artivism (murals), and a craft (embroidery). I intend to analyze Chicano socio-environmental consciousness as portrayed in four different case studies: the corridos celebrating Reies López Tijerina and the work of La Alianza Federal de Las Mercedes; the corridos honoring Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta, leaders of the United Farm Workers; the murals in Chicano Park (San Diego, California –from which the quote in the title is taken); and the embroidery of a local protest against privatization, enclosure and environmental degradation of a land grant in the Sangre de Cristo mountains of southern Colorado.

    Art (in its broadest sense) can reclaim a historical identity, making it available for the political use of the community. Through this paper I intend to contribute to uncover the richness of Chicano socio-environmental consciousness, which I believe deserves more scholarly scrutiny. This consciousness, I argue, is central to Chicano’s sense of community and plays a key role in their struggle for cultural autonomy.

  • 7.
    Perez Ramos, María Isabel
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Water Apocalypse: Utopian Desert Venice Cities and Arcologies in Southwestern Dystopian Fiction2016In: Ecozona, ISSN 2171-9594, E-ISSN 2171-9594, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 44-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous stories have and are being written in both fiction and non-fiction about the future of the United States’ Southwest; and nearly always that future is considered to be closely linked to the vicissitudes of water. In a multidisciplinary work that combines ecocriticism, environmental history, and decolonial theories, this paper analyzes the socio-technological complexities behind water (mis)management in the Southwest with a focus on urban environments, and their socio-environmental consequences.

    A lush sprawl development called ‘Venice’ is proposed in Arizona in Leslie Marmon Silko’s Almanac of the Dead (1991). In the same line, Chicano author Rudolfo Anaya presents struggles over water rights and plans for turning Albuquerque into a ‘desert Venice’ city in his novel Alburquerque (1992). Fictional plans like these become very real when one reads the posts and news about the water-demanding Santolina sprawl development currently proposed for Albuquerque’s West side. On another note, Paolo Bacigalupi’s last novel, The Water Knife (2015) presents arcologies (self-contained, self-sufficient buildings) as an option to escape what he perceives will be a hellish region when climate change worsens and water underground levels are eventually depleted. Migration, xenophobia and environmental re-adaptation then become central issues to consider. A nuanced decolonial analysis of these dystopian narratives calls into question current decision-making around water management in the Southwest through the perspectives of these authors. If one argues that the environmental degradation of the arid Southwest is partly a consequence of the cultural oppression of the native local inhabitants, by imposing an inappropriate socio-environmental culture and ethics over the region, dystopian novels such as these become all the more relevant when proposing alternative futures.

  • 8.
    Perez-Ramos, Isabel
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    A MINOR FRAME?: How ethnic minorities ‘frame’ the environment through writing: the U.S. Southwest, a case study2014In: Framing Nature: Signs, Stories, and Ecologies of Meaning, 2014, p. 167-168Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a globalized world ruled by neoliberal rationale, some ethnic minorities still have their own ways of understanding, and writing, the environment. These perspectives have often been influenced by the discrimination that has derived from geopolitical conflicts in general and the actions of transnational corporations in particular, aiming at exploiting the natural resources of the world at whatever (social and environmental) cost.

    Activists such as Arundhati Roy, Ken Saro-Wiwa, and Nobel Prize recipient Wangari Maathai, among others, have given (written) voice to the concerns of repressed peoples and environments around the globe. Narration is a common method to frame the world and many writers have also used fiction as a way to approach these situations. Native American writer Linda Hogan and her novels Mean Spirit and Solar Storms could be used as examples of this kind of literature in North America, my area of study.

    I intend to apply Rob Nixon’s concept of ‘slow violence’, Ramachandra Guha and Joan Martínez-Alier’s theory of ‘environmentalism of the poor’ and Vandana Shiva’s term of ‘maldevelopment’ to the analysis of several examples of intersectional environmentalism expressed through narratives around the globe: some of these examples will be drawn from Rob Nixon’s book Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor, some others will be particular cases compiled for this analysis.

    Patterns will be drawn in terms of the shared characteristics of both the affected populations and the altered sites/environments, and the geopolitics behind resource extraction and the nation-states’ attitudes towards these situations and their consequences. These commonalities will then be compared to the environmental struggle(s) carried out by some of the local inhabitants of the U.S. Southwest, the Chicanos. This will allow, not only to perceive the struggle of the Chicanos in a global perspective, but also to pinpoint the specificities of their particular situation, as well as the role of literature as a method to combat both cultural and environmental degradation.

    Chicanos form a mix-blood community with Native American, Spanish, Mexican and Anglo roots, and are a growing ‘ethnic’ minority in the United States. Moreover, Chicanos’ discourse offers an alternative standpoint of a popularly represented landscape, that of the area misleadingly identified as the ‘Wild West’. Through the analysis of some literary works and their (potential) activist nature, the way in which Chicanos frame the environment they inhabit at the same time that they challenge the existing popular conceptions about it, will present yet another perspective of how a threatened cultural/ethnic group faces environmental degradation through narrative.

    This study will not only delve into the complexities of Chicanos’ cultural and environmental struggles, but also address questions such as: how does an ethnic minority fight environmental degradation from within one of the most powerful nations through narrative? And also, how do these narratives integrate the specificities of the socio-environmental struggle, at the same time that they overcome them, therefore fitting a global pattern?

  • 9.
    Perez-Ramos, Isabel
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Eco-Terrorism, Violence, or Resistance?: Resource struggles and resource privatization in literature about the U.S. Southwest and Chicanos2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Perez-Ramos, Isabel
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Identity of Absence: Chicanos & The US Southwest’s Identities Revisited2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both Chicanos and the US Southwest’s identities are often constructed in a discourse of absence. Their identities, being idealized and/or manipulated (therefore altered) along history by the ‘newcomers’ (mainly Anglo-American settlers), become themselves the justification for domination and discrimination in the eyes of the dominant culture.

    Chicanos identity conflicts have been extensively analyzed, but there is still much to explore in relation to the connection between these conflicts and the subjugation of the Southwestern environment. Both are often defined by others (and even by the own Chicanos) in the same way, that is in terms of absence rather than of presence, as the indians in Gerald Vizenor’s Fugitive Poses. This perpetuates their historical invisibility, and disregards the pressing social, cultural and environmental concerns. On the other hand, Laura Pulido writes about the dangers of turning to “strategic essentialism” (a form of this ‘identity of absence’), to defend Chicanos’ claims: arguing cultural homogeneity and an innate special connection to the land overlooks the diversity and conscious environmental ethic of many present-day Hispano Southwesterners.

    There is a need, therefore, to define (or reclaim existing definitions of) both Chicanos and the Southwest in positive, realistic ways. Literature has been used as a cultural weapon since the beginnings of the Chicano movement in the 60s; as such, it serves as a means of criticism as the writings by and about Chicanos show. Through an ecocritical analysis all these mechanisms will be exposed and analyzed.

  • 11.
    Perez-Ramos, Isabel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Locality of Water: SW acequias vs. the global market2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Perez-Ramos, Isabel M.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    High & Dry, & even Drowned: Linking Experiences of Environmental Injustices and Resistance/“Eco-Terrorisms” in the US Southwest and the Sápmi region in northern Sweden2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous parallels can be drawn between Chicanos in the Southwest and the Sami people in the Sápmi region of northern Sweden. These parallels go from land dispossession in what are often perceived as sparsely populated ‘wasteland’ and ‘idyllic wilderness’ respectively, to resource control, extraction and environmental degradation. This presentation will explores commonalities and differences between these ethnic minority communities which are geographically far apart, but face similar socio-environmental challenges. A study of three novels about opposing large dam projects (built or planned) by means of what could be considered radical environmentalism or even eco-terrorism will guide this analysis: Överskrida Gränser (Crossing Borders), (Svonni 2005), People of the Valley (Waters 1941) and The Milagro Beanfield War (Nichols 1974). Our analysis will draw on an interdisciplinary theoretical framework including Vandana Shiva, Arundhati Roy and Amita Baviskar’s respective work on (mal)development, mega dams, water management and community movements; previous work on environmental justice, from Robert Bullard to Laura Pulido; ideas of writer-activism and slow violence, mainly from Rob Nixon’s later work; and existing academic and legal documents on the different definitions of “eco-terrorism.” Through an intersectional environmentalism approach, we aim at an interdisciplinary study of fictional literary works by (and about) ethnic minorities as means of empowerment, resistance and denunciation.

  • 13.
    Perez-Ramos, Isabel M.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Water Apocalypse: Venice desert cities and utopian arcologies in Southwestern dystopian fiction2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The socio-environmental traumas in the U.S. Southwest, with roots in colonial times, are better addressed and understood from multidisciplinary approaches that consider as many dimensions of this complex history as possible. In a disciplinary work that combines ecocriticism, political ecology and decolonial theories I analyze different aspects of Chicano culture interlinked with the environmental degradation of the U.S. Southwest. My current project explores dystopian fictional narratives around utopian desert Venice cities and arcologies (self-contained, self-sufficient buildings) in the arid U.S. Southwest.

     

    The Southwest could be regarded as an undisciplined environment in itself, forcing U.S. environmentalists to get over the color green while some of the population faces a drought by painting the grass of their front yards into that same color. The struggles over water rights portrayed in the novel Alburquerque (1992), by the renown Chicano author Rudolfo Anaya, become very real when one reads the posts and news about the Santolina sprawl development currently proposed for Albuquerque’s West side. In the same line, a lush sprawl development called “Venice” is proposed in Leslie Marmon Silko’s Almanac of the Dead (1991), while Paolo Bacigalupi’s last novel, The Water Knife (2014) presents arcologies as an option to scape what he perceives will be a hellish region when climate change worsens and water underground levels are eventually depleted. Migration, xenophobia and environmental re-adaptation become then central issues to consider.

     

    A nuanced analysis of these dystopian narratives brings into question current decision making around water management in the Southwest through the decolonial perspectives of the authors. If one argues that the environmental degradation of the arid Southwest is partly a consequence of the cultural oppression of the native local inhabitants, by imposing an inappropriate socio-environmental culture over the region, novels such as these become all the more relevant when proposing alternative futures.

  • 14.
    Perez-Ramos, Isabel Maria
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Water Apocalypse: Venice desert cities and utopian arcologies in Southwestern dystopian fiction2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous stories have, and are being written in both criticism and literature about the future of the U.S. Southwest, and pretty much always said future is considered to be closely linked to the vicissitudes of water. The Southwest could be regarded as an undisciplined environment, forcing U.S. environmentalists to get over the color green while some of the population faces a drought by painting the grass of their front yards into that same color. In a disciplinary work that combines ecocriticism, political ecology and decolonial theories this presentation analyzes the way in which different Southwestern cultural groups are interlinked with the environmental degradation of the region, mostly due to the mismanagement of water.

     

    The struggles over water rights portrayed in the novel Alburquerque (1992), by the renown Chicano author Rudolfo Anaya, become very real when one reads the posts and news about the water-demanding Santolina sprawl development currently proposed for Albuquerque’s West side. In the same line, a lush sprawl development called “Venice” is proposed in Leslie Marmon Silko’s Almanac of the Dead (1991). On another tone, Paolo Bacigalupi’s last novel, The Water Knife (2015) presents arcologies (self-contained, self-sufficient buildings) as an option to scape what he perceives will be a hellish region when climate change worsens and water underground levels are eventually depleted. Migration, xenophobia and environmental re-adaptation become then central issues to consider. A nuanced analysis of these dystopian narratives brings into question current decision making around water management in the Southwest through the decolonial perspectives of the authors. If one argues that the environmental degradation of the arid Southwest is partly a consequence of the cultural oppression of the native local inhabitants, by imposing an inappropriate socio-environmental culture over the region, dystopian novels such as these become all the more relevant when proposing alternative futures.

  • 15.
    Perez-Ramos, María Isabel
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Racism, Displacement and Pollution in the Southwest of the USA: Local and global outcomes in two Southwestern literary works2012In: The Backyard of the U.S. Mansion / [ed] José Antonio Gurpegui and Isabel Durán, Alcalá de Henares: Instituto Franklin-UAH , 2012, p. 131-141Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Pérez Ramos, Isabel María
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Progress and Development According to Whom?: Reflections from the margins2016In: Transatlantic Landscapes : Environmental Awareness, Literature and the Arts / [ed] José Manuel Marrero Henríquez, Alcalá de Henares: Instituto Franklin-UAH , 2016, p. 95-111Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Pérez-Ramos, M. Isabel
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Lands of Entrapment: Environmental Health and wellbeing in literature about the U.S. Southwest and Chicano CommunitiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Through a broad overview of Southwestern literature this paper analyzes the environmental degradation of the United States Southwest and its connection to the health and wellbeing of Chicano communities (also addressing their Mexican and Pueblo neighbors). It does so in two steps. First, it analyzes toxic narratives about agricultural and industrial areas from the perspective of (mental and somatic) "toxic trauma;" second, it explicates the connection between the loss of land grants and water rights, environmental degradation, poverty, unemployment, and substance abuse in New Mexico. The analysis draws from Priscilla Ybarra’s “goodlife writing,” Maria Herrera-Sobek’s “aesthetic activism,” Linda Margarita Greenberg’s “pedagogies of crucifixion,” and Jake Kosek’s “politics of memory and longing;” as well as from Sylvia Rodríguez’ work on acequias and Joni Adamson’s work on environmental justice, with references to Stacy Alaimo’s theory of trans-corporeality.

    The narratives―Heroes and Saints, Under the Feet of Jesus, Cactus Blood, So Far From God, El Puente/The Bridge, People of the Valley, The Milagro Beanfield War, and Alburquerque―echo the work of many activists and associations across the Southwest struggling for environmental justice. Their focus on water, in line with the popular motto “el agua es vida/water is life,” moreover parallels the current opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline. Through "good life’ values these narratives, while proposing means of resistance and/or viable alternatives, expose how the environmental health issues affecting the wellbeing of both the land and the peoples of the Southwest are an entanglement of social, cultural, political, economic, and environmental factors.

  • 18.
    Pérez-Ramos, M. Isabel
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Scripps Institution of Oceanography.
    “Dam a River, Damn a People?”: Subverting dams in/through subaltern narrativesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes how the symbolism of dams as material representations of Nation and Progress can be subverted through literary tropes. We show how, in a set of subaltern narratives, dams instead come to represent environmental degradation and cultural disintegration resulting from the slow violence brought about by the imposition of these infrastructures. The narratives, all examples of writer activism, portray “invisibilized” ethnic minorities―or “unimagined communities”―resisting real and fictional dam projects in several different locations around the world: the U.S. Southwest, the U.S. Northeast/Canada’s Southeast, northern Sweden, and western India.

  • 19.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Expeditions of Gino Watkins: Arctic Travels in a Disenchanted Age2013In: Travels in the North: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Long History of Northern Travel Writing / [ed] Silje Gaupseth, Marie-Theres Federhofer, Per Pippin Aspaas, Hannover: Wehrhahn Verlag, 2013, 1, p. 191-208Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    ’… det går så enkelt till blommor emellan…’ – anteckningar om Proust och vetenskapen2013In: En plats i tiden: föredrag och artiklar om Marcel Proust / [ed] Emi-Simone Zawall, Stockholm: Atlantis & Marcel Proust-sällskapet , 2013, p. 127-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    I Milosz fotspår: Vilnius store diktare blev med tiden en orosstiftare2009In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2009-09-04Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Inför dödens vita mörker: fältdagboken som konst och vetenskap2008In: Svenska fysikaliska-meteorologiska expeditionen till Spetsbergen juli 1882-september 1883: S A Andrées dagbok från deltagandet i det första internationella polaråret / [ed] Håkan Jorikson, Gränna: Stiftelsen Grenna museum , 2008, p. 3-8Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 22 of 22
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf