Change search
Refine search result
1 - 40 of 40
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Samoyedic Diary: Early Years of Visual Anthropology in the Soviet Arctic2016In: Visual Anthropology, ISSN 0894-9468, E-ISSN 1545-5920, Vol. 29, no 4-5, p. 331-359Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Dahlberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Annlee: or, Transposition as Artistic Device2018In: Transpositions: Aesthetico-Epistemic Operators in Artistic Research / [ed] Michael Schwab, Leuven: Leuven University Press , 2018, p. 97-115Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3. Frichot, Hélène
    A Work in Ten Parts: Gathering and its Forms2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A Work in Ten Parts: Gathering and its Forms, was a set of 'philosophical' instructions that I wrote and provided to Elizabeth Presa, Centre for Ideas, VCA, University of Melbourne as part of a collaborative work participating in Hans Ulrich Obrist's ongoing Do It project. The instructions were followed by a number of VCA art students as part of a studio project, and the work was exhibited at  George Paton Gallery, Union House The University of Melbourne, Parkville (6-16 October, 2009). A catalogue published by The Centre for Ideas, VCA, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne was produced called Do It, which likewise contributes to the ongoing collaborative series curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist.

  • 4.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    All in the Production: Conversation with Nicolas Bourriaud, Somewhere in Paris2009In: Design Reporter, no 1, p. 12-13Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5. Frichot, Hélène
    Becoming Woman, Old Man2008In: Bureau, Melbourne: VCA Margaret Lawrence Gallery, Faculty of the Victorian College of the Arts, The University of Melbourne , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6. Frichot, Hélène
    David Ralph: In Captivity2008In: Landscape Architecture Australia, ISSN 1833-4814, Vol. 118, p. 31-32Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7. Frichot, Hélène
    Folds for Marion Manifold2010Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Deep Mapping for the Stony Rises is an assemblage of the topographies and topologies encountered in the making of a cross-landscape environment for six particular places in the Stony Rises of Victoria and the Flinders Ranges of South Australia. It is an experiment in the superpositioning of gathered and invited material interleaved with a stratigraphy of text – as a kind of writing over writing over writing where points once separated in time are made adjacent2 – through the medium of the gridded mat. The ten elements for a deep map are guides for peripatetic travelling through stony terrains shaped by curatorial fine-tuning further informed by instructions from collaborators, when such advice exists. Arrangements of collected, invited and offered fragments of impressions gathered across these landscapes are ordered and layered onto conceptual ground – the deep mapping mat to be laid out, reorganised, folded up and carried about as necessary. At the invitation of Gini Lee, who was one of the cited artists of 'The Stony Rises Project', I submitted a set of drawings to be used and composed at her discretion as part of her curated contribution, 'Deep Mapping.'

  • 8.
    Frichot, Hélène
    RMIT University, Melbourne Australia.
    Olafur Eliasson and the Circulation of Affects and Percepts: In Conversation2008In: Architectural Design, ISSN 0003-8504, E-ISSN 1554-2769, p. 30-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work of Danish-Icelandic artist, Olafur Eliasson is suffused with an internal atmospheric that profoundly impacts upon the experience of those who apprehend his projects. Through an array of manufactured weather conditions, wild and moody landscapes improbably enter the framed interiors that he creates. Eliasson’s atmospheric works have become increasingly compelling for interior and architectural designers alike as he activates a mobile circulation of affects and percepts creating an intimate relay between the artwork and those who enter into a zone of indiscernibility with the work. Through the manipulation of the colour, transparency, and reflection of light, Eliasson dissolves the material of interior space into the immaterial qualia of atmosphere and captures the fragile visitor in this embrace. Here I hope to go in search of a tentative theory of affect for the artist’s work in order to discover how he has enacted the mutual transformation of space, time and inhabitant. The immaterial materials of atmosphere that Eliasson manipulates move beyond mere surface effect and open up the possibility of new forms of sociality. This brief essay will recount a collective conversation that erupted in the midst of a midsummer forum held at Studio Olafur Eliasson, next to the Hamburger Bahnhof, a reputable museum of contemporary art in Berlin. The leitmotifs of the longest day of the year included temporality, or the inexorable sensation of the passing of time; the status of reality; objecthood, specifically the place of the art-object in contemporary art, but also the medium of the model or maquette; and the perception of colour and light, for example, in the phenomenon of the after-image. The event was named: Life in Space, and was attended by a series of culinary delights that culminated in a BBQ to which all the family was invited.

  • 9. Frichot, Hélène
    Sangeeta Sandrasegar2004In: New04 / [ed] Juliana Engberg, Melbourne: Australian Centre for Contemporary Art , 2004, Vol. March, p. 63-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Simone Slee, On2003In: Melbourne International Arts Festival: Visual Arts Program, p. 26-31Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11. Frichot, Hélène
    Your Mobile Expectations2008In: Artichoke, ISSN 1442-0953, Vol. 22, p. 74-75Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Gabrielsson, Catharina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Förebyggande2017In: Glas är massa i rörelse / Glass is moving mass / [ed] Axel Andersson, Stockholm: Konstfrämjandet , 2017, p. 195-201Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Att drömma om regnbågens slut och horisontens faktiska vara.1996In: Arkitektur, Vol. 1996:2, s. 49-51 : ill.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    När arkitektur är arkitektur är arkitektur konst2001In: Det transparenta huset: Om glas och ljus i konst och arkitektur ... / [ed] Tomas Lauri, Stockholm: Statens konstråd , 2001Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Gullberg, Anders
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Företal: Stockholmsfotografer2012In: Stockholmsfotografer: En fotografihistoria från Stockholms stadsmuseum / [ed] Forsmark, Ann-Sofi,, Stockholm: Stockholmia förlag , 2012, p. 8-10Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Handberg, Leif
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ödlundh, Christine
    Time and Simultaneity: Adjusting Time2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Hietala, Jan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Eat Work Rest: The Exhibition2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Eat Work Rest is a project about an artist’s private and public spheres.  The artist Prince Eugen of Sweden, Duke of Närke (1865-1947) is set in focus.  The prince’s life, as all other artists’, was separated in a private and a public sphere, and perhaps even more evidently so in his case due to his birth.  The difference between the private and the public cut through the prince’s work as an artist, his social life, his official tasks and even in what was served in his home the palatial villa Waldemarsudde on the sea just outside the city centre of Stockholm.

      The project Eat Work Rest, consisting of a book and an exhibition, originates from a few sentences 1st curator Göran Söderlund at Prince Eugen’s Waldemarsudde uttered early on the New Year of 2009.  We were in his office in the villa. He told that they – the management of the palace – had harboured plans to re-make the Prince’s study on the ground floor for some time.  He said it almost as if en passant.  The book includes texts by Charlotte Birnbaum, Power Ekroth and Christina Wistman.

      To give some understanding of the context, it should be mentioned that the interiors of three private chambers in the palace are missing since 1947, and of several guest rooms.  These were removed, all according to the provisions of the Prince’s will.

     The exhibition consists of an installation piece, an associative reconstruction of the vanished study on the first floor and the Prince’s bedchamber, emptied from their original contents soon after the Prince’s death 1947.  The chambers are re-constructed as moving digital images based on C.G. Rosenberg’s pictures of 1947, and excerpts from the documentary ‘A Summer Day at Waldemarsudde’, shot by Lennart Bernadotte in 1943, in form of back-projections on silver screen walls, which makes it possible for a viewer to experience the imagery from the inside too.  The projections are 3 x 4 m and the installation covers an area of some 500 m2.  I recognise both these colleagues as contributors to the final result, in a inter-textual sense.

      Objects and furniture essential for the original rooms, are on lone from Stopalo AB Stockholm.  These furniture are set in new unorthodox positions not unlike large assemblages.  In the room Eat we meet a kitchen table, some dining room chairs from the 18th century, a couple of pheasants, an egg-box and an IKEA lamp from the 1970.  In the room Work we find a desk from the 18th century, and early 19th century lamp and rake for a tennis court.  In the room Rest we find a pair of riding boots, a gentleman’s hat-box, a chair, an electrified chandelier, and an finally a 18th century cast iron dolphin.  The objects were presented on 18th century rugs.

     

  • 18.
    Holmstedt, Janna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Between Earthworms and Satellites2019In: Open Humanities Lab Symposium: New Humanities & the Anthropocene, KTH, Stockholm, 14-15 May, 2019, 2019Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Holmstedt, Janna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Blowhole: Posthumanist reflections on interspecies communication, listening, and the aesthetics of more-than-human relations2019In: RE:SOUND, the 8th International Conference for Histories of Media Arts 2019, Aalborg, Denmark, 20-22 Aug, 2019., 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sounds are leaky phenomena, pointing to the unavoidable entanglement of bodies, technologies and environs. A captured sound is a record of loss, as is the archive. This loss urges me – as artist, researcher, and listener – to story and restory entanglements. While the media might be fixed, listening is fluid and dynamic. And a sonic sensibility, I find, holds the potential to counteract a reductive, visual-textual logic and its related knowledge formations.

    This journey into a predominantly sonic ecology departs from the unique archival material of American neurophysiologist John C. Lilly. In the 1950s and 1960s Lilly conducted controversial scientific experiments with dolphins, as well as on himself. I will focus on an aspect previously not discussed in relation to Lilly's dolphin research, the role of listening and the use of sound technology, and I will attend to Lilly's experimental set-ups as media ecologies. The encounter with an animal "voice" and the attempts to record this phenomena as sound objects would force Lilly into uncharted territories. When the recordings of words uttered by dolphins were played back to other researchers, they didn't hear what Lilly's team had heard. As Lilly began experimenting with sound, it seemed as neither technology nor perception could be relied on. Even the role of language in the act of communication became increasingly elusive.

  • 20.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Stories We Can't Tell2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Writing architecture is not writing about architecture, but writing it, making it. It is to create new grounds, sites of actions, and construct characters who build these grounds and change them by inhabiting them critically and performatively. By situating writing in contexts where direct ways of expression are impossible, I investigate how dissident writing can circumvent the bans of an oppressive power by inventing an Aesopian language. Dissident writing is to write with multiple voices and many authors – not all of whom are welcome. To develop a tactic of writing with unwelcome co-authors, i.e. writing with the dominant power, but against it, is what dissidence could bring into writing architecture. In this way, writing dissident architecture deals with two main questions. One is: how to tell a story we cannot tell? And the other: how can this struggle with an impossible narration create a dissident architecture? To investigate these questions, in this text domestic spaces of houses are considered as a key example of performing grounds for dissidents. By going through an experiment of writing situated in the spaces of a demolished house, I discuss how the construction of dissident characters who perform in the house and the application of different genres and experimental writings complicate the house and bring on the writing of a dissident architecture.

  • 21.
    Karlsson, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Gow, Marcelyn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Purveyance Practices in Collaborative Design2003In: Reshape!: Ann-Sofie Back, Magnus Bärtås, Peter Geschwind & Gunilla Klingsberg, SERVO / [ed] Sara Arrhenius, Stockholm, Lund: IASPIS, Propexus , 2003Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Tartu.
    Protection Policies through a Lens: The Role of Representations in the Environmental Protection of Japanese Agrarian Landscapes2014In: Framing Nature: Signs, Stories and Ecologies of Meaning. Abstracts, Tartu: University of Tartu, 2014, p. 122-123Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental discourse and natural imagery hold a special place in national self-descriptions, and different visual and verbal representations of nature, that is nature through a lens or a pen, play a crucial part in establishing which elements belong to the “desirable national environment” and what parts of landscape are rather negated or ignored. Without underestimating the emotional bonds of each individual with their home landscapes, the present paper will address the role of visual (both photo and cinematographic) and verbal representations of landscapes in shaping public discourse on nature and environmental protection policies.

    The discussion will focus on the representation of traditional rice agriculture landscapes at Lake Biwa, Japan, and their role in shaping local environmental consciousness and protection policies. Framing nature in beauty images has been crucial in Japanese environmental protection already from the establishment of early national parks that was carried out hand in hand with big publicity campaigns of major train companies. Well framed visual representations that cut off today’s industrial or urban everyday landscapes are central to the discourse on national landscapes in today’s Shiga Prefecture, where photographic and cinematographic works of Imamori Mitsuhiko have highlighted near-dissappeared traditional rice agriculture ecosystems. In a skillful montage, beautiful traditional villages are depicted as embodiments of traditional Japanese wisdom about co-existance with nature and have found ardent fans among middle-aged town people who happily immerse themselves in further “framing activities”: nature walks, food tasting, ecotourism etc. “The biggest challenge was to keep garbage out of the shot,” says the framer, Imamori Mitsuhiko himself about shooting “Satoyama”, the NHK and BBC co-produced film on water cycles in traditional rice farming villages at lake Shiga. For the consumer of framed images and experiences, it is the correspondence between the first-hand experience and neat images that matters most, appears from the interviews with participants at various tourist events in traditional agricultural villages. And even though the contact of these participants with the real Shiga prefecture remains largely on the level of framed nature, thus excluding the majority of the prefecture’s present reality, the conscious popularization activity of Imamori Mitsuhiko and subsequent satoyama boom has considerably increased the popular awareness about landscape heritage both on local and national level and has in fact helped to preserve several landscape elements that had already almost dissappeared.

  • 23.
    Lundgren, Staffan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Note on Malevich2005In: Site, ISSN 1650-7894, no 13-14Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Lundgren, Staffan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Note on Rembrandt2004In: Site, ISSN 1650-7894, no 12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Lundgren, Staffan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Notes on “Notes on the Creation of a Total Art”2004In: Site, ISSN 1650-7894, p. 9-10-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Pitt, Christine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Marketing and Entrepreneurship.
    Kietzmann, Jan
    Simon Fraser Univ, Beedie Sch Business, 8888 Univ Dr Burnaby, Vancouver, BC V5A 1S6, Canada..
    Botha, Elsamari
    Univ Stellenbosch, Business Sch, Stellenbosch, South Africa..
    Wallström, Åsa
    Lulea Univ Technol, Lulea, Sweden..
    Emotions and sentiment: An exploration of artist websites2018In: Journal of Public Affairs, ISSN 1472-3891, E-ISSN 1479-1854, Vol. 18, no 2, article id e1653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artists of all genres express their emotions through their creations and market their works online. We argue that in marketing their work online, it is important to understand not only the emotional responses of the artistic works themselves but also that the sentiment evoked on their websites matters. Developing the correct website sentiment can have favorable consequences. It can increase the interest of potential consumers, assure that appropriate expectations are set for the actual consumption experience, and lead to increased sales and word of mouth marketing. Online sentiment that is ill-aligned to the emotions the actual offering evokes can have adverse consequences, including disappointment with the actual offering and buyer's remorse. To better understand the online sentiment of artists' websites, we begin by briefly revisiting the interplay between art, emotions, and the issue of online sentiment. Then, we describe a study of a sample of artists' websites that had the objective of gauging both the nature of and the extent of the emotions present in its text, as well as gaining an indication of the sentiment of the website. We describe the use of a relatively new content analysis tool to do this. Following this, we explore the data gathered, with the specific purpose of determining whether the emptions expressed on artists' websites can significantly predict sentiment, if so, which emotions tend to be the strongest predictors. We conclude by discussing some managerial implications of the results and by identifying avenues for future research.

  • 27.
    Romero, Mario
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Andrée, Jonas
    Peters, Christopher
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Thuresson, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Designing and Evaluating Embodied Sculpting: a Touching Experience2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss the design and evaluation of embodied sculpting, the mediated experience of creating a virtual object with volume which users can see, hear, and touch as they mold the material with their body. Users’ digitized bodies share the virtual space of the digital model through a depth-sensor camera. They can use their hands, bodies, or any object to shape the sculpture. As they mold the model, they see a real-time rendering of it and receive sound and haptic feedback of the interaction. We discuss the opportunities and challenges of both designing for haptic embodiment and evaluating it through haptic experimentation.

  • 28. Smith, Adam M
    et al.
    Romero, Mario
    Georgia Institute of Technology.
    Pousman, Zachary
    Mateas, Michael
    Tableau Machine: A Creative Alien Presence.2008In: AAAI Spring Symposium: Creative Intelligent Systems, AAAI , 2008, p. 82-89Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the design of Tableau Machine (TM), an AIbased,interactive, visual art generator for shared livingspaces. TM is an instance of what we call “alien presence”:an ambient, non-human, embodied, intelligent agent. Fromoverhead video in key public spaces, TM interprets itsenvironment, including its human audience, and expressesits interpretation by displaying a sequence of abstractimages of its own design. This paper is a case study in thedesign of an art generator with deep and long-termconnections to its physical and social environment.

  • 29.
    Stenberg, Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Architectural Design.
    Grid 6 (Five Chairs) av Rachel Whiteread2011In: Katalog 40: Statens konstråd 2010 / [ed] Anna Nyström, Stockholm: Statens Konstråd , 2011, 40, p. 166-171Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Holmstedt, Erik
    Inte längre mitt hem: Malmberget 1969-1978 - 2007-20082008Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Holmstedt, Janna (Artist)
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Blåshålet2019Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna session, baserad på material från ett historiskt ljudarkiv, utgår från ljudinspelningar av kommunikationsexperiment med delfiner som utfördes på 1950 och 60‐talet i USA, där delfinerna skulle lära sig att tala engelska med blåshålet.

  • 32.
    Holmstedt, Janna (Artist)
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Flock Frequency Colony: Sonospheric Communards and Points of Listening2019Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    QC 20191111

    This talk is about shutting up, about touching the matter of language, and animals that come together through listening.

  • 33.
    Holmstedt, Janna (Curator, Artist)
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Siltberg, Lars (Artist)
    Nilsson, Erik (Photographer)
    Gränssnitt2019Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ur inbjudan: "Välkomna i skymningen till en experimentell kväll med ljudvandring, film, installationer och värmande brasa. Vi har under olika tidpunkter och skiftande årstider återkommit till en och samma plats, en kolonilott. Nu bjuder vi in till en work-in-progress där vi hoppas att ni vill komma och lyssna, titta, vandra och värma er med oss.

    Vi har tänkt på kolonin som ett gränssnitt, ett medium som förbinder olika användare. Några av dessa användare är Zea mays, satellitparet Sentinel-1, diverse däggdjur, samt en uppsjö växter, mikrober och okända entiteter."

  • 34.
    Ozmin, Janek (Artist)
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Motor-Home2017Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The suburban garage, arguably one of modernity’s most prolific reflexive inventions, has received little attention in terms of critical discourse in architecture. Contemporary Marxist feminism has been utilised in architectural theory to illustrate a series of binary conditions related to the home, including hidden forms of labour, paid and unpaid work, productive and reproductive spheres, public and private, sex and gender. Through this discourse, the subject of maintenance (which includes physical repairs and renovation, housework and homemaking) is broadly accepted as a means of producing and inhabiting architectural space. This innovation has been key in determining alternative forms of architectural practice that contest and intervene in dominant patriarchal images and descriptions of the home. The garage is uniquely situated between public and private realms, house and infrastructure, store and facilitator, place of work and labour, and has often been utilised as a free and reprogrammable space in close proximity to the home. This image of liminality is expressed in a variety of media including advertising and film, where the garage situates ambiguous forms of masculinity by connecting gendered forms of maintenance to images of technology and consumption. The suburban garage as reflexive invention initially responded to the need to house an automobile, but later it becomes a site of continual reimagining, responding not only to the collective subjectivity of the household but also to practices that cannot be contained within the program of the house. By questioning the binary applications of gender and maintenance theory, it may be possible to understand how capitalism operates to produce new forms of masculine domesticities and domestic masculinities.

  • 35.
    von Heland, Jacob (Cinematographer)
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Ernstson, Henrik (Cinematographer)
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    One Table Two Elephants2018Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Holmstedt, Janna (Artist)
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Lobell, Malin (Artist)
    (p)Art of the Biomass2019Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Är möjligt att tala om jordens, dvs. myllans, rättigheter? Jord är i många fall en blind fläck och något som lätt tas för givet. Den ligger där under våra fötter. Samtidigt är den ett komplext levande system som håller på att utarmas. Den kallas också en hotad resurs, då människans matproduktion och det hårt industrialiserade jordbruket har nått en kritisk gräns.

    Holmstedt och Lobell utgår från jord som mer-än-mänsklig aktivitetszon och habitat då de spekulerar i möjligheten att upprätta ett Allting. Förutom att anknyta till nordisk historia och de tidiga församlingarna för lagstiftning, rättskipning och förvaltning, syftar Allting på Bruno Latours teori "Parliament of Things" där lagar inte instiftas med människan i centrum utan kring livet självt.

    Om vi skulle kalla till ting, vilka tingsplatser skulle kunna fungera som relationella "knutar" där politiska ekologier och mer-än-mänskliga relationer kan uppmärksammas? Vilka nya lagar skulle kunna framträda ur varje tingsplats om den bemöts som ett parlament av mänskliga och icke-mänskliga aktörer där människan inte är den privilegierade livsformen. Behövs jordreservat? Krävs en ny jordreform? Vilka är myllans rättigheter?

  • 37.
    Holmstedt, Janna (Artist)
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Shared Surfaces2019Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this combined talk, walk, listening session and reading, Janna Holmstedt will depart from an invisible border and an urban allotment, the tiny remnants of a once huge community that was levelled with the ground in 1965. Relations are traced between different figures, places and times: earthworms in the soil beneath our feet, potato riots in Stockholm during WW1, the allotment movement, archaeological findings of popcorn in Peru, Sentinel-1, a pair of satellites that orbit Earth to monitor soil moisture, and a cob of corn from Zea mays var. amylacea. All are fragments from a work-in-progress where the allotment becomes a place to think with and through, where the small place, the everyday and the trivial intra-acts with the global, large-scale and remote. Holmstedt uses this superficially demarcated piece of land as an interface - or rather, a situation of shared surfaces - through which post-anthropocentric modalities of belonging and care can be attended to, and transcorporeal entanglements be experienced. In her own words, it is a place for 'unlearning'.

  • 38.
    Holmstedt, Janna (Artist)
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Smolicki, Jacek (Artist)
    Fragmentarium Club.
    Sonic Sensibilities2019Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I Sonic Sensibilities möts Jaceks och Jannas konstnärsskap samt intresse för olika former av lyssnade praktiker och ljudteknologier. I ett aktivt lyssnade träder andra aspekter av omgivningen fram än de vi vanligtvis uppmärksammar i en visuellt orienterad kultur. Hur upplever jag omgivningen och min egen närvaro i den om jag under tystnad lyssnar in, istället för att betrakta eller prata om den? Hur låter omgivningen och objekten? Hur låter egentligen språket? Vad gör teknologin med lyssnandet och våra kroppar? I Sonic Sensibilities, som kan sägas bestå av tre akter, leds vi från befintliga ljudvärldar och lyssnande utomhus, till förstärkta, förvrängda och inspelade ljud i Jaceks performativa ljudkollage där vardagliga föremål används på oväntade och poetiska sätt, över till historiska ljudarkiv, djurröster och berättande i Jannas performance som bitvis har karaktär av föreläsning (lecture performance).

  • 39.
    Holmstedt, Janna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sonic Sensibilities: /Mis/communication/s/2019Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this mixed and postdisciplinary gathering, with listening sessions and talks by artists and researchers, we will visit the limits of communication(s) – when our technologies, ideas, languages and intentions fail us. We will among other things encounter phenomena that cannot be decoded, interspecies communication experiments, and speculations about how we can communicate with not only aliens but also inhabitants on planet Earth in a distant future.

    In a society imbued with communication technologies and a positive belief in the possibilities of accurately formulating, transmitting, receiving and archiving, it might be sobering to consider situations where the communicative attempt takes us elsewhere. Where it derails our assumptions and intentions and where we admittedly are out of control. What can be gleaned from these limits and borderlands? What can be unlearned? What ethico-political considerations do they confront us with?

  • 40.
    Holmstedt, Janna (Artist)
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Order of the Dolphin2019Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What do we hear when we think we listen? In 1961, a prominent flock of researchers were invited to a semi-secret conference arranged by NASA’s Space Science Board to discuss a subject not yet considered scientifically legitimate: What are the conditions required for establishing contact with other worlds? Could engaging in communication with dolphins prepare us for an encounter with non-human intelligence? In this listening session, Holmstedt moves between the human, the synthetic and the beastly while revisiting some of the interspecies communication experiments that were carried out in the 1950s and 60s, partly funded by NASA, where dolphins were supposed to learn to speak English with their blowholes. At the centre of the session are tape recordings from language lessons with dolphins, and a woman, whom during 75 days tried to live under equal conditions with the dolphin Peter in a flooded house.

1 - 40 of 40
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf