Change search
Refine search result
1 - 25 of 25
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Favero, Federico
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Annersten, Lars
    Musikverket.
    Berner, David
    Musikverket.
    Morreale, Fabio
    Queen Mary University of London.
    SOUND FOREST/LJUDSKOGEN: A LARGE-SCALE STRING-BASED INTERACTIVE MUSICAL INSTRUMENT2016In: Sound and Music Computing 2016, SMC Sound&Music Computing NETWORK , 2016, p. 79-84Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     In this paper we present a string-based, interactive, largescale installation for a new museum dedicated to performing arts, Scenkonstmuseet, which will be inaugurated in 2017 in Stockholm, Sweden. The installation will occupy an entire room that measures 10x5 meters. We aim to create a digital musical instrument (DMI) that facilitates intuitive musical interaction, thereby enabling visitors to quickly start creating music either alone or together. The interface should be able to serve as a pedagogical tool; visitors should be able to learn about concepts related to music and music making by interacting with the DMI. Since the lifespan of the installation will be approximately five years, one main concern is to create an experience that will encourage visitors to return to the museum for continued instrument exploration. In other words, the DMI should be designed to facilitate long-term engagement. Finally, an important aspect in the design of the installation is that the DMI should be accessible and provide a rich experience for all museum visitors, regardless of age or abilities.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    Ölme, Rasmus
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    Functional movements2012In: (What´s) the matter with method, Kortrijk, Belgium, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3. Keenan, Fiona
    et al.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    An Acoustic Wind Machine and its Digital Counterpart: Initial Audio Analysis and Comparison2016In: Interactive Audio Systems Symposium, 2016, p. 1-5Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Keenan, Fiona
    et al.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Evaluating a Continuous Sonic Interaction: Comparing a Performable Acoustic and Digital Everyday Sound2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5. Keenan, Fiona
    et al.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    €˜Listening Back: Exploring the Sonic Interactions at the Heart of Historical Sound Effects Performance2017In: The New Soundtrack, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 15-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Lamarche, Anick
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Ternström, Sten
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hertegård, Stellan
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Not just sound: Supplementing the voice range profile with the singer's ownperceptions of vocal challenges2009In: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, ISSN 1401-5439, E-ISSN 1651-2022, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 3-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A commercial phonetograph was complemented with a response button, such that presses resulted in marked regions in the voice range profile (VRP). This study reports the VRP data of 16 healthy female professionally trained singers (7 mezzosopranos and 9 sopranos). Subjects pressed the button to indicate sensations of vocal instability or reduced control during phonation. Each press thereby marked potential areas of difficulty. A method is presented to quantify the consistency of button use for repeated tasks. The pattern of button presses was significantly consistent within subjects. As expected, the singers pressed at the extremes of VRP contours as well as at register transitions. These results and the potential of the method for the assessment of vocal problems of singers are discussed.

  • 7.
    Lindborg, PerMagnus
    Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Sound Art Singapore: Conversation with Pete Kellock, Zul Mahmod and Mark Wong2014In: eContact!, Vol. 16, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a “constructed multilogue” oriented around a set of questions about sound art in Singapore. I have lived here since 2007 and felt that a “community report” should aim to probe recent history deeper than what I could possibly do on my own, in order to give a rich perspective of what is happening here today. I was very happy when Pete Kellock, Zul Mahmod and Mark Wong agreed to be interviewed. Each has a long-time involvement in the Singapore sound scene, in a different capacity. Pete is an electroacoustic music composer who has worked in research and entrepreneurship, and is a founder of muvee technologies. Zul is a multimedia artist and performer who has developed a rich personal expression, mixing sonic electronics, sculpture and robotics in playful ways. Mark is a writer and sound artist who has followed Singapore’s experimental scenes closely since the 1990s.

    I sent the three of them a letter containing a range of observations I had made (which may or may not be entirely accurate) and questions (admittedly thorny and intended to provoke), including the following:

    The geographical location and Singapore’s historic reason-to-be as a trading post has instilled a sense of ephemerality — people come and go, ideas and traditions too — as well as a need to develop contacts with the exterior. The arts scene in general seems to be largely a reflection of whatever the current trading priorities demand. In what way does the current local sound art reflect the larger forces within Singaporean society? Since art is mostly orally traded, how are its traditions nurtured and developed?

    Around 2010, the Government seems to have indicated a new task for cultural workers, including sound artists and musicians: to define — create or discover, stitch-up or steal — a “Singapore identity”. The Singapore Art Festival shut down two years while the think tanks were brewing. Will this funnel taxpayer money and (more importantly) peoples’ attention towards folkloristic or museal music, rather than to radical and/or intellectual sound art? At the same time, there is considerable commercial pressure to subsume music / sound listening into an experiential, multimodal, game-like and socially mediated lifestyle product. Are commercialization and identity-seeking two sides of the same coin — one side inflation-prone, and the other a possible counterfeit? Is there room for a “pure listening experience”, for example to electroacoustic music? Or is the future of sound art ineluctably intertwined with sculptural and visual elements?

    Different kinds of creative people involved in sound art are entrepreneurs, programmers, academics, educators, curators and journalists. Which institutions nurture talent and bring audiences to meet new experiences? Where are the hothouses for developing ideas, craft, artistry, innovation and business?

    The interviews, loosely structured around these themes, were made in January and February 2014. Our conversations often took unexpected turns (mostly for the better). I diligently transcribed the recordings, and each interviewee made corrections and additions, before we gently nudged spoken language a little closer to prose. I then brought out a pair of big scissors and a large pot of coffee, and made a cut-out collage, weaving the texts into the multilogue that follows. The idea has been to create an illusion of four people conversing with each other under the same roof. Deceit or not, at the very least, we all live and work on the same small island, somewhere in the deep southeast. I hope you will enjoy reading Sound Art Singapore.

  • 8.
    Pabon, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Howard, David M.
    Ternström, Sten
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Kob, Malte
    Eckel, Gerhard
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Future Perspectives2017In: Oxford Handbook of Singing / [ed] Welch, Graham; Howard, David M.; Nix, John, Oxford University Press, 2017, Vol. 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter, through examining several emerging or continuing areas of research, serves to look ahead at possible ways in which humans, with the help of technology, may interact with each other vocally as well as musically. Some of the topic areas, such the use of the Voice Range Profile, hearing modeling spectrography, voice synthesis, distance masterclasses, and virtual acoustics, have obvious pedagogical uses in the training of singers. Others, such as the use of 3D printed vocal tracts and computer music composition involving the voice, may lead to unique new ways in which singing may be used in musical performance. Each section of the chapter is written by an expert in the field who explains the technology in question and how it is used, often drawing upon recent research led by the chapter authors.

  • 9.
    Paloranta, Jimmie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Interaction with a large sized augmented string instrument intended for a public setting2016In: Sound and Music Computing 2016 / [ed] Großmann, Rolf and Hajdu, Georg, Hamburg: Zentrum für Mikrotonale Musik und Multimediale Komposition (ZM4) , 2016, p. 388-395Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a study of the interaction with a large sized string instrument intended for a large installation in a museum, with focus on encouraging creativity,learning, and providing engaging user experiences. In the study, nine participants were video recorded while interacting with the string on their own, followed by an interview focusing on their experiences, creativity, and the functionality of the string. In line with previous research, our results highlight the importance of designing for different levels of engagement (exploration, experimentation, challenge). However, results additionally show that these levels need to consider the users age and musical background as these profoundly affect the way the user plays with and experiences the string.

  • 10.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    Department of Theatre, Film and Television, University of York, United Kingdom.
    Film and theatre-based approaches for sonic interaction design2014In: Digital Creativity, ISSN 1462-6268, E-ISSN 1744-3806, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 15-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sonic interaction design studies how digital sound can be used in interactive contexts to convey information, meaning, aesthetic and emotional qualities. This area of research is positioned at the intersection of sound and music computing, auditory displays and interaction design. The key issue the designer is asked to tackle is to create meaningful sound for objects and interactions that are often new. To date, there are no set design methodologies, but a variety of approaches available to the designer. Knowledge and understandingofhow humans listen and interpret sound is the first step toward being able to create such sounds.This article discusses two original approaches that borrow techniques from film sound and theatre. Cinematic sound highlights how our interpretation of sounddependson listening modes and context, while theatre settings allow us to explore sonic interactions from the different perspectives of the interacting subject, the observer and the designer.

  • 11. Pousman, Zachary
    et al.
    Romero, Mario
    Georgia Institute of Technology, USA.
    Smith, Adam
    Mateas, Michael
    Living with Tableau Machine: A Longitudinal Investigation of a Curious Domestic Intelligence2008In: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing, ACM Press, 2008, p. 370-379Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a longitudinal investigation of Tableau Machine, an intelligent entity that interprets and reflects the lives of occupants in the home. We created Tableau Machine (TM) to explore the parts of home life that are unrelated to accomplishing tasks. Task support for "smart homes" has inspired many researchers in the community. We consider design for experience, an orthogonal dimension to task-centric home life. TM produces abstract visualizations on a large LCD every few minutes, driven by a set of four overhead cameras that capture a sense of the social life of a domestic space. The openness and ambiguity of TM allow for a cycle of co-interpretation with householders. We report on three longitudinal deployments of TM for a period of six weeks. Participant families engaged with TM at the outset to understand how their behaviors were influencing the machine, and, while TM remained puzzling, householders interacted richly with TM and its images. We extract some key design implications for an experience-focused smart home.

  • 12. Reid, Katherine L. P.
    et al.
    Davis, Pamela
    Oates, Jennifer
    Cabrera, Densil
    Ternström, Sten
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Black, Michael
    Chapman, Janice
    The acoustic characteristics of professional opera singers performing in chorus versus solo mode2007In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1873-4588, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 35-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, members of a professional opera chorus were recorded using close microphones, while singing in both choral and solo modes. The analysis included computation of long-term average spectra (LTAS) for the two song sections performed and calculation of singing power ratio (SPR) and energy ratio (ER), which provide an indication of the relative energy in the singer's formant region. Vibrato rate and extent were determined from two matched vowels, and SPR and ER were calculated for these vowels. Subjects sang with equal or more power in the singer's formant region in choral versus solo mode in the context of the piece as a whole and in individual vowels. There was no difference in vibrato rate and extent between the two modes. Singing in choral mode, therefore, required the ability to use a similar vocal timbre to that required for solo opera singing.

  • 13.
    Romero, Mario
    et al.
    The Georgia Institute of Technology, USA.
    Mateas, Michael
    A preliminary investigation of Alien Presence2005In: Proceedings of Human-Computer Interaction International (HCII 2005), Las Vegas, NV, USA, July 2005, HCII , 2005, , p. 9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work in ubiquitous computing and ambient intelligence tends to focus on information access and task supportsystems informed by the office environment, which tend to view the whole world as an office, or on surveillancesystems that feature asymmetric information access, providing interpretations of activity to a central authority. Thealien presence provides an alternative model of ambient intelligence; an alien presence actively interprets abstractqualities of human activity (e.g. mood, social energy) and reports these interpretations, not to a central authority, butback to the user’s themselves in the form of ambient, possibly physical displays. The goal of an alien presence is nottask accomplishment and efficient access to information, but rather to open unusual viewpoints onto everydayhuman activity, create pleasure, and provide opportunities for contemplation and wonder. The design of an alienpresence is an interdisciplinary endeavor drawing on artificial intelligence techniques, art practices of creation andcritique, and HCI methods of design and evaluation. In this paper we present preliminary work on the TableauxMachine, an alien presence designed for the home environment, as well as discuss a number of general design issuesof alien presence including co-interpretation, authorship, richness of expression vs. system complexity, tensionsbetween viewing computation as a medium vs. as a model, issues of privacy, and evaluation.

  • 14.
    Romero, Mario
    et al.
    Georgia Institute of Technology, USA.
    Pousman, Zachary
    Mateas, Michael
    Alien Presence in the Home: The Design of Tableau Machine2008In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 373-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduce a design strategy, alien presence, which combines work in human---computer interaction, artificial intelligence, and media art to create enchanting experiences involving reflection over and contemplation of daily activities. An alien presence actively interprets and characterizes daily activity and reflects it back via generative, ambient displays that avoid simple one-to-one mappings between sensed data and output. We describe the alien presence design strategy for achieving enchantment, and report on Tableau Machine, a concrete example of an alien presence design for domestic spaces. We report on an encouraging formative evaluation indicating that Tableau Machine does indeed support reflection and actively engages users in the co-construction of meaning around the display.

  • 15. Rossing, T D
    et al.
    Sundberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Ternström, Sten
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Acoustic comparison of soprano solo and choir singing.1987In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 82, no 3, p. 830-836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five soprano singers were recorded while singing similar texts in both choir and solo modes of performance. A comparison of long-term-average spectra of similar passages in both modes indicates that subjects used different tactics to achieve somewhat higher concentrations of energy in the 2- to 4-kHz range when singing in the solo mode. It is likely that this effect resulted, at least in part, from a slight change of the voice source from choir to solo singing. The subjects used slightly more vibrato when singing in the solo mode.

  • 16. Ryan, Joel
    821 words and 20 images2014In: No Patent Pending: self-made performative media, Germany: iii editions with MER. Paper Kunsthalle , 2014Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Selamtzis, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Ternström, Sten
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Richter, Bernard
    Burk, Fabian
    Köberlein, Marie
    Echternach, Matthias
    A comparison of electroglottographic and glottal area waveforms for phonation type differentiation in male professional singers2018In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, ISSN 0001-4966, Vol. 144, no 6, p. 3275-3288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compares the use of electroglottograms (EGGs) and glottal area waveforms (GAWs) to study phonation in different vibratory states as produced by professionally trained singers. Six western classical tenors were asked to phonate pitch glides from modal to falsetto phonation, or from modal to their stage voice above the passaggio (SVaP). For each pitch glide the sample entropy (SampEn) of the EGG signal was calculated to detect the occurrence of phonatory instabilities and establish a ᅵground truthᅵ for the performed phonation type. The cycles before the maximum SampEn were labeled as modal, and the cycles after the peak were labeled as either falsetto, or SVaP. Three automatic categorizations of vibratory state were performed using clustering: one based only on the EGG, one based on the GAW, and one based on their combination. The error rate (clustering vs ground truth) was, on average, lower than 10% for all of the three settings, revealing no special advantage of the GAW over EGG, and vice vers...

  • 18.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet, Arts, communication and learning.
    Artificial Body Voices2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Artificial Body Voices, 25-27 november 2011 Studio Acusticum i Piteå

     

    I Artificial Body Voices stiger publiken in i en mytopoetisk värld för att möta fantasieggande hybridvarelser, en dansande robotsvan, pulserande musik, underskön sång, en interaktiv röstmaskin och tretton dansare omslutna av videoanimationer som slingrande rör sig över väggar och golv. Vi vill inbjuda publiken till ett lekfullt experimentarium som undersöker människans längtan och drift att med teknologin omskapa, förändra och förlänga sina kroppsliga och röstliga förmågor.

  • 19.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet, Arts, communication and learning.
    Excerpts from the artistic process of Artificial Body Voices2011In: Artistic Research in Action: Proceedings of Carpa 2 - colloquium on Artistic Research in performing arts / [ed] Annette Arlander, Helsinki: Theatre Academy, Helsinki , 2011, p. 95-112Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artificial Body Voices is a scenic complex that explores the human desire to transform our bodies and connect to technology. Through stimulation rather than simulation this project will invite the audience to an artistic experiment connecting choreography, robotics, music, electro acoustics, vocal art, video and computer animation. This complex of bodies and voices will be developed in a process divided into a series of workshops, where the contributors share and transform the artistic material into new formats and combinations. In between the workshops the team re-cycles the material by enfolding and unfolding the material through our bodies, voices and computers.

  • 20.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet, Arts, communication and learning.
    Ombra mai fù: The interactive Singing Tree2010Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OMBRA MAI FÙ

    This sensual tree, built of copper, reacts on the closeness of the audience. When the audience approach, the tree performs the Largo by Handel with its trembling loudspeaker-leafs. In this aria, Xerxes gives voice to his love for a tree that allows him to seek refuge in its shadow.

     

     

  • 21.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet, Arts, communication and learning.
    Swanlake Revisited: An Interactive Exhibition2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Under Oktober förvandlas Dansmuseets underjordiska rum till en mytopoetisk sjö där besökarens närvaro får märkliga svanvarelser att dyka upp och försvinna bland virtuella vågor. I Swanlake Revisited återbesöker vi den urgamla legenden om knölsvanen som lever sitt livi stumhet, men som vid dödsögonblicket en enda gång utbrister i oerhört vacker sång. 

  • 22.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Handberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Opera Mecatronica: An interactive exhibition within artistic research2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet, Arts, communication and learning.
    Lundin, Magnus
    University of Borås.
    Olimpia: A giant electro mechanically choreographed marionette with new coloratura music.2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    OLIMPIA

    The puppet Olimpia’s virtuoso coloratura aria is performed by a giant electro mechanically choreographed marionette built from highly patinated scrap machine parts. The music is ‘coloratura’ in its original sense – coloured or embellished – and implies a re-colouring of Offenbach’s aria from “The tales of Hoffmann”. The choreography is both a response to Heinrich Kleist’s homage to the marionette (1810), ‘the most graceful of all dancers whose non self conscious movements simply obey the realm of purely mechanical forces’,  and yet at the same time it is a staging of an anorexic yearning for a body without skin, flesh or psyche.

     

    The marionette consists of nine body parts connected – via a string system – to 15 computer directed servo engines, attached to an aluminium frame in the ceiling. Marionette height 300 cm. Frame 240x240 cm2.

     

    Concept, choreography and movement programming: Åsa Unander-Scharin

    Puppet maker, electronics and software: Magnus Lundin

    Aria: Jaques Offenbach (from Les racontes d’Hoffmann, 1881)

    Singer: Jeanette Bjurling (recording: Lars-Göran Ehn)

    Music: Carl Unander-Scharin

    Light design: Anders Larsson

    Photo: Rune Ahlström

     

    First performance in the Reactor hall at The Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, 2010

     

    Produced by Scen- och Sinnesproduktion, financial support by Längmanska kulturfonden and the Swedish Arts Grants Committee

  • 24.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet, Arts, communication and learning.
    Lundin, Magnus
    University of Borås.
    Olimpia: The choreographed electromechanic puppet, dancing to remixed and recomposed music2010Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The puppet Olimpia’s virtuoso coloratura aria is performed by a giant electro mechanically choreographed marionette built from highly patinated scrap machine parts. The music is ‘coloratura’ in its original sense – coloured or embellished – and implies a re-colouring of Offenbach’s aria from “The tales of Hoffmann”. The choreography is both a response to Heinrich Kleist’s homage to the marionette (1810), ‘the most graceful of all dancers whose non self conscious movements simply obey the realm of purely mechanical forces’,  and yet at the same time it is a staging of an anorexic yearning for a body without skin, flesh or psyche. 

  • 25.
    Holmstedt, Janna (Artist)
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Blåshålet2019Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna session, baserad på material från ett historiskt ljudarkiv, utgår från ljudinspelningar av kommunikationsexperiment med delfiner som utfördes på 1950 och 60‐talet i USA, där delfinerna skulle lära sig att tala engelska med blåshålet.

1 - 25 of 25
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf