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  • 1.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Kazemian, RezaKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.Rönn, MagnusKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Nordic Journal of Architectural Research: Nordisk arkitekturforskning2009Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Kazemian, Reza
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Rönn, Magnus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    The Architectural Competition (Editors' Notes): Introduction2011In: The Architectural Competition: Research Inquiries and Experiences / [ed] Magnus Rönn, Reza Kazemian, Jonas Andersson, Stockholm: Axl Books, 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Backlund, Sara
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Gyllensvärd, M.
    Gustafsson, A.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    SVID (Swedish Industrial Design Foundation).
    Mazé, Ramia
    Interactive Institute.
    Redström, Johan
    Center for Design Research, Royal Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Static!: The aesthetics of energy in everyday life2006In: WonderGround 2006 / [ed] Ken Friedman, Terence Love, Eduardo Côrte-Real, Chris Rust, Lisbon: CEIADE – Centro Editorial do IADE , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Compose or decompose - Resource allocation in engineering design projects2013In: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013, 2013, 362-367 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a paper that reviews the planning, execution and reflection of the collaborative writing efforts made by students when composing their final design project reports. Past research has indicated collaborative writing (CW) as one of the most challenging task that could be assigned to student groups [1]. CW is a process that involves project management, including resource allocation and essentially a great portion of writing skill. Whereas numerous engineering design projects highlight the uniqueness and creative aspects brought forward and the process in which this was created - the final piece of the puzzle how the final report was established is a phenomenon that get dimmed. There is dualistic propagation of parallel processes where the 'artifact' constitutes the main design work and where the efforts made to produce a written report relates to the other. A tradition that maybe is obsolete in some places but that has a life of its' own in other domains. The more administrative work involved with compiling a report of 'good enough' character whilst motivating and supporting each other should be balanced against the activities involved in producing the final output/design/prototype. This study is based on interviews and written 'pros and cons' reflections with project participants, project documentation and lecturer's reflections. Early indications show that communication and iterative work processes, allowing cross-checking, validation and confirmation is crucial for engaging greater commitment to the collaborative writing process. Independently of project management style and delegations made; labour intensity and work distribution of activities seem to propagate a skew execution of work. This is especially noticeable when administrative functions are weak amongst project members, which can be a consequence when putting students from various programs/disciplines/schools in a joint exercise of this type. Based on the findings, the paper stipulates a set of preventive coaching tips to guideline collaborative writing efforts and endorsing increased rigor to the final report and its process. Establishing this set of awareness among students would ultimately minimize uncertainties and dilemmas prior to 'entering the boat' - when the ship has sailed so has also its crew and based on how well they master to serve and execute their skills - so will also the trip be remembered - pleasant or horrific - taking them to paradise or hell.

  • 5.
    Björndal, Petra
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. ABB Corporate Research.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Artman, Henrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    From transactions to relationships: Making sense of user-centered perspectives in large technology-intensive companies2015In: 4th IFIP 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2015, Springer-Verlag New York, 2015, 114-124 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we analyze interviews from four technology-intensive companies, focused on service and service development. All companies have during the last two decades introduced interaction design units, and the corporations were selected due to their interest in also expanding the service share of their business. This service shift has been a top-down initiative. However in only two companies, the initiatives have led to the establishment of enterprise wide service development processes, and in the other two companies, the service development is more ad hoc. It is argued that even if interaction design has close theoretical relation to service design such combination has so far been limited. We discuss the shift from product to service view of the offerings within these companies, and relate this to user-centered perspectives. We argue there is a window of opportunity within technology-intensive and engineering focused industries to include user-centered design when formalizing service development.

  • 6.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Karjalainen, Matti
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Mäki-Patola, Teemu
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Kanerva, Aki
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Huovilainen, Antti
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Jordá, Sergi
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Kaltenbrunner, Martin
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Geiger, Günter
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Bencina, Ross
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    de Götzen, Amalia
    University of Padua.
    Rocchesso, Davide
    IUAV University of Venice.
    Controlling sound production2008In: Sound to Sense, Sense to Sound: A state of the art in Sound and Music Computing / [ed] Polotti, Pietro; Rocchesso, Davide, Berlin: Logos Verlag , 2008, 447-486 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hermann, ThomasBielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany.Hunt, AndyUniversity of York, York, UK.
    Proceedings of ISon 2010 - Interactive Sonification Workshop: Human Interaction with Auditory Displays2010Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    These are the proceedings of the ISon 2010 meeting, which is the 3rd international Interactive Sonification Workshop. The first ISon workshop was held in Bielefeld (Germany) in 2004, and a second one was held in York (UK) in 2007.These meetings:

    • focus on the link between auditory displays and human‐computer interaction
    • bring together experts in sonification to exchange ideas and work‐in‐progress
    • strengthen networking in sonification research

    High quality work is assured by a peer‐reviewing process, and the successful papers were presented at the conference and are published here.

    ISon 2010 was supported by COST IC0601 Action on Sonic Interaction Design (SID) (http://www.cost‐sid.org/).

     

    About Interactive Sonification

    Sonification & Auditory Displays are increasingly becoming an established technology for exploring data, monitoring complex processes, or assisting exploration and navigation of data spaces. Sonification addresses the auditory sense by transforming data into sound, allowing the human user to get valuable information from data by using their natural listening skills.

    The main differences of sound displays over visual displays are that sound can:

    • Represent frequency responses in an instant (as timbral characteristics)
    • Represent changes over time, naturally
    • Allow microstructure to be perceived
    • Rapidly portray large amounts of data
    • Alert listener to events outside the current visual focus
    • Holistically bring together many channels of information

    Auditory displays typically evolve over time since sound is inherently a temporal phenomenon. Interaction thus becomes an integral part of the process in order to select, manipulate, excite or control the display, and this has implications for the interface between humans and computers. In recent years it has become clear that there is an important need for research to address the interaction with auditory displays more explicitly. Interactive Sonification is the specialized research topic concerned with the use of sound to portray data, but where there is a human being at the heart of an interactive control loop. Specifically it deals with:

    • interfaces between humans and auditory displays
    • mapping strategies and models for creating coherency between action and reaction (e.g. acoustic feedback, but also combined with haptic or visual feedback)
    • perceptual aspects of the display (how to relate actions and sound, e.g. cross‐modal effects, importance of synchronisation)
    • applications of Interactive Sonification
    • evaluation of performance, usability and multi‐modal interactive systems including auditory feedback

    Although ISon shines a spotlight on the particular situations where there is real‐time interaction with sonification systems, the usual community for exploring all aspects of auditory display is ICAD (http://www.icad.org/).

     

    Contents

    These proceedings contain the conference versions of all contributions to the 3rd International interactive Sonification Workshop. Where papers have audio or audiovisual examples, these are listed in the paper and will help to illustrate the multimedia content more clearly.

    We very much hope that the proceedings provide an inspiration for your work and extend your perspective on the new emerging research field of interactive sonification.

    Roberto Bresin, Thomas Hermann, Andy Hunt, ISon 2010 Organisers

  • 8.
    De Witt, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Sound design for affective interaction2007In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics / [ed] Paiva, A; Prada, R; Picard, RW, 2007, Vol. 4738, 523-533 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different design approaches contributed to what we see today as the prevalent design paradigm for Human Computer Interaction; though they have been mostly applied to the visual aspect of interaction. In this paper we presented a proposal for sound design strategies that can be used in applications involving affective interaction. For testing our approach we propose the sonification of the Affective Diary, a digital diary with focus on emotions, affects, and bodily experience of the user. We applied results from studies in music and emotion to sonic interaction design. This is one of the first attempts introducing different physics-based models for the real-time complete sonification of an interactive user interface in portable devices.

  • 9.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    TILLBLIVELSER: En trasslig berättelse om design som normkritisk praktik2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing awareness of norm-critical perspectives (in society, academia and industry) brings with it the need to develop methods to ensure they can be implemented in practice. This thesis discusses how the role of design contributes to and maintains norms, and shows how design as a norm critical practice has great potential to bridge the gap between theory and practice in norm-critical work. This potential lies in using design as a peda-gogic tool that can concretize and make understandable what would otherwise be perceived as complex, unclear or remote. The thesis pays special attention to the role of artefacts in the creation of the stories of the world. The discursive design thing is introduced as a tool to visualize norms and to create discussion. The three-dimensional, physical thing exposes us to a more diverse experience of norms than when we just address them in words or pictures.The empirical work in this thesis stems from five research projects that differ from each other and were carried out under varied conditions. The projects have tackled a range of problems and power relationships. However, together they draw a complex picture of how norms arise, overlap and constantly change over time, place and space – and how design can be used to support or disrupt this process.By revisiting the projects, it becomes clear how the researcher’s position and actions (or non-actions) shape the norm development process. This results in an insight that meaning can not be construc-ted from an outside perspective, but is a constant ”becoming” that occurs in an entanglement of relationships arising between different bodies, both human and non-human. As a norm critical perspective implies paying attention to power relationships, it also assumes a power critical approach to the production of meaning extracted from the norm-critical work, and that we – as researchers and designers – take responsibility for our prevail by highlighting our own bodies and gaze.The thesis therefore proposes the concept of diffraction as an approach to the production of meaning in norm critical design practices. A diffractive approach enables an understanding of how the production of meaning occurs in various coincidences, but also how our own interventions shape the story. It opens up to the realization that parallel narratives are possible and thus becomes a tool to break away from the linear understanding framework and offer an exploration of alternative thought patterns. A diffractive approach to the production of meaning is thus also a tool to pro-mote increased creativity.

  • 10.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Broms, Loove
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. Interactive Institute.
    Becoming the Energy AWARE Clock: Revisiting the Design Process Through a Feminist Gaze2013In: Experiments in Design Research / [ed] Eva Brandt, Pelle Ehn, Troels Degn Johansson, Maria Hellström Reimer, Thomas Markussen, Anna Vallgårda, Köpenhamn: The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools Architecture, Design and Conservation , 2013, 258-266 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the border between technology and design (form giving) from a feminist perspective. Looking at the energy system and how it has been integrated in the household, we want to address the underlying structures that have been built into the ecology of electrical appliances used in daily life, preserving certain norms that could be questioned from both a gender and a sustainability perspective. We have created an alternative electricity meter, the Energy AWARE Clock, addressing design issues uncovered in an initial field study. In this paper, we will make parallels to these issues. We also use feminist technoscience studies scholar Donna Haraway’s theory of the cyborg in order to clarify useful concepts that can be derived from feminist theory and that can act as important tools for designers engaged in creative processes. From our own experience with the Energy AWARE Clock this approach has great potential for questioning and rethinking present norms within sustainability and gender, from the viewpoints of design research and design practice.

  • 11.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Räsänen, Minna
    Södertörns Högskola.
    Börjesson, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Hertz, Anne- Christine
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Sundbom, Cristine
    Konstfack.
    The Androchair: Performing Gynaecology through the Practice of Gender Critical Design2017In: The Design Journal, ISSN 1460-6965, Vol. 20, no 2, 1-19 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper highlights the important role that design plays when it comes to women’s overall experi- ences of ther gynaecological examination. It exempli es how the examination can become renegotiable through the practice of a critical design. We will re ect this in the design of the contemporary gynaecological examination chair (GEC). We used women’s experiences as a starting point for the design of an Androchair (a conceptual male equivalent of the GEC), in order to make the experiences critically visible. Inspired by the view of the gynaecolog- ical examination as a performance where the Androchair is represented as a prop and was placed on a stage as a discussion object during a public seminar. The Androchair allowed for both critical and multiple readings of the GEC and through that, the gynaecology examination at large. Moreover, it stimulated a discussion about alternative ideas towards achieving a more positive experience. 

  • 12.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Räsänen, Minna
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Ilstedt, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Visualising gender norms in design: Meet the Mega Hurricane Mixer and the drill Dolphia2012In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 6, no 3, 85-94 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article highlights how a gender perspective can be performed by design as critical practice. Two common household appliances - a drill and a hand blender - were used as a starting point. Inspired by Derrida's term deconstruction, the product language of the tools was analysed and then switched in two new prototypes: the hand blender Mega Hurricane Mixer and the drill Dolphia. The prototypes were shown at exhibitions and lectures. The comments by the audience show that a switching of product language entails that their relationship to the artifact itself also changes. Overall, the elements, which previously had been perceived as 'lacking transparency', were now visible. For example, the drill was identified as a "drill for women" and considered inadequate for drilling, and the mixer revealed needs and functions that the traditional mixer did not satisfy. This implies that design should not only be seen as 'final products' but as a part of a social process that takes place between the user, the artifact and the norms of society. By switching the product languages it was possible to highlight how gender values are connected to each design and each artifact. This means that the design of the artifacts around us is not fixed, but can be renegotiated and situated in time, place, and context.

  • 13. Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    Lewandowski, Vincent
    Bresin, Roberto
    Hwang, Sungjae
    Song, John
    Gim, Junghyeon
    Griggio, Carla
    Leiva, Germán
    Romero, Mario
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST). Georgia Institute of Technology.
    Sweeney, David
    Regan, Tim
    Helmes, John
    Vlachokyriakos, Vasillis
    Lindley, Siân
    Taylor, Alex
    Demo Hour2015In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 22, no 5, 6-9 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactivity is a unique forum of the ACM CHI Conference that showcases hands-on demonstrations, novel interactive technologies, and artistic installations. At CHI 2015 in Seoul we hosted more than 30 exhibits, including an invited digital interactive art exhibit. Interactivity highlights the diverse group of computer scientists, sociologists, designers, psychologists, artists, and many more who make up the CHI community.

  • 14.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Practicing Design Judgement through Intention-Focused Course Curricula2015In: Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, ISSN 1360-1431, E-ISSN 2040-8633, Vol. 20, no 1, 47-58 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper elaborates on how design judgement can be practiced in design education, as explored in several iterations of an advanced course in interaction design. The students were probed to address four separate design tasks based on distinct high-level intentions, i.e. to 1) take societal responsibility, 2) to generate profit, 3) to explore a new concept, and 4) to trigger reflection and debate. This structure, we found, served as a valuable tool in our context for bringing important topics to discussion in class and for actively practicing design judgement. We discuss what we see as the main qualities of this approach in relation to more conventional course structures in this area, with a focus directed more towards aspects of methodology, specific interaction techniques, and design principles more generally.

  • 15.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Murer, M.
    Solsona Belenguer, Jordi
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems.
    Handcrafting electronic accessories using 'raw' materials2014In: TEI '14 Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction, 2014, 369-372 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this studio we explore the design of interactive electronic accessories made from natural materials such as wood, copper, silver, wool and leather. A set of handcrafted sensor components along with easy to use sensor boards that connect with example smartphone software, will be utilized as a toolkit for the studio activities. Participants will, through hands-on activity, create with, learn about and discuss the role of natural materials in the design of wearable interactive designs.

  • 16.
    Gradin, Emma
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Design för snabbcykelvägar: Ett designkoncept för snabbcykelvägar i Stockholmsregionen2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    From 2010 to 2014, regional and state organizations in the region of Stockholm have developed an EU-finnanced project named SATSA II - regional cykelstrategi (regional bicycling strategy). The strategy aims to increase the number of citizens commuting by bicycle in the region and develop a new intermunicipal infrastructure for fast bicycling. By providing a network of fast cycling routes on a regional scale, called “snabbcykelvägar”, the strategy promotes a shift towards more sustainable transport for the citizens of Stockholm county. The new regional network of bicycle routes have strategically been placed to pass by local centres, transport nodes, larger working areas and universities.

    The purpose of this master thesis is to develop a design concept for fast cycling routes (snabbcyelvägar) in the region of Stockholm. The design concept have been developed through the vision of the ‘good bicycling experience’. To define what it is that provides a ‘good bicycling experience’, physical, environmental and spatial aspects have been studied through empirical research and through relevant theories found in the research field of environemnetal psycology and semiotics. The aspects that provides a ‘good bicycling environment’ has been structured into three criterias. The criterias are: safety, continuity and likeability (attractivity). The three criterias has further been transformed in to designprincipals which are presented in a toolbox. The toolbox is the result of the study and can be used by planners and architects to design a regional network of cycling routes that provides a good expereince for the present and future bicycle commuters in the region of Stockholm (see Toolbox 2, p. 65).

  • 17.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    När arkitektur är arkitektur är arkitektur konst2001In: Det transparenta huset: Om glas och ljus i konst och arkitektur ... / [ed] Tomas Lauri, Stockholm: Statens konstråd , 2001Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Grimheden, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Creating a better world by international collaboration in product innovation engineering - The piep way2009In: DS 59: Proceedings of E and PDE 2009, the 11th Engineering and Product Design Education Conference - Creating a Better World, 2009, 38-42 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article summarizes efforts undertaken within the Swedish Product Innovation Engineering program (PIEp), in the area of education for product innovation. A key aspect of the program is to create a systematic change in higher engineering education in product development, to move toward a focus on innovative product development, where entrepreneurship thrives and student ideas are brought to reality. Examples include the introduction of new undergraduate and graduate courses in innovation engineering, close integration between project courses offered at PIEp partner universities, joint research projects, and workshops that allow entrepreneurs and companies to better utilize student ideas and projects. During the first years of PIEp, in the build-up phase, a large effort has been placed on creating an international network of'innovation friends'. We strongly believe that there is no need to invent the wheel again - rather we have an obligation to search for, find and gather all relevant actors within this field, on the global arena. Within the rather limited network of partners and friends we have established this far, we have explored several common interest areas, including activities such as university-spanning workshops and collaborative projects.

  • 19.
    Grimpe Martineau, Marc-André
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    How mobility networks have been dealt with socially and how they can better be dealt with in the future2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The city, since the industrialization period, is no longer the product of a single mind. With bold and massive investment in infrastructure networks that followed this period, engineering professions gained unparallel social status and gained importance in municipality ranks. In parallel to this, social sciences have been very slow to pick up on the issue of mobility. The global neoliberal environment and more competitive one in which cities are confronted today, has resulted with local governments, public-private partnerships and new ways of augmenting chances of economical investments. Municipality documents used as a basis for the production and construction of urban environments are not equipped to deal with commercial and political motivated drawings and plans. There is a lack of communication between both languages that result in an unfiltered ‘laissez faire’ of aesthetics. Spatial design fields are capable of creating terminology that can properly address the serious issues concerning our networks of flows but are not enough by themselves considering the economical environment and the following self-generated urbanity inflicting our cities. Landscape architecture offers an open-ended perspective on small to large scale networks of infrastructures, thus possibly being able to bridge the gap between institutional planning mechanisms and actual design. The theoretical background generated from this research will be applied to a case scenario. Boulevard Taschereau (also called provincial road 134 at some parts) is among the most important and used arteries of the South Shore of Montréal, Québec (Canada). A contextual solution to boulevard Taschereau’s congestion issues will have to be generated in order for it to meet the expectations and social needs of its current and future users.

  • 20.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    New Urbanism and Beyond: Designing Cities for the Future2008 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Sustainable Urbanism and Beyond: Rethinking Cities for the Future2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    The Best of New Urbanism: Selected Articles & Essays 2002-2012: Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of Congress for New Urbanism2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This unique book brings together, for the first time ever, a collection of probably the best papers & essays written on the international phenomena known as new urbanism. The range of articles spans different tenets of the movement, its theories and principles, methods & tools, contributions & critique and much more. The authors originate from variety of disciplines such as, sociology, public policy, human geography, economics, urban planning, urban design, architecture, real estate development and urban studies. It is a unique and timely collection of new and older works, freshly complied for the 20th anniversary of congress of new urbanism and the new urbanism movement. This volume is a limited release printed only for academia, faculty and students

  • 23.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Jing, Jing
    The Built Environment for Children: Stockholm Experience2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The enjoyment of, and impact on children from the built environment is a very significant aspect of “social sustainability”, but it is relatively underrepresented in the discourse on sustainable development. Despite significant advancements in the understanding of the relationship between the built environment and child health and development made over the past several decades, many argue that contemporary urban (and sub-urban) environments in developed countries are having negative repercussions on child health and development.

     

    Stockholm, featuring both advancements as child-friendly city which reflects Sweden’s national branding as “child-friendly” nation (Swedish Institute, 2012) and challenges as to its radical urban transformation which in combination with a relative shortage of housing that places great pressure on city planning. The paper draws importance to the phenomenon of public space regeneration, with particular focus on understanding how public spaces can be built and adapted to provide children with environments that stimulate their social, educational and physical development. The high levels of activities to modify, expand, and build new areas in the city to accommodate more people, including more children, provides a dynamic and robust setting for case study.  This paper reviews the built environment for pre-school aged children (age 0-6) in the city of Stockholm and investigate how planners, architects and designers account for children as users of the spaces and places that they plan and design. A series of case studies on child-friendly design are provided in order to produce learning materials for architects, planners and policy makers based upon the Stockholm experience.

  • 24.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Lundström, Mats
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Urban Design In Sweden2012In: Urban Design Practice: An International Review / [ed] Sebastian Loew, London: RIBA - Royal Institute of British Architects Publishing , 2012, 96-112 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban Design Practice gives a fascinating account of the state of urban design practice across the world today. Packed with invaluable local knowledge from on-the-spot contributors, its global scope offers an armoury of background facts and figures to professionals interested in exporting their skills internationally. Along the way it reveals how urban design is practiced, identifies a multitude of key concerns and refines our understanding of what urban design (so often a nebulous concept) means.

    Aimed broadly at practitioners – masterplanners, architects, landscape architects, planners, civil engineers – and students and academics of these disciplines, twenty chapters analyse a different country’s urban design context. Fully illustrated and structured in a similar way, each chapter features a case study, general background economic statistics, and a handy ‘quick guide’ to the types of work available, the underlying legislation and tips for securing work. 

    Features chapters of the following countries: 

    Argentina, Australia, Brazil, China, the Czech Republic, Dubai, Egypt, England, France, Germany, India, Italy, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, South Africa, Spain, Sweden and the USA.

  • 25.
    Hårleman, Maud
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Werner, Inga Britt
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Billger, M.
    Significance of colour on room character: Study on dominantly reddish and greenish colours in north-respectively south - Facing rooms2006In: Proc. Conf. Des. Emot., 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we treat a study concerning room character due to colour appearance and spatial evaluation in different compass orientations. Rooms of the same colour, but observed in light from different compass orientation will appear differently; their identity colours will differ. The question now is if these circumstances are confined to colour impression or if they also cause a different room character. A study is made in Sweden in the Northern hemisphere in which two rooms, a north and a south-facing were used, Ninety subjects, evaluated and compared the experimental rooms, equal in all respects except quality of light in 118 empirical studies. The walls were coloured consecutively in six hues in two nuances; the inherent colours were six pinkish and five greenish, plus one yellowish and one bluish colour. Room character was described aided by semantic scales. Data were statistically processed using the SPSS 1 statistical program to analyse connections between spatial evaluation, inherent colour and compass orientation. NCS colour vocabulary was used. Finally, verbal descriptions with own words were used as a supplementary method to unfold nuances in response. The study show that differences in hue and nuance affect evaluation of room character. Subjects reacted distinctly different on pinkish and greenish rooms; they had separate colour connotations. Room compass orientation resulted in different evaluation through weakening or strengthening of associations linked to the colours by colour connotations.

  • 26.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    SICS.
    Ståhl, Anna
    Sundström, Petra
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    Interactional Empowerment2008In: CHI 2008 Proceedings - Dignity in Design, ACM Press, 2008, 647-656 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose that an interactional perspective on how emotion is constructed, shared and experienced, may be a good basis for designing affective interactional systems that do not infringe on privacy or autonomy, but instead empowers users. An interactional design perspective may make use of design elements such as open-ended, ambiguous, yet familiar, interaction surfaces that users can use as a basis to make sense of their own emotions and their communication with one-another. We describe the interactional view on design for emotional communication, and provide a set of orienting design concepts and methods for design and evaluation that help translate the interactional view into viable applications. From an embodied interaction theory perspective, we argue for a non-dualistic, non-reductionist view on affective interaction design.

  • 27.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Behovet av design2000In: Svenska Former:: Ett Upplevelseverk om Nutida Svensk Formgivning / [ed] Susanne Helgeson, Kent Nyberg, Prisma , 2000, 38-41 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Design, energi och hållbar utveckling2011Report (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    Stiftelsen svensk industridesign.
    Energi som syns2007In: Under ytan: En antologi om designforskning / [ed] Sara Ilstedt Hjelm, Stockholm: Raster förlag, 2007, 2500, 118-131 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur kan elkonsumtion i hemmet synliggöras på ett begripligt och engagerande sätt? Kan design användas för att skapa medvetande och ändra beteende? Det var några av utgångspunkterna för Static! som handlade om att skapa medvetenhet kring energiförbrukning i hemmet med hjälp av design.

  • 30.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    Interactive Institute.
    If everything is design, what then is a designer?2005In: In the making: NORDIC DESIGN RESEARCH CONFERENCE, Copenhagen, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    On a scale between art and design: On the Aesthetics of Function, from the Bauhaus until Today2008In: (Re)Searching the digital Bauhaus / [ed] Thomas Binder, Jonas Löwgren, Lone Malmborg, Springer, 2008, 1, 191-234 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    People in design2010In: Static! Designing for energy Awareness / [ed] Ramia Mazé, Stockholm: Arvinius förlag , 2010, 43-48 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The dysfunctionality of everyday things: - on stress, design and artefacts2003In: Techne:: Design wisdom / [ed] Mike Press, Sara Owen, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the increasing issue of stress and burnout in contemporary society and attempts to connect this to product design. Stress can be defined as the reaction of a mismatch between the demands of the world and the needs and capacities of the individual. To what degree does technological products and design artefacts contribute to stress?

  • 34.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    Stiftelsen svensk industridesign.
    Under ytan: En antologi om designforskning2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här boken vänder sig till dem som är intresserade av att veta mer om forskning inom design. det gäller såväl forskare från olika discipliner och praktiker inom området, som lärare och elever på designskolor.

    Hur skapar man en teoretisk grund för en definition av designkunskap? Hur skapas kvinnliga och manliga positioner i designprocesser? Hur fångar man upp människors önskningar och behov i samband med produktutveckling och är tingen medskapare av våra identiteter? Hur förhåller sig innovation, design och teknik till varandra? P vilket sätt kan designtänkande användas för att skapa förändring av stora och komplexa system, som städer och energisystem? Är en satsning på design lönsam för företag?

    Detta är några av de frågor som diskuteras i den här boken som innehåller 23 bidrag från bland andra interaktionsdesigner, industridesigner, ingenjörer, arkitekter, ekonomer och filodofer, uppdelade i sju illustrerade avsnitt.

  • 35.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Visualizing the Vague: Invisible Computers in Contemporary Design2005In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 21, no 2, 71-78 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Gustafsson, Anton
    Interactive Institute.
    Gyllenswärd, Magnus
    Interactive Institute.
    Designing for Energy Awareness: The Power-Aware Cord2005In: Pride and pre-design: The conference for Cultural Heritage and the Science of Design / [ed] Yrjö Sotama, Helsinki: Valopaino OY , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    et al.
    SVID, Stiftelsen Svensk Industridesign.
    Koskinen, IlpoUniversity of Industrial Arts and Design.
    Design Inquiries: Nordes 20072007Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Mårtens, Pehr
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Design as enabler of Social Innovation: - A Swedish Perspective2010Report (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Isaksson, Anna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Börjesson, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Att synliggöra det osynliga: Design som aktör i jämställdhetsarbete2014In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 35, no 1, 28-47 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research points to the need for developing methods to change established gender orders and converting gender perspectives into practical action. Based on a gender equality project at the Centre for Health Technology Halland (HCH), this article discusses the potential of critical design as an agent within the framework of gender equality work and work for change. The project worked with critical design as a tool for making visible what a gender perspec- tive can mean in the context of one’s work, in this case health technology. It resulted in a conceptual prototype called the Androchair – a medical chair designed for men but based on women’s experiences of the gynaecological chair. The aim of the article is to study and discuss the significance of including a prototype, that is an object, in the gender equality work of an organisation. Special focus is placed on whether, and in that case how, a prototype can influence notions of gender and gender equality in relation to one’s own area of work. The empirical data consists of qualitative interviews with staff at the HCH. Actor-net- work theory is used to interpret the data. The analysis shows how the Androchair raises questions of power, needs and interpretative prerogative in relation to what one does in one’s work. Furthermore, it does this to a greater extent than more conventional ways of conveying knowledge about gender equality (such as academic texts, statistics and PowerPoint presentations). Physical objects are perceived of as making gender and gender equality issues more tangible. 

  • 40. Jonsson, Oskar
    et al.
    Sperling, Lena
    Östlund, Britt
    Dalholm Hornyánszky, Elisabeth
    User Requirements of Furniture Influenced by a Move to a Senior Housing2012In: FORMakademisk, ISSN 1890-9515, E-ISSN 1890-9515, Vol. 5, no 1, 49-67 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    User-centred design approaches within the field of furniture design for old people involves an act of embracing and balancing various end-user needs and assessing their relative importance for the product experience. It is often assumed that older people’s physiological needs dominate their other needs. In the present study, three focus group interviews were carried out with the exploratory purpose of gaining an understanding of how people feel and think about changes when moving to and living in an apartment in senior housing, outside the housing market, and what impact this has on their opinions of furniture and other interior products. Twelve people aged 59–93 took part. The outcomes of the focus group interviews point to demands on products that support the physical, psychological and social changes that relocation and aging may bring, and correspond to an independent and self-determinant identity. User requirements related to usability and affective product experience for the design of totally new or improved products are proposed. The paper discusses the complexity in the research assignment to communicate and bring end-user knowledge and experiences to life, and suggests that designers will benefit from carrying out or being involved in user-centred research.

  • 41. Jonsson, Oskar
    et al.
    Östlund, Britt
    Warell, Anders
    Dalholm Hornyánszky, Elisabeth
    What about furniture in Swedish Nursing Homes?: A Design Perspective on Perceived Meanings within the Physical Environment2014In: Journal of Interior Design, ISSN 1071-7641, Vol. 39, no 2, 17-35 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are good reasons to believe that furniture designers can play an important role in the design of appropriate caring environments and thus contribute to the care that is provided. Designers are usually engaged by manufacturers that develop furniture for public procurement and a market for elderly consumers but without being able to learn from those who spend their everyday lives in these environments. This paper is based on industrial design and presents a study that explores the relationships between people and furniture in nursing homes. Thematic interviews were carried out with residents and personnel, in total twenty-one participants. A go-along method was utilized in parts of the interviews with the residents. The empirical study was carried out in three nursing homes in Stockholm. The results prove that elderly people strive for a sense of home in their private rooms in contrast to shared rooms and that the perspectives on furniture differ between the elderly people and the personnel. The conclusion is that understanding the role of furniture at nursing homes can help to reinforce the identity of elderly residents and their needs of continuity and social and existential safety. The recommendations are to involve the experiences of elderly people in the design processes and to make more informed furniture investment decisions for nursing homes.

  • 42.
    Kazemian, Reza
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Design Interactivity and Communicative Quality Judgment versus Urban Design Competition: A Design Methodology Statement2009In: Nordisk Arkitekturforskning, ISSN 1102-5824, Vol. 2 - 3, 68-78 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study is targeted to analyze the essence of design, design methodology and the communicability of quality judgment process of urban design competitions. The aim is to provide a political argument which supports organizational and procedural reforms of the entire cycle of competition, from judgment to selection and implementation of a prize-winning architectural design. The study is searching to provide some principle definitions of the concepts of design competition as a design methodology and is keen to find out a new model of competing system which provides better interactivity and communication among wider sections of designers, jurors, clients and end-users. We need to know to what extents the design qualities and visions can be judged rectified and realized by relying on the solutions favoured and selected by few experts. What are the essential quality criteria that are being prioritized by jury members? What are the roles and positions of key players, especially the end users, in quality judgment processes? How are different needs, values, and visions being met after the implemented prize-awarded urban design projects? How can the processes of an urban design competition be reformed, new communication channels be created and a high standard of quality judgment and fairness of the system be maintained?

  • 43.
    Kazemian, Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Rönn, MagnusKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Arkitekturens kvalitetsfrågor: en antologi med uppsatser från en vidareutbildningskurs2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Kazemian, Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Rönn, MagnusKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Building the Future Conference: Nordic Journal of Architectural Research, Vol. 45, No. 4:20052005Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Kosmack Vaara, Elsa
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. SICS, Swedish ICT.
    Exploring the Aesthetics of Felt Time2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    By building a felt time repertoire, designers can sensitively feed a sense of time into their design work. And this in turn can help them produce an interaction gestalt that is richer, more sensual. My research on this suggests that this is not entirely easy, however. One has to develop a ‘feel’ for time. My research exploration began when I worked on designing a biofeedback data system, Affective Health, struggling with the tension and division between clocktime and the users’ unceasingly changing, ‘felt’ experiences. By turning to artistic practice, of music and culinary arts, I hoped to find keys to this question. Through connecting interaction-design research to these practices, I could start unfolding possibilities of temporal aesthetics in interaction design. I point to a space where designers can expand their understanding of felt time and playfully explore the sense of time that interactive systems and physical materials can deliver. Through the aspects below I point to the importance of being sensitive to felt forms and expressions of time to approach the temporal gestalt in interaction.

     

    • Through my research I have strived to move outside clocktime and re-imagine the sense of time that interactive systems deliver.

    • One part of this space is felt rhythms and how they shape temporal experiences.

    • In common to those rhythms are the rest and pause moments that form their vitality.

    • One way of working with rhythm is to see how felt shapes and rhythms of time resonate through the temporal gestalt in interaction.

    • Aesthetic sensitivity, felt timers, can help us to orient ourselves in time.

    • By approaching time as plastic: time as a form and shape that we can hold on to, squeeze and weave together, we can start finding tools for remoulding the sense of time in systems, artefacts and services.

    • Finally, I have worked with aesthetic transformations that can encourage people to start experiencing temporality from new perspectives and with a different approach.

  • 46.
    Lindborg, PerMagnus
    Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Editorial - Special Issue on Sound Art and Interactivity in Singapore: SI13 and More2014In: eContact!, Vol. 16, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The SI13 NTU/ADM Symposium on Sound and Interactivity in Singapore provided a meeting point for local researchers, artists, scholars and students working creatively with sound and interactivity, as well as the foundation for an issue exploring sound and interactivity in the Southeast Asian country.Figure 1. Snapshots from the SI13 exhibition, which could be visited throughout the symposium from 14–16 November 2013. [Click image to enlarge] The School of Art Design Media of Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University hosted the Symposium on Sound and Interactivity from 14–16 November 2013. A total of 15 artworks and 14 papers were selected by a review committee for presentation by 24 active participants during the three-day symposium. While all but four of the participants are residents of the island, they represent seventeen different countries, thus reflecting the cosmopolitan nature of Singapore in general and of sound artists and researchers in particular. 1[1. See the SI13 website for more information.]Thanks to funding from Nanyang’s CLASS conference scheme, Roger T. Dean (MARCS Institute, University of New South Wales, Australia) and Diemo Schwarz (IRCAM, France) could be invited as Keynote Speakers; they also performed in the concert that opened the symposium, and contributed to the exhibition.It is a pleasure to collaborate with eContact! in presenting a broad collection of articles emanating from this event, and to use these as a basis for an overview of sound art and related activities in Singapore. Eleven texts from the SI13 Proceedings have been edited for this issue. Joining them are two texts originally written for the catalogue of the “Sound: Latitudes and Attitudes” exhibition held at Singapore’s Institute of Contemporary Arts (7 February – 16 March 2014). Finally, in the guise of a “community report” on sound art activities in Singapore, I have contributed a “constructed multilogue” created from interviews with three sound art colleagues.

  • 47.
    Lindborg, PerMagnus
    Université de Paris IV Sorbonne.
    Le dialogue musicien-machine : Aspects des systèmes d'interactivité musicale2003Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [fr]

    Ce texte a comme sujet la confluence entre la création musicale et les sciences cognitives. Le but principal du travail a été de faire de la reconnaissance sur le terrain. Le présent texte est donc forcément incomplet, et ne servira que de point de départ pour une recherche substantielle.

    J’ai choisi comme thématique l’interactivité musicale, qui sera définie comme le dialogue musicien–machine. Je vais tenter d’approcher ce phénomène par multiples chemins, qui se superposent. Le thème restera au centre, et autour de lui, j’esquisserai sa relation avec plusieurs faits et phénomènes liés, en particulier : les langages naturels et formels, la question de l’interface à la création, l’intelligence artificielle, et les notions de mémoire et de sens. Ces approches mises ensemble constitueront l’étude des aspects des systèmes d’interactivité.

    Le vaste sujet de l’interactivité musicale est incrusté dans l’histoire de la musique d’ordinateur, une histoire qui date déjà d’un demi-siècle au moins. Par conséquent il sera nécessaire de cerner le cœur du sujet et de parcourir des cercles concentriques ou en spirale, pour gagner des connaissances qui nous permettent de comprendre mieux le phénomène. La procédure est un peu comme quand on observe une étoile avec l’œil nu : si on la regarde tout droit elle disparaît… La rétine est plus sensible à la lumière dans les côtés. Le texte est donc fatalement un collage consistant de plusieurs études d’envergure limitée. Malgré cela, il faut respecter les aspects importants propres au sujet, essayer d’esquiver le superflu et faire le plus possible de liens. La recherche est guidée par trois thématiques. Quelle est la matière, en d’autres termes, les composants et les processus qui constituent le système de proprement dit, utilisé dans la situation de performance musicale ? Deuxièmement, quelle est la relation entre recherche cognitive et outils technologiques à disposition ? Troisièmement, quelles implications est-ce que les technologies ont eues et auront d’autant plus à l’avenir sur la créativité musicale ?

    Depuis plusieurs années, les concepts qui sous-tiennent ce texte ont influencé mon travail de compositeur et performeur. J’ai fait des expériences en la matière au travers d’œuvres employant des dispositifs électroacoustiques de configuration variable : “Beda+” (1995), “Tusalava” (1999), “Leçons pour un apprenti sourd-muet” (1998-9), “gin/gub” (2000), “Manifest”[1] (2000), “Project Time”[2] (2001), “sxfxs” (2001), “Extra Quality” (2001-2), ”D!sturbances 350–500”[3]… Ces morceaux de musique sont nés d'une curiosité pour le fondement théorique de la cognition et le fonctionnement du cerveau humain. En particulier, je me suis consacré à analyser la situation de jeu dans laquelle a lieu un échange d’informations et d’initiatives musicales entre musicien et machine, qui agissent sur un degré équivalent de participation dans un système complexe. J’éprouve que cette situation ludique peut également servir d’outil de recherche ; elle est un peu comme un laboratoire, ou un banc d’essai, pour tester des hypothèses, qu’elles soient des propos limités à la musique, ou bien plus étendues, élargissant vers des terrains inhabituels.

    Étant compositeur, j’ai essayé de rendre l’étude ni trop limitée, ni strictement descriptive. J’ai ressenti le besoin d’analyser des travaux contemporains, ayant des composants scientifiques : les trois projets étudiés sont effectivement en cours de développement. Il s’agissait dans cette étude de capter plutôt leur raison d’être que de montrer leurs formes respectives dans un état finalisé, qui de toute façon n’est pas leur destin. Si la musicologie se contentait de démontrer des structures dans des œuvres de répertoire connues depuis longtemps, ou si elle s’enfermait dans un académisme technocrate développant des modèles n’expliquant que des choses qui sont évidentes pour les musiciens, alors elle souffrirait d’anémie. En proposant une hypothèse, elle doit comporter des aspects prédictifs. Ce serait encore mieux si des modèles développés en support à l’hypothèse étaient facilement accessibles et pouvaient servir au développement de nouveaux outils innovants. Cela est souhaitable, non seulement pour stimuler la production créative, mais également pour aider à mieux comprendre le fonctionnement de la créativité lui-même.

    L’activité musicale, au sens général, pour ceux qui la produisent autant que pour ceux qui l’apprécient, est un exercice essentiellement non-verbal dont le but est l’émergence d'une compréhension de la créativité humaine d’un ordre autre que verbal ou écrit. En étudiant la créativité, et surtout sa formalisation, ne risquerait-on pas de la dénaturer ? Peut-être la créativité ne risque-t-elle pas de s’effondrer dans la recherche ? Que restera-t-il de la création musicale le jour où une machine aura composé une œuvre capable d’émouvoir les auditeurs ignorant tout de son mode de fabrication ? Néanmoins, en suivant l’appel de William Faulkner, “kill your darlings”, espérons transcender la créativité telle qu’on la connaît et aller vers des pays musicaux inouïs.

  • 48.
    Lindborg, PerMagnus
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics. Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Psychoacoustic, physical, and perceptual features of restaurants: A field survey in Singapore2015In: Applied Acoustics, ISSN 0003-682X, E-ISSN 1872-910X, Vol. 92, 47-60 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sound is a multi-faceted phenomenon and a critical modality in all kinds of sevicescapes. At restaurants, our senses are intensively stimulated. They are social places that depend on acoustic design for their success. Considering the large economic interests, surprisingly little empirical research on the psychoacoustics of restaurants is available. Contributing to theory building, this article proposes a typology of designed and non-designed sonic elements in restaurants. Results from a survey of 112 restaurants in Singapore are presented, with a focus on one element of the typology, namely interior design materials. The collected data included on-site sound level, audio recordings from which psychoacoustic descriptors such as Loudness and Sharpness were calculated, perceptual ratings using the Swedish Soundscape Quality protocol, and annotations of physical features such as Occupancy. We have introduced a measure, Priciness, to compare menu cost levels between the surveyed restaurants. Correlation analysis revealed several patterns: for example, that Priciness was negatively correlated with Loudness. Analysis of annotations of interior design materials supported a classification of the restaurants in categories of Design Style and Food Style. These were investigated with MANOVA, revealing significant differences in psychoacoustic, physical, and perceptual features between categories among the surveyed restaurants: for example, that restaurants serving Chinese food had the highest prevalence of stone materials, and that Western-menu places were the least loud. Some implications for managers, acoustic designers, and researchers are discussed. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 49.
    Lindborg, PerMagnus
    Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Sound Art Singapore: Conversation with Pete Kellock, Zul Mahmod and Mark Wong2014In: eContact!, Vol. 16, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a “constructed multilogue” oriented around a set of questions about sound art in Singapore. I have lived here since 2007 and felt that a “community report” should aim to probe recent history deeper than what I could possibly do on my own, in order to give a rich perspective of what is happening here today. I was very happy when Pete Kellock, Zul Mahmod and Mark Wong agreed to be interviewed. Each has a long-time involvement in the Singapore sound scene, in a different capacity. Pete is an electroacoustic music composer who has worked in research and entrepreneurship, and is a founder of muvee technologies. Zul is a multimedia artist and performer who has developed a rich personal expression, mixing sonic electronics, sculpture and robotics in playful ways. Mark is a writer and sound artist who has followed Singapore’s experimental scenes closely since the 1990s.

    I sent the three of them a letter containing a range of observations I had made (which may or may not be entirely accurate) and questions (admittedly thorny and intended to provoke), including the following:

    The geographical location and Singapore’s historic reason-to-be as a trading post has instilled a sense of ephemerality — people come and go, ideas and traditions too — as well as a need to develop contacts with the exterior. The arts scene in general seems to be largely a reflection of whatever the current trading priorities demand. In what way does the current local sound art reflect the larger forces within Singaporean society? Since art is mostly orally traded, how are its traditions nurtured and developed?

    Around 2010, the Government seems to have indicated a new task for cultural workers, including sound artists and musicians: to define — create or discover, stitch-up or steal — a “Singapore identity”. The Singapore Art Festival shut down two years while the think tanks were brewing. Will this funnel taxpayer money and (more importantly) peoples’ attention towards folkloristic or museal music, rather than to radical and/or intellectual sound art? At the same time, there is considerable commercial pressure to subsume music / sound listening into an experiential, multimodal, game-like and socially mediated lifestyle product. Are commercialization and identity-seeking two sides of the same coin — one side inflation-prone, and the other a possible counterfeit? Is there room for a “pure listening experience”, for example to electroacoustic music? Or is the future of sound art ineluctably intertwined with sculptural and visual elements?

    Different kinds of creative people involved in sound art are entrepreneurs, programmers, academics, educators, curators and journalists. Which institutions nurture talent and bring audiences to meet new experiences? Where are the hothouses for developing ideas, craft, artistry, innovation and business?

    The interviews, loosely structured around these themes, were made in January and February 2014. Our conversations often took unexpected turns (mostly for the better). I diligently transcribed the recordings, and each interviewee made corrections and additions, before we gently nudged spoken language a little closer to prose. I then brought out a pair of big scissors and a large pot of coffee, and made a cut-out collage, weaving the texts into the multilogue that follows. The idea has been to create an illusion of four people conversing with each other under the same roof. Deceit or not, at the very least, we all live and work on the same small island, somewhere in the deep southeast. I hope you will enjoy reading Sound Art Singapore.

  • 50.
    Lowden, Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University .
    Favero, Federico
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lightning Design. KTH MID.
    Ljus och hälsa: En kunskapssammanställning med fokus på dagsljusets betydelse i inomhusmiljö2017Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report reports the published evidence in scientific papers with a focus on Nordic research, but also includes relevant technical reports and books. The results are mainly presented for the non-visual effects of daylight.

    The report indicates that more attention should be paid to the health-promoting effects that natural daylight provides in the living environment. Building design is the most important determining factor for natural daylight exposure in times when the general trend is for reduced time spent outdoors. It is especially important to consider good lighting at schools and in health care facilities.

    Light is crucial for the regulation of circadian rhythms, sleeping and waking cycles, the regulation of mood, and the activation of stress responses. 

    including access to daylight, windows, and views, becomes crucial. Good access to natural daylight in the environment facilitates the regulation of circadian rhythms and improves sleep, and daylight entering through windows promotes orientation in the room, reduces falls, and prevents depressive symptoms.

    There is a linear relation between time spent outdoors and good health, and the more natural daylight that is obtained, the fewer the health complaints that are reported. In an environment devoid of daylight, sensitivity to other evening light sources such as computer screens and tablets increases, and this affects sleep and circadian rhythms negatively.

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