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  • 1.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Kazemian, RezaKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.Rönn, MagnusKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Nordic Journal of Architectural Research: Nordisk arkitekturforskning2009Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Kazemian, Reza
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Rönn, Magnus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    The Architectural Competition (Editors' Notes): Introduction2011In: The Architectural Competition: Research Inquiries and Experiences / [ed] Magnus Rönn, Reza Kazemian, Jonas Andersson, Stockholm: Axl Books, 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersson López, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Svenns, Thelma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sensitiv – Designing a Sonic Co-play Tool for Interactive Dance2021In: Proceedings International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression  2021, PubPub , 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study a musician and a dancer explore the co-play between themthrough sensory technology. The main questions concern the placement andprocessing of motion sensors, and the choice of sound parameters that a dancer canmanipulate. Results indicate that sound parameters of delay and pitch altered dancers’experience most positively and that placement of sensors on each wrist and ankle witha diagonal mapping of the sound parameters was the most suitable.

  • 4.
    Angelaki, Stavroula
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lighting Design.
    Triantafyllidis, Georgios A.
    Lighting Design Lab, Aalborg University, 2450 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Light as a Form of Visual Language Supporting Daily Schedules in Educational Spaces: A Design Framework2024In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 1385-1385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how lighting can be employed as a visual language to enhance communication between the space and its users and develop a design framework for educational spaces. A primary school is used as a case study to apply the proposed design framework. The study focuses on lighting interventions in existing educational spaces to support daily schedules and transitions between activities. In this context, electric light is used as an indicator, highlighting the daily schedule and activities in the space. A theoretical approach is used as a foundation for establishing the design framework that leads to lighting proposals based on the specific spatial characteristics of each study. The outcome is a design solution based on the dominant spatial elements that define the space’s identity and function. The study focuses on educational spaces and lighting for peripheral vision while considering pupils’ visual and spatial development. The proposal has the role of an additional light layer that signals transitions in terms of activities or spatial mobility.

  • 5.
    Angelaki, Stavroula
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lighting Design.
    Triantafyllidis, Georgios A.
    Besenecker, Ute
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lighting Design.
    Lighting in Kindergartens: Towards Innovative Design Concepts for Lighting Design in Kindergartens Based on Children’s Perception of Space2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 2302-2302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Light is the foundation of the visual perceptual process that initiates the evaluation of the surrounding area. Linked to various aspects and rhythms of the body, light connects us to both the natural environment and the interior space. The process of perceiving and assessing space for children and adults with different viewing heights and viewing perspectives as well as the role of light to facilitate this are the key elements of this study. The paper describes general lighting design strategies for kindergartens, specifically developed to create an environment that takes into account the children’s scale and cognitive processes. The objective was to discuss environments that support the child’s spatial perception along with shape and object recognition by means of lighting design, for example by creating distinct, well-placed shadows. The proposed strategies are informed by a literature review on the concepts and interrelations of light, human physiology and the perception of scale and space. In addition, our process also included visits to kindergartens to observe and analyse existing lighting as well as the use of simulation programs to test lighting scenarios and their patterns/distribution of light and shadow. The outcome described in this paper is a proposal and strategy to take into account children’s vantage points when designing lighting in kindergartens that is still open to practical interpretations in real-world sites.

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  • 6.
    Aquili, Tommaso
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    The Austerical City.: London at the crush test of austerity2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the UK, the unprecedented cuts to local budgets, implemented by the national governments from 2010 to the present day, have pushed local authorities to reconsider their scope, their role and their action. The ever decreasing budgets have de facto transformed local councils from service providers to territorial entrepreneurs, as the pressing pursuit of revenues has placed the economic profit at the core of the local policy-making. Urban planning plays a central role in this shift in mindset. The British planning system has been remodelled so to facilitate the implementation of development processes, as these grant revenues from planning obligations, uplifts in land values and higher income from taxes. The reform of the planning system has however conceded free rein to developers, especially through the introduction of the Development Viability Appraisal, a document which they use to reduce the provision of affordable housing, in favour of luxury housing tenures. Therefore, in London the mechanisms that rule the territorial transformations exacerbate the existing housing crisis and force local communities to face displacement. Austerity has thus initiated a cascade-effect whose negative externalities are tangible at the very local level. The emerged topics find their concretization in the description of the Heygate Estate regeneration.

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  • 7.
    Aronson, Eran
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Sketches of shadows and light2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A master thesis about visuaualization techniques in the lighting design process.

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  • 8.
    Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ramberg, R.
    Sundholm, H.
    Cerratto-Pargman, T.
    Action context and target context representations: A case study on collaborative design learning2017In: Computer Supported Collaborative Learning 2005: The Next 10 Years!, Taylor and Francis , 2017, p. 1-7Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the concept of representations produced in the context of collaborative design. More specifically, on the interplay between collaborative creation of sketches (design proposals), and argumentation and negotiation processes taking place in the design activity. The question raised in this paper is how sketches produced during a design session reflect and mediate dialogues and argumentation in the design activity and how the sketches feed into an envisioned use context or vice versa. The concepts of action contextand target context representations are introduced and used to illustrate shifts of focus during a design session. We have studied a group of students working on a design task in an interactive space for two weeks. The purpose of the study was to investigate how an environment meant to support collaborative work and learning support collaborative and creative learning of interaction design. The results indicate that students attending a course on interaction design did not pay enough attention to target representations. Furthermore the results suggest that "action context representations" to a large extent occupy student activities as a result of either complex technology or as a result of the students thrust to do something instrumental. We suggest that pedagogical programs for collaborative learning of design may relieve some of the mapping, or interplay, of design proposals and the target context representation. 

  • 9.
    Backlund, Sara
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Gyllensvärd, M.
    Gustafsson, A.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    SVID (Swedish Industrial Design Foundation).
    Mazé, Ramia
    Interactive Institute.
    Redström, Johan
    Center for Design Research, Royal Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Static!: The aesthetics of energy in everyday life2006In: WonderGround 2006 / [ed] Ken Friedman, Terence Love, Eduardo Côrte-Real, Chris Rust, Lisbon: CEIADE – Centro Editorial do IADE , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Balaam, Madeline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Campo Woytuk, Nadia
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ciolfi Felice, Marianela
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kilic Afsar, Ozgun
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Stål, Anna
    Søndergaard, Marie Louise Juul
    Intimate Touch2020In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 14-17Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Balaam, Madeline
    et al.
    Open Lab Newcastle University, UK.
    Hansen, Lone Koefoed
    Aarhus University.
    D’Ignazio, Catherine
    Emerson College.
    Simpson, Emma
    Newcastle university.
    Almeida, Teresa
    Open Lab Newcastle University, UK.
    Kuznetsov, Stacey
    Arizona State University.
    Catt, Mike
    Newcastle University.
    Juul Sondergaard, Marie Louise
    Dept of Digital Design and Information Studies, Aarhus University.
    Hacking Women’s Health2017In: CHI EA '17 Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Denver, Colorado, USA — May 06 - 11, 2017, ACM , 2017, p. 476-483Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this two-day workshop is to bring together a nascent community of researchers to share research, ideas, methods and tools that can encourage, inspire and strengthen those of us working on digital women's health. Our workshop aims to take a pro-active stance, offering participants the opportunity to critique, design and hack existing and new women's digital health experiences. Or, in other words, to get their hands dirty. Through our hack-led event we aim to face headon issues related to digital women's health, such as taboo, power and prejudice. This workshop will address current gaps in research and practice by enabling us to develop the confidence, networks and strategies that can facilitate researchers/designers/technologists to work within this space.

  • 12.
    Battisti, Chiara
    et al.
    Università degli Studi di Verona.
    Dahlberg, LeifKTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Law, Fashion and Identities2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Bell, Fiona
    et al.
    Department of Computer Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA.
    Wu, Shanel
    School of Information Technology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Campo Woytuk, Nadia
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Vasquez, Eldy S.Lazaro
    ATLAS Institute, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA.
    Alistar, Mirela
    ATLAS Institute and Computer Science, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA.
    Buechley, Leah
    Department of Computer Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA.
    Making Biomaterials for Sustainable Tangible Interfaces2024In: TEI 2024 - Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2024, article id 55Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this studio, we will explore sustainable tangible interfaces by making a range of biomaterials that are bio-based and readily biodegradable. Building off of previous TEI studios that were centered around one specific biomaterial (i.e., bioplastics at TEI'22 and microbial cellulose at TEI'23), this studio will provide participants the ability to experience a wide variety of biomaterials from algae-based bioplastics, to food-waste-based bioclays, to gelatin-based biofoams. We will teach participants how to identify types of biomaterials that are applicable to their own research and how to make them. Through hands-on activities, we will demonstrate how to implement biomaterials in the design of sustainable tangible interfaces and discuss topics sensitized by biological media such as more-than-human temporalities, bioethics, care, and unmaking. Ultimately, our goal is to facilitate a space in which HCI researchers and designers can collaborate, create, and discuss the opportunities and challenges of working with sustainable biomaterials.

  • 14.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Compose or decompose - Resource allocation in engineering design projects2013In: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013, 2013, p. 362-367Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a paper that reviews the planning, execution and reflection of the collaborative writing efforts made by students when composing their final design project reports. Past research has indicated collaborative writing (CW) as one of the most challenging task that could be assigned to student groups [1]. CW is a process that involves project management, including resource allocation and essentially a great portion of writing skill. Whereas numerous engineering design projects highlight the uniqueness and creative aspects brought forward and the process in which this was created - the final piece of the puzzle how the final report was established is a phenomenon that get dimmed. There is dualistic propagation of parallel processes where the 'artifact' constitutes the main design work and where the efforts made to produce a written report relates to the other. A tradition that maybe is obsolete in some places but that has a life of its' own in other domains. The more administrative work involved with compiling a report of 'good enough' character whilst motivating and supporting each other should be balanced against the activities involved in producing the final output/design/prototype. This study is based on interviews and written 'pros and cons' reflections with project participants, project documentation and lecturer's reflections. Early indications show that communication and iterative work processes, allowing cross-checking, validation and confirmation is crucial for engaging greater commitment to the collaborative writing process. Independently of project management style and delegations made; labour intensity and work distribution of activities seem to propagate a skew execution of work. This is especially noticeable when administrative functions are weak amongst project members, which can be a consequence when putting students from various programs/disciplines/schools in a joint exercise of this type. Based on the findings, the paper stipulates a set of preventive coaching tips to guideline collaborative writing efforts and endorsing increased rigor to the final report and its process. Establishing this set of awareness among students would ultimately minimize uncertainties and dilemmas prior to 'entering the boat' - when the ship has sailed so has also its crew and based on how well they master to serve and execute their skills - so will also the trip be remembered - pleasant or horrific - taking them to paradise or hell.

  • 15.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Leifer, L.
    Beyond design thinking - Whose perspective is driving the people-Centric approach to change?2017In: Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Building Community: Design Education for a Sustainable Future, E and PDE 2017, Institution of Engineering Designers, The Design Society , 2017, p. 613-618Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research paper attempts to position fundamental principles of design thinking within a framework of problem-solving theory. The roles that are assumed in a co-creation community, team or workplace, are influenced by a champion who arises and systematically anchors alternatives and ideas once proposals are about to be realised. By embracing diversity, design thinking introduces interdisciplinary challenges that can lead to radical change and break-through innovation. This paper attempts to trace design thinking back to its foundational concern with the design of novel products, services, and business models. Regarding design thinking as a problem-focused (rather than solution-fixated) ethos, mindset or disposition, instead of merely a practitioners’ tool, we believe that this perspective is needed to deepen our understanding of design thinking. Hence, this paper provides a literature review at some depth, guided by a purpose-driven question: How do individual roles in an organisation become utilized throughout the anchoring and implementation of design thinking among stakeholders?.

  • 16.
    Besenecker, U. C.
    et al.
    RPI.
    Bullough, J. D.
    Investigating visual mechanisms underlying scene brightness2017In: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 16-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Short-wavelength (<500 nm) output of light sources enhances scene brightness perception in the low-to-moderate photopic range. This appears to be partially explained by a contribution from short-wavelength cones. Recent evidence from experiments on humans suggests that intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) containing the photopigment melanopsin might also contribute to spectral sensitivity for scene brightness perception. An experiment was conducted to investigate this possibility at two different light levels, near 10 lx and near 100 lx. Subjects provided forced-choice brightness judgments and relative brightness magnitude judgments when comparing two different amber-coloured stimuli with similar chromaticities. A provisional brightness metric including an ipRGC contribution was able to predict the data with substantially smaller errors than a metric based on cone input only.

  • 17.
    Besenecker, U. C.
    et al.
    RPI.
    Bullough, J. D.
    Radetsky, L. C.
    Spectral sensitivity and scene brightness at low to moderate photopic light levels2016In: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 676-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study of scene brightness perception was conducted to assess whether spectral sensitivity for scene brightness perception at low to moderate light levels (∼3-110 lux) could be partially explained by a contribution of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC). An experiment was conducted at two different light level ranges and using two different spectral power distributions. The results suggest an increase in short-wavelength spectral sensitivity as a function of increasing light level. The results also confirm that including ipRGC as well as cone photoreceptor input in scene brightness spectral sensitivity resulted in improved predictions compared to including either cone input only or rod as well as cone input.

  • 18.
    Besenecker, Ute Christa
    et al.
    RPI.
    Krueger, Ted
    Luminous color in architecture: Exploring methodologies for design-relevant research2015In: Enquiry The ARCC Journal for Architectural Research, ISSN 2329-9339, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes our process in conducting research toward better understanding of the experience and perception of luminous colors in architectural contexts. Our intention is to contribute to a body of knowledge useful for designers by introducing a designerly way of working into an otherwise academic research approach. Luminous color influences our perception of form, space, and ambiance. The use of such color in architectural design has increased significantly over the past two decades, and with the advent of light-emitting diodes (LEDs), this trend is rapidly accelerating. However, LEDs produce luminous color in a different manner than traditional lighting systems. Identical-appearing colors can have different spectral compositions. Current work in health and perception sciences demonstrates that these different spectra can have distinct physiological and neurological effects.

    Current studies in different academic research fields into luminous color cannot be translated easily into a format relevant to architectural design. We therefore look to ways of studying the phenomenon using hybrid methods that would be consistent with design disciplines and goals. Efforts include structured experimental studies at a large scale to enable participants to experience different vantage points, peripheral perceptions, and free locomotion.

    The objective is to listen to the phenomenon and let it guide the research. We are following a process and developing research methods that are at a scale and in contexts appropriate to architectural applications. Although we borrow qualitative and quantitative methods from other disciplines for our individual studies, the overall goal is to remain fluid and open, to go beyond such established methods, structuring the endeavor as much as possible as a design process. Our approach is less structured than laboratory research, but targeted to be more ecologically and architecturally valid.

  • 19.
    Besenecker, Ute
    et al.
    RPI.
    Krueger, Ted
    Pearson, Zachary
    Bullough, John D.
    Gerlach, Robert
    The experience of equivalent luminous colors at architectural scale2018In: Cultura e Scienza del Colore - Color Culture and Science, ISSN 2384-9568, Vol. 10, no 0, p. 13-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Luminous color used in architectural settings impacts our perception of space and ambiance. With light emitting diode, solid state lighting technology the possibilities of customizing light spectra are manifold, and colored light can be mixed and matched using a variety of different spectral compositions. We conducted several experiments at architectural scale to explore whether stimuli closely matched for chromaticity and light level would produce recognizable differences in visual and visceral qualities.Study 1 used qualitative research methods; during the experiment, participants were free to walk from one illuminated space to another to compare conditions close-up and from afar. Study 2 used quantitative research methods; participants were situated in a fixed viewing location and responded to a questionnaire that was designed based on the responses from Study 1. In Study 3 blood pressure was measured in response to all of the lighting conditions.Overall, the results showed that subjects perceived differences in the visual qualities of the conditions. The results also showed significant differences in affective qualities and physiological responses between some of the conditions.

  • 20.
    Björndal, Petra
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. ABB Corporate Research.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Artman, Henrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    From transactions to relationships: Making sense of user-centered perspectives in large technology-intensive companies2015In: 4th IFIP 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2015, Springer-Verlag New York, 2015, p. 114-124Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we analyze interviews from four technology-intensive companies, focused on service and service development. All companies have during the last two decades introduced interaction design units, and the corporations were selected due to their interest in also expanding the service share of their business. This service shift has been a top-down initiative. However in only two companies, the initiatives have led to the establishment of enterprise wide service development processes, and in the other two companies, the service development is more ad hoc. It is argued that even if interaction design has close theoretical relation to service design such combination has so far been limited. We discuss the shift from product to service view of the offerings within these companies, and relate this to user-centered perspectives. We argue there is a window of opportunity within technology-intensive and engineering focused industries to include user-centered design when formalizing service development.

  • 21.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    The office architecture: A contextual experience with influences at the individual and group level2019In: Context: The Effects of Environment on Product Design and Evaluation, Elsevier BV , 2019, p. 431-455Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book chapter focuses on office experience design from both the individual employee and the group and organizational perspective, since the experience of the office and its influence operate simultaneously at these levels. The presented review shows that the experience of office architecture, similar to other architectural experiences, is a holistic experience created by the combined effect of the physical characteristics of the environment and the functional feature of office work. As such, the office experience is a contextual experience, which, in this book chapter, is approached through an investigation of the role of different dimensions in the workplace design and their importance for employees’ environmental satisfaction. This is done by a presentation of three separate studies that from various perspectives investigate employees’ satisfaction with design-related factors in different office designs. Although the studies have partly different dimensions in focus, they all indicate that personal control is a key factor for high employee satisfaction and that different factors can enable this using different means. Recognizing this, the author believes there is a need for a holistic office design that identifies the different needs related to office work that is founded in the contextual experience of the office.

  • 22.
    Bouchouireb, Hamza
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics.
    Advancing the life cycle energy optimisation methodology2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Life Cycle Energy Optimisation (LCEO) methodology aims at finding a design solution that uses a minimum amount of cumulative energy demand over the different phases of the vehicle's life cycle, while complying with a set of functional constraints. This effectively balances trade-offs, and therewith avoids sub-optimal shifting between the energy demand for the cradle-to-production of materials, operation of the vehicle, and end-of-life phases. This work further develops the LCEO methodology and expands its scope through three main methodological contributions which, for illustrative purposes, were applied to a vehicle sub-system design case study.

    An End-Of-Life (EOL) model, based on the substitution with a correction factor method, is included to estimate the energy credits and burdens that originate from EOL vehicle processing. Multiple recycling scenarios with different levels of assumed induced recyclate material property degradation were built, and their impact on the LCEO methodology's outcomes was compared to that of scenarios based on landfilling and incineration with energy recovery. The results show that the inclusion of EOL modelling in the LCEO methodology can alter material use patterns and significantly effect the life cycle energy of the optimal designs.

    Furthermore, the previous model is expanded to enable holistic vehicle product system design with the LCEO methodology. The constrained optimisation of a vehicle sub-system, and the design of a subset of the processes which are applied to it during its life cycle, are simultaneously optimised for a minimal product system life cycle energy. In particular, a subset of the EOL processes' parameters are considered as continuous design variables with associated barrier functions that control their feasibility. The results show that the LCEO methodology can be used to find an optimal design along with its associated ideal synthetic EOL scenario. Moreover, the ability of the method to identify the underlying mechanisms enabling the optimal solution's trade-offs is further demonstrated.

    Finally, the functional scope of the methodology is expanded through the inclusion of shape-related variables and aerodynamic drag estimations. Here, vehicle curvature is taken into account in the LCEO methodology through its impact on the aerodynamic drag and therewith its related operational energy demand. In turn, aerodynamic drag is considered through the estimation of the drag coefficient of a vehicle body shape using computational fluid dynamics simulations. The aforementioned coefficient is further used to estimate the energy required by the vehicle to overcome aerodynamic drag. The results demonstrate the ability of the LCEO methodology to capitalise on the underlying functional alignment of the structural and aerodynamic requirements, as well as the need for an allocation strategy for the aerodynamic drag energy within the context of vehicle sub-system redesign.

    Overall, these methodological developments contributed to the exploration of the ability of the LCEO methodology to handle life cycle and functional trade-offs to achieve life cycle energy optimal vehicle designs.

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    bouchouireb2019thesis
  • 23.
    Bouchouireb, Hamza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Jank, Merle-Hendrikje
    RWTH Aachen University, Laboratory for Machine Tools and Production Engineering (WZL), Germany.
    O'Reilly, Ciarán J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Göransson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Schöggl, Josef-Peter
    University of Graz, Institute of Systems Sciences Innovation & Sustainability Research, Austria.
    Baumgartner, Rupert J.
    University of Graz, Institute of Systems Sciences Innovation & Sustainability Research, Austria.
    Potting, José
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    The inclusion of End-Of-Life modelling in the Life Cycle Energy Optimisation methodologyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, an End-Of-Life (EOL) model is included in the Life Cycle Energy Optimisation (LCEO) methodology to account for the energy burdens and credits stemming from a vehicle’s EOL processing phase and balance them against the vehicle’s functional requirements and production and use phase energies. The substitution with a correction factor allocation method is used to model the contribution of recycling to the EOL phase’s energy. The methodology is illustrated through the optimisation of the design of a simplified vehicle sub-system. For the latter, multiple recycling scenarios with varying levels of assumed recycling induced material property degradation were built, and their impact on the vehicle sub-system’s optimal solutions was compared to that of scenarios based on landfilling and incineration with energy recovery. The results show that the inclusion of EOL modelling in the LCEO methodology can significantly alter material use patterns thereby effecting the life cycle energy of the optimal designs. Indeed, the vehicle sub-system’s optimal designs associated with the recycling scenarios are on average substantially heavier, and less life cycle energy demanding, than their landfilling or incineration with energy recovery-related counterparts.

  • 24.
    Bouchouireb, Hamza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    O'Reilly, Ciarán J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Göransson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Schöggl, Josef-Peter
    University of Graz, Institute of Systems Sciences Innovation & Sustainability Research, Austria.
    Baumgartner, Rupert J.
    University of Graz, Institute of Systems Sciences Innovation & Sustainability Research, Austria.
    Potting, José
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    The inclusion of vehicle shape and aerodynamic drag estimations within the life cycle energy optimisation methodology2019In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 84, p. 902-907Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work describes a widening of the scope of the Life Cycle Energy Optimisation (LCEO) methodology with the addition of shape-related design variables. They describe the curvature of a vehicle which impacts its aerodynamic drag and therewith its operational energy demand. Aerodynamic drag is taken into account through the estimation of the drag coefficient of the vehicle body shape using computational fluid dynamics simulations. Subsequently, the aforementioned coefficient is used to calculate the operational energy demand associated with the vehicle. The methodology is applied to the design of the roof of a simplified 2D vehicle model which is both mechanically and geometrically constrained. The roof is modelled as a sandwich structure with its design variables consisting of the material compositions of the different layers, their thicknesses as well as the shape variables. The efficacy of the LCEO methodology is displayed through its ability to deal with the arising functional conflicts while simultaneously leveraging the design benefits of the underlying functional alignments. On average, the optimisation process resulted in 2.5 times lighter and 4.5 times less life cycle energy-intensive free shape designs. This redesign process has also underlined the necessity of defining an allocation strategy for the energy necessary to overcome drag within the context of vehicle sub-system redesign.

  • 25.
    Bouchouireb, Hamza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    O'Reilly, Ciarán J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Göransson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Schöggl, Josef-Peter
    University of Graz, Institute of Systems Sciences Innovation & Sustainability Research, Austria.
    Baumgartner, Rupert J.
    University of Graz, Institute of Systems Sciences Innovation & Sustainability Research, Austria.
    Potting, José
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Towards holistic energy-efficient vehicle product system design: The case for a penalized continuous end-of-life model in the life cycle energy optimisation methodology2019In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ISSN 2220-4334, E-ISSN 2220-4342, Vol. 1, p. 2901-2910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Life Cycle Energy Optimisation (LCEO) methodology aims at finding a design solution that uses a minimum amount of cumulative energy demand over the different phases of the vehicle's life cycle, while complying with a set of functional constraints. This effectively balances trade-offs, and therewith avoids sub-optimal shifting between the energy demand for the cradle-to-production of materials, operation of the vehicle, and end-of-life phases. The present work describes the extension of the LCEO methodology to perform holistic product system optimisation. The constrained design of an automotive component and the design of a subset of the processes which are applied to it during its life cycle are simultaneously optimised to achieve a minimal product system life cycle energy. A subset of the processes of the end-of-life phase of a vehicle’s roof are modelled through a continuous formulation. The roof is modelled as a sandwich structure with its design variables being the material compositions and the thicknesses of the different layers. The results show the applicability of the LCEO methodology to product system design and the use of penalisation to ensure solution feasibility.

  • 26.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Karjalainen, Matti
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Mäki-Patola, Teemu
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Kanerva, Aki
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Huovilainen, Antti
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Jordá, Sergi
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Kaltenbrunner, Martin
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Geiger, Günter
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Bencina, Ross
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    de Götzen, Amalia
    University of Padua.
    Rocchesso, Davide
    IUAV University of Venice.
    Controlling sound production2008In: Sound to Sense, Sense to Sound: A state of the art in Sound and Music Computing / [ed] Polotti, Pietro; Rocchesso, Davide, Berlin: Logos Verlag , 2008, p. 447-486Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hermann, ThomasBielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany.Hunt, AndyUniversity of York, York, UK.
    Proceedings of ISon 2010 - Interactive Sonification Workshop: Human Interaction with Auditory Displays2010Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    These are the proceedings of the ISon 2010 meeting, which is the 3rd international Interactive Sonification Workshop. The first ISon workshop was held in Bielefeld (Germany) in 2004, and a second one was held in York (UK) in 2007.These meetings:

    • focus on the link between auditory displays and human‐computer interaction
    • bring together experts in sonification to exchange ideas and work‐in‐progress
    • strengthen networking in sonification research

    High quality work is assured by a peer‐reviewing process, and the successful papers were presented at the conference and are published here.

    ISon 2010 was supported by COST IC0601 Action on Sonic Interaction Design (SID) (http://www.cost‐sid.org/).

     

    About Interactive Sonification

    Sonification & Auditory Displays are increasingly becoming an established technology for exploring data, monitoring complex processes, or assisting exploration and navigation of data spaces. Sonification addresses the auditory sense by transforming data into sound, allowing the human user to get valuable information from data by using their natural listening skills.

    The main differences of sound displays over visual displays are that sound can:

    • Represent frequency responses in an instant (as timbral characteristics)
    • Represent changes over time, naturally
    • Allow microstructure to be perceived
    • Rapidly portray large amounts of data
    • Alert listener to events outside the current visual focus
    • Holistically bring together many channels of information

    Auditory displays typically evolve over time since sound is inherently a temporal phenomenon. Interaction thus becomes an integral part of the process in order to select, manipulate, excite or control the display, and this has implications for the interface between humans and computers. In recent years it has become clear that there is an important need for research to address the interaction with auditory displays more explicitly. Interactive Sonification is the specialized research topic concerned with the use of sound to portray data, but where there is a human being at the heart of an interactive control loop. Specifically it deals with:

    • interfaces between humans and auditory displays
    • mapping strategies and models for creating coherency between action and reaction (e.g. acoustic feedback, but also combined with haptic or visual feedback)
    • perceptual aspects of the display (how to relate actions and sound, e.g. cross‐modal effects, importance of synchronisation)
    • applications of Interactive Sonification
    • evaluation of performance, usability and multi‐modal interactive systems including auditory feedback

    Although ISon shines a spotlight on the particular situations where there is real‐time interaction with sonification systems, the usual community for exploring all aspects of auditory display is ICAD (http://www.icad.org/).

     

    Contents

    These proceedings contain the conference versions of all contributions to the 3rd International interactive Sonification Workshop. Where papers have audio or audiovisual examples, these are listed in the paper and will help to illustrate the multimedia content more clearly.

    We very much hope that the proceedings provide an inspiration for your work and extend your perspective on the new emerging research field of interactive sonification.

    Roberto Bresin, Thomas Hermann, Andy Hunt, ISon 2010 Organisers

  • 28. Bullough, J. D.
    et al.
    Besenecker, Ute
    RPI.
    Snyder, J. D.
    Skinner, N. P.
    Work zone lighting and visual performance: Analysis and Demonstration2013In: Transportation Research Record, ISSN 0361-1981, E-ISSN 2169-4052, no 2337, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In part because of the potential for high levels of glare from work zone illumination, recommendations for light levels from work zone illumination systems are substantially higher than for levels used along roadways in non-work zone locations. In a two-part study, requirements for work zone illumination light levels were assessed. First, levels for workers varying in age from 20 to 60 years were evaluated with the relative visual performance model, with and without the presence of visibility-reducing glare. Except for the smallest, lowest-contrast tasks performed by the older workers, an illuminance of 10 lx resulted in visibility well above the threshold even in the presence of glare, and an illuminance of 30 lx resulted in suprathreshold visibility for these conditions as well. The results of these computational analyses were largely confirmed in a full-scale, outdoor field demonstration attended by transportation agency engineers and highway contractors. Together, the findings suggest that when lighting systems provide sufficient glare control, light levels do not always need to be especially high to ensure adequate visibility for workers.

  • 29. Bullough, J. D.
    et al.
    Radetsky, L. C.
    Besenecker, U. C.
    RPI.
    Rea, M. S.
    Influence of spectral power distribution on scene brightness at different light levels2014In: LEUKOS The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, ISSN 1550-2724, E-ISSN 1550-2716, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 3-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exterior lighting has multiple objectives. Brightness perception is a relevant parameter for outdoor lighting because it is correlated with perceptions of safety and security. Understanding the influence of the spectral characteristics of lighting to scene brightness perception is important in order to devise exterior lighting specifications that support perceptions of safety and security in exterior lighted environments, as well as to optimize light source technologies to account for these factors. A study of scene brightness perception under different light levels and spectral power distributions was conducted to assess whether scene brightness perception exhibited increased short-wavelength spectral sensitivity as a function of increasing light level. The results confirm that a successful model of spectral sensitivity for scene brightness perception should incorporate a shift in short-wavelength sensitivity like the one investigated in the present study.

  • 30.
    Campo Woytuk, Nadia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Park, Joo Young
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Maslik, Jan
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ciolfi Felice, Marianela
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Tactful Feminist Sensing: Designing for Touching Vaginal Fluids2023In: DESIGNING INTERACTIVE SYSTEMS CONFERENCE, DIS 2023, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2023, p. 2642-2656Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observing the texture, color, and conductivity of cervical mucus has the potential to support menstrual cycle and fertility tracking, generating a layer of rich bodily, tactile/haptic knowledge in addition to other collected data, such as cycle length or body temperature. This pictorial presents design explorations, four design concepts, and one prototype of a sensor for measuring the conductivity of cervical mucus in vaginal fluids. We present these as instances in the design space for sensing intimate bodily fluids and provide discussions on the proximities, visibilities, and temporalities of these sensing technologies. We offer the unfolding concept of "tactful feminist sensing", opening up for further engagements with intimate care that attend to the multiplicity and fleshiness of bodies.

  • 31.
    Cannizzaro, Chiara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Alinejad, Maedeh
    GeoMind AB, Nacka, Sweden..
    Beijer-Lundberg, Anders
    ELU Konsult AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Larsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Spross, Johan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Effect of Uncertainty in Design Decisions for Driven Piles in Soil with High Boulder Content2023In: GEO-RISK 2023: ADVANCES IN MODELING UNCERTAINTY AND VARIABILITY / [ed] Najjar, S Medina-Cetina, Z Ching, J, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2023, Vol. 347, p. 268-276Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Driven piles can be severely damaged during driving into soil with high boulder content and can potentially lose their structural integrity, resulting in premature pile refusal. This can cause large additional project cost and delays, including an urgency to change the design in progress. Geotechnical uncertainties related to the spatial variability of soil's boulder content aggravate the complexity of the problem, making it difficult to assess the probability of premature pile refusal due to boulders and to identify the optimal pile design and driving strategy. Existing tools for drivability assessment are mainly deterministic and excessively simplistic, relying on the technical expertise of the personnel involved in the design and execution of the project rather than adopting a systematic treatment of the uncertainties at the specific geological location. A transparent methodology to support the decision-making in pile design is necessary for a cost-effective driving and optimal design solutions. This paper discusses how pile design can be understood from a risk perspective, with specific focus on the assessment of pile drivability. It is found that a new probabilistic approach that provides a correlation between the results from site investigations with the quantities of boulder in the soil layer by inverse analysis can create a solid basis for decision-making in pile design.

  • 32.
    Chicau, Joana
    et al.
    Creative Computing Institute, University of the Arts London, London, United Kingdom.
    Popova, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Fiebrink, Rebecca
    Creative Computing Institute, University of the Arts London, London, United Kingdom.
    From Individual Discomfort to Collective Solidarity: Choreographic Exploration of Extractivist Technology2024In: TEI 2024 - Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2024, article id 54Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We invite technology practitioners to join us in the collaborative exploration of discomfort associated with technology in the age of surveillance capitalism. With the help of body-based exercises inspired by choreography we will articulate the discomforts of living and designing with extractivist technology. Our studio is aimed at technology practitioners of a broad range of expertise who have experienced discomfort in relation to data-driven extractivist systems. In the first part of the studio participants will share their experiences of resisting such systems both as users and creators of technology. In the second part, participants will engage in an ideation session to propose forms of countering existing technologies. Embodied methods and choreographic approaches will be used for making digital discomfort tangible and for guiding the exploration of the topics at stake. As an outcome, participants will collectively design a toolbox to conceptualise discomfort in a tangible, embodied way, and form a network to continue discuss these matters post-studio in an online community discussion group.

  • 33.
    Ciolfi Felice, Marianela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Fdili Alaoui, Sarah
    Université Paris-Saclay, CNRS, Inria,LISN.
    Mackay, Wendy E.
    Université Paris-Saclay, CNRS, Inria,LISN.
    Studying Choreographic Collaboration in the Wild2021In: Designing Interactive Systems Conference 2021 (DIS ’21), New York, USA, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    DIS2021-Ciolfi-Felice-et-al
  • 34.
    Ciolfi Felice, Marianela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Juul Sondergaard, Marie Louise
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Resisting the Medicalisation of Menopause: Reclaiming the Body through Design2021In: CHI '21: Proceedings of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The menopause transition involves bodily-rooted, socially-shaped changes, often in a context of medicalisation that marginalises people based on their age and gender. With the goal of addressng this social justice matter with a participatory design approach, we started to cultivate partnerships with people going through menopause. This paper reports on interviews with 12 women and a design workshop with three. Our data analysis highlights their experiences from a holistic perspective that reclaims the primacy of the body and acknowledges the entanglement of the physical and the psychosocial. Participants’ design concepts show how design can come close the body to make space for menopause experiences, recognising and transforming them. We discuss how HCI can actively engage with the body to promote appreciation for it during menopause, and call for design that accompanies people in resisting the medicalisation of menopause as an enactment of social justice in everyday life. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    ciolfi-felice-et-al-2021-resisting
  • 35.
    Clark, Brendon
    et al.
    Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden.
    Playing with the elasticity of hybrid design education2023In: IxD&A: Interaction Design and Architecture(s), ISSN 1826-9745, E-ISSN 2283-2998, no 58, p. 110-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the shift in design education from traditional, hands-on practices to digitally-based approaches, particularly accelerated by the sudden and temporary remote teaching mandates that affected design schools during the global pandemic restrictions of the early 2020’s. It uses a case involving an interaction design class during such restrictions, where students engaged in, designed, and facilitated 15-minute remote collaborative activities called “Fire-up” sessions, to demonstrate how a short design doing task can provide surface what is at stake in the design of hybrid learning activities. Reflections of the students and teachers are used to take the pulse of remote and hybrid teaching arrangements that are physicality and materiality inherent in design education, emphasizing the perceived elasticity of physical and digital arrangements in these contexts. The paper offers three main sensitizing instruments to consider when arranging and engaging in hybrid design work.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 36.
    De Witt, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Sound design for affective interaction2007In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics / [ed] Paiva, A; Prada, R; Picard, RW, 2007, Vol. 4738, p. 523-533Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different design approaches contributed to what we see today as the prevalent design paradigm for Human Computer Interaction; though they have been mostly applied to the visual aspect of interaction. In this paper we presented a proposal for sound design strategies that can be used in applications involving affective interaction. For testing our approach we propose the sonification of the Affective Diary, a digital diary with focus on emotions, affects, and bodily experience of the user. We applied results from studies in music and emotion to sonic interaction design. This is one of the first attempts introducing different physics-based models for the real-time complete sonification of an interactive user interface in portable devices.

  • 37.
    Dervishaj, Arlind
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Sustainable Buildings. Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Jamova cesta 2, Ljubljana, 1000, Slovenia.
    From Sustainability to Regeneration: a digital framework with BIM and computational design methods2023In: Architecture, Structures and Construction, ISSN 2730-9886, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 315-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design methods, frameworks, and green building certifications have been developed to create a sustainable built environment. Despite sustainability advancements, urgent action remains necessary due to climate change and the high impact of the built environment. Regenerative Design represents a shift from current practices focused on reducing environmental impacts, as it aims to generate positive effects on both human and natural systems. Although digital design methods are commonly employed in sustainable design practice and research, there is presently no established framework to guide a digital regenerative design process. This study provides an analysis of existing literature on regenerative design and digital design methods and presents a framework based on building information modelling (BIM) methodology and computational design methods, that can be applied to both urban and building design. This framework identifies digital tools and organizes indicators based on the pillars of climate, people, and nature for regenerative design, drawing upon a comprehensive analysis of literature, including standards, sustainability frameworks and research studies. The framework is illustrated through a case study evaluation. The paper also highlights the potential and limitations of digital methods concerning regenerative design and suggests possibilities for future expansion by incorporating additional quantifiable indicators that reflect research developments, to achieve positive outcomes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 38.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    TILLBLIVELSER: En trasslig berättelse om design som normkritisk praktik2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing awareness of norm-critical perspectives (in society, academia and industry) brings with it the need to develop methods to ensure they can be implemented in practice. This thesis discusses how the role of design contributes to and maintains norms, and shows how design as a norm critical practice has great potential to bridge the gap between theory and practice in norm-critical work. This potential lies in using design as a peda-gogic tool that can concretize and make understandable what would otherwise be perceived as complex, unclear or remote. The thesis pays special attention to the role of artefacts in the creation of the stories of the world. The discursive design thing is introduced as a tool to visualize norms and to create discussion. The three-dimensional, physical thing exposes us to a more diverse experience of norms than when we just address them in words or pictures.The empirical work in this thesis stems from five research projects that differ from each other and were carried out under varied conditions. The projects have tackled a range of problems and power relationships. However, together they draw a complex picture of how norms arise, overlap and constantly change over time, place and space – and how design can be used to support or disrupt this process.By revisiting the projects, it becomes clear how the researcher’s position and actions (or non-actions) shape the norm development process. This results in an insight that meaning can not be construc-ted from an outside perspective, but is a constant ”becoming” that occurs in an entanglement of relationships arising between different bodies, both human and non-human. As a norm critical perspective implies paying attention to power relationships, it also assumes a power critical approach to the production of meaning extracted from the norm-critical work, and that we – as researchers and designers – take responsibility for our prevail by highlighting our own bodies and gaze.The thesis therefore proposes the concept of diffraction as an approach to the production of meaning in norm critical design practices. A diffractive approach enables an understanding of how the production of meaning occurs in various coincidences, but also how our own interventions shape the story. It opens up to the realization that parallel narratives are possible and thus becomes a tool to break away from the linear understanding framework and offer an exploration of alternative thought patterns. A diffractive approach to the production of meaning is thus also a tool to pro-mote increased creativity.

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    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 39.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Broms, Loove
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. Interactive Institute.
    Becoming the Energy AWARE Clock: Revisiting the Design Process Through a Feminist Gaze2013In: Experiments in Design Research / [ed] Eva Brandt, Pelle Ehn, Troels Degn Johansson, Maria Hellström Reimer, Thomas Markussen, Anna Vallgårda, Köpenhamn: The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools Architecture, Design and Conservation , 2013, p. 258-266Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the border between technology and design (form giving) from a feminist perspective. Looking at the energy system and how it has been integrated in the household, we want to address the underlying structures that have been built into the ecology of electrical appliances used in daily life, preserving certain norms that could be questioned from both a gender and a sustainability perspective. We have created an alternative electricity meter, the Energy AWARE Clock, addressing design issues uncovered in an initial field study. In this paper, we will make parallels to these issues. We also use feminist technoscience studies scholar Donna Haraway’s theory of the cyborg in order to clarify useful concepts that can be derived from feminist theory and that can act as important tools for designers engaged in creative processes. From our own experience with the Energy AWARE Clock this approach has great potential for questioning and rethinking present norms within sustainability and gender, from the viewpoints of design research and design practice.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Ehrnberger et al. Becoming the Energy AWARE Clock Nordes 2013
  • 40.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Räsänen, Minna
    Södertörns Högskola.
    Börjesson, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Hertz, Anne- Christine
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Sundbom, Cristine
    Konstfack.
    The Androchair: Performing Gynaecology through the Practice of Gender Critical Design2017In: The Design Journal, ISSN 1460-6925, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper highlights the important role that design plays when it comes to women’s overall experi- ences of ther gynaecological examination. It exempli es how the examination can become renegotiable through the practice of a critical design. We will re ect this in the design of the contemporary gynaecological examination chair (GEC). We used women’s experiences as a starting point for the design of an Androchair (a conceptual male equivalent of the GEC), in order to make the experiences critically visible. Inspired by the view of the gynaecolog- ical examination as a performance where the Androchair is represented as a prop and was placed on a stage as a discussion object during a public seminar. The Androchair allowed for both critical and multiple readings of the GEC and through that, the gynaecology examination at large. Moreover, it stimulated a discussion about alternative ideas towards achieving a more positive experience. 

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    fulltext
  • 41.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Räsänen, Minna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Ilstedt, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Visualising gender norms in design: Meet the Mega Hurricane Mixer and the drill Dolphia2012In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 85-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article highlights how a gender perspective can be performed by design as critical practice. Two common household appliances - a drill and a hand blender - were used as a starting point. Inspired by Derrida's term deconstruction, the product language of the tools was analysed and then switched in two new prototypes: the hand blender Mega Hurricane Mixer and the drill Dolphia. The prototypes were shown at exhibitions and lectures. The comments by the audience show that a switching of product language entails that their relationship to the artifact itself also changes. Overall, the elements, which previously had been perceived as 'lacking transparency', were now visible. For example, the drill was identified as a "drill for women" and considered inadequate for drilling, and the mixer revealed needs and functions that the traditional mixer did not satisfy. This implies that design should not only be seen as 'final products' but as a part of a social process that takes place between the user, the artifact and the norms of society. By switching the product languages it was possible to highlight how gender values are connected to each design and each artifact. This means that the design of the artifacts around us is not fixed, but can be renegotiated and situated in time, place, and context.

  • 42.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lewandowski, Vincent
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hwang, Sungjae
    Song, John
    Gim, Junghyeon
    Griggio, Carla
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Leiva, Germán
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Romero, Mario
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST). Georgia Institute of Technology.
    Sweeney, David
    Regan, Tim
    Helmes, John
    Vlachokyriakos, Vasillis
    Lindley, Siân
    Taylor, Alex
    Demo Hour2015In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 6-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactivity is a unique forum of the ACM CHI Conference that showcases hands-on demonstrations, novel interactive technologies, and artistic installations. At CHI 2015 in Seoul we hosted more than 30 exhibits, including an invited digital interactive art exhibit. Interactivity highlights the diverse group of computer scientists, sociologists, designers, psychologists, artists, and many more who make up the CHI community.

  • 43.
    Favero, Federico
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lighting Design.
    Light and Motion: Effects of Light Conditions and MEDI on Activity and Motion Area under a Sky-Lighting MachineManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated whether differences in light levels and spectral properties have effects on motion. Twenty-two participants, divided into groups of two, experienced the same room in two diffused light conditions (Daylight DL or static Artificial light AL), which were experienced in a repeated measure design layout, controlled for order. Both light conditions offered a stimulus of at least 250 melanopic equivalent daylight illuminance (mEDI) lx, without a view. Participants were observed during an individual reading session and a collaborative construction game session. We measured the connectivity of the built structures; Activity by actigraphy; and we automatically extracted Motion Area and Quantity of Motion from video analysis. We found a correlation between mEDI values in the two Light Conditions (Daylight DL or Artificial light AL) and Activity; and a correlation between Light Condition and Motion Area. Diffuse daylight conditions were correlated with lower activity and less extended motion than a diffuse static condition, at levels recommended for office lighting and to ensure alerting responses. Indeed, static artificial light was found to be related to increased spatial exploration, which might indicate restlessness, and high mEDI to a more composed motion. Actigraphy measurements correlate with quantity of motion values, therefore the two methods provide comparable results. Results also show a high correlation between all photometric values in the daylight condition. These findings offer arguments for favoring diffuse daylight conditions in the design of places where it is desirable to avoid fidgetiness, like educational institutions, and to support composed motion, like medical institutions.  

  • 44.
    Favero, Federico
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lighting Design.
    Light and Perception: Study of the Effects of Daylight and Artificial Light on Affect, Mood and Sleepiness under a Sky-Lighting MachineManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated whether light conditions have an impact on mental states, perception and perceived health symptoms in a controlled experiment. Twenty-eight participants, divided into groups of two, experienced the same room in two diffused light conditions (Daylight DL or static Artificial Light AL), which were experienced in a repeated measure design layout, controlled for order. Both light conditions offered a stimulus of at least 250 melanopic equivalent daylight illuminance (mEDI) lx, without a view. Participants were observed during different tasks, an individual reading session and a collaborative construction game session. The results show an effect of Light Condition on Mood and Pleasure, Mood was higher and Pleasure was better in the Daylight Condition. We did not find an effect of Light Condition on Arousal and on Sleepiness during the whole duration of the sessions, although results indicate lower Sleepiness in DL during the construction game session. Results indicate that the recommended mEDI levels can be maintained in a day-lit-only space during working hours (9:00 to 17:00 h) around the Equinox in Stockholm, 59°N. In the analysis limited to the DL sessions, we found that illuminance values, together with one measure of variation, are correlated to better pleasure. The current results show that the effects on Mood and Pleasure do significantly differ between Light Conditions but participants were not aware whether the source was artificial or natural. Thus we presume these effects could be even more relevant in a room with a view. 

  • 45.
    Favero, Federico
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Light Rhythms: Exploring the Perceptual and Behavioural Effects of Daylight and Artificial Light Conditions in a Scandinavian Context2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This compilation thesis collects multidisciplinary work on the study of the impact of light rhythms on perception and behaviour. The thesis was structured to answer and discuss the questions: “How does a person feel and behave inan illuminated space?” and “Do variable light conditions influence perception, appraisal and motion?”. In order to answer the questions, I applied methods from design, psychology and behavioural science, conducted literature reviews and performed two experimental studies. In response to the first question, the outcome of the five papers included in the thesis show that light and lighting rhythms elicit specific acute and long-term effects. These effects impact on these categories of aspects: visual and perceptual, appraisal and experience, behavioural and physiological. To structure and visualize these diverse aspects, I introduce the CLAPP framework: Context Light(ing) Action (behaviour), Perception, Person. The framework highlights the complex interplay between light, environment, and human response, by displaying features related to spatial and light rhythms, effects of light on mind and body, and personal features. The framework can provide structure and direction for education and research activities within the scope of Architectural Lighting Design. In response to the second research question, results from the experimental studies reveal that, even after eliminating view and sunlight, variable daylight conditions elicit better mood, higher pleasure, and influence motion, compared to artificial light conditions. The results of this thesis may contribute to achieving the UN sustainability goals, specifically to improve the well-being of the population (SDG3), to design a built-environment that is safe and resilient (SDG 11), and to promote the uses of affordable and clean energy (SDG 7). Building on the experience gained during this thesis work, I am confident that multidisciplinary collaboration will enable to integrate the diverse aspects included in the CLAPP framework, paving the way for the design of spaces that are both resilient and supportive of health.

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    Favero_Kappa
  • 46.
    Favero, Federico
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lighting Design.
    Besenecker, Ute
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lighting Design.
    Artificial light(ing) or electric light(ing)?2022In: The 8th International Light Symposium: Re-thinking Lighting Design in a Sustainable Future, Copenhagen, Denmark / [ed] IOP, Bristol: Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2022, Vol. 1099, p. 1-11Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers and designers use the words "artificial" or "electric" to describe lighting products, design, or research related practices, and there appear to be differing opinions about which is the more appropriate term. Generally, there are challenges with a common use of language and vocabulary in interdisciplinary research and this might be also valid for design and research in lighting design across different disciplines. The authors were educated in opposing practices of using "electric" lighting vs "artificial" lighting; this started a discussion and the conceptualization of this article. The paper explores, summarizes and discusses through literature review and a survey the concepts described and conveyed by both terms in different disciplines. Interestingly we could find differences among and between disciplines and professional backgrounds. This might indicate that the education and nomenclature in the field influences the use of terms. We found a tendency to refer to light sources either in terms of the energy used to generate the light, e.g. electric light or gaslight, but also in terms of the effect that it evokes, e.g. candle light is defined natural. Generally, a common lighting glossary could be developed through continuous discussion and studies. As today's complex questions are discussed in interdisciplinary teams, a common language might promote effective communication and stimulate sustainable solutions.

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    fulltext
  • 47.
    Favero, Federico
    et al.
    KTH MID.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University .
    NATURAL EXPERIMENT ON THE EFFECT OF ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING AND DAYLIGHT2014In: PROCEEDINGS of  CIE 2014 "Lighting Quality and Energy Efficiency”, Vienna, AUSTRIA, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the effect of the exposure to daylight and artificial light indoor during Scandinavian winter. Twenty-one subjects experienced two radically different lighting solutions for three days in a row, eight hours each day: one group (n=12) was exposed only to daylight, one (n=9) only to artificial electric lighting (>500lx average on work plane, 3000K). We observed an effect between light conditions on mood, which was elevated in the daylight room. Mean levels of alertness and perceived energy ratings were higher in the daylight condition. An effect of the lighting condition was found for activity levels as measured by the actigraphs, especially in the morning. Due to the experimental design it is at present difficult to tease out if observed effects were due to the lighting exposure or to other environmental factors, e.g. architectural layout, timing or intensity of the exposure, therefore future further studies would be needed to examine different combinations of factors.

  • 48.
    Favero, Federico
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lighting Design.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stress Research Institute at the Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ejhed, Jan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Study of the Effects of Daylighting and Artificial Lighting at 59° Latitude on Mental States, Behaviour and Perception2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 2, article id 1144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although there is a documented preference for daylighting over artificial electric lighting indoors, there are comparatively few investigations of behaviour and perception in indoor day-lit spaces at high latitudes during winter. We report a pilot study designed to examine the effects of static artificial lighting conditions (ALC) and dynamic daylighting conditions (DLC) on the behaviour and perception of two groups of participants. Each group (n = 9 for ALC and n = 8 for DLC) experienced one of the two conditions for three consecutive days, from sunrise to sunset. The main results of this study show the following: indoor light exposure in February in Stockholm can be maintained over 1000 lx only with daylight for most of the working day, a value similar to outdoor workers’ exposure in Scandinavia; these values can be over the recommended Melanopic Equivalent Daylight Illuminance threshold; and this exposure reduces sleepiness and increases amount of activity compared to a static artificial lighting condition. Mood and feeling of time passing are also affected, but we do not exactly know by which variable, either personal or group dynamics, view or variation of the lighting exposure. The small sample size does not support inferential statistics; however, these significant effects might be large enough to be of importance in practice. From a sustainability point of view, daylighting can benefit energy saving strategies and well-being, even in the Scandinavian winter.

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    PaperIII_Sustainability
  • 49.
    Feldfeber, Ivana
    et al.
    DataGénero.
    Quiroga, Yasmín Belén
    DataGénero.
    Guevara, Clarissa
    TEC de Monterrey.
    Ciolfi Felice, Marianela
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Feminisms in Artificial Intelligence: Automation Tools towards a Feminist Judiciary Reform in Argentina and Mexico2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The lack of transparency in the judicial treatment of gender-based violence (GBV) against women and LGBTIQ+ people in Latin America results in low report levels, mistrust in the justice system, and thus, reduced access to justice. To address this pressing issue before GBV cases become feminicides, we propose to open the data from legal rulings as a step towards a feminist judiciary reform. We identify the potential of artificial intelligence (AI) models to generate and maintain anonymised datasets for understanding GBV, supporting policy making, and further fueling feminist collectives' campaigns. In this paper, we describe our plan to create AymurAI, a semi-automated prototype that will collaborate with criminal court officials in Argentina and Mexico. From an intersectional feminist, anti-solutionist stance, this project seeks to set a precedent for the feminist design, implementation, and deployment of AI technologies from the Global South. 

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    FeminismsInAI
  • 50.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    How do you design for the joy of movement?2012In: Plei-Plei! / [ed] Fernaeus, Y., Holopainen, J., Höök, K., Ivarsson, K., Karlsson, A., Lindley, S., & Norlin, C., Stockholm: PPP Company Ltd , 2012, p. 8-15Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The work in this book was conducted at an exciting point in time when the whole field of Human-Computer Interaction shifted its focus away from settings in which people would sit more or less still in front of static computers, to instead start exploring how to make good use of all the added possibilities of technologies that can be moved around. At the same time, researchers became increasingly interested in aspects of experience and enjoyment in the use of technology. As discussed in the introduction, notions such and play and learning, work and leisure, casual and serious technology use, are sometimes presented as conceptual dichotomies that may be difficult to combine. However, to many people, such distinctions are not meaningful, since practices and technologies – especially mobile ones – travel between the different social spheres of our lives, accompanying them wherever they go. Therefore,

    addressing aspects of leisure, pleasure and play is a relevant challenge for most interaction designers. In many cases, mobility and enjoyment seems very tightly intertwined, and in this chapter I will discuss different ways that this has become manifested in the illustrated pages of this book.

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    fulltext
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