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  • 1. Agres, K. R.
    et al.
    Schaefer, R. S.
    Volk, A.
    van Hooren, S.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Dalla Bella, S.
    Müller, M.
    de Witte, M.
    Herremans, D.
    Ramirez Melendez, R.
    Neerincx, M.
    Ruiz, S.
    Meredith, D.
    Dimitriadis, T.
    Magee, W. L.
    Music, Computing, and Health: A Roadmap for the Current and Future Roles of Music Technology for Health Care and Well-Being2021In: Music & Science, E-ISSN 2059-2043, Vol. 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fields of music, health, and technology have seen significant interactions in recent years in developing music technology for health care and well-being. In an effort to strengthen the collaboration between the involved disciplines, the workshop “Music, Computing, and Health” was held to discuss best practices and state-of-the-art at the intersection of these areas with researchers from music psychology and neuroscience, music therapy, music information retrieval, music technology, medical technology (medtech), and robotics. Following the discussions at the workshop, this article provides an overview of the different methods of the involved disciplines and their potential contributions to developing music technology for health and well-being. Furthermore, the article summarizes the state of the art in music technology that can be applied in various health scenarios and provides a perspective on challenges and opportunities for developing music technology that (1) supports person-centered care and evidence-based treatments, and (2) contributes to developing standardized, large-scale research on music-based interventions in an interdisciplinary manner. The article provides a resource for those seeking to engage in interdisciplinary research using music-based computational methods to develop technology for health care, and aims to inspire future research directions by evaluating the state of the art with respect to the challenges facing each field.

  • 2. Alekand, Katrin
    et al.
    Lindström, Kati
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Mutid ja mesilased – aegadetagune intervjuu Thomas A. Sebeokiga.2020In: Acta Semiotica Estica, ISSN 1406-9563, Vol. XVIIArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Alfvén, Hannes
    et al.
    Dept Applied Physics and Information Science, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
    Barnaby, Frank
    International Peace Research Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    Patterson, Walter C.
    Friends of the Earth, London, UK.
    Lempert, Robert
    Harvard Univeristy, Cambridge, USA.
    Human IQ vs Nuclear IQ1981In: Bulletin of the atomic scientists, ISSN 0096-3402, E-ISSN 1938-3282, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 4-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Allen, Irma
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Dirty coal: Industrial populism as purification in Poland's mining heartland2021Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the second half of the 2010s, far-right populist parties gained increasing power and influenceacross Europe, and around the world. Core to their ethnonationalist, anti-elite agenda, and theiremotive politics, has often been a defense of fossil fuels, threatening action to address the climatecrisis and raising the spectre of fascism. Increasingly-perceived-as-‘dirty’ coal, the raw material thatmade the industrial modern world order possible and contributed most to its mountingcontradictions, has acquired a special status in contemporary far-right ideology. What is theemotional intersection between them at a time of far-reaching economic, environmental and energyinstability and change, when coal has not only been losing its material value and its symbolic link tomodernity, but is increasingly widely deemed immoral too?

    To date, studies of far-right populism have largely overlooked how energy and environmentalchange feature in their present rise. This reflects how these issues have been largely treated astechnical matters, and therefore relegated to the domain of scientific expertise, rather thanrecognized as inherently social, cultural and political concerns. Tending to adopt a macro-levelapproach, far-right studies have also not yet fully addressed the historically, geographically, andculturally-situated reasons for this success, particularly among the (white, male) industrial workingclass.From a bottom-up, ethnographic perspective, the role of intersectional (class-based,occupational, gendered, racialized regional and national) ecologically-positioned embodiedsubjectivities and identities and their emotional lived experience remains to be considered.

    This PhD thesis, set within the concerns of a transdisciplinary environmental and energy humanitiesframework, addresses this lacunae in the context of Poland; the most coal-dependent country in theEuropean Union where a pro-coal platform unexpectedly helped the far-right populist party Lawand Justice (Prawo i Sprawiedliwość) into majority government in 2015. It is primarily based on ayears’ ethnographic research conducted in 2017 with both residents and particularly coal miners andtheir families in a minescape in Upper Silesia, the nation’s, and one of Europe’s, last remainingmining heartlands. Adopting a postcolonial postsocialist perspective, and drawing on rare empiricaldata from participant observation and qualitative interviews, the thesis explores the politics ofincreasingly ‘dirty’ coal expressed in localized conflicts over air pollution, domestic heating, andthe meaning of work, dignity, respectable personhood, the economy and community, setting themwithin their historical context. The rapidly shifting material and symbolic meaning of coal withinthe context of Silesia’s long-standing troubled history is particularly studied in light of Europeanintegration, a post-industrial, neoliberal, ‘green’-cosmopolitan project that links East and West in anunequal relationship. The naming of coal and its way of life as increasingly ‘dirty’ in newlystigmatizing senses from ‘outside’, is found to be experienced by the mining community as an eliteimposedprocess of ecological dispossession. This generates a toxic intersectionally-andecologically-mediated shame in the bodies of those that particularly labour intimately with itsmaterial touch; a shame that resonates with what this thesis terms industrial populist politics and itsemotive charge as a felt common sense. In the postsocialist context of the marginalization anddevaluation of industrial working-class lives, and pervasive and normalized orientalist classismexperienced as an attack on one’s ecologically-enmeshed Silesian-Polishness, the relational longingfor a sense of a purified home, that can cleanse dirt’s discomforting and shame-inducing stigmas inoverlapping economic, social, cultural and environmental terms by refusing and reversing itsdesignation, is proposed as lying at the heart of industrial populism’s visceral draw.

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  • 5.
    Allen, Irma
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Thinking with a Feminist Political Ecology of Air-and-breathing-bodies2020In: Body & Society, ISSN 1357-034X, E-ISSN 1460-3632, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 79-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social theory has paid little attention to air, despite its centrality to bodily existence and air pollution being named the world’s biggest public health crisis. Where attention to air is found, the body is largely absent. On the other hand, conceptualizing the body without life-sustaining breath fails to highlight breathing as the ongoing metabolic bodily act in which the materiality of human and more-than-human intermingle and transmute one another. Political ecology studies how unequal power structures and knowledge production reproduce human–environment relations, including a nascent focus on the body and air – but as separate issues. This article argues that a political ecology of air would productively fuse with a political ecology of the body to bring the visceral realm into intersectional analysis of air’s contemporary materialities. A feminist political ecology situates explicitly air-and-breathing-bodies, their intimately posthuman, relational, elemental and corpomaterial intra-action, at the heart of such analysis.

  • 6.
    Allen, Irma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Kaijser, Anna
    Vem ska offras för kolet?2016In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7. Anderson, E F
    et al.
    John, D
    Mikulski, R
    Redford, A
    Romero, Mario
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Preserving and presenting cultural heritage using off-the-shelf software2020In: Springer Series on Cultural Computing, The National Centre for Computer Animation, Bournemouth University, Poole, United Kingdom: Springer , 2020, p. 423-444Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The preservation and presentation of cultural heritage (CH) encompasses many domains and disciplines and ranges from tangible CH, traditionally taking the form of museum exhibits and historical sites that are open to the public to intangible CH, focussing on human and societal aspects of CH, as opposed to physical artefacts. The use of computer graphics (CG) and related techniques such as interactive virtual environments since the 1990s has had a profound impact on the presentation of and public engagement with CH, allowing virtual reconstruction of archaeological/historical sites as well as the virtual (re-)construction of culturally and historically relevant artefacts. These are frequently implemented using bespoke or proprietary systems, often explicitly created with a CH application in mind, which may require specialist expertise or significant investment. There exist, however, alternative approaches that can simplify and improve the uptake of CG for CH. In this chapter we discuss how off-the-shelf CG systems such as developer and artists’ tools for the entertainment industries, which are comparatively inexpensive, usually provide open developer licenses, and sometimes are even available free of charge, or affordable consumer-level hardware, can be used for the preservation and presentation of tangible and intangible CH, the application of which we illustrate with a set of case studies. 

  • 8.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Kazemian, Reza
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Rönn, Magnus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    The Architectural Competition (Editors' Notes): Introduction2011In: The Architectural Competition: Research Inquiries and Experiences / [ed] Magnus Rönn, Reza Kazemian, Jonas Andersson, Stockholm: Axl Books, 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Anstey, Tim
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Architectural Technologies.
    The Dangers of Decorum2006In: arq Architecture research quarterly, ISSN 1359-1355, E-ISSN 1474-0516, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 131-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decorum, "appropriateness", is deeply embedded in the psyche of architects as a means to justify their actions. This essay considers the shifting significance of this term for architectural discourse.

  • 10.
    Armiero, Marco
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Beyond Nonpartisan Discourses:Radical Knowledge for Extreme Times2020In: ecocene. CAPPADOCIA JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL HUMANITIES, ISSN 2717-8943, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 147-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of scientists agree on climate change and on the most daunting environmental problems humans arefacing today. Moved by a commendable desire to contribute to the solution of these problems, several scientists havedecided to speak up, telling the scientific truth about climate change to decision-makers and the public. Althoughappreciating the commitment to intervene in the public arena, I discuss some limits of these interventions. I arguethat stating the reality of climate change does not prescribe any specific solution and sometimes it seems faint indistributing responsibilities. I ask whether unveiling/knowing the truth can be enough to foster radicaltransformations. Can knowledge move people towards transformative actions if power relationships do not change?Various environmental justice controversies prove that even when science is certain—and this is rarely the case inthat kind of controversies—knowing might be not enough in the face of power structures preventing free choices and radical changes. In the end of my article, I state that it is fair to recognize that scientists have done their parts, and it is now up to social movements to foster the radical changes in power relationships that are needed for transforming societies.

  • 11.
    Armiero, Marco
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. CNR Italian Natl Res Council, Inst Studies Mediterranean, Rome, Italy..
    From waste to climate2022In: Social Text, ISSN 0164-2472, E-ISSN 1527-1951, Vol. 40, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has often been said that the problem with climate change is its invisibility. People do not mobilize about climate change because they cannot see it; even less can they see CO2 emissions—that is, the most relevant material element causing climate alternations. Although I would argue that for some people climate change is more visible than for others, it remains a global environmental problem not easily felt on the ground. On the other hand, waste appears to be an incumbent presence, almost impossible to avoid; it also seems more localized than global climate change. People mobilize around waste because it stands in front of their eyes and noses. This is how the story has been told so many times. This article instead tells another story, one in which climate activism is rooted in struggles against waste contamination. In Naples, Italy, twenty years of mobilization against toxicity—which, by the way, is much less visible and much more harmful than the urban garbage in the streets—has generated an epistemic community trained to understand the invisible connections linking local problems, global issues, and socioenvironmental inequalities. Their original elaboration of biocide as the theoretical framework explaining the production of toxic communities provided them with an equally original framework to understand climate change and its unequal impacts on people and ecosystems. In moving between waste and climate, local and global, those epistemic communities have not only changed the ways in which climate activism has been conceived but have also changed themselves.

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  • 12.
    Armiero, Marco
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    I saperi estremi della natura2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Armiero, Marco
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Institute for Studies on the Mediterranean.
    Wasteocene: Stories from the Global Dump2021Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humans may live in the Anthropocene, but this does not affect all in the same way. How would the Anthropocene look if, instead of searching its traces in the geosphere, researchers would look for them

    in the organosphere, in the ecologies of humans in their entanglements with the environment? Looking at this embodied stratigraphy of power and toxicity, more than the Anthropocene, we will discover the Wasteocene. The imposition of wasting relationships on subaltern human and more-than-human communities implies the construction of toxic ecologies made of contaminating substances and narratives. While official accounts have systematically erased any trace of those wasting relationships, another kind of narrative has been written in flesh blood, and cells. Traveling between Naples (Italy) and Agbogbloshie (Ghana), science fiction and epidemic outbreaks, this Element will take the readers into the bowels of the Wasteocene, but it will also indicate the commoning practices which are dismantling it.

     

  • 14.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Anternini, Luca
    Ambientalisti indisciplinati: il ruolo dell’ecologia politica nell’Antropocene2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Dawson, Ashley
    CUNY, Grad Ctr, English, New York, NY USA.;CUNY, Coll Staten Isl, English, New York, NY USA..
    Biasillo, Roberta
    Univ Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Turham, Ethemcan
    Univ Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Urban Climate Insurgency: An Introduction2022In: Social Text, ISSN 0164-2472, E-ISSN 1527-1951, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban climate insurgency refers to the ensemble of grassroots initiatives aiming to tackle climate change from a radical point of view. Insurgency in this case does not imply violence but rather refers to the radical rejection of the current socioecological system. While explicitly challenging planetary ecocide and climate-change effects, these forms of insurgency target all policies that make the urban condition yet more precarious, demonstrating that climate mobilization is inherently intersectional. The focus here is on the urban dimension of this global climate insurgency that unsettles the dichotomy between rural and urban. It is on the urban terrain, already fissured by racial capitalism but also traversed by antiracist and promigrant movements, that the climate emergency becomes a climate and social justice issue. This introductory essay offers a fresh approach to the new municipalist project and digs into its environmental agenda. From New York to Mälmo, from Rio de Janiero to Istanbul, passing through Jakarta, Bangalore, and Naples, this special issue explores the articulation of radical climate-change politics, the materialization of climate injustices, and grassroots reactions to these injustices in the urban sphere.

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  • 16.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    De Angelis, Massimo
    University of east London .
    Anthropocene: Victims, Narrators, and Revolutionaries2017In: The South Atlantic Quarterly, ISSN 0038-2876, E-ISSN 1527-8026, South Atlantic Quarterly, Vol. 116, no 2, p. 345-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The absence of a reflection on revolutionary practices and subjects is the main weakness of the radical critique of the Anthropocene. The risk is to envision the Anthropocene as a space for villains and victims but not for revolutionaries. It is crucial to challenge the (in)visibility and (un)knowability of the Anthropocene beyond geological strata and planetary boundaries. As the Capitalocene, the Anthropocene has left its traces in the bodies of people upon which the new epoch has been created. The traces of the Capitalocene are not only in geological strata but also in the biological and genetic strata of human bodies; exploitation, subordination, and inequalities are inscribed into the human body and experienced, visible and knowable by subalterns without the mediation of—many times actually in opposition to—mainstream scientific knowledge. This essay inflects the concept of Capitalocene with what we call Wasteocene, to stress the contaminating nature of capitalism and its perdurance within the sociobiological fabric, its accumulation of externalities inside both the human and the earth's body. The essay envisions the Wasteocene as a feature of the Capitalocene, especially adapted to demystify the mainstream narratives of the Anthropocene. To enhance these arguments, the essay builds on the findings of the Environmental Justice Organisations, Liabilities and Trade (EJOLT) atlas of environmental conflicts and on in-depth research on the struggles against toxic contamination in Campania, Italy.

  • 17.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Fava, Anna
    Of Humans, Sheep, and Dioxin: A History of Contamination and Transformation in Acerra, Italy2016In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 67-82Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Palestino, Maria Federica
    University of Naples Federico II (Italy).
    Berruti, Gilda
    University of Naples Federico II (Italy).
    Madonna, Raniero
    Dawson, Ashley
    CUNY (USA).
    Sedrez, Lise
    Federal University of Rio De Janeiro (Brazil).
    Spaccaforno, Pietro
    Anguelovski, Isabelle
    Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) (Spain).
    Occupy Climate Change città dopo città2021In: Trame: Pratiche e saperi per una ecologia politica situata / [ed] Ecologie Politiche del Presente, Napoli: Tamu , 2021, p. 91-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 19.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Palolo De Rosa, Salvatore
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Ambiente2020In: Una scuola per la cittadinanza, PM edizioni , 2020Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History.
    Sgueglia, Leandro
    Wasted Spaces, Resisting People: the politics of waste in Naples, Italy2019In: Tempo & Argumento, E-ISSN 2175-1803, Vol. 11, no 26, p. 135-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how the waste crisis in Naples, which has been occurring since the 1990s, has stimulated the political creativeness of local activists who have started to experiment new ways for participation and community building. In particular, we investigate how environmental justice struggles have evolved in commoning processes (that is, in the creation of participatory institutions and in the defense of commons) by studying the social mobilization in Chiaiano, a neighborhood at the northern periphery of Naples (Italy). Using oral history interviews, documents produced by grassroots organizations, mass media reports, and our participants’ observation notes, we have analyzed the evolution of the mobilization in Chiaiano, the connections between environmental concerns and commoning, and the results in terms of social experimentation

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  • 21.
    Arrhenius, Thordis
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies.
    Nine points towards an expanded notion of architectural work2016In: Tabula Plena : Forms of Urban Preservation, Zurich: Lars Müller Publishers , 2016, p. 192-209Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Univ Aberdeen, Scotland.
    The socialist way of life in Siberia: transformation in Buryatia2017In: Slavonica, ISSN 1361-7427, E-ISSN 1745-8145, Vol. 22, no 1-2, p. 106-107Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Department of Siberian Ethnography, Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography (Kunstkamera), Universitetskaya nab. 3, 199034 Saint Petersburg, Russia.
    Environmental Encounters: Woolly Mammoth, Indigenous Communities and Metropolitan Scientists in the Soviet Arctic2019In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 142-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article investigates how in the Soviet Arctic researchers and indigenous communities searched and understood the mammoth before and during the Cold War. Based on a vast number of published and unpublished sources as well as interviews with scholars and reindeer herders, this article demonstrates that the mammoth as a paleontological find fusing together features of extinct and extant species, plays an in-between role among various environmental epistemologies. The author refers to moments of interactions among these different actors as “environmental encounters,” which comprise and engagement with the physical, political, social and cultural environments of the Arctic. These encounters shape the temporal stabilisations of knowledge which enable the mammoth to live its post-extinct life. The article combines approaches from environmental history and anthropology, history of science and indigenous studies showing the social vitality of a “fossil object”.

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  • 24. Arzyutov, Dmitry V.
    et al.
    Kan, Sergei
    The Concept of the ‘Field’ in Early Soviet Ethnography: A Northern Perspective2017In: Sibirica (keele): Interdisciplinary Journal of Siberian Studies, ISSN 1361-7362, E-ISSN 1476-6787, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 31-74Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 25.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Constructing industrial futures for the Arctic2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The circumpolar north has become increasingly important as a potential supply area for minerals, fossil energy resources and new shorter routes for international shipping. Allthough mining, oil and gas extraction are not new activities in the Arctic, the prospect of an ice free Arctic ocean may open possibilities for resource extraction in areas where such activities used to be unthinkable. Such visions of the future of the Arctic are not new however, there are several examples in the history of the Arctic of economic actors formulating visions of what the future of the region should be. The objective of this paper is to analyze the production of future visions for the Arctic by actors within large scale natural resource utilization industries historically and their influence on the economy and politics of the region. The paper will focus on actors involved in the coal mining industry in the Arctic archipelago Spitsbergen / Svalbard from 1898-present. The main research questions are: what futures visions have been produced by actors within the Spitsbergen coal mining industry and why? To what extent have these future visions gained influence in different time periods and why? How has companies and governments interacted in order to strengthen political influence and/or control over natural resources?

     

    The paper is based on analyses of sources from two contexts in which companies outlined their visions of the future of Spitsbergen – in written documents and material objects. Companies promoted their visions of the future in the form of narratives published in company prospects, expedition reports, annual reports, articles in professional journals and in correspondence with potential allies such as government bodies. They also formulated their visions by constructing buildings and technological systems in the landscape of Spitsbergen – material representations of potential, real or unlikely futures, economic and / or political.

     

    I will show that the Spitsbergen mining companies used their future visions in order to build actor networks. By constructing narratives about potential futures, they tried to enroll capital owners and political actors in to actor-networks strong enough to realize their visions. In a similar way, actors within politics and science included industry in their future visions in order to push their own agendas. Therefore, although the future visions of Arctic industry had many similar traits, the actors producing the visions often had quit different motives for producing them – economic visions hiding political agendas and strategic considerations. Moreover, the future visions has changed over the course of the 20th century, as result of the changing economic and political contexts on Svalbard and in Europe and the USA.

     

    The results suggest that Arctic future visions produced by industrial companies become influential if the companies share common interests with other influential actors (governments) and if they are able to build strong networks with such actors. Moreover, they show that Arctic future visions are most often elements in strategies aimed at achieving goals outside of the Arctic. The results can be used to deepen our understanding of the mineral and energy projects that underpin contemporary Arctic futures.

  • 26.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Constructing the pasts of competing Spitsbergen futures: Russian heritage in action2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Constructing the pasts of polar futures: the Janus face of polar heritage2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Creating sustainable development in the Arctic: abandoned extraction sites as assets for new Arctic futures2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impacts of climate change on polar cultural heritage have received an increasing attention in recent years within the field of heritage research. Less attention has been place on other processes of global change affecting the Arctic, where cultural heritage plays an important role – industrialization and de-industrialization. In recent years the circumpolar Arctic has been affected by a global mining boom, triggered by high world market prices on minerals as well as notions of the Arctic as a future arena for resource extraction in the wake of climate change. This mining boom is affecting communities in much of the Arctic region and holds a central place in debates about sustainable development there. A central item of these discussions focus on the question of how to handle the physical remains of mining sites once the boom is over and the activities have seized. The attitudes to abandoned mining sites differ across the Arctic. In some cases they have been perceived as unwanted legacies of problematic pasts, making land reclamation a preferred strategy. In other cases abandoned mines and associated infrastructures have been re-defined as cultural heritage and have become anchor points for local identities and a resource for new economies.

    The objective of this paper is to present a research project aiming to explain these differences in order to understand under which circumstances abandoned large-scale resource extraction sites can be turned into resources for new futures in post-industrial Arctic communities. The focus is on the European Arctic, but in a circumpolar and bi-polar comparative perspective. The main questions are: how have different groups of actors interpreted and used physical remains of abandoned resource extraction operations, and why? Which policies are needed to turn abandoned resource extraction sites into resources for constructing new futures in the Arctic? By addressing these questions, the field of heritage studies can make an important contribution to the discussion on sustainable futures in the Arctic.

  • 29.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Creating sustainable development in the Arctic: abandoned extraction sites as assets for new futures2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impacts of climate change on polar cultural heritage have received an increasing attention in recent years within the field of heritage research. Less attention has been place on other processes of global change affecting the Arctic, where cultural heritage plays an important role – industrialization and de-industrialization. In recent years the circumpolar Arctic has been affected by a global mining boom, triggered by high world market prices on minerals as well as notions of the Arctic as a future arena for resource extraction in the wake of climate change. This mining boom is affecting communities in much of the Arctic region and holds a central place in debates about sustainable development there. A central item of these discussions focus on the question of how to handle the physical remains of mining sites once the boom is over and the activities have seized. The attitudes to abandoned mining sites differ across the Arctic. In some cases they have been perceived as unwanted legacies of problematic pasts, making land reclamation a preferred strategy. In other cases abandoned mines and associated infrastructures have been re-defined as cultural heritage and have become anchor points for local identities and a resource for new economies.

    The objective of this paper is to present preliminary results from a research project aiming to explain these differences in order to understand under which circumstances abandoned large-scale resource extraction sites can be turned into resources for new futures in post-industrial Arctic communities. The focus is on the European Arctic, but in a circumpolar and bi-polar comparative perspective. The main questions are: how have different groups of actors interpreted and used physical remains of abandoned resource extraction operations, and why? Which policies are needed to turn abandoned resource extraction sites into resources for constructing new futures in the Arctic? By addressing these questions, the field of industrial heritage studies can make an important contribution to the discussion on sustainable futures in the Arctic.

  • 30.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Kampen om naturresurserna2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Report on the ICOMOS Advisory Mission to Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape (C1099) 18th-20th March 20142014Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Heritage Committee decision 37 COM 7B.43 (37th session, Phnom Penh, Cambodia, 2013) requested the State Party (Mapungubwe world heritage site, South Africa) to submit a minor boundary modification for the buffer zone of Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape, that clarifies the policies for protecting the property with respect to mining in the buffer zone and in relation to “off-set benefits”. Acting upon this request, the State Party worked on a revision of the buffer zone through 2013 and, as a part of this process, invited an ICOMOS Advisory Mission to the Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape. ICOMOS responded in favour of the invitation and sent ICOMOS expert Dr. Dag Avango to visit the proposed Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape buffer zone from 18-20 March 2014. This publication is the final report of Dag Avango's mission, describing the buffer zone of the World Heritage Site, the consequences of reducing it and reccomendations on how ICOMOS should act on the issue.

  • 32.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sustainable Communities and the Legacies of Mining in the Nordic Arctic2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sustainable Communities and the Legacies of Mining in the Nordic Arctic2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Greening of Arctic Mining Landscapes: The Politics of Industrial Heritage at Svalbard2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    To populate places with allies: on human-thing entanglements in contested polar spaces2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Valfångst, industriarv och geopolitik i Sydatlanten2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Grönlund-Myrberg, Lena
    Falun Copper Mine World Heritage Site.
    Falun copper mine – industrial heritage in mining futures2014In: Industrial and Mining Landscapes within world heritage context / [ed] Albrecht, Helmuth and Hansell, Friederike, Freiberg: IWTG/TU Bergakademie Freiberg , 2014, p. 142-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Falun copper mine is an industrial heritage site locatedin middle Sweden. Mining began here in the 8th century AD. Over a thousand years later, in 1992, the mine was closed and in 2001 Unesco declared it a world heritage site. Eight years later the Australian company Drake Resources started prospect drilling, right in the middle of the world heritage area, to investigate the possibilities for re-opening the mine again. This development is not unique. Rising world market prices for raw materials in recent years is driving a mining boom, in which companies seek licenses for prospecting and mining in increasingly remote locations, as well as in national parks and cultural heritage sites. World heritage sites are not excluded. From Cornwall to Falun, prospecting and mining companies attempt to reopen mining operations in world heritage sites where the historical remains that form the bases of the sites are a result of a long history of mining. This has led to a discussion within global heritage organisations such as TICCIH and ICOMOS, on how to deal with this development – are new mining operations in historical mining districts only a problem or could it also be seen as a resource, an activity representing continuity rather than destruction?

    The objective of this article is to describe the developmentof prospecting activities and mining plans at the Falu coppermine world heritage site and its possible consequences. What prospecting activities have taken place at the Falu copper mine after Unesco inscribed it on the world heritage list and why? How has local media and the organizations managing and protecting, responded to these plans andactivities and why? What could be the consequences of renewedmining operations at Falun?

  • 38.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Lagerås, Per
    Riksantikvarieämbetet.
    Inledning2012In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, no 63Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Why history and industrial heritage matter for Arctic communities2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Robin, Libby
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Placing the Anthropocene2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Solnes, Sander
    Registrering av kulturminner i Pyramiden: Registrering utfört på oppdrag fra Sysselmannen på Svalbard2013Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta är en rapport från ett uppdrag vars syfte var att 1) registrere fredete kulturminner och 2) finna och kartfeste faste kulturminner fra før 1946 samt beskrive dem slik de er i dag og prøve å tolke tidligere funksjon. I uppdraget ingick att se närmmere på de teknisk industrielle kulturminnene som ligger i dagen, samt vurdere verdien av tidligere (men ikke fredete) industrielle kulturminner. Uppdraget ble utført av Dag Avango og Sander Solnes i Pyramiden i perioden 21.08-28.08. Rapporten innehåller resultaten av Avangos och Solnes inventering.

  • 42.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    van der Watt, Lize-Marie
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    On constructing Cultural Heritage in Antarctica (CHAQ)2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Battisti, Chiara
    et al.
    Università degli Studi di Verona.
    Dahlberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Focus: Law, Fashion and Identities2016In: Pólemos, ISSN 2036-4601, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Battisti, Chiara
    et al.
    Università degli Studi di Verona.
    Dahlberg, LeifKTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Law, Fashion and Identities2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 45. Benner, Mats
    et al.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Wormbs, Nina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Digital undervisning – påverkar coronaepidemin den akademiska friheten i Sverige?2020In: Forskningspolitikk, ISSN 0333-0273, E-ISSN 0805-8210, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Berglund, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Discourses on age: Confronting disputed concepts by means of dialogue2009In: AI & Society: The Journal of Human-Centred Systems and Machine Intelligence, ISSN 0951-5666, E-ISSN 1435-5655, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 117-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores approaches to discourses concerning age, with different agendas and national contexts. The Dialogue Seminar Method is introduced, as a means of facilitating reflection and access to tacit knowledge. Democratic dialogue requires orchestration, and enables horizontal communication and collective reflection.

  • 47. Berglund, Karl
    et al.
    Jansson, Oscar
    Rahm, Lina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History.
    Digital humaniora, datorisering och litteraturvetenskap i en digitaliserad värld2022In: Tidskrift för litteraturvetenskap, ISSN 1104-0556, E-ISSN 2001-094X, Vol. 51, no 3-4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    De senaste decennierna har ”digital humaniora” nämnts i otaliga sammanhang och kommit att påverka litteraturvetenskaplig utbildning och forskning – trots att begreppets innebörd alltjämt är omdebatterad. Är det en ny disciplin eller specialisering av forskning och undervisning som redan bedrivs? På vilka sätt hänger digital humaniora ihop med samhällets och universitetens datorisering? Är det ett svar på hur litteraturen kan förstås i en digitaliserad värld, eller en fingervisning om litteraturvetenskapens framtid? För att reda i begreppen bjöd TFL-redaktionen in till ett panelsamtal via videolänk, av och med Karl Berglund (Uppsala universitet), Oscar Jansson (Lunds universitet) och Lina Rahm (KTH). 

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  • 48. Bergthaller, Hannes
    et al.
    Emmett, Rob
    Johns-Putra, Adeline
    Kneitz, Agnes
    Lidström, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    McCorristine, Shane
    Pérez Ramos, Isabel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Phillips, Dana
    Rigby, Kate
    Robin, Libby
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Mapping Common Ground: Ecocriticism, Environmental History, and the Environmental Humanities2014In: Environmental Humanities, E-ISSN 2201-1919, Vol. 5, p. 261-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of the environmental humanities presents a unique opportunity for scholarship to tackle the human dimensions of the environmental crisis. It might finally allow such work to attain the critical mass it needs to break out of customary disciplinary confines and reach a wider public, at a time when natural scientists have begun to acknowledge that an understanding of the environmental crisis must include insights from the humanities and social sciences. In order to realize this potential, scholars in the environmental humanities need to map the common ground on which close interdisciplinary cooperation will be possible. This essay takes up this task with regard to two fields that have embraced the environmental humanities with particular fervour, namely ecocriticism and environmental history. After outlining an ideal of slow scholarship which cultivates thinking across different spatiotemporal scales and seeks to sustain meaningful public debate, the essay argues that both ecocriticism and environmental history are concerned with practices of environing: each studies the material and symbolic transformations by which “the environment” is configured as a space for human action. Three areas of research are singled out as offering promising models for cooperation between ecocriticism and environmental history: eco-historicism, environmental justice, and new materialism. Bringing the fruits of such efforts to a wider audience will require environmental humanities scholars to experiment with new ways of organizing and disseminating knowledge.

  • 49.
    Bertilsson, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Bevattningens biopolitik: Lågt grundvatten som ett regeringsbart problem i Sverige2024In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 33, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In several parts of Sweden, difficulties arise regarding access to water. In this article, I explore the biopoliticsthat take shape when low groundwater levels are turned into an object of government. Firstly, I examinethe formation of a so-called anatomical politics which refers to a disciplining form of power in which theresponsibilities and actions of the population are at the center. Secondly, I explore the priorities that are madein the political work where human life, health, and well-being are to be protected and other life forms that arenot vital for human living are instead deprioritized or allowed to die. The problems have clear consequencesbut do not pose a threat to human survival. Political efforts aim to bring about changes in people’s everydaylives and affect the use and decoration of households and public spaces. Empirically, I attach particularsignificance to the irrigation bans that Swedish municipalities can introduce to reduce water consumption.

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    fulltext
  • 50.
    Bertilsson, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Drought or low water availability as an historical preparedness problem2022Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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