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  • 1.
    Anstey, Tim
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Architectural Technologies.
    The Dangers of Decorum2006In: arq Architecture research quarterly, ISSN 1359-1355, E-ISSN 1474-0516, Vol. 10, no 1, 131-139 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decorum, "appropriateness", is deeply embedded in the psyche of architects as a means to justify their actions. This essay considers the shifting significance of this term for architectural discourse.

  • 2.
    Armiero, Marco
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    I saperi estremi della natura2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Anternini, Luca
    Ambientalisti indisciplinati: il ruolo dell’ecologia politica nell’Antropocene2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    De Angelis, Massimo
    University of east London .
    Anthropocene: Victims, Narrators, and Revolutionaries2017In: The South Atlantic Quarterly, ISSN 0038-2876, E-ISSN 1527-8026, South Atlantic Quarterly, Vol. 116, no 2, 345-362 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The absence of a reflection on revolutionary practices and subjects is the main weakness of the radical critique of the Anthropocene. The risk is to envision the Anthropocene as a space for villains and victims but not for revolutionaries. It is crucial to challenge the (in)visibility and (un)knowability of the Anthropocene beyond geological strata and planetary boundaries. As the Capitalocene, the Anthropocene has left its traces in the bodies of people upon which the new epoch has been created. The traces of the Capitalocene are not only in geological strata but also in the biological and genetic strata of human bodies; exploitation, subordination, and inequalities are inscribed into the human body and experienced, visible and knowable by subalterns without the mediation of—many times actually in opposition to—mainstream scientific knowledge. This essay inflects the concept of Capitalocene with what we call Wasteocene, to stress the contaminating nature of capitalism and its perdurance within the sociobiological fabric, its accumulation of externalities inside both the human and the earth's body. The essay envisions the Wasteocene as a feature of the Capitalocene, especially adapted to demystify the mainstream narratives of the Anthropocene. To enhance these arguments, the essay builds on the findings of the Environmental Justice Organisations, Liabilities and Trade (EJOLT) atlas of environmental conflicts and on in-depth research on the struggles against toxic contamination in Campania, Italy.

  • 5.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Fava, Anna
    Of Humans, Sheep, and Dioxin: A History of Contamination and Transformation in Acerra, Italy2016In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290, Vol. 27, no 2, 67-82 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Iengo, Ilenia
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The politicization of ill bodies in Campania, Italy2017In: Journal of political ecology, ISSN 1073-0451, E-ISSN 1073-0451, Vol. 24, 44-58 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The communities affected by toxic contamination in Campania, Italy, have had to confront the challenge of proving a direct causal connection between exposure to pollutants and health issues, given a long history of mismanagement of waste. Medical studies have been conducted, but the social and political debate is static. In September 2014, the Italian Ministry of Health simply repeated earlier statements that Campania's increasing cancer rates are due to poor lifestyle habits. The article casts light on the politicization of ill bodies of Campania. We analyze three practices of political action and resistance which employed the subjectivization of physical bodies and illnesses to expose environmental injustice affecting communities. In the neighborhood of Pianura, Naples, people gathered medical records as evidence for a trial into 'culpable epidemics.' In the so-called Land of Fires, in the northern periphery of Naples, hundreds of postcards featuring pictures of children killed by rare pathologies were sent to the Italian Head of State and the Pope. Finally, in the town of Acerra, the blood of a dying shepherd became a political object to prove exposure to dioxin contamination in that area. The politicization of illness and bodies conflates the public and private, challenges the mainstream production of knowledge, and proposes an alternative narrative for affected communities and individuals. Nevertheless, the practices of this politicization have differed and are not always 'political', as we will show through the three cases.

  • 7.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Constructing industrial futures for the Arctic2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The circumpolar north has become increasingly important as a potential supply area for minerals, fossil energy resources and new shorter routes for international shipping. Allthough mining, oil and gas extraction are not new activities in the Arctic, the prospect of an ice free Arctic ocean may open possibilities for resource extraction in areas where such activities used to be unthinkable. Such visions of the future of the Arctic are not new however, there are several examples in the history of the Arctic of economic actors formulating visions of what the future of the region should be. The objective of this paper is to analyze the production of future visions for the Arctic by actors within large scale natural resource utilization industries historically and their influence on the economy and politics of the region. The paper will focus on actors involved in the coal mining industry in the Arctic archipelago Spitsbergen / Svalbard from 1898-present. The main research questions are: what futures visions have been produced by actors within the Spitsbergen coal mining industry and why? To what extent have these future visions gained influence in different time periods and why? How has companies and governments interacted in order to strengthen political influence and/or control over natural resources?

     

    The paper is based on analyses of sources from two contexts in which companies outlined their visions of the future of Spitsbergen – in written documents and material objects. Companies promoted their visions of the future in the form of narratives published in company prospects, expedition reports, annual reports, articles in professional journals and in correspondence with potential allies such as government bodies. They also formulated their visions by constructing buildings and technological systems in the landscape of Spitsbergen – material representations of potential, real or unlikely futures, economic and / or political.

     

    I will show that the Spitsbergen mining companies used their future visions in order to build actor networks. By constructing narratives about potential futures, they tried to enroll capital owners and political actors in to actor-networks strong enough to realize their visions. In a similar way, actors within politics and science included industry in their future visions in order to push their own agendas. Therefore, although the future visions of Arctic industry had many similar traits, the actors producing the visions often had quit different motives for producing them – economic visions hiding political agendas and strategic considerations. Moreover, the future visions has changed over the course of the 20th century, as result of the changing economic and political contexts on Svalbard and in Europe and the USA.

     

    The results suggest that Arctic future visions produced by industrial companies become influential if the companies share common interests with other influential actors (governments) and if they are able to build strong networks with such actors. Moreover, they show that Arctic future visions are most often elements in strategies aimed at achieving goals outside of the Arctic. The results can be used to deepen our understanding of the mineral and energy projects that underpin contemporary Arctic futures.

  • 8.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Constructing the pasts of competing Spitsbergen futures: Russian heritage in action2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Constructing the pasts of polar futures: the Janus face of polar heritage2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Creating sustainable development in the Arctic: abandoned extraction sites as assets for new Arctic futures2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impacts of climate change on polar cultural heritage have received an increasing attention in recent years within the field of heritage research. Less attention has been place on other processes of global change affecting the Arctic, where cultural heritage plays an important role – industrialization and de-industrialization. In recent years the circumpolar Arctic has been affected by a global mining boom, triggered by high world market prices on minerals as well as notions of the Arctic as a future arena for resource extraction in the wake of climate change. This mining boom is affecting communities in much of the Arctic region and holds a central place in debates about sustainable development there. A central item of these discussions focus on the question of how to handle the physical remains of mining sites once the boom is over and the activities have seized. The attitudes to abandoned mining sites differ across the Arctic. In some cases they have been perceived as unwanted legacies of problematic pasts, making land reclamation a preferred strategy. In other cases abandoned mines and associated infrastructures have been re-defined as cultural heritage and have become anchor points for local identities and a resource for new economies.

    The objective of this paper is to present a research project aiming to explain these differences in order to understand under which circumstances abandoned large-scale resource extraction sites can be turned into resources for new futures in post-industrial Arctic communities. The focus is on the European Arctic, but in a circumpolar and bi-polar comparative perspective. The main questions are: how have different groups of actors interpreted and used physical remains of abandoned resource extraction operations, and why? Which policies are needed to turn abandoned resource extraction sites into resources for constructing new futures in the Arctic? By addressing these questions, the field of heritage studies can make an important contribution to the discussion on sustainable futures in the Arctic.

  • 11.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Creating sustainable development in the Arctic: abandoned extraction sites as assets for new futures2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impacts of climate change on polar cultural heritage have received an increasing attention in recent years within the field of heritage research. Less attention has been place on other processes of global change affecting the Arctic, where cultural heritage plays an important role – industrialization and de-industrialization. In recent years the circumpolar Arctic has been affected by a global mining boom, triggered by high world market prices on minerals as well as notions of the Arctic as a future arena for resource extraction in the wake of climate change. This mining boom is affecting communities in much of the Arctic region and holds a central place in debates about sustainable development there. A central item of these discussions focus on the question of how to handle the physical remains of mining sites once the boom is over and the activities have seized. The attitudes to abandoned mining sites differ across the Arctic. In some cases they have been perceived as unwanted legacies of problematic pasts, making land reclamation a preferred strategy. In other cases abandoned mines and associated infrastructures have been re-defined as cultural heritage and have become anchor points for local identities and a resource for new economies.

    The objective of this paper is to present preliminary results from a research project aiming to explain these differences in order to understand under which circumstances abandoned large-scale resource extraction sites can be turned into resources for new futures in post-industrial Arctic communities. The focus is on the European Arctic, but in a circumpolar and bi-polar comparative perspective. The main questions are: how have different groups of actors interpreted and used physical remains of abandoned resource extraction operations, and why? Which policies are needed to turn abandoned resource extraction sites into resources for constructing new futures in the Arctic? By addressing these questions, the field of industrial heritage studies can make an important contribution to the discussion on sustainable futures in the Arctic.

  • 12.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Kampen om naturresurserna2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Report on the ICOMOS Advisory Mission to Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape (C1099) 18th-20th March 20142014Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Heritage Committee decision 37 COM 7B.43 (37th session, Phnom Penh, Cambodia, 2013) requested the State Party (Mapungubwe world heritage site, South Africa) to submit a minor boundary modification for the buffer zone of Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape, that clarifies the policies for protecting the property with respect to mining in the buffer zone and in relation to “off-set benefits”. Acting upon this request, the State Party worked on a revision of the buffer zone through 2013 and, as a part of this process, invited an ICOMOS Advisory Mission to the Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape. ICOMOS responded in favour of the invitation and sent ICOMOS expert Dr. Dag Avango to visit the proposed Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape buffer zone from 18-20 March 2014. This publication is the final report of Dag Avango's mission, describing the buffer zone of the World Heritage Site, the consequences of reducing it and reccomendations on how ICOMOS should act on the issue.

  • 14.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sustainable Communities and the Legacies of Mining in the Nordic Arctic2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Greening of Arctic Mining Landscapes: The Politics of Industrial Heritage at Svalbard2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Avango, Dag
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Valfångst, industriarv och geopolitik i Sydatlanten2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Grönlund-Myrberg, Lena
    Falun Copper Mine World Heritage Site.
    Falun copper mine – industrial heritage in mining futures2014In: Industrial and Mining Landscapes within world heritage context / [ed] Albrecht, Helmuth and Hansell, Friederike, Freiberg: IWTG/TU Bergakademie Freiberg , 2014, 142-153 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Falun copper mine is an industrial heritage site locatedin middle Sweden. Mining began here in the 8th century AD. Over a thousand years later, in 1992, the mine was closed and in 2001 Unesco declared it a world heritage site. Eight years later the Australian company Drake Resources started prospect drilling, right in the middle of the world heritage area, to investigate the possibilities for re-opening the mine again. This development is not unique. Rising world market prices for raw materials in recent years is driving a mining boom, in which companies seek licenses for prospecting and mining in increasingly remote locations, as well as in national parks and cultural heritage sites. World heritage sites are not excluded. From Cornwall to Falun, prospecting and mining companies attempt to reopen mining operations in world heritage sites where the historical remains that form the bases of the sites are a result of a long history of mining. This has led to a discussion within global heritage organisations such as TICCIH and ICOMOS, on how to deal with this development – are new mining operations in historical mining districts only a problem or could it also be seen as a resource, an activity representing continuity rather than destruction?

    The objective of this article is to describe the developmentof prospecting activities and mining plans at the Falu coppermine world heritage site and its possible consequences. What prospecting activities have taken place at the Falu copper mine after Unesco inscribed it on the world heritage list and why? How has local media and the organizations managing and protecting, responded to these plans andactivities and why? What could be the consequences of renewedmining operations at Falun?

  • 18.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Why history and industrial heritage matter for Arctic communities2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Robin, Libby
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Placing the Anthropocene2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Solnes, Sander
    Registrering av kulturminner i Pyramiden: Registrering utfört på oppdrag fra Sysselmannen på Svalbard2013Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta är en rapport från ett uppdrag vars syfte var att 1) registrere fredete kulturminner och 2) finna och kartfeste faste kulturminner fra før 1946 samt beskrive dem slik de er i dag og prøve å tolke tidligere funksjon. I uppdraget ingick att se närmmere på de teknisk industrielle kulturminnene som ligger i dagen, samt vurdere verdien av tidligere (men ikke fredete) industrielle kulturminner. Uppdraget ble utført av Dag Avango og Sander Solnes i Pyramiden i perioden 21.08-28.08. Rapporten innehåller resultaten av Avangos och Solnes inventering.

  • 21. Bergthaller, Hannes
    et al.
    Emmett, Rob
    Johns-Putra, Adeline
    Kneitz, Agnes
    Lidström, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    McCorristine, Shane
    Pérez Ramos, Isabel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Phillips, Dana
    Rigby, Kate
    Robin, Libby
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Mapping Common Ground: Ecocriticism, Environmental History, and the Environmental Humanities2014In: Environmental humanities, ISSN 2201-1919, Vol. 5, 261-276 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of the environmental humanities presents a unique opportunity for scholarship to tackle the human dimensions of the environmental crisis. It might finally allow such work to attain the critical mass it needs to break out of customary disciplinary confines and reach a wider public, at a time when natural scientists have begun to acknowledge that an understanding of the environmental crisis must include insights from the humanities and social sciences. In order to realize this potential, scholars in the environmental humanities need to map the common ground on which close interdisciplinary cooperation will be possible. This essay takes up this task with regard to two fields that have embraced the environmental humanities with particular fervour, namely ecocriticism and environmental history. After outlining an ideal of slow scholarship which cultivates thinking across different spatiotemporal scales and seeks to sustain meaningful public debate, the essay argues that both ecocriticism and environmental history are concerned with practices of environing: each studies the material and symbolic transformations by which “the environment” is configured as a space for human action. Three areas of research are singled out as offering promising models for cooperation between ecocriticism and environmental history: eco-historicism, environmental justice, and new materialism. Bringing the fruits of such efforts to a wider audience will require environmental humanities scholars to experiment with new ways of organizing and disseminating knowledge.

  • 22.
    Dahlberg, Leif
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Letellier, Isabelle
    Stockholm University.
    Gardens of Justice2014In: Pólemos, ISSN 2036-4601, Vol. 8, no 2, 217 – 222 p.217-222 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    de Pablo, A. D.
    KTH.
    Preservation of Franco’s social housing estates in Madrid2015In: Urbanism and Dictatorship: A European Perspective, Birkhauser Boston , 2015, 135-147 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Ekström, Anders
    Uppsala universitet.
    Ferdinand Boberg och statistikmaskineriet: Om statistik som medium, attraktion och utställning, ca 1800-19302006In: Nordisk Museologi, ISSN 1103-8152, no 1, 21-42 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Unprecedented1998In: Antithesis, ISSN 1030-3839, Vol. 9, 71-73 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Fölster, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    [Criticism without evidence, symptomatic of the health care debate] [Kritik utan evidens, symtomatiskt i sjukvårdsdebatten]2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 111, no 38Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Gärdebo, Johan
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Helsing, Daniel
    Svensson, Anna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Brenthel, Adam
    We Don't Need No Education: A Case Study for Situating the Environmental Humanities2014In: Resilience: A Journal of the Environmental Humanities, ISSN 2330-8117, Vol. 1, no 3, 42-53 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Ethnic Conflict and the Right to Return of Limbo Disaporas: Multifaceted Reflections on the Case of BiH2004In: Migration and Ethnic Studies (Migracijske i Etnicke Teme), ISSN 1133-2546, Vol. 20, no 1, 29-51 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the phenomenon of refugees and resettled persons in the process of forcedmigrations in the aftermath of man-made disasters. Although some of the ideas presented here couldhave wider application, the focus is on post-conflict zones within the former Yugoslavia, namely BiH.The paper uses the questions of ethnicity and nationalism within resettlement, dislocation and immigrationas a backdrop, into which the issue of globalization is also briefly reflected. The intention hereis not to cover a wide range of pressing topics, but simply to relate a number of issues arising in contemporarylarge-scale forced migrations to a resurgence of cultural specificity and ethnicized nationalismas counterpoints to globalization. The paper introduces the concept of “limbo diasporas” in the caseof Bosnian refugees in Sweden through reflection and linkage with the aforementioned concepts. Thepaper ends with some recommendations and open questions on social rehabilitation and ethnic healingas well as some general conclusions.

  • 29.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    New Urbanism and Beyond: Designing Cities for the Future2008 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Sustainable Urbanism and Beyond: Rethinking Cities for the Future2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    The Best of New Urbanism: Selected Articles & Essays 2002-2012: Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of Congress for New Urbanism2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This unique book brings together, for the first time ever, a collection of probably the best papers & essays written on the international phenomena known as new urbanism. The range of articles spans different tenets of the movement, its theories and principles, methods & tools, contributions & critique and much more. The authors originate from variety of disciplines such as, sociology, public policy, human geography, economics, urban planning, urban design, architecture, real estate development and urban studies. It is a unique and timely collection of new and older works, freshly complied for the 20th anniversary of congress of new urbanism and the new urbanism movement. This volume is a limited release printed only for academia, faculty and students

  • 32.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Söderlind, Anders Jerker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    7½ Humble Stance Essays in Urban Planning & Design2008Other (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Herdenstam, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Skills and Technology.
    Den arbetande gommen: vinprovarens dubbla grepp, från analys till upplevelse2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Can art express things that science can´t? Communicating experiences of wine attributes is one important part of the practical knowledge of professional wine tasters working in different contexts. A central question concerns how common terms and concepts emerge and how they are communicated in wine tasting situations. Adapting a pragmatic-constitutive perspective, investigating the dialogue while experiencing a contextual wine tasting situation stands as a core issue exploring concept formation in  wine tasters practical skills. This study takes as a starting point such dialogues. Case studies were performed in different situations where skills were communicated. When grasping important gestalt aspects of the wine, it was concluded that analogies and metaphors are important tools if explored in dialogue with the occuring gestalt aspects. It was also concluded that the analogical thinking at stake in this delicate communicative act is crucial in educational purposes involving fine judgements. It is therefore suggested that an aesthetic perspective should have the same legitimacy as the analytical one, in expressing other important aspects of the experience. These gestalt aspects of the wine experience can not be fully caught within a traditional scientific perspective using analytical methods. It is suggested that a double grip is essential when improving learning conditions for wine professionals.

     

     

  • 34.
    Herdenstam, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Sinnesupplevelsens estetik: vinprovaren, i gränslandet mellan konsten och vetenskapen2004Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Can art express things that science can´t? Communicating experiences of wine attributes is one important part of the practical knowledge of professional wine tasters working in different contexts. From this point of view a central question arise concerning how common terms and concepts emerge and how they are communicated in the wine tasting situation. The analytical perspective have been generated in attempts to quantify experienced and verbalised attributes, using analytical methods with no regard to context . The synthetic perspective, on the other hand, assumes that the wine taster first acquires an overall understanding of a wine's character and then, to the best of his ability, breaks this experience down into separate attributes. The synthetic experience is characterized by being generated during the interaction between the taster and the wine and therefore is related to the context. The synthetic experience, in comparison with the analytical one, is hard to grasp with traditional methods. On the other hand, when adapting an aesthetic perspective on the sensory experience we conclude that there are dimensions of the practical knowledge of wine tasters that can be explored in pragmatic-constitutive studies.

    The technique, inspired by the Dialogue seminar method, was applied in order to compare the judgements of attributes in four wines within different tasting groups of professional wine tasters. It was found that the variances in the terminology for the attributes investigated could be explained by the use of different markings for the same attribute. This indicates that the Dialogue seminar method, with applied modifications, might be a useful tool when training professional wine tasters. This might generate an overall understanding of the reality experienced by the wine taster. Based on our findings, we suggest that the method also can be used in order to introduce new concepts which might be included in a common language and thus make a connection between the analytical and synthetic experience.

  • 35.
    Högström, Ebba
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Kalejdoskopiska rum: Diskurs, materialitet och praktik i den decentraliserade psykiatriska vården2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the period 1967-1995, Swedish mental healthcare underwent a complete re-organisation, starting with county councils taking over responsibility for mental healthcare from the state. Asylums were then phased out and mental health care moved closer to patients. The Mental Health Reform of 1995 completed this decentralisation and put the emphasis on an independent and integrated life as a citizen in society and the idea of a dwelling of one’s own. This thesis describes and analyses spatial aspects of decentralised mental healthcare in Sweden, focusing on the decentralisation discourse regarding organisation, localisation, patient care and working methods behind decentralisation and its spatial performance. A case study of decentralised mental healthcare in Nacka, a Stockholm suburb, between 1958-1999 examines in particular the emerging decentralisation discourse 1958-1973, The Nacka Project 1974-1980 (one of the first examples of community care in Sweden), psychiatry in Nacka 1980-1994 and the official report Welfare and Freedom of Choice from 1995. The methods used include studies of documents, interviews, visual and architectural drawing analysis. The theoretical point of departure for the analysis is a post-structural heterogeneous concept of space where spatial materiality and discursiveness are looked upon as intertwined.

       The result shows that the re-organisation of mental healthcare brought about a substantial spatial transformation. Normalisation of patients’ lives involved integration into society and support for independent living. The local environment was the main trope for the early stage of decentralised mental healthcare, but the notion of a dwelling of one’s own became the important trajectory to an independent life after 1995. The idea of the patient is challenged by the independence discourse, which could be said to contain an idea of the ‘non-patient’. Overall, it can be concluded that spatial organisations of the built environment are never value-free or neutral. They reflect, enable and constrain power relations in a society and material space can contribute to the power of one group at the expense of another. Furthermore, the results of the spatialities, or the meanings, cannot be predicted. It is therefore crucial to distinguish power in all its configurations and scales and to keep negotiations alive, especially within the field of mental healthcare, but also in the care sector as a whole and in other societal institutions where policies buildings and built environment interact with user practices. This kaleidoscopic perspective can be used for examining complexities in the past and present and for encouraging future potentialities in the process of making/enacting spatial relations.

  • 36.
    Höhler, Sabine
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Local Disruption or Global Condition?: El Niño as Weather and as Climate Phenomenon2017In: GEO Geography and Environment, ISSN 2054-4049, Vol. 4, no 1, 1-11 p., 2017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    El Niño denotes a periodical warm water stream in the Pacific Ocean. But who knew about this phenomenon, where and how? El Niño ‘the boy’ emerged as a fabric of local experiences and stories of extreme weather events: tropical winter storms, floods, droughts and famines in the coastal states of South America, Indonesia and Southeast Asia. In the Northern Hemisphere this rich cultural history went largely unnoticed. Only in the 1980s and 1990s did El Niño acquire global recognition as an effect of the oceanic and atmospheric currents in the tropical Pacific region. As the oceans moved from a marginal to a central position in the discourse on the Earth’s climate cycles, ENSO – the ‘El Niño Southern Oscillation’ – became part of a global climate pattern. This paper explores El Niño ‘the boy’ and ENSO El Niño Southern Oscillation as juxtaposed and superposed environmental perceptions. While El Niño the boy conveyed horrific weather experiences on the human scale, ENSO became known through terrific scientific views of Earth from space. Earth observation by remote sensing satellites collected vast arrays of local measurements into new data fabrics. Studying the case of the US–French orbital satellite mission of TOPEX/Poseidon, this paper examines both the imagery from satellite data and the forecasting effortspreceding the strong El Niño winter of 1997–8. From the data and image sets of remote sensing satellites, recurring local disruptions emerged as a periodic global climate condition. Local experiences of El Niño and scientific perceptions of ENSO as a global climate cycle did not translate easily into each other. The paper discusses some of the epistemological tensions across spatial scales. While El Niño’s shift from exception to regularity fed into the framing of ‘climate change’ as a global disaster, the emerging ENSO regime obscured disaster locally.

  • 37.
    Höhler, Sabine
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Spaceship Earth in the Environmental Age, 1960-19902016 (ed. 2.)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of the earth as a vessel in space came of age in an era shaped by space travel and the Cold War. This study brings together technology, science and ecology to explore the way this latter-day ark was invoked by politicians, environmentalists, cultural historians, writers of science fiction and many others across three decades.

  • 38.
    Höhler, Sabine
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Wormbs, Nina
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Remote sensing: Digital data at a distance2017In: Methodological Challenges in Nature-Culture and Environmental History Research / [ed] Jocelyn Thorpe, Stephanie Rutherford, L. Anders Sandberg, London, New York: Routledge, 2017, 272-283 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39. Klimis, George Michael
    et al.
    Wallis, Roger
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    COPYRIGHT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP: CATALYST OR BARRIER?2009In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 12, no 2, 267-286 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper critically revisits the theory of entrepreneurship giving particular weight to the economic, business and sociological meaning of the term. It supports the position that the creator should be thought of as an entrepreneur, i.e. somebody who not only creates but who is also, or even primarily, aiming to exploit his/her creation to appropriate rent. The paper tries to build a theoretical framework to facilitate research in the cultural industries using the concepts of disequilibrium, entrepreneurial opportunity and rent, and intellectual property rights. We assess the disruptive role of new technologies in the music industry and examine the role of copyright as an institution that can both hinder or facilitate entrepreneurship and innovation in the digital domain.

  • 40.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Exponerat, Tillgängligt och iscensatt... och det gömda, det dömda och det glömda2009In: MODE - en introduktion: En tvärvetenskaplig betraktelse / [ed] Louise Wallenberg & Dirk Gindt, Stockholm: Raster Förlag , 2009, 175-198 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    [Detta är de inledande styckena i kapitlet och inte ett egentligt abstract]

    Direkt innanför entrén till Åhléns fanns i november 2005 fyrtioåtta(dam)ben klädda i strumpbyxor eller nätstrumpor. FrånKlarabergsleden, innanför glasväggarna, sågs kosmetikmärken som Shiseido, Dior, Givenchy, Roc och Estée Lauder, medan det man möttes av innanför huvudentrén var Biotherm och Lancôme, som övergick i Chanel, Kanebo och Guerlain. Någonstans där bakomfanns, för den som tog sig dit, Max Factor, Revlon, och Decleor, medflera. En trappa upp låg damavdelningen där det fanns tre gånger flerskyltdockor som bar kläderna till försäljning än på herravdelningen,i Debenhams fyra gånger så många. Direkt från entrén till damavdelningarna i varuhusen kunde man se minst ett, helst flera, provrum,gärna också gardinerna som dras för, medan man ofta fick letaför att hitta dem på herravdelningarna. En del påminns man ständigtom medan annat mest flyter förbi, en del måste man aktivt leta efter. Såsom herrstrumpor.

    Det här, som bildar konsekventa mönster i shoppingmiljön, förklaras ofta med tankemodeller som används inom en del retail-litteratur, framförallt i dess populärvetenskapliga version: attraktorvaror och impulsköp.1 Ofta behandlas det vidare som om shoppingmiljönhar ett enda syfte: att exponera så mycket som möjligt, och göra detså enkelt som möjligt att förse sig.2 Det är så det förmedlas i tidskrifteroch bilder, i reklam och inte sällan i andra media som filmer ochteveserier. Ändå kräver det endast lite eftertanke att peka mot varorsom brukar vara undangömda, svårnådda, eller avsides.3 Av den anledningenär det viktigt att diskutera vad valet av grad av exponeringinnebär, och också vad det innebär att något är lätt att nå eller finnsbakom disk, inuti glasboxar, eller längst upp, längst in, längst bak.

    För en sådan diskussion är det av vikt att vi vrider perspektivet och läser behandlingen av mode och kläder i varuhus och butikersom disseminering och förhandling av modesystem snarare än rationelltförsäljningsmaskineri. Detta ger oss en annan bild av vad sompågår, som i viss utsträckning är förklarande.4 Vi bör också släppa enständigt framförd argumentation om målinriktade subjekt och specifika objekt som begärs och söks upp till förmån för en syn där arkitekturenär en aktiv deltagare i ständigt pågående förhandlingar och bestämningar genom hur den ordnar, strukturerar och förmedlar rum. I shoppingmiljön, på plats i den performativa handlingen, sker ett identitetsbildande; en slags träning, utbildning, protest mot och godtagande av modesystemet.5

  • 41.
    Kunnas, Jan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Storytelling: From the early Anthropocene to the good or the bad Anthropocene2017In: The Anthropocene Review, ISSN 2053-0196, E-ISSN 2053-020X, Vol. 4, no 2, 136-150 p., 10.1177/2053019617725538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines whether the Anthropocene can be a helpful metaphor for holistic understandings of human impacts on the Earth. I argue that for this, splitting the Anthropocene into several consecutive stages would be helpful, and suggest a multistage Anthropocene: the early Anthropocene, the first acceleration phase, the post-1950 Great Acceleration, and finally the good or the bad anthropocene depending on whether humans take decisive action in time that ensures us staying within planetary boundaries. This reframing uses the power of storytelling by presenting a multifaceted picture of human agency in the Anthropocene, provides a deep framing that is positive and supports action, and provides clear signals on the direction in which we are moving. It puts humans back in their rightful place on Earth – as one of many species, although with large power for the good or the bad, and the responsibilities this brings.

  • 42.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Johan, Gärdebo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Tools for Transformation: How engineering education benefits from interactive E-learning and the Humanities2015In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings, American Society for Engineering Education , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper engages with how to construct means for student activation, using analytical models, e-learning and web tools in engineering education. Learning requires different levels of understanding and means to appropriate and formulate knowledge. However, peer instruction and student participation require a degree of facilitation, which is a role the teacher needs to analyse and develop before students can be demanded to demonstrate increased participation in course content, feedback and design. The specific context of student learning discussed here is based on experiences from a course for international engineering students at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden. The course aim is to train students in critically analyzing the role of national identities, social- and technological engineering and politics in shaping Swedish society. One challenge is to enable engineering students to develop skills in critical thinking by engaging with texts from social sciences and humanities dealing with topics formulated in the course aim. Reading, writing and discussing texts on historical and contemporary examples are used to attain learning outcomes, relating to both course content as well as practical skills of critical reflection, reasoning and developing arguments in writing. This study draws on experiences from changing a course previously relying on attendance towards encouraging and explicitly rewarding student contribution to each other’s learning. The broader aim have been for students to learn to think, read, discuss and write analytically, while using web-tools in combination with seminar exercises to increase student interaction in these processes and time on task. While these skills are instrumental, we argue that they are valuable for students to engage in interactive learning of a more transformative character where students benefit from learning through reciprocal questioning, joint learning and peer-instruction. Source material is gathered using course evaluations and feedback from students at lectures and seminars. Some early results based on experiences from the seminar activities, where students wrote a text relating to an analytical question and thereafter made commentson a fellow classmate’s text, showed that the students gained enough in-depth understanding to present an argument when commenting on a classmates’ text in the same topic. Students experienced working with analytical questions and peers as supportive for engaging with topics previously perceived to be challenging. Other students were exposed to texts with some basic components missing (defining key concepts etc.) providing challenges in formulating constructive comments and suggestions for improvements. To conclude, the implication of using analytical models, e-learning and web tools in engineering education is instrumental for student activation in the sense that students acquire skills for active reading and writing. However the use of analytical questions and reciprocal questioning in seminar activities and web forums prompts new channels for interactive learning between students and a more transformative prospect of relating skills from social sciences and humanities with engineering practices in society.

  • 43.
    Legeby, Ann
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Marcus, Lars
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Does the urban structure of Swedish cities inhibit the sharing of public space?2011In: Built Environment, ISSN 0263-7960, Vol. 37, no 2, 155-169 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues that a strong focus on residential segregation limits the understanding of the role of the built environment. The city is used as more than just a place of residence; urban life is far from restricted to where we live. The potential for interplay that develops as people share public space is argued to be just as important for integration processes as the residential mix. In addition, this article examines shortcomings related to the definition of residential segregation because of limitations within the scientific analysis of urban space: the evident difficulties in delimiting relevant geographical units and deli­miting relevant social groups. The study is based on empirical analysis of Södertälje, Sweden. Södertälje topped international news when its mayor informed the US Congress that the city had managed to receive more refugees from the war in Iraq than the US and Canada combined. However, to what extent are these new immigrants given access to Swedish society through everyday practices? The results highlight how segregation in public space – including impaired accessibility to a range of resources such as places of work and contact with other people – is a very strong feature of excluded areas and is strongly disadvantageous for newcomers. These results challenge some of the beliefs in the current public debate as well as some of the principles used by Swedish authorities to ameliorate segregation.

  • 44.
    Lidström, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Position paper: JPI Climate Future Research Leaders Forum2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sea-level rise in public science writing: history, science and reductionism2016Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few years, a rush of literary non-fiction books have appeared that aim to explain the threat of rising seas to the public. In this talk Susanna Lindstrom critiques how sea-level rise is framed in many of those books, on two accounts. First, anthropogenic sea-level change is frequently framed by accounts of natural variations of sea level in earth history, focusing on geological rather than societal processes. Second, single and sudden floods are often used to exemplify sea-level rise in ways that draw attention away from incremental environmental change in favor of fast-paced but de-contextualized events. Lindstrom’s presentation argues that both these frames de-politicize sea-level rise and may steer public understanding and discussion away from relevant social, cultural and ethical considerations. As examples of climate reductionism, these depictions may obstruct rather than facilitate appropriate negotiations in response to predicted sea-level rise.

    Sponsored by the Center for the Humanities and the Department of Literature.

  • 46.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sea-level rise in public science writing: history, science and reductionism2017In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sea-level rise is a dramatic effect of climate change, with profound implications for societies around the world. In the past few years, a rush of literary non-fiction books have appeared that aim to explain the threat of rising seas to the public. This paper critiques how sea-level rise is framed in many of those books, on two accounts. First, anthropogenic sea-level change is frequently framed by accounts of natural variations of sea level in earth history, focusing on geological rather than societal processes. Second, single and sudden floods are often used to exemplify sea-level rise in ways that draw attention away from incremental environmental change in favour of fast-paced but de-contextualized events. The paper argues that both these frames de-politicize sea-level rise and may steer public understanding and discussion away from relevant social, cultural, and ethical considerations. As examples of climate reductionism, these depictions may obstruct rather than facilitate appropriate negotiations in response to predicted sea-level rise.

  • 47.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sea-level rise in public science writing: history, science and reductionism2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Presentation Abstract: Sea-level rise is potentially one of the most dramatic effects of climate change. In the past few years, a rush of literary non-fiction books have appeared that aim to explain and communicate this threat to the public. This paper critiques how sea-level rise is framed in many of those books, on two accounts. First, anthropogenic sea-level change is frequently framed by accounts of natural variations of sea level in earth history, focusing on geological rather than societal processes. Second, single and sudden floods are often used to exemplify sea-level rise in ways that draw attention away from incremental environmental change in favour of fast-paced but de-contextualised events. The paper argues that both these frames de-politicise sea-level rise and may steer public understanding and discussion away from relevant political, cultural and ethical considerations, thereby obstructing rather than facilitating appropriate negotiations in response to predicted sea-level rise.

  • 48.
    Lidström, Susanna
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    West, Simon
    Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    An Interdisciplinary Perspective on Invasive Alien Species2017In: PLoS Ecology BlogArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Lidström, Susanna
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Åberg, Anna
    Chalmers universitet.
    Havet stiger!: Fakta och fiktion om stigande havsnivåer2016Other (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Lidström, Susanna
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Åberg, Anna
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Rising seas: facts, fictions and aquaria2016In: Curating the future: museums, communities and climate change / [ed] Jennifer Newell, Libby Robin, Kirsten Wehner, Routledge, 2016, 1, 230-239 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 85
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