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  • 1.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Tutoring online tutors: Using digital badges to encourage the development of online tutoring skills2018In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 127-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Online tutors play a critical role in e-learning and need to have an appropriate set of skills in addition to subject matter expertise. This paper explores how digital badges can be used to encourage the development of online tutoring skills. Based on previous research, we defined three digital badges, which are examples of essential tutoring skills.These skills were self-assessed during two weeks by online tutors in K-12 mathematics, who also wrote a self-reflection based on their experience. The digital badges motivated tutors to reflect on online tutoring practices. The tutors described that they gained a more detailed understanding of the tutoring process when continuously analyzing ongoing conversations. However, it was a challenge for the tutors to balance the private activity, reflection on tutoring skills, and the social activity, communication with the K-12 students. It is essential to take into account when tutors will have time to reflect, for example, by scheduling time for reflection or enabling opportunities for reflection that is flexible in time. A challenge for further research is to better understand the potential benefits of different types of badges

  • 2. Jaldemark, Jimmy
    et al.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning. Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    Öberg, Lena-Maria
    Editorial introduction: Collaborative learning enhanced by mobile technologies2018In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 201-206Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Kukulska-Hulme, Agnes
    et al.
    The Open University (UK). The Institute of Educational Technology.
    Viberg, Olga
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Mobile collaborative language learning: State of the Art2018In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 207-218Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a review of mobile collaborative language learning studies published in 2012–16 with the aim to improve understanding of how mobile technologies have been used to support collaborative learning among second and foreign language students. We identify affordances, general pedagogical approaches, second- and foreign-language pedagogical approaches, second language acquisition (SLA) principles and affective designs. The results indicate that affordances such as flexible use, continuity of use, timely feedback, personalisation, socialisation, self-evaluation, active participation, peer coaching, sources of inspiration outdoors and cultural authenticity have been emphasised. These affordances were found to be particularly suited to promote social constructivism, which is often sustained by game-based, task based and seamless learning. In terms of second and foreign language pedagogical approaches, the combination of individualised and collaborative learning prevails, along with task based, situated and communicative language learning, and raising orthographic awareness. Among SLA principles, negotiation of meaning and opportunities for feedback are highlighted. Affective aspects include increases in motivation, engagement and enjoyment, mutual encouragement, reduction in nervousness and embarrassment, and a few negative reports of risk of distraction, safety concerns, feelings of uncertainty and technical problems. The reviewed studies present a convincing case for the benefits of collaboration in mobile language learning.

  • 4.
    Lytras, Miltiades D
    et al.
    University of Patras, Gerakas, Greece.
    Naeve, Ambjörn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Semantic e-learning: synthesising fantasies2006In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 479-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When the subject of scientific analysis is learning, the research needs to be anchored in various nonmonolithic pillars. Several disciplines require a common ground of convergence. An objective observer of the domain can easily conclude that semantic e-learning brings together the three different worlds of learners, pedagogues and technologists. In this short concluding paper of the special issue, we criticise the monolithic approaches to technology-enhanced learning. We argue that semantic e-learning presents a critical research challenge to move towards extended openness, meaning exploitation and unforeseen learning opportunities for the global community. The concluding remark is a call for a new learning generation primer. Synthesizing fantasies is in fact an invitation to semantically define our commitment to collaborate and to agree on the technology-enabled services that bring learning to the forefront. The promotion of the knowledge-and-learning-society requires an integration of the demand and supply side of knowledge and learning.

  • 5.
    Naeve, Ambjörn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Lytras, Miltiades D.
    University of Patras, Gerakas, Greece.
    Nejdl, Wolfgang
    University of Hannover.
    Balacheff, Nicolas
    Leibniz laboratory (CNRS-INPG-UJF), Grenoble.
    Hardin, Joseph
    University of Michigan, USA .
    Advances of the Semantic Web for e-learning: Expanding learning frontiers2006In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 10p. 321-330Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of semantic web and its relevant technologies tools and applications provide a new context for exploitation. In the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) semantic web activity a list of priorities set the major challenges for the realization of the next generation web. The challenge of using semantic web is important for a globally sustainable future. The digital divide between the 'information haves' and the 'information-have-nots' shows no sign of shrinking.

  • 6.
    Qarabash, Haneen
    et al.
    Baghdad Univ, Baghdad, Iraq..
    Heslop, Philip
    Newcastle Univ, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Kharrufa, Ahmed
    Newcastle Univ, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Devlin, Marie
    Newcastle Univ, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Group tagging: Using video tagging to facilitate reflection on small group activities2019In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 1913-1928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative learning in class-based teaching presents a challenge for a tutor to ensure every group and individual student has the best learning experience. We present Group Tagging, a web application that supports reflection on collaborative, group-based classroom activities. Group Tagging provides students with an opportunity to record important moments within the class-based group work and enables reflection on and promotion of professional skills such as communication, collaboration and critical thinking. After class, students use the tagged clips to create short videos showcasing their group work activities, which can later be reviewed by the teacher. We report on a deployment of Group Tagging in an undergraduate Computing Science class with 48 students over a semester. Through our analysis of interviews and log data, we show that Group Tagging helped the students remain attentive and on-task during group work, and encouraged them to participate more during group activities.

  • 7.
    Viberg, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bälter, Olof
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Riese, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Mavroudi, Anna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Faculty pedagogical developers as enablers of technology‐enhanced learning2018In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the integration of digital technologies in higher education continues to increase, there is a need to understand how to best support university teachers as designers of technology‐enhanced learning (TEL) in order to support students to achieve academic success. In this study, we have examined the Faculty Pedagogical Developer Initiative at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden, an innovative project to support a bottom‐up change process of teachers as designers of TEL, with the intent to strengthen the professional pedagogical development for the faculty. Data were collected from interviews and official documents. Actor–network theory was applied for the analysis. The results suggest that the initiative stimulated both practical implementation of digital technology in educational programmes and also spurred a debate about teachers as designers of TEL between these pedagogical developers and other teachers across different schools and subjects at KTH. However, there are important social, organisational and technical challenges that should be considered when developing support for university teachers as designers of TEL. This paper concludes that this process requires a deep understanding of four interrelated elements: information, technology, organisation and social arrangements.

  • 8.
    Yli-Luoma, Petti
    et al.
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Naeve, Ambjörn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Towards a semantic e-learning theory by using a modelling approach2006In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 445-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, a semantic perspective on e-learning theory is advanced and a modelling approach is used. This modelling approach towards the new learning theory is based on the four SECI phases of knowledge conversion: Socialisation, Externalisation, Combination and Internalisation, introduced by Nonaka in 1994, and involving two levels of knowledge-tacit and explicit. In the Socialisation phase, the teacher-student interaction activates the exploratory learning behaviour. This phase is emotionally and socially loaded. The Externalisation phase is partly emotional but a cognitive dimension is also needed, which requires creativity. This phase works optimally if it is collaborative in nature. In the Combination phase, an ability for hypothetical-deductive thinking is needed for the modelling approach. During the Internalisation phase, the learning process requires that students engage in seeking to understand and explain natural phenomena, which further demands testing of the theoretical concepts.

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