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  • 1. Enström Öst, C.
    et al.
    Wilhelmsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    The long-term consequences of youth housing for childbearing and higher education2019In: Journal of Policy Modeling, ISSN 0161-8938, E-ISSN 1873-8060, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 845-858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lack of housing in areas where young adults have greater opportunities to study and get work complicates young adults’ entry into the adulthood. Difficulties in accessing housing may therefore delay childbearing and may negatively have an effect on education opportunities. To increase housing accessibility, some municipalities have earmarked apartments for young adults. These “youth dwellings” are criticized for being small and not necessarily facilitating family formation and fertility, better suiting students’ needs. We have in this paper compared the long-term pattern of childbearing and education for young adults that entered their housing market through small cheap youth housing with those youngsters that received a rental apartment from the ordinary housing stock. To be able to draw the conclusion that differences in fertility and educational pattern between these two groups comes from the different housing situation and not from differences in in preferences when it comes to childbearing or individual prerequisites for higher education, we have used a geocoded data and information on the individual's family background as well as a matching technique to create a comparison group that are similar to the treatment group in several aspects. The present results indicate that building affordable housing that is small and space efficient is sufficient and positive if the aim is to promote higher education. Affordable housing is on the other hand not enough to promote childbearing, instead, it seems to inhibit childbearing until there is a possibility of moving on in the housing career. Our result also indicates that the next step need not necessarily be homeownership, as earlier research has indicated. Entering the housing market via youth housing and then being able to move on to rental accommodation in the ordinary housing market also seems to have a positive effect on overall childbearing, although moving to cooperative housing or owned housing has an even larger effect.

  • 2. Enström Öst, Cecilia
    et al.
    Söderberg, Bo
    Wilhelmsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Household allocation and spatial distribution in a market under ("soft") rent control2014In: Journal of Policy Modeling, ISSN 0161-8938, E-ISSN 1873-8060, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 353-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyse whether segregation exists in the rental housing market in Stockholm, Sweden, a market under persistent and all-embracing, yet "soft", rent control. We use segregation measures for the uncontrolled cooperative housing segment as benchmarks for analysing whether rent control counteracts segregation. We apply the analyses to a rich dataset encompassing some 400,000 households. We find that income segregation is significantly lower in the rent control segment than in the free market benchmark. However, when analysing segregation with respect to other segregation measures, the rental housing market is more segregated in these respects than in the non-regulated market for cooperatives. Rent control has arguably led to a comparatively flat rent gradient over the city and thus the comparatively low rents in the central, and most attractive, areas of the city provide a general subsidy to those who live in these areas. But according to our results this subsidy does not efficiently benefit households with low educated level, households with children, young households or households with a migrant background.

  • 3.
    Wigren, Rune
    et al.
    Uppsala, IBF.
    Wilhelmsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Construction investments and economic growth in Western Europe2007In: Journal of Policy Modeling, ISSN 0161-8938, E-ISSN 1873-8060, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 439-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research task in the present study is to examine the statistical relationship between gross domestic product and a broad group of construction and, furthermore, the presence of crowding-out within the construction industry in Europe. The empirical analyzes support the findings of no crowding-out effect within the construction industry. Contrary, it seems that investments in especially infrastructure will have a complementary filling-in effect by an increase in both residential and other building construction. The Granger causality tests are not conclusive. However, the results imply that GDP Granger cause total construction in the short run, but not vice versa. Furthermore, infrastructure investments Granger causes GDP in the short run. The overall conclusion is that public infrastructure policies have an effect on short-run economic growth but only a weak effect on the long run and that there exist a filling-in effect from other types of construction. Furthermore, residential construction does have a long-run effect on economic growth.

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