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  • 1.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    D'Alisa, Giacomo
    Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain .
    Rights of Resistance: The Garbage Struggles for Environmental Justice in Campania, Italy2012In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 52-68Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    D'Alisa, Giacomo
    Autonomous University Barcelona, Spain.
    Voices, Clues, Numbers: Roaming Among Waste in Campania2013In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 7-16Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Armiero, Marco
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Fava, Anna
    Of Humans, Sheep, and Dioxin: A History of Contamination and Transformation in Acerra, Italy2016In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 67-82Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    D'Alisa, Giacomo
    et al.
    Autonomous University in Barcelona, Spain.
    Armiero, Marco
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    What happened to the trash: Political miracles and real statistics in an emergency regime2013In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 29-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article focuses on waste struggles in Campania, Italy, showing how the state of emergency has been used for years to silence alternative solutions to the waste crisis and favor private economic interests. In Italy, when an event severely jeopardizes human security, the prime minister declares a 'state of emergency' and appoints a commissioner with the power to coordinate actions regarding the catastrophe and rescue of the population. This procedure concentrates all the powers in one agency for coping more efficiently and timely with situations of extreme danger, which, due to their intensity and extent, need extraordinary means and power to guarantee an effective coordination and avoid institutional overlaps. In recent decades, the history of the Italian republic attests to an increasing use of the state of emergency to govern the most ordinary issues of contemporary society. Indeed, even if the first commissioners were appointed in the 1970s, Italians have experienced several extraordinary commissioners also for traffic and mobility control, or to manage 'grand' events including G8 summits, international sports meetings, and global religious conventions.

  • 5.
    Huber, Amelie
    et al.
    Autonomous University Barcelona, Spain.
    Gorostiza, Santiago
    University of Coimbra, Portugal.
    Kotsila, Panagiota
    Autonomous University Barcelona, Spain .
    Beltrán, María Jesus
    Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Spain .
    Armiero, Marco
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Beyond “Socially Constructed” Disasters: Re-politicizing the Debate on Large Dams through a Political Ecology of Risk2016In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Questions of dam safety and hazard potential most often do not take center-stage in contestations and articulations concerning large dams. Through a comparative study of two of Europe’s most emblematic dam disasters – Vajont (Italy) and Ribadelago (Spain) – and the ongoing conflict over the safety of the Lower Subansiri Hydroelectric Project in Northeast India, this article argues that the damage caused by dam disasters is often not unavoidable or unforeseen but instead allowed to happen. Our cases show that power relations, economic pressures and profit influence “risky” dam management decisions, often disregarding the vernacular knowledge of concerned communities and silencing critical voices that do not fit dominant narratives of modernization and progress. We posit that an essential requirement for re-politicizing the question of dam safety is to unpack the apolitical notion of “socially constructed disasters,” thinking instead about “capital-driven destructions.” By emphasizing resistance against dam projects and against dominant risk discourses across space and time, this article seeks to underline the legitimacy of past and ongoing struggles surrounding the construction of large dams.

  • 6.
    Peterson, Jesse
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    I Saw You Running Home2017In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290, , p. 2p. 122-123Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Turhan, Ethemcan
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Armiero, Marco
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Cutting the Fence, Sabotaging the Border: Migration as a Revolutionary Practice2017In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Valisena, Daniele
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Gough, Anne
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    From Factories in the Field to Activist Scholar: Don Mitchell Reflects on Intellectual Practice and the State of the University Today2017In: Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, ISSN 1045-5752, E-ISSN 1548-3290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Don Mitchell is one of the most influential contemporary cultural geographers and has long been at the forefront of scholarship on intersections of capital, nature and labor. His work engages the geo-historical processes of landscape co-production and discusses how social, political and labor struggles that formed landscapes have been hidden or erased. Mitchell’s research and work are informed by an urgency to uncover the forces shaping the human–land dialectic. It is difficult not to sense profound urgency at the current political–ecological conjuncture, which is why we turned to Don Mitchell to reflect on his research, intellectual practice and the state of academia and activism today. The first section of the interview centers on Mitchell’s research and the tools and methods he employs in his work. In the second section of the interview, we discuss strategies and tactics in resistance struggles, campus activism and radical scholarship. Infused throughout the interview are the influences that have shaped Mitchell’s unique approach to teaching, research and a critical academic life. We conclude with a section on current academic practice.

1 - 8 of 8
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