Change search
Refine search result
1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Brown, Nils
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Wintzell, Helene
    Owner organizations' value-creation strategies through environmental certification of buildings2016In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 863-874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The existing literature (mostly referencing heuristics of the valuation profession) provides little evidence on how property owners and managers themselves perceive value creation from environmental certification (EC) of buildings. To address this issue, questionnaire and interview data from non-residential EC building owners in Sweden are gathered and related in a strategy map' that explains their perceived value creation from EC. The mapping process also considers the four standard perspectives of the balanced scorecard, prompting researchers and owners to evaluate EC in terms of its contribution to long-term strategy, measuring it according to financial and non-financial metrics of organizational performance. The study confirmed that tenant demand is an important EC driver for property owners (particularly for large organizations) and therefore that increased EC awareness amongst tenants is important for EC and for further value creation. It was found that tool developers, property owners and valuers could all benefit from more closely aligning valuers' documentation requirements with those for accreditation with EC tools. Energy efficiency contributes significantly to value creation, but owners use energy management programs in addition to EC, possibly as a result of the performance gap phenomenon.

  • 2.
    Brown, Nils
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Wintzell, Helene
    Value creation for tenants in environmentally certified buildings2016In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research suggests that environmental certification (EC) affects rental rates in non-residential buildings, but there is still little understanding of how tenants differentiate such buildings from those without EC. This paper examines whether and how tenants perceive value creation in EC premises in Sweden. The findings (based on 29 questionnaire responses and 14 interviews with tenants in EC buildings) inform landlords and tenants on the development of EC strategies for improved organizational outcomes. EC creates value for tenants principally as support for their environmental management and reporting (e.g., low energy demand). EC is important for tenants internally, raising employee environmental awareness and improving employee attraction and retention. Tenants are generally positive about employee morale, indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and rental costs. However, it is not clear if such perceptions are dependent on features of modern premises in general, such as new fixtures, fittings and furnishings, and space-efficiency or from some EC-related feature. Tenants do not identify health or productivity increase in their EC premises. Findings suggest that the research focus should be shifted from investigating health and productivity increases through IEQ improvement to understanding the motivational improvement through value alignment with employees through EC.

  • 3.
    Gohardani, Navid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology.
    Af Klintberg, Tord
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology.
    Björk, Folke
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology.
    On An Operational Decision Making Methodology For Sustainable Building Refurbishment: A Case Study - Riksbyggen Workshop For RenovationIn: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Towards systemic retrofit: a social practices approach2013In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 563-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The UK housing stock will play an important role in achieving the 2050 national carbon reduction targets. Upgrading the energy performance of the existing housing stock is a significant challenge because retrofit activities are shaped by a wide range of fragmented policies, programmes and actors. Existing approaches to housing retrofit focus on regulations, financial incentives and information provision, but it is argued these are insufficient to realize large-scale, deep changes in energy consumption. An agenda is proposed for systemic domestic retrofit to realize radical changes in the housing stock through community-based partnerships. These programmes are based on a social practices approach that promotes social innovation. Wide-ranging energy-efficiency upgrades can be achieved through the development and realization of customized solutions to local groups of houses through facilitated engagement between occupants, housing providers, community groups, local authorities and construction professionals. Community-based domestic retrofit programmes serve to reframe the governance of household energy performance and suggest alternative routes for realizing significant reductions in energy demand through changes in the socio-technical configuration of materials, competences and images of domestic energy practices.

  • 5.
    Kazemian, Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Rönn, Magnus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Finnish architectural competitions: structure, criteria and judgement process2009In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 176-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of the Finnish architectural competition system is examined to understand how a peer-review process works for the judgement and selection of the best architectural design. The evaluation of criteria in the competition process is clarified to determine how architectural issues are conceived and examined by the professional jury members. The thought processes of the architect-dominated jurors are elucidated; particularly design criteria connected with practitioners' tacit knowledge and experienced eyes. Open and direct interviews were conducted with seven architects who have direct involvement in the Finnish competition processes. They represent a wide array of practitioners' role at the board of jury, from the Finnish Architects Association (SAFA) which is officially responsible for arranging major architectural competitions to invited architect and design competitors.

  • 6.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategic Analysis.
    Environmental rating methods: selecting indoor environmental quality (IEQ) aspects and indicators2008In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 466-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is often unclear whether environmental rating methods for buildings assess the most significant environmental aspects or if other considerations lie behind the choice of assessment aspects in specific methods. In the development of a comprehensive Swedish environmental rating method for buildings, a number of approaches for selecting environmental aspects in a method were tested. These include basing the selection on the severity and extent of problems, on official objectives, on mandatory rules, and on current practice. Once aspects, or rather building-related health problems, are selected, possible indicators for monitoring these problems can be tested with regard to theoretical and practical criteria in order to understand better the strengths and limitations of different indicators. The analyses in the paper are limited to indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and thus cover extensive reviews of current IEQ methods, Swedish objectives, and legislation as well as the severity and extent of IEQ problems. The results show that depending on the chosen approach, different numbers of aspects turn out to be significant. The approaches for prioritizing aspects suggested here can be used, preferably in combination. An aspect can be seen as motivated for inclusion in a method if many of the approaches suggest its significance.

     

  • 7.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    Selecting problem-related environmental indicators for housing management2006In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 321-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance of environmental management systems is difficult to evaluate due to insufficient methods for measuring their environmental impacts. A procedure is proposed that contains more environmentally relevant indicators for assessing environmental impacts. In addition, theoretical and practical criteria are suggested for evaluating the relevance of different indicators. This scheme was applied to the housing-management sector with the aim of finding more problem-related indicators. Data from three existing Swedish housing estates were collected and indicators calculated for three environmental aspects: energy use, household waste treatment and embedded toxic substances/materials. The results show that problem-related environmental indicators can be used in the housing sector to measure energy consumption and, to a certain extent, household waste treatment. Finding indicators for embedded toxic substances was found to be more problematic, but an example for further discussion is presented.

  • 8.
    Marteinsson, Björn
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Durability and the factor method of ISO 15686-12003In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 416-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in the service life of buildings and components and the future need for maintenance is growing, and the methodology for service life planning is starting to appear in standards. The standard ISO 15686 prescribes a factor methodology for deciding about the expected service life of a component with a prescribed probability of earlier failure. The methodology is based on extensive knowledge about materials and building technology, and examples of the use of this methodology on building components are of value for the discussion on service life planning. Results from a condition survey of timber windows are used to define the service life and effect of the factor method in the Standard. Wood is a very variable material, and for wooden windows maintenance plays a key role in the durability of the component. In this instance, condition assessment is, therefore, not sufficient to estimate the service life. Information about former maintenance and refurbishment is also needed. The results from a condition assessment and the house owner's answers to a questionnaire are combined to evaluate the estimated service life of the windows. The factors for the standardized method for estimating service life with a given confidence limit are shown to have a wide range in values that give considerable uncertainty to the practical use of the standardized methodology. For example, it is shown that the estimated service life with an 80% confidence limit is much lower than the average service life. Thus, the question is posed whether there is any meaning in estimating the lower limit of service life.

  • 9.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Built Environment.
    Bakens, Wim
    CIB Agenda 21 for Sustainable Construction: why, how and what1999In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 348-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CIB's efforts to create an Agenda 21 for the construction sector are introduced here. CIB's unique position within the international construction community allowed it to initiate a specific sectorial response to the international agendas raised by Brundtland, Habitat II, Rio and Kyoto. CIB's recognition of the problems in establishing both a framework for sustainable development; how change within industry occurs, along with CIB's past, current and proposed activities meant that CIB was perfectly suited to respond to sustainable development. This CIB-led project resulted in global collaboration and co-ordination to specifically address sustainable development for the construction community. Situated between the broad international agendas and more local and subsectorial agendas, CIB's Agenda 21 is a conceptual framework that serves as an intermediary and provides for comparison and co-ordination. The three principal objectives are: to create a global framework and terminology that will add value to national, regional and sub-sectorial agendas; to create an agenda for CIB activities and for co-ordinating CIB with specialist partner organizations, and to provide a source document for definition of R&D activities.

  • 10.
    Sjöström, Christer
    et al.
    Center for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Wolfram, Trinius
    Center for Built Environment, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Service life planning and performance requirements2005In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 173-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service life planning comprises a model for the determination of a reasonable expected service life for buildings and components, and it establishes a routine for the assessment of design alternatives. A design option is considered reasonable when it meets or exceeds performance requirements over time that have been drawn up specifically for the specific project. Due to this assessment reference, there is a very evident link to the concept of performance-based building. Any stakeholder involved in the value chain or in the design process of the building, as well as regulators and building users, can express performance requirements. Identified requirements, both in relevance and in quality, will vary with the stakeholder and his/her perspective of interest. As building sector manufacturers develop most products with reference to standards rather than with reference to specific requirements, there is no direct link from user requirements to the product design. Instead, the building designer has the responsibility to ensure performance requirements are met by the performance of products integrated into the design. As these design decisions also have to be made at the material and component level, a performance-based building would benefit from an established rationale that enables the communication of performance requirements across the relevant system levels in the relevant design processes. A path for the connection of the established concepts of service life planning and performance-based building is presented. The aim is to identify key elements that need to be developed for the successful linkage of performance-based building with service life planning.

  • 11.
    Toller, Susanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Carlsson, Annica
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Wadeskog, Anders
    Miliutenko, Sofiia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Indicators for environmental monitoring of the Swedish building and real estate management sector2013In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 146-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to assess the environmental impact of the Swedish building and property (real estate) management sector, a new top-down life cycle assessment (LCA) method was used which was based on inputoutput analysis using national statistical data. Six indicators were developed as suitable for environmental monitoring of the sector: energy use; emissions of greenhouse gases; emissions of nitrogen oxides; emissions of particulates; use of hazardous chemical products; and generation of waste. These indicators were then used to describe the environmental performance of the sector over a 15-year period in order to monitor change and improvement. The use of energy and emissions to air can be effectively followed in time-series. These indicators could be used to create incentives to evaluate regularly improvement work and to inform policy and practice. For greenhouse gas emissions, a trend was identified for space heating to become less important than construction and management towards the end of the period studied, most likely due to a transition from fossil fuels to renewable fuels for heat production. Key implications will be on the selection of building materials, the construction process and the extension of building longevity.

  • 12.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Design consequences of differences in building assessment tools: a case study2011In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 16-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental assessment tools for buildings are emerging rapidly in many countries. Do different assessment tools influence the design process and also guide 'green' building projects in different directions? Three assessment tools, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC), Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH) and EcoEffect, were tested in a case study project in Sweden: a new multi-storey residential building called Gronskar. The content and results of the three assessment tools were compared in general, while issues in the three core common categories of Energy, Indoor Environment and Materials Waste were compared in more detail. The assessment results for the case study building varied with the three tools, and the design strategies and tactics to improve the overall rating of the building project differed for each tool. This confirms that the tools can influence sustainable building in different directions and illustrates insufficient consensus between assessment tools in terms of issues, criteria and weighting. The divergent results highlight the need for an appropriate structure of assessment tools that are both environmentally relevant and practically useful. 'on assiste dans de nombreux pays a l'emergence rapide d'outils d'evaluation environnementale. Des outils d'evaluation differents influent-ils sur le processus de conception et orientent-ils egalement les projets de batiments << verts >> dans des directions differentes? Trois outils d'evaluation, le systeme Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC pour les constructions neuves), le Code for Sustainable Homes (Code pour des Logements Durables - CGH) et EcoEffect, ont ete testes dans le cadre d'un projet de construction situe en Suede et utilise comme etude de cas : un nouvel immeuble residentiel a etages multiples denomme Gronskar. Le contenu et les resultats de ces trois outils d'evaluation ont ete compares sur un plan general, tandis que les points relevant des trois principales categories communes - Energie, Environnement Interieur et Materiaux et Dechets - ont ete compares de maniere plus detaillee. Concernant l'immeuble utilise comme etude de cas, les trois outils ont donne des resultats d'evaluation qui differaient, et les strategies et tactiques de conception visant a ameliorer la notation globale du projet de construction etaient differentes pour chaque outil. Ceci confirme que ces outils peuvent influer sur un batiment durable a differents niveaux et illustre le consensus insuffisant entre les outils d'evaluation en termes d'enjeux, de criteres et de ponderation. Ces resultats divergents soulignent la necessite de pouvoir disposer d'outils d'evaluation presentant une structure adaptee pour que ceux-ci soient a la fois pertinents pour l'environnement et d'une utilite pratique. Mots cles: methodes d'evaluation, outil d'evaluation, evaluation des batiments, conception des batiments, Code for Sustainable Homes (Code pour des Logements Durables - CSH), EcoEffect, evaluation environnementale, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), batiment durable.

  • 13.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Eriksson, O.
    Professionals’ knowledge and use of environmental assessment in an architectural competition2016In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In early design phases, architects, landscape architects and urban planners are key actors whose decisions determine the environmental impact of planning and building projects. Environmental and sustainability assessment tools for buildings and neighbourhoods have been developed to promote sustainable building, but their usage has not been thoroughly evaluated. This study investigated self-reported knowledge and usage of such tools among competitors and jury group from 10 European countries involved in the international architectural competition ‘A New City Centre for Kiruna’ in Sweden. The questionnaire revealed that 13% used environmental assessment tools or management systems in the competition, although 47% had used them previously. Tool users reported greater knowledge of how to handle environmental impacts than non-users. However, the self-rated experience of handling various environmental impacts, in the competition and in general, was low for both groups. Nevertheless, the self-rated importance of environmental impacts was high among all participants. Based on this study, it is concluded that environmental assessment tools, issues and goals can be better integrated into the processes of early design in planning and building projects, and in architectural competitions. Furthermore, to limit environmental impacts in building and planning projects, professionals need to be educated about environmental strategies and solutions.

1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf