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  • 1.
    Alsmo, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Fluid and Climate Technology.
    A Study of Sources of Airborne Pollutants and Poor Hygiene in Schools2010In: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 298-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poor indoor air quality is a large problem in Swedish schools, since the health of occupants may be affected. Resources are consumed without identification of utility indicators and there is risk of problems, even after remedial measures have been taken. This can mean both unnecessary suffering for many people and considerable resources being wasted. The building itself is often in focus and other building-related problems may be neglected. The hypothesis of the present work is that other factors than the building itself have decisive influence on indoor air quality. An assessment of these nonbuilding-related reasons for bad indoor air quality has been made in the present study using particle measurements. Results show that it is possible to decrease emissions in indoor air by over 90% through identifying and eliminating activity-related sources of airborne contaminants.

  • 2. Alsmo, Thomas
    et al.
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Sick buildings or not: Indoor air quality and health problems in schools2007In: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 548-555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poor indoor air in schools has become a wide-spread problem with serious effects on occupant health. Resultant costs can be considerable at both local and national government levels. These include absenteeism and rehabilitation as well as building alterations and even demolition and rebuilding. This project aims to show factors contributing to health problems in Swedish schools. It includes a literature survey and particle measurements taken during various activities. Due to the fact that today there is no standard for indoor air quality (IAQ) in schools, in this project we used the outdoor air surrounding the building as an indicator. Results showed that indoor school environments had high airborne pollution levels, to a degree that probably causes health problems for many people. Regarding IAQ, this project shows the importance of taking into consideration choices in activities and furnishing of the building.

  • 3.
    Hesaraki, Arefeh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Demand-controlled ventilation in new residential buildings: consequences on indoor air quality and energy savings2015In: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070, Vol. 24, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The consequences on indoor air quality (IAQ) and potential of energy savings when using a variable airvolume (VAV) ventilation system were studied in a newly built Swedish building. Computer simulationswith IDA Indoor Climate and Energy 4 (ICE) and analytical models were used to study the IAQ andenergy savings when switching the ventilation flow from 0.375 ls1m2 to 0.100 ls1m2 duringunoccupancy. To investigate whether decreasing the ventilation rate to 0.1 ls1m2 during unoccupancy,based on Swedish building regulations, BBR, is acceptable and how long the reduction can lastfor an acceptable IAQ, four strategies with different VAV durations were proposed. This study revealedthat decreasing the flow rate to 0.1 ls1m2 for more than 4 h in an unoccupied newly built buildingcreates unacceptable IAQ in terms of volatile organic compounds concentration. Hence, if the durationof unoccupancy in the building is more than 4 h, it is recommended to increase the ventilation rate from0.100 ls1m2 to 0.375 ls1m2 before the home is occupied. The study showed that when the investigatedbuilding was vacant for 10 h during weekdays, increasing the ventilation rate 2 h before occupantsarrive home (low ventilation rate for 8 h) creates acceptable IAQ conditions. In this system, theheating requirements for ventilation air and electricity consumption for the ventilation fan weredecreased by 20% and 30%, respectively.

  • 4.
    Land, Carl Johan
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Biotechnology.
    Must, A.
    Hogberg, N.
    Identification of fungi, especially Stachybotrys chartarum from gypsum boards, by means of PCR and sequencing of ribosomal DNA2003In: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 227-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gypsum boards infested by Stachybotrys chartarum are often found in built-in constructions. A PCR-based analysis method has been developed for S. chartarum using specific primers based on the Tri5 gene. Another method for detecting fungi is by species identification via sequencing of ribosomal DNA. Sequencing of ITS (Internal Transcribed Spacer) and the 5.8s rDNA is straightforward and provides a basis for species identification. The sequences were searched for by means of BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) in the GenBank. The PCR technique will be an important step in the future both toward detecting fungal infestations at an early stage because of the ability to detect specifically the infestation without time-consuming cultivation in the laboratory and allowing reliable species identification based on sequences obtained from databases.

  • 5. Watson, Kelly J.
    et al.
    Evans, James
    Karvonen, Andrew
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Whitley, Tim
    Re-conceiving building design quality: A review of building users in their social context2016In: Indoor + Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, E-ISSN 1423-0070, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 509-523Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Considerable overlap exists between post-occupancy research evaluating building design quality and the concept of 'social value', popularised by its recent application to issues of the public realm. To outline this potential research agenda, the paper reviews design quality research on buildings in relation to users and their social context where the term 'social context' refers to building user group dynamics, a combination of organisational cultures, management strategies, and social norms and practices. The review is conducted across five key building types, namely housing, workplaces, healthcare, education, and the retail/service sector. Research commonalities and gaps are identified in order to build a more comprehensive picture of the design quality literature and its handling of users in their social context. The key findings concerning each building type are presented visually. It is concluded that the design quality field comprises a patchwork of relatively isolated studies of various building types, with significant potential for theoretical and empirical development through interdisciplinary collaboration. Users tend to be conceived as anonymous and autonomous individuals with little analysis of user identity or interaction. Further, the contextual impact of user group dynamics on the relationship between building design and building user is rarely addressed in the literature. Producing a more nuanced understanding of users in situ is proposed as an important area for future design quality research.

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