Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bring, Torun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Jonson, Bo
    Kloo, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Potassium sulfate droplets and the origin of turbidity in alabaster glasses2006In: Glass Technology, ISSN 0017-1050, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 15-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study of the criteria required to manufacture multicomponent semi-transparent silicate glasses, so called 'alabaster' glasses, has found that the optical effect is caused by noncrystalline potassium sulfate droplets. The droplets were characterised by use of XRD, SEM/EDX and Raman spectroscopy. The size range of the particles is of the order of 5-50 micrometers. It was found that the droplets consisted of potassium sulfate, even if other sulfate compounds were added to the glass. The amount of sulfate compound added, the melting temperature of the furnace and the melting time have significant effects on the optical density of the glass. The optical density of the glass can be correlated to the calculated surface tension of the host glass, suggesting that phase separation of a sulfate enriched liquid phase is part of the mechanism forming the droplets. By adding pigments several different colours can be obtained, but the alabaster effect is not achieved during reducing conditions, thus it seems not possible to produce colours originating from reduced pigments. Pigments tested were Cr, Fe, Co, Cu, Au, Mo/Se, Nd and Ti/Ce/Se.

  • 2.
    Bring, Torun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Jonson, Bo
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Carlson, Stefan
    Selenium: molybdenum-based coloration of alkali silicate glasses2007In: Glass Technology, ISSN 0017-1050, Glass Technology - European Journal of Glass Science and Technology Part A, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 213-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction between selenium and molybdenum in reduced alkali silicate melts, resulting in red glasses has been studied. The oxidation state of Mo is Mo(VI) as evidenced by XANES and ESCA results. Selenium is present in a reduced state, as indicated by ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy and XANES. The colour is described by ultraviolet/visible spectra and CIE colour coordinates. The main absorption peaks are at 450 and 540 nm. Similar bands are reported for MoOSe32−. Several commonly used glass components must be avoided in the batch, as they prevent formation of the red colour.

  • 3. Stålhandske, Christina
    et al.
    Bring, Torun
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Jonson, Bo
    Gold ruby glasses: influence of iron and selenium on their colour2006In: Glass Technology, ISSN 0017-1050, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 112-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colour development of gold ruby alkali silicate glasses, when various elements are added to the batch, has been investigated. Elements used in the study are selenium, iron, tin, lead, antimony, cerium, titanium and bismuth. The colours are presented and compared by their Lab coordinates. Among the elements selenium and iron are found to be important, and the role of these elements in colour development is discussed. Thermodynamic calculations show that important oxidation states are Fe2+ for iron and Se-0 and Se2- for selenium, and that higher melting temperature improves the colour, as it affects the oxidation states of both Fe and Se.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf